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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 20 NOVEMBER 2021

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwcxgl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htc)
Fortress Europe: Who gets to come in?

The European Union is at loggerheads with Belarus over the arrival of thousands of migrants. It alleges that President Lukashenko has created a deliberate crisis by facilitating the migrants' travel into Belarus and onwards to the country's borders with EU members Poland, Lithuania and Latvia. Belarus says the EU is breaching its humanitarian obligations by blocking the entry of those seeking asylum. The question of what to do with migrants is one of the most divisive issues within the EU. Its southern and eastern member countries - where the bulk of migrants arrive - are calling for a more equitable distribution of refugees among member states. They also want more money to support for processing of new arrivals. Meanwhile in western and northern European states, the rise of far-right groups is being seen as a warning to politicians not to be too accommodating to newcomers. So how does the EU fulfil its international obligations around migration while keeping a lid on populist opposition to it?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwd16q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzljdb2rncz)
US House passes Biden’s historic social spending bill

The US House of Representatives has passed US President Joe Biden's $1.9tn (£1.4tn) Build Back Better Act after facing fierce opposition from Republicans. The sweeping social spending and climate package is considered a key pillar of Mr Biden's agenda. The vote came after a record-breaking speech from House minority leader Kevin McCarthy to delay the vote. The legislation now faces significant hurdles as it heads to the US Senate. Also in the programme, the government of Mali is embarking on a drive to persuade illegal or freelance gold miners to register with the authorities. Through what's called artisanal mining, huge amounts of the precious metal are smuggled out of the country. The BBC's Fergus Nicoll reports on the government's desire to boost national revenues by reining in the informal sector. Plus, we hear from the BBC's Mark Cieslak about new artificial intelligence technology being used to help tackle the illegal wildlife trade.

PHOTO Getty Images


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh2dh3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f43)
Escaping Delhi's toxic air

Air quality continues to be severe in Delhi, the world’s most polluted national capital. The air turns especially toxic in the winter months because of unfavourable weather conditions, and farmers in neighbouring states burning crop stubble add to the problem. It gets particularly bad after Diwali, the festival of lights, when people burst firecrackers, which adds to the toxic haze covering the city.

But other factors also play a key role. Vehicular and industrial emissions and dust make the levels of PM2.5 - tiny particles that can clog people's lungs - far higher than the World Health Organization's (WHO) safety guidelines.

To escape the pollution, many people are now choosing to relocate, either permanently or for a few months, even if it means leaving behind family and friends or taking a hit on professional growth.

Should the government take stricter action against pollution? What’s it like to leave behind a well-established life for a place with cleaner air? In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how many are choosing to escape Delhi’s toxic air.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Saurabh Bhasin, advocate; Anu Anand, freelance journalist; Srinivas Ganesh, advertising professional


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwd4yv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0gry3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh2j77)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lcd)
T20 World Cup: What makes a winner?

On this week’s Stumped, Alison Mitchell, Charu Sharma and Jim Maxwell react to Australia winning the Men’s T20 World Cup and present the Stumped T20 awards for the best player, stand out moment, biggest surprise, and biggest disappointment of the tournament.

Plus, former cricketer turned sports psychologist, Jeremy Snape, joins the team to discuss what it takes mentally to be a winner and tells us about the different mindsets needed from a World Cup Final to a match with a fierce rivalry - like the Ashes.

Additional note: This week's Stumped was recorded before Tim Paine announced his decision to step down as Australia Test captain.

Photo: Australia captain Aaron Finch lifts the ICC World T20 Trophy with teammates after defeating New Zealand in the final in the UAE. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwd8pz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fw)
Afghanistan's Ministry of Vice and Virtue

Soon after taking power, the Taliban replaced the Department for Women's Affairs with the Ministry for Propagation of Virtue and Prevention of Vice. It's a name many Afghans feared during the last Taliban era, as 'morality police' enforced their extreme interpretation of Islam. BBC Afghan's Shekiba Habib lived through that era, and reports on what we know about how the current ministry is operating.

Istanbul's taxi problem
If you’ve ever struggled to hail a taxi, spare a thought for people in Istanbul. Since the 1990s, the city’s population has doubled, but the number of cabs has stayed the same, and solving the problem is a political headache for the city’s mayor. BBC Turkish journalist Esra Yalcinalp explains Istanbul's unique and frustrating taxi system.

The daily life of Colombian coca farmers
Singing local songs and celebrating harvest: some of the activities TikTok users can see from the hashtag #Catatumbo. The images show the daily lives of coca growers in one of Colombia's main coca-growing regions, and have reopened the discussion about how best to fight the drug war, as Luis Fajardo from BBC Monitoring in Miami explains.

The pirs of Pakistan
Pirs or spiritual guides are deeply embedded in Pakistani culture, including in politics. They offer blessings and guidance which many politicians feel are important for their success. BBC Urdu's Asif Farooqi reports on the complex and sometimes controversial relationship between politicians and their pirs.

(Photo: A Department for Women's Affairs sign is replaced by the Taliban with the Ministry for Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice. Credit: Javed Tanveer/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzh)
Russia’s Democracy pioneer

On 20 November 1998, a pioneer of Russian democracy was assassinated. The country was awash with contract killings at the time but Galina Starovoitova’s murder sparked outrage and many saw it as an ominous turning point in Russian politics.

Born in in the Urals region in 1946, Starovoitova had a reputation for being independent, courageous and outspoken. As one of the original leaders of Russia's perestroika-era democratic movement, she was a prominent human rights advocate, working alongside Nobel Prize-winner Andrei Sakharov.
Starovoitova first worked as an ethnographer and her studies into ethnic minorities in the USSR made her sympathetic to their desire for independence. She so impressed Armenians in the mountainous Caucasus region, that in 1989 they elected her to represent them at the Congress of People’s Deputies in Moscow. After the failed 1991 coup staged by hardliners, Starovoitova served as Russian president Boris Yeltsin's adviser on ethnic issues. But she was later dismissed by Yeltsin because of her opposition to Kremlin policy in the Caucasus. She was particularly under pressure from the lobby of Russian army generals eager to start the first Chechen War.

Starovoitova was loathed by the nationalists in the Duma and her campaign for a lustration law, to ban former party members from holding certain jobs, enraged many Communists. She also tried to take on organised crime in her home city.

Theories abound about who killed her and why. Some speculate it was the communists; others the nationalists; yet others are certain it was a "St Petersburg crime" - a euphemism for the city’s powerful mafia. A queue of over 20 thousand people had gathered to pay last respects as she lay in state before her funeral. Starovoitova’s son, Platon Borchevsky, now living in the UK, shares his memories of his mother’s life and death.


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwddg3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwdj67)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0h45h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh2wgm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct2yqn)
The Denial Files

5. ‘We fight climate denial on Wikipedia’

At the grand old age of 20, Wikipedia remains one of the world’s most popular websites. The fact that anyone with internet access can edit its pages is a key part of its success. But the website’s openness to the public is also the reason why it has become an unlikely battleground on global warming.

Despite the overwhelming body of science proving climate change is real and man-made, deniers are still active on Wikipedia. Whether it is by editing climate pages or spreading conspiracy theories, they have for a long time tried to reframe our understanding of climate change.

But a small group of dedicated volunteers is determined to keep them at bay, setting the record straight on the facts and the science behind global warming.

In this episode of the Denial Files, we set out to meet some of those volunteers and investigate how vulnerable Wikipedia remains to climate denial today.


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dp6)
Rising tensions with Russia

President Putin has said that the West was taking Russia's warnings not to cross its ‘red lines’ too lightly. This comes amid rising tensions between Russia and the West. Ros Atkins has been looking into it.

(Photo: President of Russia, Vladimir Putin. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwdmyc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytjcmlr16g)
Teenager cleared over Kenosha killings

A US teenager who shot dead two men during racial unrest has been cleared of homicide and all other charges after claiming self-defence.

Plus, Belarus’s president denies inviting migrants to his country to then travel onto the EU.

And as the UK’s Boris Johnson’s popularity wanes, parliament has been discussing whether MPs should be allowed second jobs.

Joining Julian Worricker are Lone Theils, a Danish writer, crime novelist and journalist, and Peter Hain, a member of the British House of Lords, and former UK government minister for the Labour Party.

(Photo: Kyle Rittenhouse looks over to his attorneys as the jury is dismissed for the day during his trial at the Kenosha County Courthouse in Kenosha, U.S., November 18, 2021. Sean Krajacic/Pool via REUTERS)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwdrph)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytjcmlr4yl)
Teenager acquitted of Kenosha shootings

A US teenager who shot dead two men during racial unrest has been cleared of homicide and all other charges after claiming self-defence.

Plus, Chinese tennis star, Peng Shuai, has gone missing after accusing a former vice premier of rape.

And, Danish government has asked some Syrian refugees to return to Damascus, claiming it is safe to back. They, however, fear for their well-being.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Lone Theils, a Danish writer, crime novelist and journalist, and Peter Hain, a member of the British House of Lords, and former UK government minister for the Labour Party.

(Photo: Kyle Rittenhouse walks during his trial at the Kenosha County Courthouse in Kenosha, Wisconsin, U.S., November 19, 2021. Sean Krajacic/Pool via REUTERS)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwdwfm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytjcmlr8pq)
Kenosha shooter successfully pleads self defence

A US teenager who shot dead two men during racial unrest has been cleared of homicide and all other charges after claiming self-defence.

Plus, the French hardright journalist Eric Zemmour has risen significantly in recent opinion polls even though he has not officially said he is running for president.

And, in what is being called "the great resignation", due partly to the pandemic, as many as sixty-five per cent of employees are thinking about changing their jobs.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Lone Theils, a Danish writer, crime novelist and journalist, and Peter Hain, a member of the British House of Lords, and former UK government minister for the Labour Party.

(Photo: Kyle Rittenhouse reacts to the verdict during his trial at the Kenosha County Courthouse in Kenosha, Wisconsin, U.S., November 19, 2021. Sean Krajacic/Pool via REUTERS)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh37q0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9f)
Maids to the rich and famous

Rich families around the world employ butlers and maids to look after their expensive properties. These houseworkers have access to every aspect of their employers’ lives: they get to know their habits and their deepest secrets. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two former maids who worked for wealthy families in the USA and the UK.

Stephanie Land is the bestselling author of Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother’s Will to Survive, a poignant memoir highlighting the plight of overworked and underpaid domestic workers in the USA. Her story has recently been turned into the successful Netflix series, Maid.

When she was 19, Sara Vestin Rahmani moved from Sweden to London to work as an au pair for a rich family. She thought she would only stay for a year, but she quickly became embedded in the family’s life, and was exposed to a lifestyle she never imagined was possible. She is now the director of Bespoke Bureau and the British Butler Academy, a high-end recruitment and training agency of domestic and elite service staff.

Producer: Alice Gioia

(Image: (L) Stephanie Land, credit Ashley Farr. (R) Sara Vestin Rahmani, credit Bespoke Bureau)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwf05r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6n)
Coronavirus: Europe

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has warned that Europe is once again “at the epicentre” of the Covid pandemic. The WHO reported that deaths from coronavirus in the continent have increased by 5% - making it the only region in the world where the numbers are going up. The WHO head, Dr Hans Kluge, also said Europe could see half a million more deaths by February 2022. He blamed insufficient vaccine take-up for the rise in cases.

Host Nuala McGovern hears from doctors in Romania, The Netherlands and Austria about what is happening in their country, the concerns and hopes for the future. We also hear from two Austrians about why they refuse to get a vaccine, despite the rising Covid-19 cases, and why they believe the new restrictions there have serious implications for the future freedom of their country.

(Photo: Masks used in the Covid-19 ICU unit at Giurgiu County Emergency Hospital with a Christian orthodox depiction of Jesus Christ underneath them. Credit: Octav Ganea/Inquam Photos/Reuters)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh3cg4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Explanation (w3ct2z3h)
Understanding democracy in Hong Kong

Why are there democracy protests in Hong Kong? Anu Anand talks to Stephen McDonell.

The Explanation is a snackable audio guide giving you the backstory behind the headlines. In each episode, presenter Anu Anand meets a BBC News correspondent who has lived and breathed these stories. She’ll hear clear analysis along with powerful archive. The Explanation will go back in time to unpack complex chains of events and will make the stories in question much easier to understand.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2c)
Meeting the man behind the music show This Is Africa

We meet the man behind the music show This Is Africa. Listeners quiz DJ Edu about selecting songs and his motivation in promoting African musicians.
Plus, we stick with the musical theme as we get your thoughts on a show where artists interview artists.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwf3xw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q9fx1wjyj)
Autumn leaves England in good shape

As rugby union's Autumn Internationals end we look at England women's success ahead of World Cup year in 2022 with the woman who lifted the trophy for England in 2014, Katy Daley-McClean MBE. We'll also hear from South Africa's World Cup winning captain Siya Kolisi ahead of the men's clash with England.

Venus and Serena Williams, Phil and Gary Neville, Yaya and Kolo Toure. Have you ever noticed how many sporting siblings there are?! But are you born with it? Is it down to hard work? Or is it something completely different? Sportshour’s Rachael Rhodes has been finding out about new research into the area and hearing from MMA legend Ken Shamrock.

The Jamaican bobsleigh team that competed at the 1988 Winter Olympics, and had a movie made about them, have become the standard by which all unusual sporting endeavours are judged! Well despite the 2022 games in Beijing coming just a little too soon, the next chapter of unlikely sport combinations isn't too far away. Cool Slidings. It's time to meet Alistair Fyfe, originally from Scotland and the man behind the push to get Saudi Arabia to the top of the curling podium!

James Simpson, captain of the Great Britain Wheelchair Rugby League team on why it's not all bad that the World Cup has been postponed by a year.

With men's football taking a break from domestic action to focus on qualification for the World Cup, many fans took the opportunity to go to a women's match, some for the first time. So what, if anything, is different between derby day in Manchester when it's the women and not the men in action? Katie Smith went along to find out.


Image: Autumn International match between England Red Roses and New Zealand at Sandy Park (Photo by Catherine Ivill - RFU/The RFU Collection via Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwf7p0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0hvn8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh3lyd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 today]


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwfcf4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z33)
Regarding the pain of others

BBC special correspondent Allan Little addresses the gulf between the reality of war and our ability to comprehend it from afar. His mission as a reporter has been to convey the experiences of people in the midst of war, to draw attention to injustices; to celebrate acts of heroism. So what stops us the listener or viewer, from engaging?

Inspired by the philosopher Susan Sontag's essay.

(Photo: Smoke rising from targets inside Syria during a bombardment by Turkish forces at Ras al-Ein town. Credit: EPA)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwfh58)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5g293xggw)
Austrian premier discusses Covid strategy

Austria becomes the first country European to announce a full new lockdown and plans for compulsory vaccination. The country's Chancellor, Alexander Schallenberg, discusses why he is pursuing the policy even as the World Health Organisation calls for caution on compelling people to get jabbed.

