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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 11 SEPTEMBER 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k31bk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqj8vg0dn8)
Twenty years since 9/11

It's been twenty years since the terror attacks of 9/11. We'll hear from people who were there, and who felt the aftermath. We'll also hear about how 9/11 changed the way we live our lives, and the built environments around us. Also in the programme, we'll hear about how language learning has boomed during lockdown, and how a refugee-led language programme is connecting people all around the world. We'll also hear about how protracted lockdowns are affecting Australians, and how one Aussie staple - Victoria Bitter beer - is encouraging its customers to get vaccinated.

All through the show we'll be joined by Peter Ryan, senior business correspondent at the ABC.

(Image credit: Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k352p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sp5s1y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4sjc2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lby)
The future of Afghanistan cricket, England v India and the Disability Premier League

We discuss the latest on what the future might hold for cricket in Afghanistan after speculation over whether the women's team will be able to play under the new government.

We also find out how some refugees from the country are being made to feel welcome in the UK thanks to a cricket match organised by Newport Pagnell Town Cricket Club.

Plus we reflect on the Test series between England and India, and discuss MS Dhoni's role as a mentor for the India T20 World Cup squad.

And we learn more about the Disability Premier League in England, which is currently being trialled and is described as a "world first" with players from three different impairment groups playing together for the first time.

Photo description: Afghan girls play cricket on the school grounds in Kabul on December 28, 2010. (Photo credit: SHAH MARAI/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k38tt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20ff)
Afghanistan: History repeats itself

For many in the BBC Afghan service, recent events have brought back traumatic memories. For Shekiba Habib, the first takeover by the Taliban ended her dream of becoming a doctor. 20 years on, she shares similar stories she's hearing of broken dreams and loss of hope.

El Salvador and Bitcoin: the El Zonte mystery
Bitcoin joined the US dollar as legal tender in El Salvador this week. Quite a leap, but it turns out the small tourist surf town of El Zonte had been using the cryptocurrency for a couple of years already. BBC Mundo’s Marcos Gonzalez set out to find out why.

My Hometown: Weifang
Fan Wang of BBC Chinese takes us to her hometown of Weifang in China to fly kites and play with friends.

Algeria cuts ties with Morocco
Algeria’s relationship with Morocco was caught in the fallout from this year's devastating wildfires. It blamed the fires on criminal acts by a separatist group, which it accuses Morocco of backing. Fethi Benaissa has been reporting on the break in diplomatic ties for BBC Arabic.

How Arab tourists fell in love with Ukraine
The number of tourist flights from Saudi Arabia to Ukraine has more than doubled since 2019, so what explains this new found popularity? Diana Kuryshko of BBC Ukrainian visited a tourist village in the Carpathians to speak to both holidaymakers and local businesses to find out more.

Image: Women protest in Kabul, Afghanistan on 8th September 2021
Credit: Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz1)
9/11: The backlash against American Muslims

In the Aftermath of the Al Qaeda attacks against America on September 11th 2001, many Muslims living in the US had their allegiance to America questioned. In the days after 9/11 all over America hate crimes against Muslims and anyone perceived to be Muslims soared. In 2001, according to crime statistics by the FBI, hate crimes against Muslims and Arabs in the US increased by 1,700 percent. Stories about Muslim women in hijabs and Muslim men with beards being attacked became commonplace. Farhana Haider has been speaking to Kevin James, a Muslim first responder who was at Ground Zero in New York immediately after the attacks.

Photo: Nadia Nawaz holds a sign remembering the victims of the attack. Credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k3dky)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsx)
What's ailing Japan?

Japan has received much praise internationally for successfully holding both the Olympic and the Paralympic Games in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic. At home, however, events have failed to generate much enthusiasm for the government. Analysts say a public backlash over the Olympics is one of the reasons prime minister Yoshihide Suga is not going to contest the coming elections. But it is not just the Olympics. The LDP government is also in trouble over its response to Covid vaccines, and its failure to modernise the economy, which remains sluggish. It is accused of having done little to expand employment opportunities for young people and to give greater rights to working women. So why does Japan find it so hard to bring about the changes necessary to end years of economic stagnation? How is its ageing population and its unwillingness to open up to greater immigration affecting its ability to increase growth? Plus, what does all this say about the cultural shifts taking place in the country?

Celia Hatton is joined by a panel of experts. Producers Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k3jb2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sp649b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4swlg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct1xzy)
Beirut blast: Looking for Eleni

When an Ethiopian woman called Eleni disappeared amid the chaos of the Beirut blast there seemed little hope of discovering what had happened to her.

In the wake of the explosion that devastated the Lebanese capital, rescuers searched through the rubble to try to locate hundreds of dead and missing people.

As the death toll mounted, the only clue to Eleni’s fate was a pool of blood on her employer’s kitchen floor.

It fell to two complete strangers - who had never met Eleni or each other - to try to solve the mystery using social media.

Presenter: Reha Kansara

Producers: Najib Deeb, Abiy Getahun & Yadeta Berhanu

Editor: Ed Main
Photo: Graphic showing a highlighted profile picture of a woman among lots of other social media profile pictures.

Photo credit: BBC


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkh)
Is immunity from vaccines waning?

Should we be worried that the protection against Covid-19 provided by the vaccines is going down? This worrying idea has been in the news recently, partly because of reports out of Israel. Last winter, Israel was one of the first to embark on a large scale vaccination programme of its citizens. But several months on, it’s now seen a sharp rise in the numbers of cases and hospitalisations.

Which does raise a worrying thought: is the vaccine’s effect fading?

(Israeli paramedics give a third shot of the Pfizer vaccine to ages 30 and above to battle surging infections. August 24 2021 Credit Ahmad Gharabli/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k3n26)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytc8w8g1b9)
9/11: Twenty years on

A series of events are planned in New York, Pennsylvania, and Washington DC to mark the anniversary.

Also, we hear from Afghanistan, perhaps the one country most affected in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks.

Plus, Mexico's Supreme Court has issued a landmark ruling, saying that penalising abortion is unconstitutional. We have analysis.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Bahar Dutt, an Indian conservation biologist, author and environmental journalist based in Delhi, and Mark Landler, an American journalist and London bureau chief for the New York Times newspaper.

(Image: A bronze parapet bearing the names of victims in the 9/11 attacks adorned with flowers at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York, the United States. Credit: Xinhua/REX/Shutterstock)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k3rtb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytc8w8g52f)
America remembers

Twenty years on from the September 11th attacks, a series of events will be held in New York, Pennsylvania, and Washington DC to commemorate the event.

Also, the Indian government has rolled out tools for online education to help students cope with the COVID-19 pandemic, but with mixed results.

Plus, we discuss a new way to save energy and help the planet's environment, and it involves music.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Bahar Dutt, an Indian conservation biologist, author and environmental journalist based in Delhi, and Mark Landler, an American journalist and London bureau chief for the New York Times newspaper.

(Image: The Tribute in Lights downtown Manhattan, a memorial to the victims of 9/11 terrorist attacks, is seen on the eve of the 20th anniversary of the attacks. Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k3wkg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytc8w8g8tk)
9/11 attacks commemorated

Events are planned to remember the events of 20 years ago, when al Qaeda launched attacks on the United States.

Also, a new government announced in Lebanon, more than a year after the previous administration quit.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Bahar Dutt, an Indian conservation biologist, author and environmental journalist based in Delhi, and Mark Landler, an American journalist and London bureau chief for the New York Times newspaper.

(Image: A volunteer bows during the National Anthem in St. Louis before the reading of names of those killed at the World Trade Center, and the servicemen and women who have been killed in war since the 9/11 attacks. Credit: Bill Greenblatt/UPI/REX/Shutterstock)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4t7tv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8z)
Drag kings: The women performing as men

While drag queens sit brightly under the pop culture spotlight, fewer people know about drag kings, the mostly female or non-binary performers who create male characters on stage and poke fun at the patriarchy. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two drag kings who have found a community through performance and are using their characters to explore their own masculinity and femininity.

Mētra Saberova is an artist and drag king from Latvia, who performs as Timmy, and also manages the Latvian Drag King Collective – hosting and performing at live and online drag shows. She wants to create queer-friendly spaces in a country with limited rights and protections for LGBTQ+ people.

Giovana Lago is a drag king who performs as Don Giovanni in Brazil, as part of the Kings of the Night collective. She has a real interest in the history of drag kinging, and is also a burlesque performer, something she would never have tried if she hadn’t discovered drag first.

Produced by Caitlin Sneddon


IMAGE DETAILS
L: Giovana Lago as Don Giovanni (credit André Cardoso)
R: Mētra Saberova as Timmy (credit Mētra Saberova)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k409l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d66)
Afghanistan protests

The Taliban is stamping its authority on Afghanistan, and dealing forcefully with those demonstrating against the new regime. In recent days, the details of the new government's all-male cabinet have provoked some to take to the streets in protest. Host Karnie Sharp hears from people who have been caught up in the demonstrations.

Two female medical professionals, a dentist and a doctor, describe how their working lives have changed, having been told they can no longer treat male patients - or even drive to their jobs. Another Afghan woman, a flight attendant, describes her late-night escape from the country.

(Photo: A woman chants from inside of a car during the anti-Pakistan protest in Kabul on 7 September. Credit: West Asia News Agency/Reuters)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4tckz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hdm)
Jealousy

Jealousy, rudeness, lack of respect - it can be hard not to be troubled by the way people treat us. Sometimes we may feel that people that we know are jealous and are trying to hold us back. After a personal question from Sneha in India, author of 'Universal Human' Gary Zukav joins the BBC's Sana Safi to explore how to reduce the hurt and distress caused by what others may think.

Produced by Charlie Taylor and Ruth Edwards.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1x)
Exposing fake athletes and their medals deception

As the Paralympics close in Tokyo, listeners share their thoughts on the BBC World Service’s coverage. Plus, The Fake Paralympians and its investigation into “so-called” athletes who turned out not to be what they claimed - as the able bodied took medals away from those with disabilities. We speak to the series’ editor and presenter about the trail of deception.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k441q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q4c4qlk2c)
How Sport helped America to heal: 9/11 20 years on

On the 20th anniversary of the 11 September attacks on the United States, we reflect on the role that Sport played, and continues to play, in helping to rebuild the lives of those affected and in remembering those who died.