Also in the programme; we discuss the impact of the acquittal of a seventeen-year-old in Wisconsin who shot dead two people in street protests and; the arms race for hypersonic missiles between global superpowers intensifies and; an interview with the puppeteer behind Sesame Street's first Korean American character.

Image: A person displays a cross reading "Freiheit Liberate", during a demonstration against the measures of the Austrian government's new Covid strategy. Credit: EPA/Christian Bruna


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwflxd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tl6tgn7n6)
Live Sporting Action

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Richard Heathcote/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwg2wx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0jpw5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh4g59)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct2yqn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l94)
The woman who rowed the Atlantic

In December 1999, the American Tori Murden McClure became the first woman to row across the Atlantic Ocean single-handed. It was the culmination of a dream that had brought her close to death many times as she capsized again and again during a hurricane on a previous attempt. She was inspired to keep trying by working with the great boxer Muhammad Ali. Tori Murden McClure talks to Claire Bowes.

Photo: Tori Murden McClure in the 'American Pearl' 1999 (courtesy of Sector Sport Watches and Tori Murden McClure)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwg6n1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z7v)
Sudan's October Revolution

How in 1964 Sudanese civilian protesters first brought down a military regime, plus the hunt for former Serbian leader Radovan Karadžić later convicted of genocide and war crimes. Also in the programme, Russia's public outcry at the killing of human rights pioneer and leading female politician Galina Starovoitova in the 1990s, the birth of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for anxiety and depression, and getting shot in the arm for the sake of 'art' in the USA.

Photo: People celebrate the fall of the military regime in Khartoum, November 1964 (Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwgbd5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtw)
Actor Andrew Garfield

On The Arts Hour this week, Nikki Bedi is joined by poet Mona Arshi, who discusses her new book, and by the critic Nasri Atallah.

Andrew Garfield talks about how he came to sing in the musical movie Tick Tick Boom.

Halle Berry reveals the martial arts training she undertook to play a fighter for her film Bruised.

Emily Ratajkowski reflects on whether an actress’s good looks can sometimes get in the way of securing roles.

Director Mike Leigh tells how his art school experience influenced him as a film maker.

Actors Liam Murray Scott and Dimetri Goritsas discuss appearing in London’s West End, in the play The Shark Is Broken, about the making of the film Jaws.

Nigerian poet, author and academic Timothy Ogene on his satirical novel Seesaw.

Poet Mona Arshi talks about writing her debut novel Somebody Loves You.

Writers Amitav Ghosh and Nina Mingya Powles discuss literature concerning climate change.

(Photo: Andrew Garfield. Credit: Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwgg49)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5g293yffx)
Austria plans mandatory Covid vaccine

Tens of thousands of protesters have demonstrated in the Austrian capital, Vienna, about an impending nationwide Covid lockdown and government plans to make vaccination mandatory by February. Austria's Chancellor Alexander Schallenberg tells us the measures are necessary; we also hear from an expert who argues that making vaccines compulsory is a mistake.

Also in the programme: after Kyle Rittenhouse is cleared of all charges after killing two people in Kinosha, Wisconsin, how does the law of self defence work in the US? And the latest from the migrant crisis at the Polish-Belarus border.

(Photo: The WHO has said an increase in mask wearing could immediately help prevent the spread of Covid-19 in Europe. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwgkwf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywzptdvwfd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172y0srs2vzy21)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh4y4t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptk)
Batila and Dandy: Why we make music

What happens when Bantu-soul meets English pop? Congolese musician Batila and British singer Dandy talk to Datshiane Navanayagam about how making music helps them to make sense of the societies they live in.

Liraz is an Israeli singer, actress and dancer, who’s one of Israel’s biggest stars. She speaks to Datshiane about her latest album, Zan which means "women" in Farsi. It’s a record that has had a lifetime poured into it, as it draws heavily on her family’s history and roots in Iran.

Has a film, a song or an exhibition ever changed the way you see the world? Acclaimed composer and pianist Max Richter discusses the creative power of the Japanese artist Ryoji Ikeda.

(Image: Batila and Dandy. Credit (Batila): Daron Bandeira)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwgpmk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Music Life (w3ct1hct)
Rey Sapienz, Toya Delazy, Catu Diosis and Hagan

Afro-rave and Afro-bass stars Rey Sapienz, Toya Delazy, Catu Diosis and Hagan discuss making the music faster so it feels like a workout, what traditional elements make their way into their music, and the importance of dancing while creating.

Rey Sapienz is a producer from the DRC, who relocated to Kampala in Uganda during the Congolese civil war. He started rapping at the age 12, and was the first person ever to spit his lyrics over the traditional Congolese soukous, earning him the nickname El Rey Mago – the wise king. He released his debut album Na Zala Zala in collaboration with the Congo Techno Ensemble earlier this year.

Toya Delazy is a London-based South African Afro-rave artist. Heavily influenced by her Zulu heritage, she blends contemporary electronic sounds with the deep percussion and energetic grooves that underpin Zulu culture.

Ugandan DJ and producer Catu Diosis has been making waves across Kampala’s underground electronic scene since the age of 16. She blends everything from Afro-house to techno, gqom to kuduro, and is guaranteed to get everyone on the dancefloor.

Hagan is a London-based Afro-bass artist known for his dark, energetic sound. His music is heavily rooted in Ghanaian culture, blending African rhythms and dynamic percussion with the gritty sounds of UK garage and grime.



SUNDAY 21 NOVEMBER 2021

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwgtcp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh55n2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Trending (w3ct2yqn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwgy3t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yw4)
The end for coal power?

The political message from the COP meeting was a fudge over coal, but what does the science say? Surprisingly India seems to be on track to switch away from coal to renewables. We explore the apparent contradiction with Lauri Myllyvirta of the thinktank Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air.

Also a synchrotron for Africa, how such a project would give a boost to scientific development across the continent, with Marielle Agbahoungbata from the X-tech Lab in Seme City in Benin.

Moriba Jah, who leads the Computational Astronautical Sciences and Technologies Group, at the University of Texas, in Austin, tells us what he saw when an exploding Russian satellite sent a shower of debris into the path of the International Space Station.

And the animals that carry SARS-Cov-2, an analysis from Barbara Han of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in New York shows there are many more than previously thought.

Image: A coal-fired power station in Nanjing in east China
Credit: Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian SiddleThe political message from the COP meeting was a fudge over coal, but what does the science say? Surprisingly India seems to be on track to switch away from coal to renewables. We explore the apparent contradiction with Lauri Myllyvirta of the thinktank Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air.

Also a synchrotron for Africa, how such a project would give a boost to scientific development across the continent, with Marielle Agbahoungbata from the X-tech Lab in Seme City in Benin.

Moriba Jah, who leads the Computational Astronautical Sciences and Technologies Group, at the University of Texas, in Austin, tells us what he saw when an exploding Russian satellite sent a shower of debris into the path of the International Space Station.

And the animals that carry SARS-Cov-2, an analysis from Barbara Han of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in New York shows there are many more than previously thought.

And, Cats started hanging out with humans thousands of years ago, and nowadays these fluffy, lovable pets are found in many of our homes. But there’s no doubt lots of them still have keen hunting instincts - witness all the birds and small mammals they kill each year.

CrowdScience listener Rachel started wondering whether her cat Eva could fend for herself while watching her uncoordinated swipes at a toy on a string, and seeing her fall off the sofa. Even though Eva was once a stray, she now lives entirely indoors, and it's hard to imagine her holding her own back on the mean streets. But could this pampered pet recover her survival instincts? Or would she go hungry, or fall foul of other cats or predators?

Cat behaviour expert Roger Tabor is on hand with answers. His pioneering ‘cat-navs’ shine a light on what cats get up to inside and outside the home: we meet one of his subjects, a tiny cat with a fierce personality. Roger explains how a cat’s survival toolkit depends on their sex, breed, and above all their early life. Environment matters, too, so in Japan, where Rachel and her pet cat live, we visit a cat shelter to learn about the day-to-day challenges stray cats face

And just how ‘domestic’ are our cats, anyway? How different are they from their wildcat cousins, and how did they come to be our companions in the first place? It turns out beguiling humans might be even more of a survival trick than hunting.

Image: A coal-fired power station in Nanjing in east China
Credit: Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwh1vy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0knv6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh5f4b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw6)
T-cell Covid protection before the pandemic

New research on how some people had a level of Covid immunity before the pandemic started. Blood samples showed hospital staff being monitored in the first wave already had protective ‘killer’ T-cells probably from exposure to other viruses related to the one that has swept the globe. The difference between antibodies to an infection and antibodies caused by a vaccine. And the extraordinary story of a woman who rid her body of HIV.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Microbiologist studying coronavirus. Photo credit: Janiecbros/Getty Images)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwh5m2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwh9c6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvs)
Libya's anxiously-awaited elections

Screeching tyres and the smell of burning rubber: the amateur stunt shows on Tripoli’s streets at night - and the tense atmosphere ahead of elections which could be make or break for Libya. The vote has been hard enough to arrange; it’s the fruit of a long-drawn-out UN-backed peace process. It's been beset by wrangles over who should be allowed to run, the voting schedule and what powers a president should have. Orla Guerin talks to Libyan citizens, analysts and foreign diplomats about their hopes for the presidential and parliamentary elections, which are meant to be held on December the 24th this year.

In the 1990s, Bosnia and Herzegovina saw the worst conflict in Europe since the Second World War. It was a battle for territory, and it only ended when a compromise was reached: that Bosnia would remain one single country, but with two regions. But now, certain aspects of the Dayton Agreement are beginning to look rather frayed. Some local politicians are voicing hard nationalist sentiments in public again - and Guy De Launey reports that's stirred real fear for some in Sarajevo and elswhere.

While 'migrant crises' in the Mediterranean or on the Belarus/Poland border receive a good deal of media coverage, on a global level, it's actually nations outside the EU which host the most outsiders. Whether it’s the Venezuelan exodus fanning out across Latin America, the number of refugees in Uganda or the huge Afghan population in Pakistan, or the Iraqis and Syrians in Jordan, the numbers of displaced and disposessed people they take in are far larger. According the UNHCR, Turkey is top of the global list of host nations, with more than 4 million refugees living there. That used to be a matter of official (and popular pride - but recently Ayla Jean Yackley has felt a change in the mood.

And what do you really see as an “essential service”? In Brazil, the country's indispensable lanchonetes - neighbourhood snack bars - are not just social hubs but lifelines for some. During the pandemic, many were allowed to stay trading in the teeth of local lockdown measure. Andrew Downie explores the cultural history of these no-nonsense spots for eating and drinking - and he's very much a fan, particularly of the hearty, carb-heavy fixed lunch known as the PF.

(Image: Libyan man registers to vote in a polling station in Tripoli, November 2021. Credit: Mahmud Turkia/AFP)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh5nml)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwhf3b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0l12l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh5scq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2z31)
Trading tribulation

New apps that provide access to stock markets are revolutionising the world of trading, but they are also creating problems. A new generation of traders are emerging, fuelled by social media and with dreams of earning a fortune.

Seoul journalist Grace Moon visits the Korea Centre For Gambling Problems to explore if easily accessible trading apps are fuelling addictions, before hearing worldwide stories of stock market highs and lows.

Grace speaks to Joon Kwon, who recently started trading, and is sharing his successes with followers on social media. She also hears from Matthew Bly who has a very different story, having won big and then lost thousands on the stock market.

(Photo: Woman trading via a mobile app. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwhjvg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytjcmlty3k)
Doubts remain after videos show missing Chinese tennis star

Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai has reportedly appeared as a guest at a tennis tournament in Beijing, according to state media footage. Two weeks ago she made sexual assault allegations against a former China vice-premier. Since then she has not been in direct contact with the Women's Tennis Association.

Also on the programme, in British Columbia, Canada, a state of emergency has been declared and troops deployed as thousands of people have been stranded and made homeless as the region has experiences widespread flooding.

And, a look at how Korean cinema and television has exploded in popularity around the world.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Helene von Bismarck, historian, author and research fellow at King’s College’s Centre for British Politics and Government, and Mark Kersten, a senior researcher at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto in Canada and senior consultant at the Wayamo Foundation.

(Photo: PHOTO: A file photo of China's Peng Shuai serving during a match at the Australian Open on January 15, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su/File Photo/File Photo)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwhnll)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytjcmlv1vp)
US sends military support to Ukraine

Tensions rise on the Russian-Ukraine border as American reinforcements for Ukraine's navy sailed into the gateway to the Black Sea. Russia has sent troops to the border and long-range nuclear bombers flew repeated patrols near the European Union’s border with Poland.

Also on the programme, tensions at the Belarus border with Poland result in clashes and death. German Chancellor Angela Merkel spoke to Belarusian president Alexander Lukashenko to convince him to deescalate.

And, the musician Sting reflects on music making in times of crisis such as the pandemic.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Helene von Bismarck, historian, author and research fellow at King’s College’s Centre for British Politics and Government, and Mark Kersten, a senior researcher at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto in Canada and senior consultant at the Wayamo Foundation.

(Photo: U.S. flagged general cargo ship Ocean Grand, carrying two U.S. Coast Guard cutters, sails in the Dardanelles, on its way to the Black Sea, in Canakkale,Turkey November 20, 2021. REUTERS/Yoruk Isik)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwhsbq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytjcmlv5lt)
WHO warns of half a million Covid deaths in Europe by spring

The WHO has warned that there could be half a million Covid-related deaths across Europe by spring unless urgent action is taken. In Austria on Saturday, tens of thousands of protesters took to the streets in Vienna to express concern about government plans to make vaccination mandatory by February.

Also on the programme, journalist and historian Anne Applebaum discusses Belarussian president’s tensions with Poland and Russia’s escalations with Ukraine.

And, Bosnian born author Igor Memic warns about a possible return of a conflict.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Helene von Bismarck, historian, author and research fellow at King’s College’s Centre for British Politics and Government, and Mark Kersten, a senior researcher at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto in Canada and senior consultant at the Wayamo Foundation.

(Photo: A police officer checks the vaccination status of a shopper at the entrance of a store after the Austrian government imposed a lockdown on roughly two million people who are not fully vaccinated against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Vienna, Austria, November 16, 2021. REUTERS/Lisi Niesner)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh64m3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgl)
How a new cuisine is born

How is a new cuisine created? Ruth Alexander explores two unique cuisines in South Africa and the USA: ‘Cape-Malay’- a 300-year old tradition born out of colonialism and slavery that unites Indonesian and Dutch tastes; and ‘Viet-Cajun’ - a more recent phenomenon that has seen the Vietnamese diaspora experimenting with Cajun flavours in Texas. We explore how history’s darkest episodes can lead to some of the most captivating flavour combinations and ask why some people will cringe at the term ‘fusion food’.