Mary Wittenberg was assistant race director for the New York Marathon in 2001. Going ahead just a few weeks after the attacks, it was the city’s biggest mass gathering since the losses suffered on September 11. US Sport’s big team franchises had already resumed playing but, says Mary, this was the first chance for ordinary New Yorkers to do something for their family and friends; either in remembrance or in solidarity.

We also look at the lasting legacy of Mark Bingham, who died over-powering those who had hijacked United Airlines Flight 93.
The Bingham Cup, set up in his honour, is one of the premier International Gay Rugby competitions. Karl Ainscough-Gates, the chair of International Gay Rugby, joins us to remember Mark’s sacrifice and celebrate how he continues to change lives to this day.

Plus, The Washington Post’s Jerry Brewer weighs the question of whether the relationship between sport and patriotism in the United States, which grew as a result of 9/11 and the subsequent ‘War on Terror’, has become – in the 20 years since – something toxic.

We are also joined by …

Endurance Swimmer, Lewis Pugh, who has just completed a 7.8km swim in Greenland's Ilulissat Icefjord. The distance was covered in 14 sessions over 12 days. He did it to highlight the rapid melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet as a result of climate change. The mouth of the Ilulissat Icefjord measures 7.8 km, and is fed by the world’s fastest-moving glacier.

Tokyo Paralympics Wheelchair Basketball gold-medallist, Mariska Beijer, discusses how victory for the Dutch team in her event can help to grow Para Sport in the Netherlands… and tells us about having afternoon tea with the country’s King and Princess!

Piers Edwards, from BBC Africa Sport, tells us about footballer Jean-Pierre Adams, who died this week, having slipped into a coma in 1982 when he went into hospital for a routine operation. Piers, as a younger reporter, spent time with Adams’ family and learned about how they managed every day, knowing that Jean-Pierre would never wake up.

We hear what the now double Olympic marathon champion, Eliud Kipchoge, wants to achieve with his new foundation. Kenya’s world record holder has been speaking to Ed Harry about building libraries and planting forests.

(Photo: New York City night. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k47sv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sp6vs3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4tm27)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3n)
How to prevent gaming addiction in children

China’s recent move to limit the time children spend on online gaming has put the spotlight back on the long-running concern about how excessive gaming can impact the young.

India has a booming online gaming market with around 350 million gamers, 60% of whom are under 25 years, and the pandemic has led to a massive growth of the gaming industry.

Experts say addictive behaviour in gaming comes from other underlying concerns, such as loneliness, fear of rejection, or coping with social phobia. Should gaming companies take more ownership to improve awareness and restrict gaming hours for minors? Or should the onus be more on parents to impose gaming curfews? And what are the early signs to detect addictive behaviour?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how to prevent gaming addiction in children.

Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Zerah Gonsalves, gamer, esports consultant; Dr Manoj Sharma, professor - clinical psychology, Nimhans; Rajan Navani, vice chairman and managing director, JetSynthesys


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k4cjz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2kyk)
9/11: The day that changed our lives forever

Twenty years on from the 9/11 terror attacks which left 3,000 people dead, New Yorkers and those affected by the events recall where they were and how they have managed to process the horror of what happened. Presenter and New Yorker Joan Mastropaolo, now a volunteer at the 9/11 Tribute Museum takes us on a tour of the 9/11 memorial and explains what it means to her.

Former US poet laureate Billy Collins recalls how writing and performing the official memorial poem – Names - helped him and others reflect on the individuals who lost their lives in the immediate aftermath. Annie Thoms, a teacher from one of the schools close to ground zero explains how High School students, forced to evacuate amid the confusion, recorded and eventually performed individual stories of fellow New Yorkers caught up in the attack. Three-hundred firefighters died on 9/11 and journalist Ann Nelson recalls how she turned her own experience of befriending a fire chief struggling to deal with the events into a duologue eventually performed on stage in the shadow of Ground Zero - and in a film starring Sigourney Weaver.

Wajahat Ali, a 20-year-old student at the time recalls how 9/11 changed his and the lives of fellow Muslims overnight. He would create a drama reflecting on how the lives of Muslims in America were affected by the backlash. New Yorkers like Ray Birge, who was under the tower when the first plane hit, talk about how telling their stories in the 9/11 Memorial Tour helps them cope with the trauma that never goes away.

(Photo: Flowers are placed at the 9/11 Memorial and Museum, New York, 11 September 2020. Credit: Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k4h93)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv58zjsmglq)
The 9/11 attacks remembered

Ceremonies are being held to mark 20 years since the attacks on 11th September 2001 on targets in the US. We’ll hear from Ground Zero in New York and from a woman who was in the World Trade Center when it came under attack. And we’ll ask, now that the Taleban is back in power in Afghanistan, could such attacks happen again.

(Photo: The One World Trade Center building on the day marking the 20th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks in New York City Credit: Carlos Barria/Reuters)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k4m17)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tf424c7s1)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld is live from Old Trafford as Cristiano Ronaldo makes his Manchester United return. We’ll have full match commentary as Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s side face Newcastle United and reports from the other five Premier League games kicking off at 14:00 GMT.

Ahead of the match we’ll hear from those that played alongside and coached Ronaldo in his first spell at Old Trafford and Lee James is joined by our Sportsworld team, former Congo and Blackburn defender Chris Samba, former Senegal and Brentford defender Ibrahima Sonko and the Technical Director at Stoke City Women, Chloe Jones.

We’ll be at Old Trafford cricket ground as well for the second day of the fifth and final Test between England and India, and at Flushing Meadows in New York ahead of the Women’s final at the US Open Tennis.

Photo: Cristiano Ronaldo celebrates scoring for Manchester United against Newcastle United during his first spell at Old Trafford. (Credit: Manchester United via Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k530r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sp7q00)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4vg94)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct1xzy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8p)
The struggle for women's football in Afghanistan

In the early 2000s, Afghan women and girls set up the country's first football teams. Now the Taliban has returned and women's sport has been banned. We speak to Shamila Kohestani, former captain of the Afghan women's team, about why she fought to play and why in Afghanistan, football was more than a game.

Photo: Woman's face painted with flag of Afghanistan (Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k56rw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 BBC Proms on the World Service (w3ct2gdj)
Dvorak's Cello Concerto

The BBC Proms are back in the Royal Albert Hall in London with a six-week season of concerts featuring leading British orchestras as well as international soloists and conductors.

Broadcast programme:
Dvořák - Cello Concerto in B minor

Sheku Kanneh-Mason (cello)
Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra
Domingo Hindoyan (conductor)

Even though Dvořák also wrote concertos for the piano and for the violin, it is his Cello Concerto that remains a cornerstone of the Romantic repertoire. Exploring the full range of cello expression from high drama to quiet contemplation, the work was written at a time of emotional distress for the composer: as he was working on it in his New York apartment he received the news that, back in his native Bohemia, his first love - and later sister-in-law - was seriously ill. In response, Dvořák quoted in the second and third movements of the Concerto her favourite among the many songs he had composed.

Since winning the 2016 BBC Young Musician competition, Sheku Kanneh-Mason has released several acclaimed albums, one of which climbed to No. 8 in the overall UK Official Album Chart, making Sheku the first cellist to reach the UK Top 10.

[Photo: Sheku Kanneh-Mason and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic at the 2021 BBC Proms. Credit: Chris Christodoulou/BBC]


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k5bj0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtf)
Director Nia DaCosta

On The Arts Hour this week, Nikki Bedi is joined by musician and composer Nitin Sawhney and cineaste Anna Bogutskaya to discuss cultural highlights of the week.

Candyman director Nia DaCosta on using race in the horror genre.

The two Danish directors behind the movie Shorta, Frederik Louis Hviid and Anders Olholm explain why their film is not typically Danish
Scottish actor Alan Cumming muses on today’s obsession for trying to stay young.

Steve Martin, Martin Short and Selena Gomez discuss their new comedy murder mystery series Only Murders in the Building.

Musician and composer Nitin Sawhney talks about his latest album Immigrants and also about Journeys, a festival celebrating migration, that he is curating for the Royal Albert Hall’s 150th anniversary.

Writer and musician Edward George shares his thoughts on the connection between German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen and Jamaican dub pioneer King Tubby.

(Photo: Nia DaCosta. Credit: Rodin Eckenroth/Getty)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k5g84)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58zjsnfkr)
Twenty years since 9/11

Ceremonies have been taking place to mark 20 years since the attacks on 11th September 2001 on the US. We’ll hear from Ground Zero in New York and from a woman who was in the World Trade Center when it came under attack. And we’ll ask, now that the Taliban is back in power in Afghanistan, could such attacks happen again.


PHOTO: A family member at the reflecting pool places a flag during a ceremony at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum commemorating the 20th anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2021 in New York City. CREDIT: Getty Images


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k5l08)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcc)
Limitless technology with Tom Furse, Caroline Shaw, Holly Herndon, Arushi Jain and Mat Dryhurst

Tom Furse, Caroline Shaw, Holly Herndon, Arushi Jain and Mat Dryhurst discuss why using computers makes their music feel more human, using the sound of plant pots, and how new technology will be viewed as old fashioned and retro in a few years.

Tom Furse is the keyboard player with British rock band the Horrors, and is also a producer, remix artist, and “maker of music”. He’s talking to Arushi Jain, a composer, pianist, synthesist, and singer from New York who grew up in Delhi. She blends her computer science and engineering studies with her musician influences, including Indian classical. Holly Herndon is an American experimental composer based in Berlin, and her husband, Mat Dryhurst, is a philosopher and digital artist. And Caroline Shaw is a Grammy and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer and violinist based in New York. She’s written film scores and worked with rappers Kanye West and Nas, and her latest album brings together influences as wide ranging as Abba and author James Joyce.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k5prd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywtm22l09c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0slpbjq1y0)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4w20s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt3)
Fashion: King of glamour Ali Mahdavi

As Fashion weeks launch around the world, The Cultural Frontline is looking at the glamour and spectacle of the world of fashion.