(Picture: Pot lid being opened. Credit: Getty/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Contributors:

Cass Abrahams: Chef and Author, Cape Town, South Africa
Mai Pham: Food writer, Houston, USA


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwhx2v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh68c7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxv)
Fighting the apartheid my grandfather created

Wilhelm Verwoerd has spent most of his life wrestling with his surname and what it represents. His grandfather, Dr Hendrik Verwoerd, is widely known as the 'architect of apartheid' in South Africa because of the brutal policies he introduced as a government minister and then prime minister of the country in the 1950s and 1960s. But Wilhelm turned his back on his family's apartheid politics and is committed to tearing down its racist legacy. His book is called: Verwoerd: My journey through family betrayals.

This episode was first broadcast on 14th December 2019.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Andile Masuku
Producer: Deiniol Buxton

(Photo: Wilhelm Verwoerd. Credit: Wojciech Klimala)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwj0tz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct051h)
Deeply Human

Sex

Most female mammals schedule their sex life into just the couple of days of when they’re fertile. So why do humans (in theory, at least) do it whenever the mood strikes?

To find out, Dessa explores stinky t-shirt tests, and all sorts of things we’d better not mention here. Parental discretion is strongly advised.

Image: Metronome with ticking heart (Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh6d3c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2z3c)
The hidden faiths of Northern Ireland

This year marks the centenary of Northern Ireland. Since its inception it has been divided between those who want to be Irish, who are mostly Catholic, and those who want to remain British, who are mostly Protestant. But what about the people of faith outside the sectarian divide – or those of no faith?

Reporter Julia Paul meets Joseph Nawaz, whose father was a Muslim from Pakistan and whose mother a white Catholic from Northern Ireland. His parents were married in the 1970s, at a time when most NI churches wouldn’t even marry a Catholic and Protestant. Joseph talks about his journey to embrace his mixed heritage and the two very different religions in his childhood.

Esther Chong was born in Malaysia to Chinese parents and moved to Northern Ireland for a better life. The day after she arrived she attended a service at the Chinese Christian Church in Belfast and she says God began to show her her path forward in Northern Ireland. Both her children are autistic and she now runs support groups at her church for other Chinese families, especially those who struggle with the language barrier.

Dr Satyavir Singhal is a consultant at the Royal Hospital in Belfast and a Hindu. He moved to Northern Ireland from India with his family in 2000. The more people in Northern Ireland asked him about his faith and his country of birth, the more he was drawn closer to his faith. In 2014, he became more involved in the Indian Community Centre and Hindu Temple in Belfast, and now he teaches society about Hinduism.

(Photo: Dr Satyavir Singhal. Credit: Julia Paul)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwj4l3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0lrkc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh6hvh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2z3f)
One Hundred Years of Exile

What do we owe refugees?

Katy Long hears stories from refugees and those who work to support them from Rwanda to Russia, and Israel to Paraguay. She asks what do we owe refugees?

(Photo: A person holding a "refugees welcome" placard seen in the crowd. Credit: EPA)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwj8b7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2x)
What is the metaverse and why is Facebook so obsessed with it?

As Facebook rebrands itself as Meta, which vision of the so-called metaverse will we adopt in the future? Will one firm dominate or will control be decentralized? And what dangers and opportunities will there be as we adopt avatars and become embodied in our online experience. With Charmaine Cozier.


(Image: Woman wearing augmented reality glasses at night / Getty/Qi Yang)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh6mlm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3ct1gy8)
Salmon wars

Sockeye and Chinook salmon make one of the world's great animal migrations, swimming 900 miles from the Pacific Ocean up 6,500 feet into Idaho’s Sawtooth Mountains, where they spawn and die - but that journey may not happen much longer.

In addition to the gauntlet of predators the fish face, from orcas to eagles, they are also running into a man-made obstacle: huge concrete dams.

Most scientists agree the dams need to go for the fish to live, but the dams provide jobs, clean energy, and an inexpensive way for farmers to get their crops to international markets.

However, US Congressman Mike Simpson, a Republican representing Idaho, has a plan to save the salmon. He wants to blow up four dams on the Snake River and reinvent the region's energy infrastructure - a plan which has been overwhelmingly rejected by his own party.

Heath Druzin investigates how a bitter fight is now playing out in America's Pacific Northwest, pitting Native American tribes and conservationists against grain growers and power producers.

Presented by Heath Druzin
Produced by Richard Fenton-Smith

(Image: Sockeye salmon. Credit: Mike Korostelev)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwjd2c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5g2940ccz)
Sudan's military reinstates ousted PM Hamdok

Sudan's ousted Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok reinstated, after being placed under house arrest during a military coup last month.
All political detainees will be released as part of a new agreement between the military, civilian leaders and ex-rebel groups, mediators said.
We speak with a leader of the main opposition bloc, which has rejected the new deal.

Also in the programme; the Mexicans who have been deported from the US but take the skills they've learnt to built better lives back home; and the government in Britain is launching what it describes as a far-reaching review in potential racial bias in the design of medical devices.


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwjhth)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm3)
Mary Somerville: The queen of 19th-Century science

For someone who was largely self-taught, Mary Somerville's rise to renown in the male-dominated world of science was quite remarkable. Although women were barred from being members of the learned societies where knowledge was shared in the early 19th-Century, Somerville found alternative ways to become one of the most respected figures in maths and science of her day.

Scottish-born Somerville played a crucial role in communicating the latest findings in science through a series of successful books. She regretted never making any original discoveries herself however, so does her experience suggest we should re-evaluate the role of originality in science?

Bridget Kendall is joined by Jim Secord, emeritus professor of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge, who has edited the works of Mary Somerville; Dr Brigitte Stenhouse, lecturer in the History of Mathematics at the University of Oxford whose doctoral thesis looked at the mathematical work of Mary Somerville; and Ruth Boreham, former project curator at the National Library of Scotland, who is writing a biography of Mary Somerville.

Producer: Fiona Clampin

(Photo: Royal Bank of Scotland £10 note featuring Mary Somerville)


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dky)
A TikTok tale

Nowadays if you are an academic and who needs some participants for a study you go online, but over the summer academic studies were inundated with participants who all happened to be teenage girls ... we explore how one TikTok can tip the balance of data gathering.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Chris Flynn


(Image: TikTok logo is displayed on a smartphone screen/Getty/NurPhoto/contributor)


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwjmkm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwjr9r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tl6tgrd1k)
Live Sporting Action

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Michael Regan/Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwk3k4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0mqjd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh7gtj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2z3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwk798)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhp)
Europe braces for another Covid wave

On Business Weekly, we look at the new wave of Covid-19 that’s hitting several European countries. We hear how the different take-up rates of vaccinations and booster shots are making things difficult for governments and how some are now resorting to lockdowns just for the unvaccinated. We also hear about the growing incidences of mobile phone spyware and how unwitting victims are having their every movement tracked by modern day stalkers. Plus we look at period poverty and sanitary sustainability, as the market for menstruation products widens. Business Weekly is presented by Sasha Twining and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Police officers monitor covid restriction compliance in Innsbruck, Austria, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwkc1d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5g2941bc0)
Anti-coup protests in Sudan continue after PM reinstated

Sudan's Prime Minister Abdullah Hamdok was reinstated in a deal struck with the military leadership, weeks after the October 25th coup. But the agreement failed to rouse optimism in pro-democracy protesters who feel their Prime Minister may have agreed under duress. We hear from a protester in Khartoum who says the deal only handed more power to the military. We also speak to the former US assistant secretary of state for Africa, who says this is a positive step in the transition to a civilian government.

Also on the programme: Some Mexican deportees are finding ways to rebound in their home country; And after calls for information regarding Peng Shuai, The International Olympic Committee says its president, Thomas Bach, has held a video call with the Chinese tennis star and claims all is well.

(Photo: Abdel Moneium Suleiman)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwkgsj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywzptdysbh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172y0srs2w2tz4)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh7v1x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwkljn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 Deeply Human (w3ct051h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh7yt1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 The Explanation (w3ct2z3h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 More or Less (w3ct2dky)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]



MONDAY 22 NOVEMBER 2021

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45pkjy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vscxtb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2z3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45pp92)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzljrld29gb)
Anti-lockdown protests sweep across Europe

Tens of thousands of people have been marching in the Belgian capital, Brussels, to protest against anti-Covid measures. Thousands of demonstrators also took to the streets in the Netherlands, Austria, Croatia and Italy as anger mounted over new curbs. Dan Michaels, Brussels Bureau Chief for The Wall Street Journal, explains why there is so much opposition to new anti-covid measures.

On World Fisheries Day, Vera Coelho of the campaigning group Oceana, talks about the challenges worldwide of overfishing.

And we look at period poverty and sanitary sustainability, as the market for menstruation products widens.

(Image: Protesters gathering in front of police in Brussels. Credit: Getty Images).


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsd1kg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct1m8p)
Listening to coral reefs

Coral reefs are some of the most diverse ecosystems in the world, and also some of the noisiest. Up close, a healthy reef teems with trills, whoops, buzzes, hums and snaps made by the diverse lifeforms that inhabit it. But as many reefs are now degrading due to rising temperatures, their sound signatures are changing.

Conservationist Rory Crawford meets marine scientists who believe these sounds could provide a new way of monitoring the health of coral reefs, and boosting their resilience. He listens in to soundscapes that have been recorded around reefs in diverse parts of the world, and hears a selection of the sometimes surprising noises that have been picked up by researchers’ hydrophones.

Sounds are crucial to underwater species and a healthy-sounding reef will attract fish and other organisms to settle on it, so is it possible to use acoustics to boost the ecosystem on damaged coral?

Underwater recordings courtesy of: Tim Lamont/University of Exeter, Ben Gottesman, The Centre for Global Soundscapes, and Discovery of Sound in the Sea

Producer: Anne McNaught
Editor: Deborah Cohen

Picture: The underwater world of Philippines, Southeast Asia, Pacific Ocean, Credit: Giordano Cipriani/Getty Images


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45pt16)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtht9sf0g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsd59l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2drg)
Could giving nature rights help fight climate change?

Around the world a growing number of rivers, mountains, nature reserves, even marshes have all been given legal rights. It’s an idea that’s being tested in courtrooms around the world. But to what extent might this help reduce the worst impacts of climate change and help us adapt to a warmer and wetter world?
Presenters Kate Lamble and Neal Razzell are joined by:
Natalia Greene , Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature
John DX Lapid, reporter in the Philippines
Liza Osorio, lawyer
Jacinta Ruru, Professor of Law at the University of Otago, Aotearoa/New Zealand
Jan Darpo, Professor of Environmental Law, Uppsala University, Sweden

Producer: Darin Graham
Researcher: Natasha Fernandes
Series producer: Ros Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound engineer: James Beard


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45pxsb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct051h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsd91q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 The Explanation (w3ct2z3h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45q1jg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtht9snhq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsddsv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9g)
An assistance dog changed my life

Women from Brazil and the UK tell Nora Fakim how assistance dogs are improving both their mobility and wellbeing.

Maria Villela lives and works in Brazil. She has glaucoma and was blind by the time she left university. As guide dogs are rare in Brazil, ten years ago Maria decided to email every international guide dog school she could to try and get an assistance animal. She was finally partnered with her dog Spirit through Guide Dogs of the Desert, USA. She says although she lived an independent life before getting her dog, Spirit has given her peace.

Alice Moore-Simmons has brittle bones, a rare condition called Ehlers Danlos syndrome and Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) which causes her blood pressure to drop very suddenly. Alice was given her first assistance dog, Bella, through the charity Dogs for Good, when she was 15 years old. More recently she’s been partnered with Winter who’s trained to look out for signs of Alice passing out, makes sure she has her medication, helps her get dressed, fetches and picks things up. Alice says Winter helps calm her anxiety and gives her confidence.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

(Image: (L) Maria Villela and her dog Spirit, credit Maria Villela. (R) Alice Moore-Simmons and her dog Winter, courtesy Dogs For Good)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45q58l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv303cm479b)
Waukesha: Fatalities after car drives into Christmas parade in US

A car has been driven into a Christmas parade in the US state of Wisconsin, causing deaths and many injuries.

Austria has become the first European Union country to reimpose a full lockdown in response to a surge in Covid infections.

And from Australia, could a Chinese multi-lingual robot beat the staff shortages in the hospitality sector as the country tries to move past covid lockdown.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45q90q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv303cm4c1g)
Shocking fatal incident in the US city of Waukesha

Police say there are 'some fatalities' after a car ploughed into a holiday parade in Wisconsin in the US.

Pakistan lifts a ban on an Islamist party and releases hundreds of its supporters from jail, so why now and what effect will having this right wing party back on the political scene have?

Football: arguably the biggest football team in the world is looking for a new manager, so who is likely to be the new Manchester United boss?


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45qdrv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv303cm4gsl)
US: Car ploughs into parade killing five people

Five people have died after a driver ploughed an SUV into a Christmas parade in Wisconsin in the US. Police say dozens more have been injured.

Austria goes into full lockdown for 20 days as the number of coronavirus infections continue to rise. People in the country have been demonstrating against this and the government's plan to make Covid vaccinations compulsory.

In football news, we look at who will replace Premier League manager Ole Gunnar Soskjaer after he was sacked by Manchester United.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45qjhz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6p)
Ryan Girdusky: Race and education in America

Scratch beneath the surface of everyday American life and you find an increasingly polarised culture. Donald Trump is no longer in the White House, but the culture wars he inflamed are still raging. In a special edition of HARDtalk from New York, Stephen Sackur speaks to an influential conservative activist in the thick of the fight. Ryan Girdusky, the founder of the 1776 Project Political Action Committee, says America’s schoolchildren are being brainwashed about race and he’s out to stop it. What does it say about America that the classroom is now a political battleground?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsdwsc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j5p)
Texas abortion laws

Texas has introduced the most stringent abortion law in America. Tamasin Ford assesses some of the reaction to this law by employers and employees who have traditionally been attracted to the Lone Star State because of its low taxes and lower house prices.

Ashley Lopez, NPR journalist in Austin explains the complexities of the law and how it will disproportionately affect women of colour. Curtis Sparrer, co-founder of PR firm Bospar, explains how his company is offering to help relocate employees who want to move out of the state. And Vivek Bhaskaran, CEO of Austin-based QuestionPro, explains how his company will offer financial assistance to employees who need to get a termination. We also hear from Valerie Veteto, who moved to Texas, attracted by its job prospects and low house prices, but is now preparing for a move to New York.

Producer: Nisha Patel

(Picture: Protests outside the Supreme Court in the US Credit: Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1s)
The Woman in Gold by Gustav Klimt

'The Woman in Gold' was one of Gustav Klimt's most famous paintings. It was a portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer, but it was taken from her family by the Nazis and only returned to them after a long legal battle. Louise Hidalgo has been speaking to Randol Schoenberg the young lawyer who took on the case.

Picture: Adele Bloch-Bauer I, or 'The Woman in Gold', painted in 1907 by Gustav Klimt, from the collection of the Neue Galerie in New York. (Credit: Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45qn83)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsf0jh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prc)
Would my cat survive in the wild?