Photographer and artist Ali Mahdavi has photographed countless celebrities, capturing some of the world’s best known faces. He explains why he’s obsessed with unconventional beauty and old fashioned Hollywood glamour.

The Fashion industry has a huge environmental impact but high-end designers are starting to address the glaring issues of overproduction and waste. Australian designer Kym Ellery explains why she teamed up with upcycling expert Duran Lantink to dig out and recirculate the growing pile of unsold stock in her warehouse and turn it into a whole new collection.

Designer Abi Sheng sees the future of fashion as being less about traditional garments and more about designing alternative bodies. Her latest work, a gender transformative suit, aims to change the appearance of the person wearing it, creating a fluid gender identity. Abi Sheng discusses how she designed and printed the suit and her vision for the future of what we wear.

Writer and campaigner Sinéad Burke made fashion industry insiders sit up and take notice with her fashion blog about the lack of inclusivity in fashion and design. She explains why she decided to take on the industry and how fashion can put people with disabilities at the heart of the design process.



SUNDAY 12 SEPTEMBER 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k5y7n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yvp)
Keep most fossil fuel in ground to meet 1.5 degree goal

For the world to have a decent chance of limiting global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees, 90 per cent of remaining coal reserves and 60% of unexploited oil and gas have to stay in the ground. These are the stark findings of carbon budget research by scientists at University College London. Dan Welsby spells out the details to Roland Pease.

Virologist Ravi Gupta of the University of Cambridge describes his latest research that explains why the Delta variant of SARS-CoV-2 is much more infectious and more able to evade our immune systems and covid vaccines than other variants.

When dense fog rises from the Pacific ocean into the foothills of the Andes, oases of floral colour bloom for a few weeks or months. When the fog goes, the plants die and disappear for another year or maybe another decade. The true extent of these unique ecosystems (known as fog oases or Lomas) has now been revealed by researchers at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew in the UK, working with colleagues in Peru and Chile. They’ve discovered that the Lomas are much more extensive than suspected. Ecologist Carolina Tovar tells Roland why the fog oases are threatened and need to be protected.

A species of duck can now be added to the list of birds such as parrots and starlings that mimic human speech and other sounds in their environment. Listen to Ripper, the Australian musk duck who was hand-reared on a nature reserve where he learnt to imitate his keeper say ‘You bloody fool’ and imitate the sound of an aviary door closing. Animal behaviour researcher Carel ten Cate of Leiden University says that Ripper is not the only mimicking musk duck mimic but why this duck species has evolved this trick remains a mystery.

Pioneering physicist Nikolas Tesla had a dream of connecting the world up through wireless communication and power. And whilst at the start of the 20th Century Tesla demonstrated that electricity could be transmitted wirelessly very short distances, the amount of power that was needed to do this made it an unfeasible venture and the idea has since lain mostly forgotten.

CrowdScience listener, George from Ghana, has asked the team whether it is once again time to reconsider this means of power generation. In countries where rugged landscapes make laying traditional power lines difficult, could wireless electricity help connect those currently reliant on costly and polluting generators?

CrowdScience gets talking to various scientists who are now using state of the art technology to reimagine Tesla’s dream. We speak to a team in New Zealand developing ‘beamable’ electricity and hear how they are using lasers to make sure they don’t harm any wildlife that might wander into the beam.

We then hear how wireless electricity could help fulfil the power demands of a growing electric vehicle market. We learn how a town in the USA is turning its bus fleet electric and putting wireless chargers into the tarmac at bus stops so that the busses can trickle charge as passengers get on and off.

Finally, we ask whether one day, the tangled knot of wires spilling out of our electronic devices will be but a thing of the past.

(Image credit: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k61zs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sp8nz1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4wf85)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvr)
Art, gardening and wellbeing during Covid

How art and gardening has saved some people’s mental health during the pandemic. Claudia visits the most wonderful allotment to find out how one community in the UK has benefited.

Nightmares and how people with psychosis can be plagued and even traumatised by bad dreams, but that there is a way of dealing with them.

Plus, can kindness help you live a long life and evidence on whether dogs feel jealous!

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Close up of women planting salad seedlings. Photo credit: Betsie Van der Meer/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k65qx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2kyk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k69h1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvb)
Farewell to Germany’s ‘Mutti’

Pascale Harter introduces analysis, reportage and personal reflections from correspondents around the world.

This week Germany’s Chancellor, Angela Merkel, delivered her final speech in parliament, before elections in two weeks’ time. After 16 years in office, ‘Mutti’ or ‘Mother’ as Mrs Merkel is sometimes called, is standing down and says she will not run again. But as Damien McGuinness hears, this label is not quite as straight forward as it seems.

In Brazil, Independence Day was less of a celebration and more of a rally this year – with President Jair Bolsonaro using it to announce that: “Only God will remove me from power”. The president is under mounting pressure as he is under investigation by the Supreme Court for posting documents on social media from a sealed police investigation and for the dissemination of fake news. He also narrowly avoided being impeached by congress for his handling of the Covid crisis. In São Paulo Andrew Downie looked on as Brazilians were divided by their president once more.

Twenty years on from the 9/11 attacks in the United States, Catherine Byaruhanga takes stock of the war on terror in Africa. As she reports there are still many jihadist groups operating across the continent. And frequently it’s civilians who bear the brunt of the conflict.

With the US gone from Afghanistan the world is watching to see how the Taliban may have changed since the last time it was in power 20 years ago. Has there been a shift in its views when it comes to music, art and the media? For a possible insight into what they’ll do, we hear from the BBC’s Sahar Zand. In 2019 she met the Taliban’s Deputy Director of the Department for the Promotion of Virtue and Elimination of Vice.

Presenter: Pascale Harter
Producer: Bethan Head

(Image: German Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks in Parliament. Credit: Reuters/Michele Tantussi)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4wnrf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k6f75)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sp916f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4wshk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz2)
4. Probe

There are allegations the cheating went wider within intellectual disability sport, and that it wasn’t just the gold-winning Spanish basketball team. An investigator for the International Paralympic Committee reveals what he found, and discusses specific accusations he heard about another of the basketball teams.

The probe has shocking consequences for intellectual disability sport: a total ban from the Paralympic Games. Dan has a heart-to-heart with his mum and dad about the impact on his budding swimming career.

And Dan speaks to the man who was in charge of the International Paralympic Committee when it took the decision that has overshadowed Dan’s life ever since.

Presenter: Dan Pepper
Series Producer: Simon Maybin

(Photo credit: EPA)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k6jz9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytc8w8jy7d)
9/11 anniversary: Emotional tributes paid to lives lost

US marks 20 years since the deadliest terror attacks on its soil.

Also, the Muslim world after 9/11.

Plus, after world’s first climate change induced famine in Madagascar, scientists warn that climate change will disrupt further food security in Eastern and Southern Africa.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Myriam Francois, Franco-British journalist and film maker; and Ian Black, Visiting Senior Fellow, Middle East Centre at the London School of Economics.

(Image: Flowers on a 9/11 memorial while it reflects the Tribute in Light art installation on the 20th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks in New York City. Credit: REUTERS)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k6nqf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytc8w8k1zj)
UN hopes to raise humanitarian funds for the Afghan people

Ahead of a UN donor's conference on Afghanistan on Monday, a former finance minister tells us what are the country’s most pressing needs and how can the world help.

Also, a historian’s take on the Taleban running Afghanistan.

And the curator of a new Vermeer exhibition in Germany will tell us all about the mystery of a restored painting of the Dutch master which already has stolen the show.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Myriam Francois, Franco-British journalist and film maker; and Ian Black, Visiting Senior Fellow, Middle East Centre at the London School of Economics.

(Image: United Nations briefing on Afghanistan. Credit: Mandatory Credit: CHINE NOUVELLE/SIPA/REX/Shutterstock)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k6sgk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytc8w8k5qn)
Candidates gear up for TV debate in Germany

The candidates to be Germany's next Chancellor are getting ready for a televised debate ahead of the election on September 26th.

Also, the story of an Afghan journalist beaten up by the Taliban for covering a protest and the story of a woman protester.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Myriam Francois, Franco-British journalist and film maker; and Ian Black, Visiting Senior Fellow, Middle East Centre at the London School of Economics.

(Image: German Christian Democratic Union (CDU) leader, Prime Minister of North Rhine-Westphalia and candidate for Chancellor Armin Laschet and TV journalist Tina Hassel arrive for the ARD Sommerinterview in Berlin. Credit: REUTERS/Christian Mang)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4x4qy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg4)
The power of a photograph

Food photography is about much more than beautifully presented dishes in cookbooks - it’s also being used to change the way we think about what we eat.

Emily Thomas meets three photographers to discuss some of their most powerful images - from a bloody scene in a Thai slaughterhouse to a display of human resilience in a refugee camp.

They explore why still images of food and food production can be a compelling way to communicate about politics, society, and economics. We also hear about the impact such hard-hitting photography can have on the people behind the lens.

To see the images described on the show, plus a few more, visit our homepage www.bbc.com/foodchain

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Simon Tulett.

Contributors:

Jo-Anne McArthur;
Dorte Verner;
Li Huaifeng.

(Picture: A Moken spear fisherman diving for his catch. Credit: Dorte Verner)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k6x6p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4x8h2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxd)
The secretaries who inspired the hit movie 9 to 5

Dolly Parton's 9 to 5 has long been an anthem for working women around the world. She wrote it on the set of a movie - the hit 80s comedy 9 to 5 starring Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin and of course Dolly Parton. It's a film about three secretaries who decide to take revenge on their misogynist boss. The film was inspired by the stories of real secretaries who became so exasperated by how they were being treated by their managers they decided to fight back. They formed an organisation called 9to5 and Karen Nussbaum was one of its founders. This programme was originally broadcast on the 9th of December 2020.

Any comments please email us on outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Saskia Edwards
Producer: Fiona Woods

Picture: 9 to 5 film
Credit: Shutterstock

Clips used:
9 to 5 [Dolly Parton, RCA Nashville]
9 to 5 [IPC Films, Colin Higgins]
Barbarella [Dino de Laurentiis Cinematografica, Roger Vadim]
Private Secretary [Jack Chertok Television Productions]
Bad bosses contest [Phil Donahue Show, Multimedia Entertainment]
Coffee protest news clip [CBS]


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k70yt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2g78)
5. The takedown

Is the FBI's cover about to be blown? Agent Jensen suspects the Task Force is onto her.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4xd76)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2kyh)
Ground Zero for God

Jim Giaccone will never forget the day his brother Joe simply vanished – killed in a blast so forceful that not even a trace of his remains was ever recovered.
Joe was one of the 2,977 victims of the terror attacks of 11 September 2001 when members of al-Qaeda – an Islamist extremist group – flew planes into the World Trade Center in New York. They also crashed into the Pentagon on the outskirts of Washington DC and another plane was downed in a field near the town of Shanksville, Pennsylvania.
Jim not only lost his brother that day, he also lost his faith. With grief came anger and a reckoning with God that continues when he revisits New York’s Ground Zero on the 20th anniversary of 9/11.

Jim tells his story to Jane O’Brien who discovers that he is not alone in re-evaluating his beliefs. She also hears from others who say the terrible events served to strengthen their faith and a Muslim American who say’s they still face hostility because of their religious identity.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k74py)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sp9rp6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4xhzb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2hh0)
Libya's Revolution

The rule of the gun

BBC reporter Tim Whewell, who covered the 2011 uprising, returns to the country to ask why plans to integrate the militias into a unified national army came to nothing. He talks to past and present militiamen - including the young man Wadah al-Keesh, who later left his group in disgust - and Mohammed al-Durat, truck-driver turned police commander, who has reunited with a band of friends to fight in every major battle over the last ten years - and believes he will in future too. Tim talks to revolutionary politician Abdul-Rahman al-Suwayhli and famous brigade commander Salah Badi about the lead-up to civil war - and hears too about its human cost from a young woman, Rasha Akhdar, who lost her father in fighting around Tripoli. Back in Britain, he learns the inside story of the UK's failed attempt to train a new Libyan fighting force from senior military officer Hugh Blackman - and asks former foreign secretary William Hague whether foreign powers could have adopted different policies to help stabilise Libya.


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k78g2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 BBC Proms on the World Service (w3ct2gdj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k7d66)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv58zjsqcht)
The UN's nuclear agency and Iran reach a monitoring deal

Inspectors from the UN's nuclear agency have been given permission to service surveillance equipment at sites in Iran after what have been described as constructive talks in Teheran. But will this save the Iran nuclear deal, the JCPOA?

Also in the programme: Pope Francis on a visit to Hungary where he’s met the anti-immigration prime minister, Viktor Orban; and we hear from a forensics specialist still trying to identify the remains of victims of the 9/11 attacks, 20 years on.

(Photo: Iranian Atomic Organization chief Mohammad Eslami, and Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Rafael Mariano Grossi during a joint press conference in Tehran, Iran, 12 September 2021. Credit: EPA)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k7hyb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rln)
Louder! How the electric guitar conquered popular music

Whether it be a kerrang, a chop, a blistering solo, some finger picking or a subtle flange, the electric guitar is one of the defining sounds of the 20th century. Without it – and its constant companion, the amplifier - popular culture would be unrecognisable today: no big gigs, no stadium concerts. And almost certainly no rock music. But why was it needed and how was it created? Who were the pioneers of the technology and who were the early-adopting exponents?

Rajan Datar and his three guest experts delve into the roots of this iconic instrument.
Monica Smith is Head of Exhibitions and Interpretation for the Smithsonian's Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation. Among the many projects she has curated at the museum is From Frying Pan to Flying V: The Rise of the Electric Guitar.
Paul Atkinson is professor of Design and Design History at Sheffield Hallam university and the author of Amplified: A Design History of the Electric Guitar.
HP Newquist is the founder of the National Guitar Museum in the United States. He has written numerous books on the guitar and its history, and was the editor-in-chief of Guitar Magazine.

[Image: electric guitars. Credit: ilbusca/Getty Images]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k7mpg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k7rfl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tf424gd5d)
Live Sporting Action

We’ll have build-up, full match commentary and post-match analysis on the Premier League game between Leeds United and Liverpool at Elland Road, with Lucy Ward among our guests. Ward was part of Leeds’ academy set-up for many years and worked with current players including Kalvin Philips. She also played for Leeds United’s women’s team.

Elsewhere, we’ll have the latest on day three of the final Test between England and India, reflect on the Italian Grand Prix and we’ll talk American Football on the opening weekend of the new NFL season.

Photo: Liverpool's James Milner is challenged by Kalvin Phillips of Leeds United during a Premier League match between Leeds United and Liverpool at Elland Road. (Credit: Pool/Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k83nz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1spbqn7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4ygyc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2kyh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k87f3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dh7)
Bitcoin becomes legal tender in El Salvador

In this edition of Business Weekly, we look at why one of the poorest countries in Latin America, El Salvador, decided to make Bitcoin legal tender. We also find out what happened when the cryptocurrency crashed on the first day it was rolled out. We hear about the devastating economic effects of covid in Kenya as it rolls out further curfew restrictions. Also as the matriarch of European politics, the German Chancellor Angela Merkel, prepares to leave office, we hear what issues are playing on the minds of German voters as they get ready to head to the polls. And for years Lamu, Kenya’s ancient trading port, has been in decline. But the government hopes the opening of a vast, new facility will make it a commercial superstar once more. Plus the chief executive of Babbel, Arne Schepker tells us why the company is listing on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange and whether lockdowns have impacted on people’s desire to learn languages. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: A man is seen in a store where bitcoins are accepted in La Libertad, El Salvador, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k8c57)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58zjsrbgv)
Iran: Monitoring deal is not a permanent solution says UN nuclear chief

The head of the UN nuclear watchdog, the IAEA, says it's solved its most urgent issue with Iran by striking a deal to continue the surveillance of some of its nuclear facilities. What does this mean for the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA)agreement? Also in the programme: Emma Raducanu makes tennis history and we hear from Lebanon where despite a new government, the country remains in crisis.

( Picture: Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Rafael Mariano Grossi addresses the media after his arrival at the Vienna International Airport. Credit: Alex Halada)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k8gxc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2g78)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4yv5r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hdm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k8lnh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywtm22nx6g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0slpbjsyv3)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4yyxw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 13 SEPTEMBER 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvdpdx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlcnv1s9l5)
Fears one of China's biggest property groups could collapse

Fears are mounting that one of China's biggest property development groups, Evergrande, is close to collapse. Sara Hsu, an economist and visiting scholar at China's Fudan University gives us her analysis of what has gone wrong and why she believes the Chinese government won't let the debt laden company fail. It's London International Shipping week and we talk to Sarah Kenny, the chair of Maritime UK, about the surging costs of transporting freight by sea and making shipping more climate friendly. Also in the programme, the lights are on again on Broadway. Theatre critic Matt Windman with AM New York tells us how the lockdown hit a key part of the entertainment industry while Kate Shindle, the President of the Actors' Equity Association in New York shares with us the excitement of the stars and crews as theatres prepare to open their doors.

(Image:China Evergrande Centre building sign is seen in Hong Kong, Credit: Reuters)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g31p9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct1m87)
Future vaccines

The COVID19 pandemic has revolutionised the way vaccines are made, and underlined the inequalities in access to vaccines. But will it leave a legacy? Roland Pease explores the potential for mRNA and other revolutionary vaccines to make future health protection faster, safer and more flexible, whether 'universal' vaccines will give broader protection, and how access to vaccines can be made more equitable.

Picture: Coronavirus vaccines on the production line, Credit: MikeMareen/Getty Images


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvdt51)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zhf49)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g35ff)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr0)
When will countries stop exploring for oil?

If we are to ensure that there’s no more than a 1.5 degrees centigrade increase in global warming, the International Energy Agency recently stated that oil exploration must stop. A few countries have heeded that warning but the vast majority have not. The Climate Question hears from two nations – one already rich from oil, the other poor and yet to benefit from recent oil finds – about why they are continuing to explore. But, even for those who are following the IEA’s advice, will stopping be straightforward or might hurdles still lie in wait?

Contributors:
Fatih Birol, Executive Director of the International Energy Agency
Bård Lahn, Research Fellow at the Center for International Climate Research, Norway
Catherine Higham, Climate Change Laws of the World Coordinator, London School of Economics

Presenters: Jordan Dunbar & Gaia Vince
Reporter: Kiana Wilburg
Producers: Darin Graham & Soila Apparicio
Series producer: Rosamund Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvdxx5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2g78)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g395k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hdm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvf1n9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zhnmk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g3dxp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p90)
What can we learn from nomadic life?

What's the appeal of a nomadic existence with no settled place to live? The award-winning film, Nomadland shone a light on the sense of community, support and friendship that exists among people in the United States living in their vehicles and moving from place-to-place. How much do these modern-day nomads have in common with traditional communities around the world? Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women from Somalia and US about life on the move.

Shugri Said Salh was sent to live with her grandmother at the age of six and enjoyed an idyllic childhood living as a nomad in Somalia: herding camels, raising goats, and enjoying nightly stories and songs of her ancestors. She fled her country’s brutal civil war living in refugee camps in Kenya before settling in California where she's now a nurse. She's written a book, The Last Nomad, about an almost-forgotten way of life full of beauty, innovation, and tradition as well as danger.

Carol Meeks lives part of the year on the road in a converted van. After seeing the unhealthy food some fellow travellers were eating, she started a YouTube channel posting videos about how to cook tasty meals, cheaply on a small camping stove. She called it Glorious Life on Wheels and now interviews solo women living in their vehicles and travelling the US as they try to get by on meagre incomes.