Cats started hanging out with humans thousands of years ago, and nowadays these fluffy, lovable pets are found in many of our homes. But there is no doubt lots of them still have keen hunting instincts - witness all the birds and small mammals they kill each year.

CrowdScience listener Rachel started wondering whether her cat Eva could fend for herself while watching her uncoordinated swipes at a toy on a string, and seeing her fall off the sofa. Even though Eva was once a stray, she now lives entirely indoors, and it is hard to imagine her holding her own back on the mean streets. But could this pampered pet recover her survival instincts? Or would she go hungry, or fall foul of other cats or predators?

Cat behaviour expert Roger Tabor is on hand with answers. His pioneering ‘cat-navs’ shine a light on what cats get up to inside and outside the home; we meet one of his subjects, a tiny cat with a fierce personality. Roger explains how a cat’s survival toolkit depends on their sex, breed, and above all their early life. Environment matters, too, so in Japan, where Rachel and her pet cat live, we visit a cat shelter to learn about the day-to-day challenges stray cats face.

And just how ‘domestic’ are our cats, anyway? How different are they from their wildcat cousins, and how did they come to be our companions in the first place? It turns out beguiling humans might be even more of a survival trick than hunting.

Presenter: Melanie Brown
Producer: Cathy Edwards

Contributors:
Roger Tabor – Chartered Biologist and Cat Behaviourist
Jamie Baker – Head Keeper, Battersea Park Children’s Zoo
Dr Eva-Maria Geigl – Research Director, CNRS (French National Centre for Scientific Research)
Susan Roberts and Cheryl Nodhturft-Mori – Japan Cat Network

(Image: Cat in Lion costume. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45qs07)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsf48m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct2yqn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dky)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45qwrc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtht9thqm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsf80r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45r0hh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv0)
The Jewish prisoner, the treasure hunters and the secret diary

A few years ago, Menachem Kaiser went to Poland to uncover his family history. All he knew was that his grandfather survived the Holocaust but the rest of his relatives were killed. In search of his family’s lost home, Menachem met a group of treasure hunters who led him to a secret diary and the story of the Nazi’s mysterious underground city, Project Riese. Menachem Kaiser’s book is called Plunder: A memoir of family property and stolen Nazi treasure.

Presenter: Mobeen Azhar
Producer: Maryam Maruf
The excerpts from Abraham Kajzer's book are read by Martin Esposito

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: One of the underground tunnels in Project Riese. Credit: JANEK SKARZYNSKI/AFP via Getty Images)


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45r47m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtht9tr6w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsfhj0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45r7zr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5gfkf779c)
Protests in Europe as Covid restriction return

Unrest has spread across the continent as countries bring in measures to curb infections. Austria has returned to a full national lockdown as demonstrations against new restrictions aimed at curbing Covid-19 infections spread across Europe. People clashed with police in the Netherlands and Belgium.

Also in the programme: At least five people have been killed after a car ploughed into a Christmas parade in the US state of Wisconsin; Chile heads for a divisive headed run-off as far right surges; and Afghanistan’s healthcare system on the brink of collapse.

(Photo: People take part in an anti-coronavirus measures protest in Brussels Belgium, 21 November 2021. Credit: EPA).


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45rcqw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsfr08)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4894w49lvq)
Austria enters new coronavirus lockdown

Amid rapidly rising Covid-19 cases, the Austrian government has imposed a 20 day lockdown. We get reaction to the move from Vienna-based tour guide Angelika Kronberger, and we get a sense of the likely economic impact from Professor Klaus Prettner at the Vienna University of Economics and Business. Also in the programme, the US private equity giant KKR has made a €33bn bid for Telecom Italia. We get the background from Daniele Lepido of Bloomberg in Milan. The BBC's Nora Fakim in Mauritius meets environmental activists Anish Manga of the Fridays for Future movement, and Karuna Rana, co-founder of the climate group Sia, to hear how climate change is affecting the country. Plus, our workplace commentator Sandip Roy identifies some of the workplace culture differences between offices in India and the United States.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Vishala Sri-Pathma, Nisha Patel and Gareth Barlow.

(Picture: A closed Christmas market in Vienna. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45rhh0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvyg96hfg)
Covid protests in Europe

Austria has today returned to full lockdown because of the rise Covid cases. It comes after protests in several European countries over lockdown restrictions. We’ll hear about the measures the governments across the continent are imposing and speak to two people - one in Austria, one in the Netherlands - who oppose restrictions.

We’ll also speak to Dr Eleanor Murray from Boston University School of Public Health about the Covid situation in Europe.

We’ll get the latest from Wisconsin where at least five people were killed after a car ploughed into a Christmas parade on Sunday.

Our colleague from the Reality Check team explains the online censorship techniques that have been used against the Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai since she made allegations of sexual assault against a former senior politician.

(Photo: Protesters face riot place clash during an anti-coronavirus measures protest in Brussels Belgium, 21 November 2021. Credit: STEPHANIE/ LECOCQ/EPA)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45rm74)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvyg96m5l)
Europe tackles rise in Covid cases

Austria has today returned to full lockdown because of the rise in Covid cases. It comes after protests in several European countries over lockdown restrictions. We’ll hear about the measures the governments across the continent are imposing and speak to two people in Austria and in the Netherlands who oppose restrictions.

Professor Manfred Green, a medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in Israel, will be joining us to talk about the spread of Covid in Europe and to answer audience questions about the virus.

We’ll get the latest from Wisconsin where at least five people were killed after a car ploughed into a Christmas parade on Sunday.

Our colleague from the Reality Check team explains the online censorship techniques that have been used against the Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai since she made allegations of sexual assault against a former senior politician.

(Photo: Police officers control the occupants of a vehicle at a check point at the German-Austrian border during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as Austria"s government imposed a general lockdown from Monday, in Salzburg, Austria, November 22, 2021. Credit: Lukas Barth/Reuter


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45rqz8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45rvqd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtht9vgpn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsg6zs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nnxq4vqjr)
2021/11/22 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45rzgj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsgbqx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2zqd)
Genetic dreams, genetic nightmares

Biologist Matthew Cobb presents the first episode in a series which looks at the 50-year history of genetic engineering, from the concerns around the first attempts at combining the DNA of one organism with the genes of another in 1971 to today’s gene editing technique known as CRISPR.

The first experiments to combine the DNA of two different organisms began at Stanford University in California in 1971. The revolutionary technique of splicing genes from one lifeform into another promised to be a powerful tool in understanding how our cells worked. It also offered the prospect of a new cheap means of manufacturing life-saving drugs – for example, by transferring the gene for human insulin into bacteria, growing those genetically engineered microbes in industrial vats and harvesting the hormone. A new industrial revolution based on biology looked possible.

At the same time some scientists and the public were alarmed by disastrous scenarios that genetic engineering might unleash. What if microbes engineered with toxin genes or cancer genes escaped from the labs and spread around the world?

In early 1974, responding to the public fears and their own disquiet about how fast the techniques were developing, the scientists leading this research revolution called for a global moratorium on genetic engineering experiments until the risks had been assessed.

This was followed by an historic meeting of 130 scientists from around the world in February 1975 in California. Its purpose was to decide if and how the genetic engineering research could be done safely. It was a rancorous affair but the Asilomar conference is held up as an idealist if imperfect example of scientists taking responsibility as they developed a powerful new technology.

(Picture: DNA molecule, Credit: KTS Design/Science Photo Library/Getty Images)


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45s36n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5gfkf82j8)
Afghan banks 'approaching collapse'

The Afghanistan representative of the United Nations Development Programme, Abdallah Dardari, warns that the country's banking sector is 'approaching collapse rapidly'.

Also in the programme: as Venezuela's regional elections deliver sweeping success for the governing Socialist Party, we'll ask if the opposition was right to end its boycott; and why did migrants from Iraqi-Kurdistan decide to return after attempting to cross into the EU from Belarus?

(Photo: Afghans line up outside a bank to take out their money after Taliban takeover in Kabul, Afghanistan on 1 September 2021. Credit: Reuters/Stringer)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45s6ys)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx022q5jhr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172y0ss4c59l4d)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsgl75)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrpvf89pkq)
Jerome Powell nominated for a second term as Federal Reserve chair

Jerome Powell has been nominated for a second term as chair of the US Federal Reserve by President Joe Biden. Mr Powell is set to stay in the role, which includes managing inflation and regulating the financial system, for a further four years. Also in the programme, the US private equity giant KKR has made a €33bn bid for Telecom Italia. We get the background from Daniele Lepido of Bloomberg in Milan. The BBC's Nora Fakim in Mauritius meets environmental activists Anish Manga of the Fridays for Future movement, and Karuna Rana, co-founder of the climate group Sia, to hear how climate change is affecting the country. Plus, our workplace commentator Sandip Roy identifies some of the workplace culture differences between offices in India and the United States.

(Picture: Jerome Powell. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45sbpx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsgpz9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



TUESDAY 23 NOVEMBER 2021

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45sgg1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z7v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45sl65)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqpqw2pyhw)
Jerome Powell nominated for a second term as Fed chair

Jerome Powell has been nominated for a second term as chair of the US Federal Reserve by President Joe Biden. Mr Powell is set to stay in the role, which includes managing inflation and regulating the financial system, for a further four years. El Salvador plans to build the world's first "Bitcoin City", funded initially by bitcoin-backed bonds. We hear from a key strategist of the plan, Samson Mow. Sasha Twining is joined throughout the programme by Mehmal Sarfraz, co-founder of The Current PK, and journalist in Lahore, Pakistan and Alexander Kaufman, from the Huffington Post in New York.

(Picture: Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45spy9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtht9w9xk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsh26p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2zqv)
Reaching for the sky

Memory Sidira is buzzing with excitement as she talks about what she is learning during her course at Malawi’s Drone and Data Academy - the first of its kind in Africa. The Academy’s aim is to build local expertise for Malawi’s expanding drone industry and to teach young Africans from across the continent 21st Century skills in drone flight and data analysis. Ruth Evans hears how drones are inspiring young Africans like Memory to reach for the sky.

After completing the first course run by the Drone and Data Academy last year, 24-year-old Debra Duwa Matambalika is doing her dream job, working as a drone pilot delivering essential medicines to remote rural areas. Thumbiko Zingwe is another former graduate of the Academy – but he is not just reaching for the sky; His goal is to set up Malawi’s very own space programme to help address critical development issues on the ground. He has a futuristic vision of Malawi’s skies being full of drones - “like a semi-Wakanda” in his favourite super-hero film Black Panther. The technology, he believes, will leapfrog one of the poorest countries on earth into the 21st Century: “It’s the beginning of a beautiful story that will have a beautiful ending.”


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45stpf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45syfk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtht9wkdt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsh9py)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdy)
Anifa Mvuemba: Preparing for the runway

The fashion label Hanifa was launched in 2012 - Anifa Mvuemba's dream of a label that featured ready-to-wear clothes for women sizes 0-20, finally came true. And now she's preparing for her debut runway show in Washington, DC, and is designing shoes to accompany it, her first foray into footwear.

Join Karen Baker as she meets Anifa at the drawing table where the design for a beautiful evening gown is emerging but will it make it to the catwalk? Feel the buzz as preparations for the show pick up pace and Karen meets others involved in preparing for a runway show, from music makers to make-up artists to models.

Presented and co-produced by Karen Baker and co-produced by Rebecca Armstrong for BBC World Service.


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45t25p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv303cm746f)
China piles pressure on Taiwanese firms

China tells Taiwanese companies that they will be punished if they support independence for the island, but how do you check a company's political loyalty?

100 days after the Taliban swept to power in Afghanistan we focus on the country once again as the Red Cross says withholding international funds is leading to acute hunger.

America's culture wars heat up after Kyle Rittenhouse, the 18 year old found not guilty of murdering two people during a Black Lives Matter march, speaks to the media.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45t5xt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv303cm77yk)
Afghanistan: 100 days of the Taliban

One hundred days since the Taliban took over in Afghanistan a leading Unicef official there says life is so desperate it's now a case of day-to-day survival for many - we'll hear from her.

New research seems to suggest specific Covid-19 vaccines may be more beneficial than others to the elderly.

And we hear from the 13-year-old cancer survivor who - on the other side of treatment - could have decided to take a trip to Disneyland or get a PlayStation, but instead decided to give his gift to the homeless.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45t9ny)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv303cm7cpp)
China targets Taiwanese firms

China tells Taiwanese companies that they will be punished if they support independence for the island. But how do you check a company's political loyalty? We'll go live to Taiwan.

Former world leaders call for a more equal response to the pandemic -- we speak to one of them shortly -- the former Prime Minister of New Zealand.

And 100 days after the Taliban swept to power in Afghanistan we focus on the country once again as the Red Cross says withholding international funds is leading to acute hunger. We have a special report from there.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45tff2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plt)
The tiny satellites changing how we see Earth

CubeSats are small but mighty. They started as an educational toy in 1999, but now help people tackle issues from deforestation in Brazil to modern slavery in Greece.

Cheap to make and launch, these tiny satellites’ biggest role is in remotely scanning the Earth. Thousands are whizzing over our heads right now tracking a huge range of stuff - including herds of elephants, coral reefs and volcanic ash clouds.

We look at how CubeSats have opened up space to nations and start-up companies and helped usher in a new, commercial, space age.

Produced and presented by Claire Bates.

Image: A CubeSat (Nasa)


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vshspg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jgq)
How to live to 150

Would you want to live to 150? With leaps in technology, science and medicine, it's becoming an increasingly realistic possibility.

Elizabeth Hotson talks to Sergey Young, founder of Longevity Vision Fund and author of The Science and Technology of Growing Young. Sergey tells us why he embarked on a mission to help us live longer. Plus, Dr Michael Hufford from biotechnology company, Lygenesis tells us about organ regeneration technology, which enables a patient's lymph nodes to be used as bioreactors to regrow functioning ectopic organs.

We also go on a voyage of discovery into the world of cryonics with Dennis Kowalski, president of the Cryonics Institute in Michigan, where you can have your body frozen and stored until the technology exists to bring you back to life some time in the future. We also hear from Paul Hagen, who's planning to follow his father's footsteps by undergoing the cryonics procedure.

(Picture of an energetic older couple via Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x69)
Europe's last smallpox epidemic

Eighteen million people were vaccinated against smallpox in the former communist Yugoslavia in only a month and a half in 1972. The mass vaccination campaign succeeded in containing the last smallpox epidemic in Europe. Dr Ana Gligic was a virologist who detected the first cases of the disease and helped tackle the outbreak.