Produced by Jane Thurlow


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvf5df)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2v0m8v7f5)
North Korea tests new long range missile

Despite food shortages and the pandemic, the country continues to develop weapons.

Iran has agreed to resumed surveillance of their nuclear sites - does this mean a breakthrough in THAT nuclear headache? ....

And big news for Britney Spears fan: the pop singer has announced she's getting married to her long term partner.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvf94k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2v0m8vc59)
North Korea announces test of new type of missile

We hear what distance it travelled, why now, and what the reaction has been from its neighbours and the US.

International donors hold talks today to discuss humanitarian relief for Afghanistan - we'll get a sense of the extent of support required, and how it might reach those in need under Taliban rule.

And we're live in Germany as the country prepares for elections later this month which will finally bring an end to Angela Merkel's time in office. So who could possibly replace her?


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvfdwp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2v0m8vgxf)
Afghanistan: Humanitarian crisis discussed by world leaders

Without the aid the country has relied on for years, 18 million Afghans are now in desperate need. We hear from an humanitarian organisation still working in the country.

North Korea claims to have test launched two cruise missiles over the weekend - a move that comes ahead of talks in Tokyo about the secretive nation's relations with the outside world.

And we hear about a allegations of human rights abuse in the Central African Republic.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvfjmt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (p04xtpwr)
Former interrogator for the CIA, James Mitchell

American psychologist James Mitchell helped devise the CIA’s enhanced interrogation programme after the 9/11 attacks. He personally interrogated some of the top terrorist suspects using the programme’s techniques, including waterboarding. His critics label him a torturer; he says he has nothing to apologise for and what he did was harsh, but legal and necessary.He speaks to Zeinab Badawi.

(Photo: James Mitchell)


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g3wx6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j57)
Does sustainable investing make any difference?

Is corporate social responsibility, so called "greenwashing", really changing carbon emitting businesses or just making it look that way? Canadian businessman Tariq Fancy used to work as Blackrock's Chief Investment Officer for sustainable investing. He tells Ed Butler why he thinks CSR isn't a good enough tool to achieve a net zero economy.

(Picture: Two climate activists from Extinction Rebellion talk to each other outside the Bank of England during a protest. Credit: Getty Images.).


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1b)
The Attica prison rebellion

In September 1971 prisoners in a high security jail in the USA turned on their guards taking 42 people hostage. After 4 days of negotiations, armed police retook the jail. By the time the siege ended 39 people were dead. Rebecca Kesby spoke to Carlos Roache, a former prisoner who took part in the uprising.

PHOTO: Attica prisoners making the black power salute (Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvfncy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g40nb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqx)
Can we transfer electricity wirelessly?

Pioneering physicist and inventor Nikolas Tesla dreamt of connecting the world up through wireless communication and power. Despite demonstrating he could transfer power short distances his longer distance experiments were considerably less successful. But CrowdScience listener, George from Ghana, wants to know if now - more than one hundred years after Tesla’s demonstrations - his dream of wireless power is closer to becoming a reality.

In countries where rugged landscapes make laying traditional power lines difficult and costly, could wireless electricity help connect those communities who are without mains power?


CrowdScience presenter Melanie Brown beams to reporters around the world who visit scientists now using state of the art technology to reimagine Tesla’s dream.

Alex Lathbridge is in Ghana and after meeting listener George he gently doorsteps a local electrical engineering lecturer to find out how electricity can ‘jump’ between two coils.

Reporter Stacy Knott visits start-up company EMROD in New Zealand who are developing ‘beamable’ electricity. She hears an electric guitar being powered from 36 metres away with no wires and finds out how they are using lasers to make sure they don’t harm any wildlife that might wander into the beam.

We then hear how wireless electricity could help fulfil the power demands of a growing electric vehicle market. Reporter John Ryan visits the town of Wenatchee where it has been electrifying its’ bus fleet and putting wireless chargers into the tarmac at bus-stops so that the busses can trickle charge as passengers get on and off.

Finally, we ask whether one day, the tangled knot of wires spilling out of our electronic devices will be but a thing of the past.
Presented and Produced by Melanie Brown with additional reporting from; Alex Lathbridge, John Ryan and Stacey Knott

With contributions from; Prof. Bernard Carlson, Dr Samuel Afoakwa, Ray Simkin, Greg Kushnier, Andy Daga and Richard DeRock


(Photo credit: Getty Images)


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvfs42)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g44dg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct1xzy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvfww6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zjhvg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g484l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p90)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvg0mb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtk)
The murder case that started a cyber sleuth revolution

For decades, no one knew who ‘Tent Girl’ was – a female corpse found in the woods, wrapped in a tent canvas. That was until Todd Matthews, whose father in law discovered the body, became consumed by the mystery. By day he was a factory worker, and by night he became an amateur detective – using the internet to find the unidentified woman’s family. Eventually, Todd would be known as the ‘first cyber sleuth’ and his important research would change how missing persons cases are dealt with around the world.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Sophie Eastaugh

Picture: Composite of the grave of 'Tent Girl' and Todd Matthews
Credit: Ashley Simpson White and Todd Matthews

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvg4cg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zjrbq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g4hmv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvg83l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv59bt2y7f6)
North Korea tests a new long-range cruise missile

North Korea has tested a new long-range cruise missile capable of hitting much of Japan, state media has said. The US military said the latest tests posed threats to the international community, and Japan said it has "significant concerns". We speak to a former South Korean general.

Also today, the UN Secretary General warns of a "looming humanitarian catastrophe" in Afghanistan; and for the second year in a row, a record number of environmental activists are reported to have been murdered around the world. We hear from the Philippines.

(Photo: Detail from undated combination photo released by the official North Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) shows the test firing of a long-range cruise missile, issued 13 September 2021. Credit: KCNA/EPA)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvgcvq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (p04xtpwr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g4r43)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y48423t0lzk)
Alibaba shares slide on Alipay breakup report

It has been reported that Beijing wants to break up Alibaba's payments subsidiary Alipay. Duncan Clark is chairman of consultancy BDA China, and author of Alibaba: The house that Jack Ma built, and explains the background. Also in the programme, we explore whether corporate social responsibility is actually changing carbon emitting businesses, or just making it look that way. Tariq Fancy used to be investment management firm BlackRock's chief investment officer for sustainable investment, and argues that CSR is not a good enough tool to facilitate a net zero economy. Our regular workplace commentator Pilita Clark asks whether companies hiring workers should take into account candidates' star ratings issued by Uber drivers as part of the recruitment process. Plus, following her stunning victory at the tennis US Open over the weekend, we find out how much money the British star Emma Raducanu might expect to make from her burgeoning career.

(Picture: An Alipay logo on a building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvghlv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxpvpyxhk9)
Afghanistan: What is daily life like now?

As the United Nations warns that Afghanistan is facing a major humanitarian crisis, we look at what daily life is now like in the country. The BBC has obtained and verified video footage showing civilians being killed by the Taliban in Afghanistan. We get more details from our colleagues. And we look at the Afghan women's online campaign to protest Taliban dress code. It comes after the Taliban said women will be allowed to continue their studies, but classrooms will be gender-segregated and strict Islamic dress code will be mandatory. We hear from some of the women affected by the new rules.

Also, a new report says a record number of environmental and land rights activists were murdered last year. We speak to activists around the world about the threats they are facing.

And Dr Eleanor Murray - assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health – answers your questions on the latest coronavirus stories.

(Photo: Taliban forces stand guard at a roadside checkpoint in Kabul, Afghanistan, 09 September 2021. Credit: EPA/STRINGER)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvgmbz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxpvpyxm9f)
Record number of environmental activists murdered

A record number of activists working to protect the environment and land rights were murdered last year. According to a new report from Global Witness, 227 people were killed around the world in 2020, the highest number recorded for a second consecutive year. We hear a conversation with environmental activists talking about the work they do, and the dangers they face.

And as the United Nations warns that Afghanistan is facing a major humanitarian crisis, we look at what daily life is now like in the country. The BBC has obtained and verified video footage showing civilians being killed by the Taliban in Afghanistan. We get more details from our colleagues.

Also, Professor Manfred Green, medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel, joins us to discuss the latest news and research about Covid-19, and answer your questions.

(Photo: A woman holds a poster with a photo of slain indigenous environmental activist Berta Caceres during a protest to mark International Women's Day outside the public prosecutor's office in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Credit: Jorge Cabrera/Reuters)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvgr33)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvgvv7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zkgth)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g573m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nhtytkqnl)
2021/09/13 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvgzlc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g5bvr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct1m88)
Covid origins: The science

Presenter: Roland Pease

Picture: Wuhan Residents Told Not To Leave As Coronavirus Pneumonia Spreads, Credit: Stringer/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvh3bh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv59bt2z2n3)
Afghanistan: UN says country facing “most perilous hour”

The UN secretary general, Antonio Guterres, has said the people of Afghanistan face perhaps their most perilous hour. Mr Guterres said one in three Afghans didn't know where their next meal would come from and that the poverty rate was spiralling.

Also on the programme: Reaction from Washington DC as Secretary of State Antony Blinken testifies over America’s withdrawal from Afghanistan; and we reflect on the record number of environmental activists who were murdered last year

(Picture: Aid workers in Afghanistan Credit: Getty Images)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvh72m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (p04xtpwr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g5lc0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p90)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvhbtr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywtzbcwncq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sm1lv0q0c)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g5q34)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48yhvdqwcw)
Alibaba shares slide on Alipay breakup report

It has been reported that Beijing wants to break up Alibaba's payments subsidiary Alipay. Duncan Clark is chairman of consultancy BDA China, and author of Alibaba: The house that Jack Ma built, and explains the background. Also in the programme, we explore whether corporate social responsibility is actually changing carbon emitting businesses, or just making it look that way. Tariq Fancy used to be investment management firm BlackRock's chief investment officer for sustainable investment, and argues that CSR is not a good enough tool to facilitate a net zero economy. Our regular workplace commentator Pilita Clark asks whether companies hiring workers should take into account candidates' star ratings issued by Uber drivers as part of the recruitment process. Plus, following her stunning victory at the tennis US Open over the weekend, we find out how much money the British star Emma Raducanu might expect to make from her burgeoning career.

(Picture: An Alipay logo on a building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 14 SEPTEMBER 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvhlb0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqjn3rdymq)
Democrats unveil plans to raise US taxes

Leading Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives have outlined plans for a substantial roll-back of former President Donald Trump's tax cuts, including raising the top tax rate on corporations to 26.5% from 21%. Democrats on the powerful House Ways and Means Committee will debate legislation this week that would achieve the changes as part of their broader, $3.5 trillion domestic investment plan. James Politi, the Washington bureau chief for the Financial Times Newspaper, explains the political strategy by the Biden administration.

China's clampdown on technology companies is targeting the country's largest digital payment platform Alipay, which serves more than a billion users.

Beijing is also expected to force Alipay's parent, Ant, founded by the billionaire Jack Ma, to hand over the user data on which it relies for making its loans. Isabel Hilton, the founder of China Dialogue and an expert on the country with Lao Institute at Kings College, gives us her analysis.

The retail giant Walmart has been the victim of fake news, after a false story was reported about it doing a deal for customers to use the digital currency Litecoin. We hear how the company's shares were affected and how the fake story was spread.

Throughout the programme we also get the views of Alexis Goldstein, an activist and financial reform advocate in Washington DC and Shuli Ren, an opinion writer with Bloomberg in Hong Kong.

(Picture: US Capitol Building. Getty Images.)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvhq24)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zlb1d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g62bj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz3)
5. Court

A criminal case is brought against the so-called fake Paralympians and the team’s organisers. The prosecutor gives the inside take on the legal process and an outcome that left many frustrated.

And Dan hears about the man accused of being the mastermind behind the scam and his surprising back story. Will he explain himself and apologise to the victims?

Presenter: Dan Pepper
Series Producer: Simon Maybin

(Photo credit: EPA)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvhtt8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvhykd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zlkjn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g69ts)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdh)
Designing the new Aston Martin

The makers of James Bond's car entered new territory. Aston Martin, the British manufacturer usually associated with 007's sports car, launched their first family motor - an SUV.

In the Studio gained exclusive access to the design and manufacturing process. Another chance to hear how we joined head of design, Marek Reichman, in his studio, following the car through rigorous testing, and finally, saw it launched to the public.

(Image: Aston Martin SUV. Credit: Dean Smith)


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvj29j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2v0m8y4b8)
Afghanistan: Secretary of State Blinken faces critical Congress

Anthony Blinken is grilled by US lawmakers as they begin an enquiry into the pull-out from Afghanistan

A BBC climate change investigation has shown that the number of extremely hot days around the globe has doubled in forty years.

And the first mainstream Christian church in America has ordained a transgender bishop. The Rev. Megan Rohrer will lead congregations in Northern California and northern Nevada.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvj61n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2v0m8y82d)
Congress starts enquiry into the pull-out from Afghanistan

Secretary of State Anthony Blinken is questioned about who's to blame for the debacle.

Pope Francis is visiting Slovakia - but people are asking questions about the unusually long duration of his trip.

And Broadway is back: musicals are reopening in New York's theatres after 18 months of closed doors because of the pandemic.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvj9ss)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2v0m8yctj)
Poll highlights climate anxiety amongst young people

Half of those surveyed in a new report said they think humanity is doomed.

Norwegians are also focusing on climate change - they have been voting in a general election that could boost the country's green agenda.

And there has been a pre-trial court hearing in New York - where the UK's Prince Andrew is the subject of a civil suit alleging sexual assault allegations. Prince Andrew denies the allegations, and his lawyer's have challenged the court's jurisdiction in the case.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvjfjx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plc)
The hotel for homeless people

What would happen if the government of a country decided to try to find everyone who was homeless and living on the streets and find a place for them to live?

That is exactly what happened in England as the coronavirus pandemic hit. The government says 90% of rough sleepers were offered rooms in hotels that sat empty because of the lockdown.

Simon Maybin spent the past year and a half following the lives of some of the people who came to live in a Holiday Inn hotel in Manchester.


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g6st9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jg8)
Rethinking tourism in Africa

Tourism in Africa, even before the pandemic, was still not bringing in as many visitor dollars as it might. But, from stargazing trips to plans for a brand-new museum of evolution, we hear from the people changing perceptions around holidays in sub-Saharan Africa. Safari tours aren't going away, but the industry is changing and that's good news for Africa's underperforming tourism sector. Vivienne Nunis hears from Susan Murabana, CEO of The Travelling Telescope under the stars just outside Nairobi, Dr. Muchazondida Mkono, a Zimbabwean academic and lecturer in tourism at the University of Queensland Business School, and from famous Kenyan paleoanthropologist Richard Leakey.

(Image credit: Supoj Buranaprapapong, Getty Images.)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5v)
The lost king of France

King Louis XVI of France and his queen, Marie Antoinette, were killed during the French Revolution. Their son and heir was said to have died in prison in 1795 but did he in fact escape? The 10-year-old spent his last two years of life in solitary confinement with no human contact. During his final few months he neither talked nor walked, rumours spread that this was an imposter and that the real dauphin had been smuggled out in a laundry basket and replaced with another boy. Years later, dozens of men from all over the world were claiming they were Louis-Charles, the rightful heir to the French throne. It could never be proven one way or the other, but in 2000 a team of scientists took DNA samples from the heart of the boy, which had been recovered and kept in a royal crypt. Claire Bowes has been speaking to professor Jean Jacques Cassiman and historian Deborah Cadbury about the mystery.

(Photo: Illustration of Louis XVII - formally Louis-Charles, Dauphin of France in prison.Credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvjk91)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g6xkf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct1m88)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvjp15)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvjss9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zmdrk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g751p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvjxjf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwt)
Why this Covid doctor hid his homeless past

Emmanuel Taban spent his childhood as a witness to the violent civil war in Sudan. He grew up in what is now South Sudan but, by the time he was a teenager, he'd spent time in prison – falsely accused of being a rebel spy – and had then left his home. He ended up travelling across Africa, mainly on foot, sleeping on the streets and relying on the kindness of strangers for food. Eventually he reached South Africa where he finally was able to go to school and get a scholarship to study medicine. He became a well-known lung specialist whose work into Covid treatments would save many lives. All this time, his family had no idea where he was and many years later, when they were finally reunited, they couldn't believe how a boy from Juba had become a well-regarded doctor with his own medical practice. For a long time, Emmanuel hid what he'd endured to fulfill his ambitions - his new life was very different to the one he'd left behind. But now he was proud of all he'd achieved and was ready to reveal the truth about his journey. His book is called The Boy Who Never Gave Up.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Katy Takatsuki

(Photo: Dr Emmanuel Taban. Credit: Darrel Fraser)

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvk18k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zmn7t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g7djy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct1m88)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvk50p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv59bt314b9)
Climate change: World now sees twice as many days over 50C

The number of extremely hot days every year when the temperature reaches 50C has doubled since the 1980s, a global BBC analysis has found. They also now happen in more areas of the world than before, presenting unprecedented challenges to human health and to how we live.

Also in the programme: poll highlights climate anxiety among youngsters, we hear from one; and Guinea’s military junta starts consultation to try to build a consensus after the country’s latest coup d'etat.

(Photo: A man takes a drink close to a street thermometer (reading 49 degrees Celsius, 120.2 Fahrenheit) in southern Spain on the 13th of August. Credit: EPA).


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvk8rt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g7n16)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bld9m5f5j)
US inflation shows signs of cooling

Inflation in the US is running at 5.3%, slightly down on July's year-on-year figure. Andrew Hunter is senior US economist at Capital Economics, and talks us through the latest data. Also in the programme, there are suggestions that pasta prices could rise by 50% owing to a shortage of wheat. Tosin Jack is commodity intelligence manager at price analysis company Mintec Global, and explains the background. Apple has been forced to issue an emergency update for its operating systems to block so-called 'zero-click' spyware, which can access device contents without users clicking on a rogue link or file. Plus, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on the changing face of tourism in Kenya.

(Picture: Fruit prices in a supermarket. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvkdhy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxpvpz0dgd)
Climate change: Life at 50C

A BBC global analysis has found that the number of extremely hot days above 50C has doubled since the 1980s. We speak to some of the journalists who have been looking at the data and the consequences of extreme heat around the world.

We'll talk about protests by Afghan women against the new dress code being enforced by the Taliban for female students

We'll get your questions answered on the coronavirus pandemic, with Dr Isaac Bogoch from the University of Toronto. We'll also reflect the conversation around Nicki Minaj's Twitter feed, as she discusses with her fans her decision on whether to get a Covid-19 vaccination. And we'll hear a conversation between teenagers who want to have the vaccine, against the wishes of their parents.

Picture: A woman seeks a cooling breeze from an electric fan during a very hot day in Rome, Italy in August 2021 (EPA/MASSIMO PERCOSSI)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvkj82)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxpvpz0j6j)
Coronavirus conversations: Challenging antivax parents

We speak to two young Americans helping others to challenge their parents' stance against Covid jabs.

We'll get your questions answered on the pandemic with Dr Swapneil Parikh in Mumbai. We'll also reflect the conversation around Nicki Minaj's Twitter feed, as she discusses with her fans her decision on whether to get a Covid-19 vaccination.

A BBC global analysis has found that the number of extremely hot days above 50C has doubled since the 1980s. We speak to some of the journalists who have been looking at the data and the consequences of extreme heat around the world. We'll get an expert to answer your questions on that story too.