PHOTO: A smallpox patient in Yugoslavia in 1972 (Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45tk56)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zqv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vshxfl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2zqd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45tnxb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45tsng)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtht9xdmq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsj4xv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45txdl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jx8)
Matt Goss: Life and loss in a superstar boy band

In the late 80s, the British group Bros was one of the most successful pop acts in the world. Made up of lead singer Matt Goss, his twin brother Luke, and childhood friend Craig Logan, Bros quickly achieved multi-platinum selling albums and legions of adoring fans. But behind the scenes not everything was as it seemed. By 1992 the band had collapsed, and the relationship between the brothers never fully recovered. Matt tells Mobeen Azhar how the split affected his mental health, and how he eventually made his way back to music. His new album is called The Beautiful Unknown.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Mobeen Azhar
Producer: Rebecca Vincent

(Photo: Matt Goss of Bros performs at Brixton Academy, London in 2019. Credit: Jim Dyson/Getty Images)


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x69)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45v14q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtht9xn3z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsjdf3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2zqd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45v4wv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5gfkfb46g)
Afghans in desperate need of humanitarian aid

Since the Taliban took power in mid-August, the financial aid on which the country depends was frozen. Donor countries don’t want to legitimise Taliban rule, but Afghan citizens are experiencing real agony on the ground. Aid agencies are demanding emergency intervention.

Also in the programme: Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed vows to lead from the battle front; and dozens are killed in a bus crash in Bulgarian motorway.

(A man carries a child to receive medical treatment at a hospital in Kandahar, Afghanistan, 23 November 2021. Credit: EPA).


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45v8mz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsjmxc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4brh1ygf1p)
US taps Strategic Petroleum Reserve

Aiming to lower fuel costs, the US has authorised use of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The action is being taken simultaneously with several other countries, and we assess the likelihood of success of the move at curbing inflation with Ken Rogoff, professor of economics at Harvard University. Also in the programme, the cosmetics company Lush has said it is deactivating some social media accounts until platforms "take action to provide a safer environment for users". We find out more from the firm's chief digital officer, Jack Constantine. Plus, we meet the so-called scambaiters who are taking revenge on telephone scammers. Rosie Okumura tells us why she tries to keep callers on the line whilst recording the calls and releasing them on social media. Monica Vaca is acting deputy director of the US Federal Trade Commission's bureau of consumer protection, and discusses what they are doing to try and tackle scam callers. And Mark Button, professor of security and fraud at the University of Portsmouth, reminds us that many scam callers are engaged in the activity under pressure from organised criminals.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Vishala Sri-Pathma and Faarea Masud.

(Picture: A pipe at a US Strategic Petroleum Reserve facility. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45vdd3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvyg99dbk)
Bulgaria bus crash

At least 46 people, including 12 children, died when a bus returning from a trip to Turkey crashed in western Bulgaria. The bus rammed a crash barrier on a motorway south-west of the capital Sofia. We'll get more details from our reporter.

As part of the BBC’s coverage of 100 days since the Taliban in Afghanistan swept to power, we’ll be explaining what’s happened in the country since August. We’ll catch up with people who spoke to us in the aftermath of the takeover to hear what life has been like in the past three months.

Our colleague Yalda Hakim joins us from Kabul to describe how the humanitarian crisis is interrupting basic services and affecting livelihoods in the country. We’ll also hear her interview with the Taliban spokesperson who was asked whether all women and girls will be allowed to freely work and study.

And we’ll again answer your questions and talk through the latest news on Covid-19 with one of our regular experts, Dr Isaac Bogoch in Canada.

(Photo: Fire fighters, police officers and investigators inspect the wreckage of a North Macedonia-registered bus that caught fire after crashing along a highway, killing at least 45 people, near the village of Bosnek, Bulgaria, 23 November 2021. Credit: VASSIL DONEV/EPA)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45vj47)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvyg99j2p)
Afghanistan: 100 days of Taliban rule

The Taliban in Afghanistan swept to power 100 days ago. We'll be explaining the developments that led to the takeover and what’s happened in the country since August. We’ll catch up with people who spoke to us in the aftermath of the takeover to hear what life has been like for them.

We’ll hear from students in Iraq’s Kurdistan region where hundreds of people have been protesting in the city of Sulaimani calling for restoration of a government student allowance.

We’ll also explain why the Turkish currency has hit new lows against the dollar and the impact on everyday life.

Dr Swapneil Parikh, an infectious disease researcher in Mumbai India will talk about today's other Covid stories and answer audience questions.

(Photo: A group of women wearing burqas crosses the street as members of the Taliban drive past in Kabul, Afghanistan October 9, 2021. Credit: Jorge Silva/File Photo/Reuters)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45vmwc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jx8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x69)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45vrmh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtht9yclr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsk3ww)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nnxq4ymfv)
2021/11/23 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45vwcm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zqv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsk7n0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt0)
Smart speakers used in gaslighting

IoT devices like smart speakers and networked heating controls are increasingly being used by perpetrators of domestic violence – for instance by changing the temperature the heating is set to or the music that the victim listens too, remotely. Julia Slupska from the Oxford Internet Institute will be discussing these new findings at the Shameless! Festival of Activism Against Sexual Violence in London. She joins us on the show.

A possible alternative to GPS?
We have relied on GPS for location services for almost 30 years, but it’s vulnerable to inaccuracy and attack. Professor Zak Kassas from the University of California, Irvine, explains his proposal for its replacement, harnessing the power of increasingly abundant low earth orbit communication satellites like SpaceX’s Starlink.

Mapping sea cucumbers using drones
Sea cucumbers aren't the flashiest creatures on Australia’s great barrier reef, and they have long been understudied and poorly understood. But Dr Karen Joyce, co-founder of GeoNadir wants your drone footage to help learn more to help map the animals and their habitats.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: Bob Nettles
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: Man setting home gadgets via smartphone.
Credit: ismagilov/Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45w03r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5gfkfbzfc)
Afghanistan: 'a nation on the brink of starvation'

The BBC's Yalda Hakim speaks to Afghans trying to cope with the country's food crisis. A foreign ministry spokesman tells her it's not the Taliban's fault.

Also in the programme: "Black Tuesday" for the Turkish currency, the lira; and the United States releases 50 million barrels of oil to try to bring down energy prices.

(Photo: An Afghan child receives medical treatment at a hospital in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Credit: EPA/stringer)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45w3vw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx022q8fdv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172y0ss4c5dh1h)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vskh48)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycsj94w2wx3)
US taps Strategic Petroleum Reserve

US President Biden has been speaking about the state of economy. And, in a bid to bring down energy prices, the United States is to release fifty million barrels of oil from its strategic reserves. The action is being taken simultaneously with several other countries, and we assess the likelihood of success of the move at curbing inflation.

Also in the programme, you'd imagine winning the lottery and spending the winnings would be an incredible feeling. But not for a nursery in Southern Mexico. Parents say they are being threatened by a gang following their $950,000 win - many have fled the area.

Plus, we meet the so-called scambaiters who are taking revenge on telephone scammers. Rosie Okumura tells us why she tries to keep callers on the line whilst recording the calls and releasing them on social media. Monica Vaca is acting deputy director of the US Federal Trade Commission's bureau of consumer protection, and discusses what they are doing to try and tackle scam callers. And Mark Button, professor of security and fraud at the University of Portsmouth, reminds us that many scam callers are engaged in the activity under pressure from organised criminals.

(Picture: A pipe at a US Strategic Petroleum Reserve facility. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45w7m0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsklwd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 24 NOVEMBER 2021

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45wcc4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45wh38)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqpqw2svdz)
US to release oil reserves in attempt to lower prices

The US has said it is releasing 50 million barrels of oil from its reserves in an attempt to bring down soaring energy and petrol prices. The move is being taken in parallel with other major oil-consuming nations, including China, India, Japan, South Korea and the UK.

Also in the programme, you'd imagine winning the lottery and spending the winnings would be an incredible feeling. But not for a nursery in Southern Mexico. Parents say they are being threatened by a gang following their $950,000 win - many have fled the area.

Plus, we meet the so-called scambaiters who are taking revenge on telephone scammers.

PHOTO: Getty Images


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45wlvd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtht9z6tn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vskz3s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2z3g)
One Hundred Years of Exile

How do refugee crises end?

Katy Long hears stories from refugees who have returned to their homeland, to those who have been resettled, and to those who are still in limbo, she examines how does a refugee crisis end.

(Photo: Afghan refugees seen during a protest outside the UNHCR office for various demands, 24 August, 2021, New Delhi, India. Credit: Sanjeev Verma/Hindustan Times/Getty Images)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45wqlj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jx8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x69)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45wvbn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtht9zg9x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsl6m1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Comb (w3ct2z2d)
Tricked and shipped

Tricked by their parents into going back to Africa. Hannah and Arif suddenly found themselves at boarding schools in Nigeria and Uganda, far from their homes in London. Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/thecomb


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45wz2s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv303cmb13j)
Wisconsin Christmas Parade attacker in court

Newsday will start with the court appearance of the man accused of driving down a Christmas parade in Wisconsin - the death toll has risen sadly.

We hear about the man who spent 42 years in jail for murders he had nothing to do with.

Also on the programme a major study of South American migration reveals in detail the factors pushing people from Latin America to try to get into the United States.

And a report on the Afghan female footballers who - after many attempts - finally escaped after the Taliban took over.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45x2tx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv303cmb4vn)
A sixth charge added to Wisconsin Christmas Parade attack trial

As the man accused of driving into a Christmas parade in the US killing five people appears in court it's revealed the first child has died from injuries sustained. We'll hear from a local pastor who gave shelter to people running from the attack.

Investigations continue into the cause of a bus crash in Bulgaria that claimed the lives of 46 tourists from Turkey. Newsday will get the latest from a reporter in Sofia.

We'll hear from one of the scientists tasked with saving the planet from an asteroid strike.

And what a gift for the wife...a third size replica in white marble of the Taj Mahal, which is one of the wonders of the world. But rather than a mausoleum for a dead princess (like the original) its a gift - to his wife. The building is complete with four large living rooms and a meditation space. We speak to the builder - and get a quote just in case you're interested on buying one for yourself.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45x6l1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv303cmb8ls)
Nasa puts satellite on suicide mission to deflect potential deadly asteroid

Nasa has just launched a spacecraft on a suicide mission to smash into a far flung asteroid. But fear not we are not under attack - Nasa merely wants to test the ability to deflect the paths of comets.

Also, in Kabul our reporter there has been looking at the deteriorating economic and humanitarian situation. It is just over 100 days since the Taliban took control of the country.

Plus, an ideological battle between the European Union and its member state Poland - has the threat by the EU to withhold funds forced a change of heart in how Poland deals with its LGBT community.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45xbb5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc6)
Péter Márki-Zay: Can Viktor Orban be beaten at the ballot box?

Next Spring, Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, the EU's most controversial leader, will seek a new mandate. His grip on power in Budapest is tight, covering the parliament, the media and the economy. His opponents at home and in Brussels call him an autocrat, but can he beaten at the ballot box? Stephen Sackur speaks to Péter Márki-Zay, who will lead a united opposition front into the election. He’s a small town mayor with big ambition, but is being the candidate who is not Orban enough?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vslplk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jph)
Baristas of the world unite!

Starbucks workers in Buffalo, New York, are this month balloting to join a union - part of a surprise post-pandemic trend in union activism across America, as retail and hospitality workers find that the tight post-pandemic labour market is giving them more bargaining power with their employers.

Ed Butler speaks to Michelle and Jaz - two baristas in Buffalo, New York, who are encouraging their colleagues to organise - and to Richard Bensinger, who hopes to represent them as part of the Workers United union. He reckons this marks a turning point for unions in the US, which have for decades seen thin membership numbers.

We also hear from Stephen Delie at the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, a Michigan-based think tank and advocacy group for "right-to-work" laws, which discourage union membership. Unions, he says, take workers' hard-earned money for little or no return.

(Picture: Starbucks union supporters posing in a group photo with Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez; Credit: Michael Sanabria)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8k)
The doctor who helped her mother to die

In 2001, the Netherlands became the first country in the world to legalise voluntary euthanasia: although the new law was ground-breaking, it was based in part on the result of a dramatic criminal trial that happened nearly three decades earlier, in 1973. The case concerned a doctor who helped her elderly and terminally ill mother to die after her mother had repeatedly begged her to do so. Dr Truus Postma was put on trial for carrying out voluntary euthanasia and was facing a sentence of up to 12 years if found guilty. Her dilemma as both a doctor and a daughter triggered a national debate about whether her actions were murder or mercy. The case broke taboos and led to the founding of the NVVE, a Dutch organisation which began to campaign for voluntary euthanasia to be made legal. Viv Jones speaks to Dr Postma’s daughter, Marga Postma, and to Klazien Albeda, founder of the NVVE.

(Photo: Dr Truus Postma outside court. Bert Verhoeff / Anefo. National Archives of the Netherlands.)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45xg29)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2z3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsltbp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45xktf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45xpkk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxthtb09jt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsm1ty)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Comb (w3ct2z2d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45xt9p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzj)
My anonymous teen story became a playground sensation

In 2005, when London schoolgirl Jade LB was just 13, she got a computer for her birthday and began writing a fictional story on it – the sometimes raunchy, sometimes disturbing adventures of a 17-year-old girl called Keisha. Written in a mixture of text language, slang and patois, the story became legendary and was passed around playgrounds all over London. But when she first put it online with a promise to post a new chapter every two weeks, Jade had no idea of the impact it would have, or how Keisha would shape her life for years to come. Her book, Keisha the Sket, is out now. The readings you heard were by Nadia Rose.

Burhan Sönmez is now a prize-winning novelist, but when he was growing up in Turkey, a teenager of Kurdish origin, he had ambitions to be a lawyer. In the early 1980s he moved to Istanbul to begin his law degree, but these were dangerous times in Turkey. In 1980 there was a military coup in the country, and a wave of brutal repression, arrests and torture followed. Burhan tells Jo Fidgen about his detention in Istanbul and how he and his fellow inmates would escape into their imaginations to cope with torture and interrogation. This interview was first broadcast in December 2016.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Jade LB. Credit: Stuart Simpson)


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45xy1t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxthtb0k12)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsm9b6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45y1sy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5gfkff13k)
Haqqani network blames US for violence in Afghanistan

A senior member of the Taliban in Afghanistan, Anas Haqqani, has called on all sides in the two-decade conflict to forgive each other, but insisted that the United States was the main cause of the hostilities. In a BBC interview, Anas Haqqani said that all the participants were sorry there had been casualties.

Also in the programme: Is Colombia's peace process faltering? We will hear from the man who negotiated the peace deal for the government five years ago; and rescuing the Afghanistan girls' football team.

(Photo: Anas Haqqani (left), BBC correspondent, Yalda Hakim (right). Credit: BBC)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45y5k2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsmjtg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4czn4vl8lq)
Samsung to build microchip factory in Texas

South Korea's Samsung has chosen Taylor, Texas for a new $17bn computer chip factory. The US is hoping to bring more such hi-tech manufacturing back on to American shores, and we explore the implications with Rebecca Klar, who covers tech policy for The Hill. Also in the programme, there is a debate in India about whether to follow China's lead in banning crypto-currency trading. We find out more from Glen Goodman, author of The Crypto Trader. Starbucks workers in Buffalo, New York, are holding a ballot this month to decide whether to join a union. It's part of a trend of union activism across America, as the BBC's Ed Butler reports. Plus, at its annual Golden Joystick awards, the video games industry celebrated 50 years of games, marking the November 1971 launch of Computer Space. Dan Dawkins is content director at Games Radar, and tells us more about the event.