Picture: A teenager receives a vaccine dose against Covid-19 in Phnom Penh, Cambodia (REUTERS/Cindy Liu)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvkn06)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvkrrb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zncql)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g840q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nhtytnmkp)
2021/09/14 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvkwhg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g87rv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsk)
Tech on the island of Jersey

Digital Planet is back in Jersey, the small English speaking island off the coast of France. We’re travelling around in an on-demand electric vehicle – all booked, paid for and locked and unlocked with an app from our smart phones. We’re finding out about agricultural tech on a dairy farm – how the famous Jersey Cows, that produce premium milk - are being managed by the latest innovations and we’re also out in the fields where a host of sensors and data analytics are helping with the Jersey potato harvest. And if that is not enough we visit the remote control tower at St. Helier airport and see how remote airfields around the world are beginning to embrace this technology, pioneered on Jersey, to make flying to seldom used airports safer. Guests include: Gavin Breeze, Director of Evie, Air traffic controllers Marc Hill and Richard Mayne, Jersey Cow Girl Becky Houzé and Mike Renouard, Business Unit Director at the Jersey Royal Company.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: Bill Thompson has a pre-interview chat with guest on Digital Planet. Credit: Ania Lichtarowicz / BBC)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvl07l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv59bt31zk6)
Climate change: studies on extreme heat and anxiety released

A new report has found that the number of these extremely hot days has more than doubled around the world over the last forty years. Meanwhile, a global survey has suggested that nearly 60% of young people say they are extremely worried about climate change. We look at this as well as what politicians in Europe have been saying about the challenges facing policy-makers.

Also on the programme: A look at Lebanon where ministers in a functioning government have met for the first time in more than a year; and Broadway star Sara Bareilles reflects on the world of theatre as it learns to live alongside COVID-19.

(Picture: Thermometer sign in Cordoba, southern Spain, credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvl3zq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g8h83)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvl7qv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywtzbczk8t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sm1lv3lxg)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g8m07)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48yhvdts8z)
US inflation shows signs of cooling

Inflation in the US is running at 5.3%, slightly down on July's year-on-year figure. Robert Reich is a Professor of Public Policy at the University of California Berkeley and a Secretary of Labour under President Clinton, and he talks us through the latest data. The plane maker Boeing says it expects that it will take another two and a half years for global aviation to return to pre-pandemic levels; we hear from its Chief Strategy Officer, Marc Allen. Also in the programme, there are suggestions that pasta prices could rise by 50% owing to a shortage of wheat. Tosin Jack is commodity intelligence manager at price analysis company Mintec Global, and explains the background. Plus, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on the changing face of tourism in Kenya. (Picture: Fruit prices in a supermarket. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 15 SEPTEMBER 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvlh73)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqjn3rhvjt)
US inflation shows signs of cooling

Inflation in the US is running at 5.3%, slightly down on July's year-on-year figure. Robert Reich is a Professor of Public Policy at the University of California Berkeley and a Secretary of Labour under President Clinton, and he talks us through the latest data. The plane maker Boeing says it expects that it will take another two and a half years for global aviation to return to pre-pandemic levels; we hear from its Chief Strategy Officer, Marc Allen. Also in the programme, there are suggestions that pasta prices could rise by 50% owing to a shortage of wheat. Tosin Jack is commodity intelligence manager at price analysis company Mintec Global, and explains the background. And New York's theatres have start to reopen and there's a new promotional film featuring Oprah Winfrey to encourage customers back as we hear from our arts correspondent, Vincent Dowd. Also in the programme, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on the changing face of tourism in Kenya. Plus we're joined throughout the programme by Peter Landers Tokyo bureau chief of The Wall Street Journal and Alison Schrager, economist, writer and senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute in New York.

(Picture: Fruit prices in a supermarket. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvllz7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zp6yh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g8z7m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2hh1)
Libya's Revolution

Building a state

A decade after the end of dictatorship, Libya is gearing up for planned elections at the end of this year that many hope will finally bring a peaceful and democratic future. The country is slightly more stable since the end of civil war two years ago. But despite a peace agreement, it is still effectively split in two, politically and militarily. Separate forces control the two halves of the country, backed by different foreign powers. And some think war will break out again.

BBC reporter Tim Whewell, travels around Libya to find out what progress is being made towards building a state. He visits a spectacular horse-racing event - a sign of increasing prosperity. Travel around Libya is easier now. Some armed groups have been integrated into official police and army structures. Tim visits a new government checkpoint. But he discovers many people are still terrified of militias that appear to have been "regularised" in name only.

Activists and journalists who voice opinions that armed groups dislike can be threatened, and even abducted - with courts often powerless to intervene. One radio station which sprang up as a lively forum for debate after the revolution no longer dares to broadcast talk shows. Tim talks to a former presenter who was jailed and tortured by a militia after taking part in a young people's protest against corruption. He also interviews former interior minister Fathi Bashagha, who hopes to lead Libya after the elections. What is his plan to achieve security and justice? And what can be done to stem the rising numbers of Libyans attempting the perilous crossing of the Mediterranean, seeking a new life in Europe?

Presenter: Tim Whewell
Producer: Bob Howard

(Photo: Traditional Libyan horseman in Misrata, Libya Credit: BBC)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvlqqc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvlvgh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zpgfr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g96qw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jn9)
3. The president

Networker, survivor - Afghanistan's former leader Hamid Karzai, famous for his traditional cloak and sheepskin hat, is back in the news. While others fled Kabul in mid-August when the Taliban swept in, Karzai stayed. He sat with them to help negotiate the transfer of power. In power for 13 of the past 20 years, the former president tells Lyse Doucet he's proud of what Afghanistan achieved and says neither he nor the US were able to stem the resurgence of the Taliban.


Series music composed by Arson Fahim


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvlz6m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2v0m9117c)
California recall vote: Governor Gavin Newsom looks set to win

With more than half the ballots counted, over two-thirds of voters say they want to keep the governor.

We'll hear from the investigators who say they have uncovered who owned the ammonium nitrate that blew up in Beirut last year, killing more than 200 people.

And we'll head to the Caribbean where the relaxation of Covid regulations to boost tourism seems to have resulted in a huge spike in cases.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvm2yr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2v0m914zh)
California recall: US media calls it for Newsom

Governor Gavin Newsom tells voters he's "humbled and grateful" as he survives a rare state-wide vote to remove him from office.

A controversial court set up to try alleged war crimes from the conflict in Kosovo in the late 1990s begins its first case today.

And we'll hear a stark warning that 'journalism could disappear' in Afghanistan because of the number of beatings and arrests since the Taliban took over.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvm6pw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2v0m918qm)
North Korea fires two ballistic missiles into the sea

It comes just days after it claimed it had successfully test-fired new long range cruise missiles.

The Democratic governor of the US state of California, Gavin Newsom, has beaten off an attempt to vote him out of office.

And the French Defence Minister warns Mali against entering into a deal with a Russian security company.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvmbg0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbr)
Robin Hanbury-Tenison: An explorer protecting indigenous lands

Stephen Sackur speaks to one of the world’s great modern-day explorers, Robin Hanbury-Tenison. He has committed himself to the protection of indigenous people and their lands, but have his efforts made a difference?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g9pqd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jp1)
The future of vaccines

The founders of German biotechnology company BioNTech were researching how to fight cancers using messenger RNA, "the unloved cousin of DNA", when covid-19 first appeared and they realised mRNA could be used to make a vaccine for the disease. Financial Times journalist Joe Miller has been following the company since just before the pandemic and tells Rebecca Kesby how they created the first covid-19 vaccine. Could mRNA help cure other diseases and improve vaccine access to low income countries? We ask Oksana Pyzik of the UCL School of Pharmacy. And how might the technology change the whole pharmaceutical industry? We hear from Dr Richard Torbett, CEO of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry.

Producer: Benjie Guy

(Picture: a collection of mRNA covid vaccines. Credit: Getty Images.)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x83)
The earthquake that devastated Haiti

In 2010 the Haitian capital and surrounding areas were hit by a catastrophic earthquake. Much of Port Au Prince was flattened and more than a hundred thousand people were killed. Amid the destruction and death people's first instinct was to pull together and help one another. Zak Brophy has been speaking to Kinsley Jean who was just a teenager when his family home collapsed around him.

Photo: Men gather to try to reach those still buried in the rubble beneath the Haitian Department of Justice building in January 2010.(Photo by Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvmg64)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2hh1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73g9tgj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvmky8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2kyk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvmppd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zq9nn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gb1ys)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jn9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvmtfj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz2)
The crazy things we do for love

Two stories from the Outlook archive of the crazy things we do for love.

In 2003, Rachel Colenso and her partner Richard went on a first date climbing Piz Badile in the Swiss Alps. What was meant to be a romantic getaway ended up being a disaster when they were engulfed in a fierce electrical storm and trapped on a narrow, icy ledge with little food and water for three days. The pair narrowly escaped with their lives, so why did Rachel agree to return to the mountain with Richard? She shares her story with Emily Webb. This interview was first broadcast in August, 2020.

Our second story is one of obsession, longing and love conquering all. Fabio Zaffagnini is obsessed with the band Foo Fighters. He knew they wouldn't perform in his small Italian city so instead he organised a concert where 1,000 musicians played one of their songs. This attracted the attention of the band’s frontman Dave Grohl, who went on to make Fabio’s dreams come true. This interview was first broadcast in July, 2019.

Picture: Rachel Colenso
Credit: Rachel Colenso

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x83)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvmy5n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zqk4x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gb9g1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvn1xs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv59bt3417d)
North Korea fires two ballistic missiles

South Korea says it had completed trials of a submarine launched ballistic missile. The announcement came hours after its neighbour North Korea test-fired two ballistic missiles into the sea. Japan said the North Korean launch was 'outrageous'.

Just two days before Russia goes to the polls we hear about the unprecedented crackdown on dissent in the country.

Angry exchanges at a special tribunal in The Hague, where a pro-independence fighter from Kosovo is facing allegations of war crimes.

Also, we hear how health workers in France who refuse to be vaccinated against Covid-19 risk being suspended without pay.

And how plastic in the oceans is affecting Whales and Dolphins and exacerbating climate change.