Today's edition is presented by Fergus Nicoll, and produced by Nisha Patel and Faarea Masud.

(Picture: Samsung flags outside a building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45y996)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvyg9d97n)
Europe's Covid surge

European countries have continued to report record numbers of daily Covid infections, with hospitals across the continent feeling the pressure. In the Netherlands, the parliament has heard warnings that intensive care units are being forced to decide which patients they can help and who to turn away. We’ll speak to Dutch medical experts who share their thoughts on the situation.

We’ll also hear from two people in Germany and in Austria who - after new mandates were announced- decided to have Covid vaccines.

And this week we are hearing about the deteriorating situation in Afghanistan since the Taliban takeover; western aid has been cut off and millions of Afghans are facing starvation. Our colleague Yalda Hakim is in Kabul and will be telling us about her interview with a senior member of the Taliban who’s called on all sides in the two-decade conflict to forgive each other.

(Photo: People walk on a street while shopping amid a renewed spread of the coronavirus disease in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Credit: Reuters/Eva Plevier)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45yf1b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvyg9ddzs)
The end of the Merkel era in Germany

Germany has announced a new centre-left government. Olaf Scholz will head the three-party coalition under a deal to end 16 years of government led by Angela Merkel. Our correspondent brings you the latest.

European countries have continued to report record numbers of daily Covid infections, with hospitals across the continent feeling the pressure. In the Netherlands the parliament has heard warnings that intensive care units are overwhelmed. We’ll speak to Dutch doctors about the situation.

This week we are hearing about the deteriorating situation in Afghanistan since the Taliban takeover; western aid has been cut off and millions of Afghans are facing starvation. Our colleague Yalda Hakim is in Kabul and will be telling us about her interview with a senior member of the Taliban who’s called on all sides in the two-decade conflict to forgive each other.

(Picture: Olaf Scholz delivers a statement after a final round of coalition talks to form a new government, in Berlin, Germany. Credit: Reuters/Fabrizio Bensch)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45yjsg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45ynjl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxthtb18hv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsn0sz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nnxq51jby)
2021/11/24 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45ys8q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2z3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsn4k3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw7)
Covid cases across Europe

James Gallagher, BBC health and science correspondent, examines Covid case rates across Europe.

A report on a new study documenting the incidence of Typhoid in three capital cities - Blantyre, Malawi and Kathmandu, Nepal, for the first time - plus updated estimates in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Claudia discusses the role of antibiotic resistance and gets an update on a new vaccine for the disease.

Remembering Professor Sir Michael Rutter, ‘the father of child psychiatry’ who died recently.

And can house work help your memory?


Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: A crowded street in Brussels, Belgium in November 2021. Photo credit: Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45yx0v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5gfkffwbg)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45z0rz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx022qcb9y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172y0ss4c5hcyl)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsnd1c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycsy0j5jg0v)
Samsung to build microchip factory in Texas

South Korea's Samsung has chosen Taylor, Texas for a new $17bn computer chip factory. The US is hoping to bring more such hi-tech manufacturing back on to American shores, and we explore the implications with Justin Sayers from the Austin Business Journal. Also in the programme, there is a debate in India about whether to follow China's lead in banning crypto-currency trading. We find out more from Glen Goodman, author of The Crypto Trader. Starbucks workers in Buffalo, New York, are holding a ballot this month to decide whether to join a union. It's part of a trend of union activism across America, as the BBC's Ed Butler reports. Plus, at its annual Golden Joystick awards, the video games industry celebrated 50 years of games, marking the November 1971 launch of Computer Space. Dan Dawkins is content director at Games Radar, and tells us more about the event.

(Picture: Samsung flags outside a building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45z4j3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsnhsh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Comb (w3ct2z2d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



THURSDAY 25 NOVEMBER 2021

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45z887)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45zd0c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqpqw2wrb2)
Samsung to build microchip factory in Texas

South Korea's Samsung has chosen Taylor, Texas for a new $17bn computer chip factory. The US is hoping to bring more such hi-tech manufacturing back on to American shores, and we explore the implications with Justin Sayers from the Austin Business Journal. And would you want to live to 150? With leaps in technology, science and medicine, it's becoming an increasingly realistic possibility; the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on the science - and business - of longevity. Plus, at its annual Golden Joystick awards, the video games industry celebrated 50 years of games, marking the November 1971 launch of Computer Space. Dan Dawkins is content director at Games Radar, and tells us more about the event. And we're joined throughout the programme by Catherine Yeung from Fidelity in Hong Kong and in Washington DC, Dante Disparte, Head of Global policy at Circle Pay.


(Picture: Samsung flags outside a building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45zhrh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxthtb23qr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsnw0w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gy9)
Rotterdam and the cocaine connection

Europe’s North Sea coast has overtaken the Iberian peninsula as the primary point of entry for cocaine reaching the continent. Industrial-sized labs have been busted in the Netherlands, and mafia-style executions have occurred on the streets. Most recently, crime journalist Peter R de Vries was shot and mortally wounded in busy Amsterdam. Linda Pressly asks how the Netherlands has become one of the largest illicit drug economies in the world.

Reporter: Linda Pressly
Producer: Michael Gallagher
Editor: Bridget Harney

Image: CCTV footage from the port of Rotterdam showing cocaine ‘collectors’ – young men charged with retrieving smuggled narcotics from shipping containers (Credit: Kramer Group)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45zmhm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45zr7r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxthtb2c70)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsp3j4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgm)
Gabriella D'Cruz: Global Youth Champion

Gabriella D’Cruz, from Goa, wants to improve diets, transform livelihoods, and protect the planet using an often-overlooked marine vegetable - seaweed.

Ruth Alexander speaks to the 29-year-old about her big plans for the underwater crop, and her hope that it could bring lasting economic and environmental change to India’s coastal communities.

Gabriella’s passion and her project’s potential saw her chosen by a panel of international judges as the winner of The Food Chain Global Youth Champion Award 2021.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

Producer: Simon Tulett

Contributors:

Gabriella D'Cruz, founder of The Good Ocean;
Ismahane Elouafi, chief scientist at the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations.

(Picture: Gabriella D'Cruz in the sea holding a basket of seaweed. Credit: Gabriella D'Cruz/BBC)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45zvzw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpp5gd0)
Three men have been charged with the killing of Ahmaud Abery

Three white men have been convicted of the murder of a black jogger in Georgia. President Joseph Biden said the killing of Ahmaud Abery was a devastating reminder of how far America still had to go in the fight for racial justice.

The leaders of France and Britain have been holding talks following the death of 27 migrants crossing the English channel. Newsday will speak to the UN's refugee body, UNHCR.

Serious unrest on the streets of the Solomon Islands. The country's growing relationship with China is a source of discontent, with people worried about their jobs coming under threat.

And the international police organisation Interpol is under scrutiny, as human rights groups criticise some of the candidates standing to become its next president.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjww45zzr0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpp5l44)
Dozens of people drown after refugee boat capsizes in Channel

27 migrants have died in the waters between England and France after their boat capsized. President Emmanuel Macron of France and Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson have been discussing ways to stem the flow of people taking the risky route to reach the UK.

And fears that the low intensity conflict in eastern Ukraine may be about to heat up as the US and Europeans claim that Russia is building up its troops near the border with Ukraine.

And for those advancing in years and concerned about their eye sight , some good news, there may be a way to improve things - though it does involve staring into a bright red light.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjww4603h4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpp5pw8)
Migrant Channel crossings: 27 people headed for the UK drown near Calais

Twenty-seven people drown in the English Channel attempting to reach the UK. It has pushed the migrant crisis to the top of the political agenda in Paris and London. But can such a problem be solved by greater enforcement?

In Turkey the continued imprisonment of activist Osman Kavala has focused attention on the country's human rights record.

There is serious unrest on the streets of the Solomon Islands. The country's growing relationship with China is a source of discontent, with people worried about their jobs coming under threat.

Many countries in Europe are facing a renewed onslaught of Covid infections - one such example is Germany where the number of pandemic deaths has passed 100,000.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjww460778)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2y)
Why aren’t countries doing more to stop climate change?

What progress are China, India, Africa, Europe and the US making to limit climate change? Some experts believe they should they go at different paces to reflect their carbon footprints and development goals. And there are calls that developed nations must pay more to help developing nations prepare from transitioning from fossil fuels to renewable energy. With Charmaine Cozier.


(Image: Attendees in the Blue Zone during the COP26 climate talks in in Glasgow/ Jonne Roriz)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsplhn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jb6)
Why is Turkey's currency collapsing?

Turkey's currency has been in free fall this week, reaching a record low against the US dollar. The Lira's collapse has been sparked, in part, by President Recep Tayyip Erdogan doubling down on his controversial economic policies, such as demanding that the central bank cut interest rates despite rapidly accelerating inflation.

Ed Butler explores why President Erdogan is so attached to the policy, at the expense of three central bank governors in the last three years, and asks what impact the currency crisis is having on Turkey's economy. Ed speaks to Gulcin Ozkan, professor of finance at King's College London, economist and former fund manager Mohamed El-Erian, and to a forlorn wealth manager in Istanbul.

Producer: Will Bain

(Picture: Turkish Lira notes; Credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x41)
Estonia’s internet ‘Tiger Leap’

Estonia started connecting all its schools to the internet very early. In 1996 less than two percent of the world’s population had access to the web but Estonia’s initiative, known as ‘Tiger Leap’ captured the imagination and the hopes of the whole country. Estonians became early adopters of all sorts of digital services, from online banking to digital ID cards. However, a decade later Estonia was one of the first places in the world to suffer a sustained cyber attack. Caroline Bayley has been speaking to one of the founders of ‘Tiger Leap’- former government minister Jaak Aaviksoo. Photo credit: Getty images


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjww460bzd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gy9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vspq7s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjww460gqj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm4)
Laskarina Bouboulina, the mother of modern Greece

The 1821 Greek war for independence from the Ottoman empire became an inspiration for people all over Europe who wanted to dismantle the old multi-ethnic empires. But it is less well known that a number of women played key roles in the uprising. In this programme, Bridget Kendall and guests focus on Laskarina Bouboulina, perhaps the best known of Greek women freedom fighters. For the last two centuries, Bouboulina's deeds as as a brave sea captain and a generous financier of the uprising have enthralled people in Greece and elsewhere but how many of these stories are based in fact? And what is the significance of Bouboulina today?

To find out Bridget is joined by:
Dr. Margarite Poulos, a historian of modern Greece from Western Sydney University whose book Arms and the Woman surveys the role of Greek women in the country's military struggles;
Dr. April Kalogeropoulos Householder from University of Maryland, Baltimore County, who has not only written about Laskarina Bouboulina but also made a documentary film about her;
and Pavlos Demertzis-Bouboulis, who is a descendant of Bouboulina as well as the director of a museum dedicated to her on the island of Spetses.

[Image: Portrait of Laskarina Bouboulina, 1830, by Adam Friedel. From the collection of Bouboulina Museum, Spetses. Credit: Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l95)
Zenyatta

In November 2009, Zenyatta became the first – and only – mare to win the Breeders Cup Classic, one of the most prestigious horse races in America. Undefeated in all but one of her races, Zenyatta became wildly popular with the public; she was as well-known for her dance moves in the paddock as she was for coming from behind to snatch victory at the last moment. Zenyatta’s jockey, Mike Smith, talks to Jonathan Holloway. The programme is a Made-In-Manchester Production.

PHOTO: Zenyatta and Mike Smith in action in 2010 (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjww460lgn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxthtb36fx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vspyr1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjww460q6s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k41)
The bionic gloves that brought music back to me

For many years, acclaimed Brazilian pianist Joao Carlos Martins graced the world's most famous concert halls, performing as a pianist and celebrated interpreter of Johann Sebastian Bach's music. He'd studied the piano since he was eight years old, and by the age of 21 had made his debut at the Carnegie Hall in New York sponsored by Eleanor Roosevelt. His career was going well until a series of health issues and injuries meant he couldn't fully play anymore. It started with a neurological condition called focal dystonia, which caused spasms in his hands. Then a soccer injury damaged a nerve in his arm, and in 1995 he was attacked by a mugger who hit him over the head, injuring his brain. Although he had over 20 operations, the dexterity in his hands was severely impeded and he was restricted to playing with just three fingers. He went on to become a celebrated conductor, but it looked like his professional piano playing was over. That was until Brazilian designer Ubiratan Bizarro Costa created a special pair of 'bionic' gloves for him. Now aged 81, they help Joao move all of his fingers more freely, reuniting him with the pieces and music he loves.

Neil Harbisson has a condition that means he only sees in greyscale. Throughout his life people would talk to him about colour, but when your world is entirely black and white, it's a very difficult concept to understand. But when he was at university Neil met another student and together they developed an antenna that would translate colours into music notes. Neil underwent a controversial surgery to have the antenna permanently implanted in his skull. He now considers himself a cybernetic organism - a cyborg. He spoke to Saskia Edwards in December 2018.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Joao Carlos Martins wearing his bionic gloves. Credit: Miguel Schincariol/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x41)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjww460tyx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxthtb3fy5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsq679)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjww460yq1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5gfkfhy0n)
Channel disaster: France calls for co-operation

President Macron of France calls for greater European co-operation to tackle human traffickers, after 27 people died trying to cross the English channel in an inflatable boat; we hear from his party.


Also in the programme: Australia sends police and soldiers to the Solomon Islands after two days of rioting; and we hear from eastern Ukraine as tensions rise on the border with Russia.

(Photo: Remains of damaged inflatable boat and personal belongings left by people attempting to cross the English Channel on the beach near Wimereux, France, 25 November 2021. Credit: Mohammed Badra/EPA)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjww4612g5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsqfqk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49j9z1m86y)
Germany's economic challenges

Economic growth has slowed in Germany, and we look at the new government's key challenges. Matthew Karnitschnig is chief Europe correspondent for Politico in Berlin, and brings us the details. Also in the programme, the trial of former Nissan executive Greg Kelly continues in Japan. We hear from his wife Dee Kelly about the impact it has had on her life, and her campaign to see him returned to the United States. Zimbabwean nationals working in South Africa are in a race against the clock to sort out their work permits, or leave the country. The BBC's Shingai Nyoka in Harare explains the background. Following dramatic falls in the value of Turkey's currency over the past week, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on President Erdogan's unorthodox economic policies and the impact they are having on the country. Plus, on Thanksgiving, we hear about the supply chain challenges faced by a retailer in London that caters to US expats in the city, when it comes to providing the traditional turkey feast.

Today's edition is presented by Fergus Nicoll, and produced by Vivienne Nunis and Faarea Masud.

(Picture: Germany's new coalition team. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjww461669)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvyg9h64r)
The English Channel deaths

Britain and France have called for stronger international coordination to tackle human trafficking, after at least 27 people died trying to cross the English Channel. Despite the deaths, more boats have arrived in the UK today, and we’ll spend most of the programme discussing why people want to reach Britain.

We’ll hear voices from the countries of those who died yesterday to hear why people are leaving. And we put audience questions to our experts about how people arrive in Europe, and what happens after they have reached the continent.

We’ll look again at the wave of Covid infections across Europe and discuss the developments with our regular health expert Dr Emma Hodcroft in Switzerland.

(Photo: The grave of a migrant who died while trying to cross illegally from France into Britain, at the Cimetiere Nord, in Calais, France, 25 November 2021. Credit: MOHAMMED BADRA/EPA)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjww4619yf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvyg9h9ww)
The English Channel deaths

We are linking up with BBC Radio Five Live to focus on the deaths of at least 27 people who were trying to cross the English Channel to get to Britain. Nuala McGovern and Tony Livesey speak to people with first-hand experiences of making the journey into the UK and hear voices from the countries of those who died yesterday.

We’ll also explain why the UK is a popular destination, what happens to people who arrive in the country, and what is known about the people who smuggle thousands of people across the Channel in small boats.

And we look at the numbers of people trying to cross into the UK, and how that compares to other parts of the world.

(Photo: A damaged inflatable dinghy is seen on Loon Beach, the day after at leasts 27 migrants died when their dinghy deflated as they attempted to cross the English Channel, in Dunkerque near Calais, France, November 25, 2021. Credit: Johanna Geron/Reuters)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjww461fpk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k41)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x41)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjww461kfp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxthtb45dy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsqxq2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nnxq54f81)
2021/11/25 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjww461p5t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gy9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsr1g6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4n)
Deliberately doomed dart

DART is a space mission designed to hit a distant asteroid and knock it slightly out of orbit. It’s a test mission, a pilot project for a way of potentially protecting the earth from a stray asteroid. We hear from mission coordinators Nancy Chabot and Andy Rivkin, both from the Applied Physics Labs, APL, of Johns Hopkins University.

A new kind of Covid-19 vaccine has successfully undergone preliminary tests. Tuebingen University’s Juliane Walz tells us about how it hopes to stimulate a longer lasting protective effect against the virus than current vaccines.

And Haley Randolph of Chicago University sheds light on how our ancient ancestors’ exposure to viruses influences our susceptibility today.

Historian Robert Schulmann gives us an insight into the significance of research notes by Albert Einstein and Michele Besso. Sold at auction in France the notes give an insight into the collaboration between the two scientists which led to much of what we now understand about the fundamentals of physics.


Image: NASA's DART Spacecraft Launches in World's First Planetary Defense Test Mission
Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjww461sxy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5gfkfjs7k)
UN says Channel deaths were avoidable

The UN says the deaths of 27 people - who drowned trying to cross the English channel- could have been avoided if more legal routes were provided. The French and British governments vow to break the traffickers. But who are these crime gangs?

Also in the programme: The moment an amateur archaeologist realised he was digging up a major Roman mosaic in his father's field in England; and are political divisions getting in the way of Thanksgiving?

(Photo: People take part in a protest outside the Home Office in Westminster, London, demanding an end to deaths in the Channel. CREDIT: James Manning/PA Wire)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjww461xp2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx022qg771)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172y0ss4c5l8vp)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsr8yg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycs3ksky1hn)
Covid cases soar in the US

Data suggests many more Americans have been travelling over the past few days than did this time last year, but there's been a sharp rise in Covid-19 cases in recent weeks. Scientists are warning the United States could be entering a fifth wave of infections and as hospitals are getting busier, we hear from Eric Topol, a physician scientist at Scripps Research in California. Plus, Sir John Tusa tells us where power lies at top of a firm; is it with the executive team that runs the business day in, day out, or is it the board at the very top? Also in the programme, the trial of former Nissan executive Greg Kelly continues in Japan. We hear from his wife Dee Kelly about the impact it has had on her life, and her campaign to see him returned to the United States. Zimbabwean nationals working in South Africa are in a race against the clock to sort out their work permits, or leave the country. The BBC's Shingai Nyoka in Harare explains the background. Following dramatic falls in the value of Turkey's currency over the past week, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on President Erdogan's unorthodox economic policies and the impact they are having on the country. Plus, on Thanksgiving, we hear about the supply chain challenges faced by a retailer in London that caters to US expats in the city, when it comes to providing the traditional turkey feast.

(Picture: B.1.531 variant of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjww4621f6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsrdpl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



FRIDAY 26 NOVEMBER 2021

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjww46255b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l95)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjww4628xg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqpqw2zn75)
Covid cases soar in the US

Data suggests many more Americans have been travelling over the past few days than did this time last year, but there's been a sharp rise in Covid-19 cases in recent weeks. Scientists are warning the United States could be entering a fifth wave of infections and as hospitals are getting busier, we hear from Eric Topol, a physician scientist at Scripps Research in California. We discuss Apple's decision to alert some journalists and campaigners that their smartphones may have been hacked by a state - John Scott-Railton from Citizen Lab gives us the details. And Starbucks workers in Buffalo, New York, are holding a ballot this month to decide whether to join a trade union. It's part of a trend in union activism across America - we have a report from the BBC's Ed Butler. Plus, Sir John Tusa tells us where power lies at top of a firm; is it with the executive team that runs the business day in, day out, or is it the board at the very top? Plus, on Thanksgiving, we hear about the supply chain challenges faced by a retailer in London that caters to US expats in the city, when it comes to providing the traditional turkey feast. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Stephanie Hare, a technology writer in Chicago and Patrick Barta, the Asia News Editor for the Wall Street Journal newspaper; he's in Bangkok in Thailand.

(Picture: B.1.531 variant of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjww462dnl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxthtb50mv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsrrxz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1v00)
The Copa Libertadores final 2021

World Cup winner Gilberto Silva looks ahead to the Copa Libertadores final between Flamengo and Palmeiras. Also on the programme, the former Australia international Alicia Ferguson reacts to the latest abuse allegations in women's football.

Picture on website: A Palmeiras fan holding the team's flag after beating Santos. (NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjww462jdq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k41)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x41)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjww462n4v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxthtb5843)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vss0f7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2zh9)
Turning of the bones

To celebrate the lives of loved ones after they have passed away is nothing new. Many communities cling to memories, stories and anything else that makes them feel as close as possible to those who have died.

For the Malagasy people, an Austronesian ethnic group native to the island country of Madagascar, this desire to remain close to lost loved ones is viewed in a more literal sense with a funerary tradition known as Famadihana - the turning of the bones.

With the belief that the spirits of the dead only finally join the world of the ancestors after the body's complete decomposition, this ceremony involves exhuming the bodies of loved ones, replacing the silk cloth wrapped around them, and celebrating their lives as they are once again laid to rest.
Volana Razafimanatsoa explores the shifting spiritual landscape amongst the Malagasy people in the 21st Century, joining a family celebrating their loved ones and discovering what the future holds for one of their most cherished traditions.

(Photo: Isabel Malala Razafindrakoto carries the wrapped body of her son, who died aged three, as she takes part in a funerary tradition called the Famadihana. Credit: Rijasolo/AFP/Getty Images)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjww462rwz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv303cmhtxq)
Covid-19: new variant has most mutations yet

South African scientists have issued a warning about the new variant of Covid-19 there are concerns that the infection may be able to evade the current generations of vaccines.

The Netherlands is becoming the major entry point for South American illicit drugs into Europe - with consequences on the streets of Dutch cities.

And as Ethiopia becomes more divided , we hear one woman's account of the pressures of war.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjww462wn3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv303cmhynv)
Covid-19: Rising concerns about a new variant

With warnings emerging about a new Covid 19 variant in South Africa, the UK has acted to limit travel to six southern African nations.

A third day of unrest in the Solomon Islands with mobs descending on the Chinatown area of the capital, brandishing knives and axes.

And the rapidly rising divorce rates among albatrosses - environmental damage is putting unbearable stresses on the relationships of these ocean going birds.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjww4630d7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv303cmj2dz)
Covid-19: WHO to hold emergency meeting on new variant

As news emerges of a highly transmissible Covid-19 variant in South Africa the UK has moved to impose travel restrictions.

The death toll following a Siberian mine explosion has continued to rise, as investigators make arrests in connection with the tragedy.

And the Mexican parents being targeted by criminal gangs after their children's nursery won a large cash prize in a national lottery.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjww46344c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n25)
Rana Ayyub: Abuse, intimidation and legal threats

Stephen Sackur speaks to the Indian investigative journalist Rana Ayyub whose determination to dig deep into the past and present of India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi has prompted abuse, intimidation and legal action. What does her case say about the health of India’s democracy?

(Photo: Rana Ayyub appears via videolink on Hardtalk)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsshdr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j15)
The coming cleantech mining rush

Can the minerals needed to decarbonise the global economy be dug up fast enough? And can it be done without the human rights and environmental abuses of the past?

Tamasin Ford speaks to KC Michaels of the International Energy Agency says there will need to be a staggering increase in the amount of nickel, lithium, cobalt and rare earths being mined, in order to build all the batteries, wind turbines and solar panels needed. But mining consultant Dr Patience Mpofu says that the mines required can take anything up to 15 years to commission.

With many of these critical minerals concentrated in the developing world, the fear is that a rapid increase in global demand may outstrip the supply from the formal mining industry, with the gap filled by much less responsible mining operations. Emmanuel Umpula of the Congo-based NGO African Resources Watch fears a worsening of human rights abuses and pollution from such mines. But Mark Cutifani, chief executive of mining giant Anglo American, says the industry is working hard to ensure better standards of behaviour.

(Picture: South African miner; Credit: David Turnley/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzj)
The assassination of the Mirabal sisters

The three Mirabal sisters were leading figures in the Dominican Republic's opposition movement against the dictator, General Rafael Trujillo. Patria, Maria Teresa and the most prominent of the three, Minerva, were all killed on the 25th of November 1960. They were dragged from their car and beaten to death on the orders of General Trujillo. Their murders sparked outrage in the Caribbean country, and are thought to have been a motivating factor in the assassination of Trujillo himself six months later. In 2016, Rebecca Kesby spoke to Minerva's daughter, Minou Tavarez Mirabal, who explained why her mother and aunts were called 'the butterflies' and how to this day people still decorate their houses with three butterflies in tribute to them.

Photo: The three Mirabal Sisters, Patria, Minerva and Maria Teresa (Credit: Mirabal family collection)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjww4637wh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhx)
A volcano-powered Bitcoin city?

El Salvador's president made Bitcoin legal tender, now he wants to build a city. Joe Tidy speaks to Salvodoran-American cryptocurrency enthusiast and investor Gerson Martinez about the Central American country's experience with Bitcoin since its introduction earlier this year. Plus 193 member states of the UN agency Unesco say they want a more ethical approach to the development of artificial intelligence. We hear from Unesco's Gabriella Ramos about the problems with AI use today. And our own Jane Wakefield investigates the community of tweeters and YouTubers helping others find the latest Playstation and XBox consoles amid a global computer chip shortage in the run-up to Christmas.


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vssm4w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjww463cmm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htd)
Hunger in Afghanistan: Time to work with the Taliban?

It has been 100 days since the Taliban returned to power in Afghanistan and the country is on the brink of a humanitarian crisis. More than half of the country’s 39 million people face acute food insecurity as prices skyrocket. Severe drought, the pandemic and the damage caused by decades of war have all helped to bring the economy to its knees. With winter approaching the World Food Programme has warned that Afghans are at risk of being isolated from life-saving assistance. Previously international aid represented around 40% of the country’s GDP, but since the Taliban takeover the World Bank, the IMF, and the United States have cut off access to more than $9.5 billion in foreign reserves and loans. With the banking system frozen, aid organisations are struggling to pay their staff on the ground and calls for the United States and its allies to ease sanctions are growing. The international community is now asking itself whether it is possible to prevent the Afghan people from starving while at the same time minimising any benefits to a repressive Taliban leadership.

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed, Paul Schuster and Marie Sina.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjww463hcr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxthtb63c0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vssvn4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1v00)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjww463m3w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fx)
The challenges of filming at altitude

Many communities in India's northern Ladakh region are experiencing water shortages because of shrinking glaciers. BBC India team Aamir Peerzada and Neha Sharma went to report on how people in one village, Kumik, have ended up building a new settlement close to a river. It turned out to be an eventful trip.

Bodybuilding in the Arab world
Bodybuilding is a popular pastime for men throughout the Arab world, but what does it take to achieve the muscle development that bodybuilders strive for, and why do they see it as perfection? Hossam Fazulla of BBC Arabic has been investigating.

Young carers in South Korea
A 22-year-old Korean man has been sentenced to four years in prison for failing to care for his sick father. His story has started a big debate about what’s expected of young people in South Korea, as the BBC’s Julie Yoonnyung Lee explains.

The Brazilian farmer turning desert into forest
BBC Brasil's Joao Fellet loves gardening and planting trees, and one of his heroes is farmer Ernst Gotsch, who has transformed eroded and semi-arid land into new forests. So when his editor asked for positive ideas about environmental conservation, he leapt at the chance to see Ernst Gotsch’s work with his own eyes.

Highway kidnappings in Nigeria
The highway linking the capital Abuja to the city of Kaduna has become notorious for armed kidnappings. The latest took place last weekend. Meanwhile the railway connecting the two cities, which many passengers took as the safe option, has been attacked for the first time. BBC Africa's Chris Ewokor has been following both stories.

(Photo: BBC reporters next to a stream in Ladakh, northern India. Credit: Aamir Peerzada and Neha Sharma)


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjww463qw0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxthtb6bv8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vst34d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjww463vm4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5gfkfltxr)
New COVID-19 variant reaches Europe

The spread of a new variant of COVID-19 in South Africa begins to alarm health officials. Several governments, including the UK, Spain and Israel, announced travel restrictions from southern Africa as a precaution. We hear from Dr. Shabir Madhi, a professor of Vaccinology at the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa, as well as Dr. David Nabarro, Special Envoy on COVID-19 for the World Health Organisation. The WHO is meeting today in Geneva to assess the new variant.

Also in the programme: the tragic deaths of 27 people who tried to cross the English Channel by boat has caused a diplomatic spat between France and Britain. And the war in Ethiopia is becoming increasingly opaque, with the government in Addis Ababa banning all reports from the battlefield unless they're from government sources. We speak to Beverly Ochieng, a senior security analyst with BBC Monitoring.

Photo: COVID-19 virus illustration. Credit: Getty Images


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjww463zc8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vstbmn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y471zs7n7v5)
Markets on edge about new Covid variant

Stock markets around the world have declined as news of a new Covid-19 variant emerged. With the UK and others banning flights from the affected southern African countries, travel and tourism shares have fallen most sharply, and we assess the potential impact on the sector with Helen Tustin, founder of Wellbeing Travel. Also in the programme, on the shopping festival Black Friday, we get a sense of how toymakers are affected by global supply chain problems from Steve Finch, founding owner of toy company Bopster. And we get wider context from Andy Mulcahy, head of strategy at the UK e-commerce association IMRG. As the World Chess Championship gets under way in Dubai, we hear about the financial side of the game from Ilya Merenzon, chief executive of World Chess. Plus, amid concern that the conflict in Ethiopia could be about to escalate, we examine how the country's economy has been affected by the ongoing dispute between Tigray state in the north and the national government. Samuel Getachew is a business journalist in Addis Ababa, and tells us how before the fighting began, Ethiopia had become something of an economic miracle. The US is threatening to kick the country out of the AGOA preferential trade programme, and Rohit Nair, vice-president of garment maker Epic Apparel explains such a step could mean the closure of his business. And we also get the perspective of Zemedeneh Negatu, global chairman of the Fairfax Africa Fund, which invests in and owns companies across Africa.

Today's edition is presented by Fergus Nicoll, and produced by Joshua Thorpe and Faarea Masud.

(Picture: A covid vaccine worker in South Africa. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjww46433d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvyg9l31v)
New Covid variant detected

A new coronavirus variant has been detected in southern Africa. The variant is the most heavily mutated version discovered so far and some scientists have said they are worried about it. Countries have tightened travel restrictions because of the variant, imposing stricter quarantine measures or banning flights from South Africa and neighbouring countries. We'll answer your questions about the variant with our health expert, and hear from people in southern Africa on how they are feeling about the news.

Also, we're going to discuss the mental and physical toll that working throughout the pandemic has had on healthcare workers. Some have developed post traumatic stress disorder because of the overwhelming stress of the pandemic, others have experienced burnout and pressure on their mental and physical health. We'll speak to three healthcare workers to hear their experiences.

And, we’ll speak to BBC journalists working to tell the stories of the people who died while trying to cross from France to the UK by boat on Wednesday. We’re starting to learn more about their origins and lives, so we’ll tell you what we know. It’s also the topic that the BBC’s Ros Atkins has been looking at in detail this week, so we’ll hear his explanation and analysis on why people are risking their lives on small boats to cross the English Channel.

(Photo: A healthcare worker collects a swab from Bronwen Cook for a PCR test against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) before traveling to London, at O.R. Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg, South Africa, November 26, 2021. Credit: REUTERS/ Sumaya Hisham)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjww4646vj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvyg9l6sz)
Coronavirus conversations: PTSD in healthcare workers

We're going to discuss the mental and physical toll that working throughout the pandemic has had on healthcare workers. Some have developed post traumatic stress disorder because of the overwhelming stress of the pandemic, others have experienced burnout and pressure on their mental and physical health. We'll speak to three healthcare workers to hear their experiences.

Also, a new coronavirus variant has been detected in southern Africa. The variant is the most heavily mutated version discovered so far and some scientists have said they are worried about it. Countries have tightened travel restrictions because of the variant, imposing stricter quarantine measures or banning flights from South Africa and neighbouring countries. We'll answer your questions about the variant with our health expert, and hear from people in southern Africa on how they are feeling about the news.

And the BBC’s Ros Atkins has been looking into the 27 people who died on Wednesday whilst trying to cross the English Channel. We’ll hear his explanation and analysis on why people are risking their lives on small boats to cross from France.

(Photo: Medical specialists treat COVID-19 patients at a hospital in Oryol, Russia. 26/10/2021. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjww464bln)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjww464gbs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxthtb72b1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsttm5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nnxq57b54)
2021/11/26 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjww464l2x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vstyc9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prd)
Which is better: optimism or pessimism?

In most cultures, the soundtrack to our lives is one of optimism. We're told to aim for the stars, dream big and believe that tomorrow will definitely be a better day. But why do so many people subscribe to the cult of 'glass half full' when life’s hardships should make any reasonable person a bit more wary?

Listener Hannah from Germany - a self-described pessimist - is intrigued as to whether the alternative, optimistic way of life is really the best way to be. Cheerily taking on the challenge is ray of sunshine Marnie Chesterton, who finds out why 80% of the population have an optimism bias and how the ability to hope and take risks may have helped the human species get where it is today. She also meets a man who pushes the optimistic outlook to its very limits - BASE jumping world champion, Espen Fadnes. Listener Hannah on the other hand looks into the psychology of pessimism to find out if there are any advantages to her less rose-tinted view on life - and whether the culture we grow up in shapes how realistically we see the world.

CrowdScience asks whether optimism or pessimism is the answer to a happy life.
Produced by Caroline Steel and presented by Marnie Chesterton for the BBC World Service.

Contributors:
Espen Fadnes – Freefall professional
Tali Sharot – Professor of neuroscience, UCL
Julie Norem - Professor of psychology, Wellesley College
Jeanne Tsai - Professor of psychology, Stanford

[Image credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjww464pv1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5gfkfmp4n)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjww464tl5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx022qk444)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172y0ss4c5p5rs)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsv5vk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycr941zbmzg)
Markets on edge about new Covid variant

Stock markets around the world have declined as news of a new Covid-19 variant emerged. With the UK and others banning flights from the affected southern African countries, travel and tourism shares have fallen most sharply, and we assess the potential impact on the sector with Helen Tustin, founder of Wellbeing Travel. Also in the programme, on the shopping festival Black Friday, we get a sense of how toymakers are affected by global supply chain problems from Steve Finch, founding owner of toy company Bopster. And we get wider context from Andy Mulcahy, head of strategy at the UK e-commerce association IMRG. As the World Chess Championship gets under way in Dubai, we hear about the financial side of the game from Ilya Merenzon, chief executive of World Chess. Plus, amid concern that the conflict in Ethiopia could be about to escalate, we examine how the country's economy has been affected by the ongoing dispute between Tigray state in the north and the national government. Samuel Getachew is a business journalist in Addis Ababa, and tells us how before the fighting began, Ethiopia had become something of an economic miracle. The US is threatening to kick the country out of the AGOA preferential trade programme, and Rohit Nair, vice-president of garment maker Epic Apparel explains such a step could mean the closure of his business. And we also get the perspective of Zemedeneh Negatu, global chairman of the Fairfax Africa Fund, which invests in and owns companies across Africa.

Today's edition is presented by Fergus Nicoll, and produced by Joshua Thorpe and Faarea Masud.

(Picture: A covid vaccine worker in South Africa. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjww464yb9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkq9vsv9lp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3ct1v00)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 12:32 SUN (w3ct1gy8)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gy9)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gy9)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gy9)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SAT (w172xzkpylh2dh3)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkpylh2j77)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkpylh2wgm)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkpylh37q0)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkpylh3cg4)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkpylh3lyd)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkpylh4g59)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172xzkpylh4y4t)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172xzkpylh55n2)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkpylh5f4b)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzkpylh5nml)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkpylh5scq)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkpylh64m3)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzkpylh68c7)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172xzkpylh6d3c)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzkpylh6hvh)

BBC News Summary 12:30 SUN (w172xzkpylh6mlm)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkpylh7gtj)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzkpylh7v1x)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkpylh7yt1)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172xzkq9vscxtb)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzkq9vsd1kg)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172xzkq9vsd59l)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172xzkq9vsd91q)

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BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172xzkq9vsdwsc)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172xzkq9vsf0jh)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172xzkq9vsf80r)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzkq9vsfhj0)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172xzkq9vsg6zs)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzkq9vsgbqx)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172xzkq9vsgl75)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkq9vsgpz9)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkq9vsh26p)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzkq9vsh9py)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172xzkq9vshspg)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172xzkq9vshxfl)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzkq9vsj4xv)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzkq9vsjdf3)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172xzkq9vsjmxc)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzkq9vsk3ww)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172xzkq9vsk7n0)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172xzkq9vskh48)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzkq9vsklwd)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkq9vskz3s)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzkq9vsl6m1)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172xzkq9vslplk)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172xzkq9vsltbp)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzkq9vsm1ty)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172xzkq9vsm9b6)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172xzkq9vsmjtg)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172xzkq9vsn0sz)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172xzkq9vsn4k3)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzkq9vsnd1c)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzkq9vsnhsh)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkq9vsnw0w)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzkq9vsp3j4)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzkq9vsplhn)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172xzkq9vspq7s)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzkq9vspyr1)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172xzkq9vsq679)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172xzkq9vsqfqk)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzkq9vsqxq2)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172xzkq9vsr1g6)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172xzkq9vsr8yg)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzkq9vsrdpl)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkq9vsrrxz)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172xzkq9vss0f7)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172xzkq9vsshdr)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172xzkq9vssm4w)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkq9vssvn4)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172xzkq9vst34d)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172xzkq9vstbmn)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172xzkq9vsttm5)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzkq9vsv9lp)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172xzjwhvwcxgl)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjwhvwd16q)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172xzjwhvwd4yv)

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BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172xzjwhvwf7p0)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172xzjwhvwfcf4)

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BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172xzjwhvwg6n1)

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BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172xzjwhvwgpmk)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172xzjwhvwgtcp)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172xzjwhvwgy3t)

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BBC News 00:00 MON (w172xzjww45pkjy)

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BBC News 00:00 WED (w172xzjww45wcc4)

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BBC News 00:00 THU (w172xzjww45z887)

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BBC News 06:00 THU (w172xzjww45zzr0)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172xzjww4603h4)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d6n)

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BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxvyg96hfg)

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BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172xxxvyg99dbk)

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BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172xxxvyg9ddzs)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172xxxvyg9h64r)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j5p)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jgq)

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Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1jb6)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3ct1j15)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqpqw2pyhw)

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Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dhp)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1prc)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1prc)

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Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct051h)

Deeply Human 23:06 SUN (w3ct051h)

Deeply Human 03:06 MON (w3ct051h)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lt0)

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Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lt0)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct1m8p)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2zqd)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct2zqd)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct2zqd)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mvs)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mvs)

From Our Own Correspondent 00:06 MON (w3ct1mvs)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n6p)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n6p)

HARDtalk 23:06 MON (w3ct1n6p)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3ct1nc6)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3ct1nc6)

HARDtalk 23:06 WED (w3ct1nc6)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3ct1n25)

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Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nw6)

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Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2z3c)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2z3c)

Heart and Soul 00:32 MON (w3ct2z3c)

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In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tdy)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tdy)

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More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dky)

More or Less 23:50 SUN (w3ct2dky)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dky)

Music Life 23:06 SAT (w3ct1hct)

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Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv303cm479b)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172xv303cm4c1g)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172xv303cm4gsl)

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Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172xv5g2940ccz)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172xv5g2941bc0)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172xv5gfkf779c)

Newshour 21:06 MON (w172xv5gfkf82j8)

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Newshour 21:06 TUE (w172xv5gfkfbzfc)

Newshour 14:06 WED (w172xv5gfkff13k)

Newshour 21:06 WED (w172xv5gfkffwbg)

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Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172xv5gfkfmp4n)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kxv)

Outlook 22:32 SUN (w3ct1kxv)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3ct1jv0)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3ct1jv0)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3ct1jv0)

Outlook 12:06 TUE (w3ct1jx8)

Outlook 18:06 TUE (w3ct1jx8)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct1k41)

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Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3ct1k41)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l2c)

Over to You 00:50 SUN (w3ct1l2c)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l2c)

People Fixing The World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1plt)

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Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l4n)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0nnxq4vqjr)

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Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172y0nnxq54f81)

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Sporting Witness 18:50 SAT (w3ct1l94)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3ct1l95)

Sporting Witness 00:50 FRI (w3ct1l95)

Sports News 22:20 SAT (w172y0srs2vzy21)

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Sports News 22:20 MON (w172y0ss4c59l4d)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172y0q9fx1wjyj)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tl6tgn7n6)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172y0tl6tgrd1k)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lcd)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3ct1nhx)

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The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rtw)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3ct1rtw)

The Arts Hour 00:06 WED (w3ct1rtw)

The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2drg)

The Climate Question 09:06 MON (w3ct2drg)

The Climate Question 20:06 MON (w3ct2drg)

The Comb 04:32 WED (w3ct2z2d)

The Comb 11:32 WED (w3ct2z2d)

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The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct2z3f)

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The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct2z3g)

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The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p9f)

The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct1p9g)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p9g)

The Conversation 23:32 MON (w3ct1p9g)

The Cultural Frontline 22:32 SAT (w3ct1ptk)

The Cultural Frontline 04:32 SUN (w3ct1ptk)

The Cultural Frontline 10:06 MON (w3ct1ptk)

The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct2z33)

The Documentary 03:06 SUN (w3ct2z33)

The Documentary 05:32 SUN (w3ct2z31)

The Documentary 02:32 TUE (w3ct2zqv)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct2zqv)

The Documentary 20:06 TUE (w3ct2zqv)

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The Documentary 00:06 THU (w3ct2z33)

The Explanation 09:32 SAT (w3ct2z3h)

The Explanation 23:32 SUN (w3ct2z3h)

The Explanation 03:32 MON (w3ct2z3h)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct20fw)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct1rgl)

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The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3ct1rgm)

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The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rm3)

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The History Hour 19:06 SAT (w3ct1z7v)

The History Hour 00:06 TUE (w3ct1z7v)

The Inquiry 12:06 SUN (w3ct1z2x)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3ct1z2y)

The Inquiry 15:06 THU (w3ct1z2y)

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The Newsroom 02:06 SAT (w172xyxt4k0gry3)

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The Real Story 00:06 SAT (w3ct1htc)

The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1htc)

The Real Story 10:06 FRI (w3ct1htd)

The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3ct1yw4)

Trending 05:32 SAT (w3ct2yqn)

Trending 18:32 SAT (w3ct2yqn)

Trending 00:32 SUN (w3ct2yqn)

Trending 10:32 MON (w3ct2yqn)

Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172xytjcmlr16g)

Weekend 07:06 SAT (w172xytjcmlr4yl)

Weekend 08:06 SAT (w172xytjcmlr8pq)

Weekend 06:06 SUN (w172xytjcmlty3k)

Weekend 07:06 SUN (w172xytjcmlv1vp)

Weekend 08:06 SUN (w172xytjcmlv5lt)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wzh)

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Witness History 12:50 MON (w3ct1x1s)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3ct1x1s)

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Witness History 08:50 TUE (w3ct1x69)

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Witness History 12:50 WED (w3ct1x8k)

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Witness History 03:50 THU (w3ct1x8k)

Witness History 08:50 THU (w3ct1x41)

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WorklifeIndia 01:32 SAT (w3ct2f43)

WorklifeIndia 11:32 SAT (w3ct2f43)

World Business Report 01:06 SAT (w172xzljdb2rncz)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzljrld29gb)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y4894w49lvq)

World Business Report 22:32 MON (w172ycrpvf89pkq)

World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172y4brh1ygf1p)

World Business Report 22:32 TUE (w172ycsj94w2wx3)

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World Business Report 22:32 WED (w172ycsy0j5jg0v)

World Business Report 15:32 THU (w172y49j9z1m86y)

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World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172y471zs7n7v5)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct1v00)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3ct1v00)

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