(Photo: South Korean television broadcast file footage in report about the North's latest test with ballistic missiles. Credit: Reuters.)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvn5nx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gbjy9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4ctkdj98qk)
Energy prices set to rise

Wholesale prices for gas and electricity have been rising sharply across Europe. That's likely to lead to significant cost increases for businesses and households, and we find out what's causing the issue from David Sheppard, energy editor for the Financial Times. Also in the programme, campaigners argue that exposure to a seemingly endless stream of beautiful people with perfect bodies on social media sites like TikTok and Instagram can damage the wellbeing of teenagers. We hear what can be done to tackle the issue from Whitney Crenna Jennings of the Education Policy Institute, which has studied the impact of social media on mental health. The BBC's Deborah Weitzmann reports on the growing trend of property buyers bidding on homes without seeing them in person first, enabled by improvements in virtual home buying technology. Plus, Apple's co-founder Steve Wozniak is launching a new company called Privateer to help clear up space junk. We find out more from Jacob Geer, head of space surveillance and tracking at the UK Space Agency. Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson and produced by Clare Williamson and Russell Newlove.

(Picture: A power plug on Euro banknotes. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvn9f1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxpvpz39ch)
Afghanistan: The Taliban's divisions

We start in Afghanistan, where sources say a major row broke out between leaders of the Taliban, just days after they set up a new government. Senior Taliban officials told the BBC that supporters of two rival factions argued at the presidential palace in the capital Kabul - reportedly over who did the most to secure victory over the US, and how power was divided up in the new cabinet. The BBC reporter who broke the story, Khudai Noor Nasar, joins us.

Also, we hear a conversation between two doctors working on the frontline in India, to find out how they're coping with the coronavirus pandemic. India's second wave of Covid-19 left hospitals unable to take more patients and oxygen supplies running low. What's the situation now?

And our health expert for the day, Dr Maria Sundaram, joins us to answer your coronavirus questions. To send one, WhatsApp us on +447730 751925.

(Photo: Amir Khan Muttaqi, Taliban's acting Foreign Minister talks with journalists during a press conference in Kabul, Afghanistan, 14 September 2021. Credit: EPA/stringer)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvnf55)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxpvpz3f3m)
Coronavirus: Doctors in India

We go to Afghanistan, where sources say a major row broke out between leaders of the Taliban, just days after they set up a new government. Senior Taliban officials told the BBC that supporters of two rival factions argued at the presidential palace in the capital Kabul - reportedly over who did the most to secure victory over the US, and how power was divided up in the new cabinet. The BBC reporter who broke the story, Khudai Noor Nasar, joins us.

Also, we hear a conversation between two doctors working on the frontline in India, to find out how they're coping with the coronavirus pandemic. India's second wave of Covid-19 left hospitals unable to take more patients and oxygen supplies running low. What's the situation now?

And we tell you about a BBC investigation into the life of Nigerian Instagram influencer, Hushpuppi. He’s considered by the FBI to be one of the world’s most high-profile fraudsters, facing up to 20 years in prison after pleading guilty to money laundering.

(Photo: An Indian health worker inspects the ventilators set up inside a paediatric intensive care unit as a preventive measure of preparedness for the possible COVID-19 third wave at Government Omandurar Medical College Hospital in Chennai, India, 16 August 2021. Credit: EPA/Idrees Mohammed)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvnjx9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x83)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvnnnf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zr8mp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gc0xt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nhtytrjgs)
2021/09/15 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvnsdk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2hh1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gc4ny)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvs)
Covid in Vietnam

In 2020 Vietnam ran a successful track and trace system, with very few coronavirus infections and for a long time no deaths at all, while other countries had thousands. In 2021 things haven’t gone so well and since July strict stay at home orders have been in place in some cities. Nga Pham, a journalist from BBC World News, and software engineer Kevin Vu talk about what life is like in Hanoi and Ho Chi Min City.

Dr Monica Lakhanpaul, Professor of Integrated Community Child Health at University College London, talks to Claudia Hammond about a mystery disease outbreak in the state of Uttar Pradesh in India. The symptoms are fever, joint pains, headaches and nausea.

People born premature can have an increased risk of developing heart problems later in life. For the first time researchers have shown that breast milk can improve heart performance in premature babies. The new study was done by Afif El-Khuffash who looks after premature babies and is Clinical Professor of Paediatrics at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland.

And Monica and Claudia discuss the latest research into long Covid in children.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Pam Rutherford

(Picture: A resident rides her bicycle near a make-shift barricade in Hanoi during the lockdown to stop the spread of Covid-19. Photo credit: Nhac Nguyen/AFP/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvnx4p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv59bt34wg9)
Taliban rule in Afghanistan: One month on

It's been exactly one month since the Taliban seized control of Afghanistan. Now cash is in short supply, and the country is facing a mounting economic and political crisis. We hear from our correspondent Secunder Kermani reporting from near the northern Afghan city of Mazar e Sharif.

Also on the programme: the US Olympic champion, Simone Biles appears at a Senate hearing into the FBI's failings in the case of the team doctor who abused her and many other gymnasts; and we hear about the story of the child born to the mother in the Roe versus Wade case that legalised abortion in America.

(Photo: Afghanistan's Taliban-controlled central bank seizes a large amount of money from former top government officials Credit: Handout via REUTERS)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvp0wt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gcd56)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jn9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvp4my)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywtzbd2g5x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sm1lv6htk)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gchxb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48yhvdxp62)
Energy prices set to rise

Wholesale prices for gas and electricity have been rising sharply across Europe. That's likely to lead to significant cost increases for businesses and households, and we find out what's causing the issue from David Hunter, Director of Market Studies at Schneider Electric. Also in the programme, campaigners argue that exposure to a seemingly endless stream of beautiful people with perfect bodies on social media sites like TikTok and Instagram can damage the wellbeing of teenagers. We hear what can be done to tackle the issue from Whitney Crenna Jennings of the Education Policy Institute, which has studied the impact of social media on mental health. The BBC's Deborah Weitzmann reports on the growing trend of property buyers bidding on homes without seeing them in person first, enabled by improvements in virtual home buying technology. Plus, Apple's co-founder Steve Wozniak is launching a new company called Privateer to help clear up space junk. We find out more from Jacob Geer, head of space surveillance and tracking at the UK Space Agency. (Picture: A power plug on Euro banknotes. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 16 SEPTEMBER 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvpd46)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqjn3rlrfx)
Energy prices set to rise

Wholesale prices for gas and electricity have been rising sharply across Europe. That's likely to lead to significant cost increases for businesses and households, and we find out what's causing the issue from David Hunter, Director of Market Studies at Schneider Electric. Also in the programme, the world's first all-civilian mission to space, Inspiration4, has just taken off for a three day mission to orbit the Earth. The historic mission, operated by billionaire Elon Musk's firm SpaceX, is being funded by one of the passengers. We hear from Nick Spall, space writer and Royal Astronomical Society Fellow. The singer, Ed Sheeran, has won a lot of awards but he's revealed he really dislikes the big award shows themselves, because he says "The room is full with resentment'; we hear from the BBC's Harry Bligh. Plus, the BBC's Deborah Weitzmann reports on the growing trend of property buyers bidding on homes without seeing them in person first, enabled by improvements in virtual home buying technology.

Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Ralph Silva of the Silva Research Network in Toronto, Canada and Mehmal Sarfraz, co-founder The Current PK in Lahore, Pakistan.

Produced by Nisha Patel

(Picture: A power plug on Euro banknotes. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvphwb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zs3vl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gcw4q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxv)
The rise and fall of an international fraudster

Assignment reveals the inside story of Ramon Abbas, one of a new breed of global cyber fraudsters. Snared by the FBI in 2020, Abbas is better known as Instagram influencer Hushpuppi, who flaunted a life of designer clothes, private jets and penthouse apartments to millions of followers. Little did they know that his lavish lifestyle was funded through a complex web of cyber-heists.

Most cyber-criminals remain nameless, faceless, anonymous and all but untraceable. Now, Assignment unmasks Ramon Abbas, revealing a complicated, sometimes ruthless character driven by a thirst for wealth and celebrity status.

Reporters: Paul Connolly and Princess Abumere
Producer: Helen Clifton
Editor: Maggie Latham


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvpmmg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x83)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvprcl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zscbv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gd3mz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg5)
OCD, the kitchen, and me

Hot stoves, perishable food, and potentially dirty surfaces can make the kitchen a difficult place for someone with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

People with OCD will frequently experience unwanted thoughts, images or urges - which may include worries about contamination or harming themselves and others. They will often use repetitive behaviours to relieve their anxiety - including washing and cleaning, or repeatedly checking their actions. All this means that both cooking and eating food prepared by others can become very distressing.

In this episode, Emily Thomas meets three people who have suffered from the disorder. They explain how debilitating the condition can be by describing just one aspect of daily life - the way they eat.

Contributors: Chrissie Fadipe, Shai Friedland, Patricia Grisafi

If you have been affected by any of the issues raised in this programme, please see the related links section at the bottom of this page.


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvpw3q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2v0m93y4g)
AUKUS Pact created

In a bid to counter China's perceived growing military might - the US, UK and Australia agree on sharing advanced defence technologies. So how will Beijing react?

We hear about 4 ordinary citizens who have blasted off into orbit in the latest SpaceX mission.

Also, with the Taliban firmly in control in Afghanistan they are coming under increasing scrutiny - particularly over human rights. We hear about concerns for women in the country from the United Nations.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvpzvv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2v0m941wl)
China has denounced a new defence accord between the United States, Britain and Australia

The US, Britain and Australia announce a security deal over concerns about China's growing military might in the Indo-Pacific region.

China has denounced the move saying it was part of a Cold War mentality.

British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, reshuffles his top ministerial team as, in the words of one newspaper, he "sacks blundering cabinet allies". What will the UK's new female foreign secretary change?

A special report from the Afghan city of Mazar-e Sharif on life there under the Taliban.

And to Lebanon suffering one of the world's worst ever economic crisis - has seen a collapse of it's medical services.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvq3lz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2v0m945mq)
New pact allows Australia to build nuclear-powered submarines for the first time

The US, Britain and Australia announce a security deal over concerns about China's growing military might in the Indo-Pacific region.

China has denounced the move saying it was part of a Cold War mentality.

We hear about four ordinary citizens who've blasted off to space in the latest SpaceX mission.

And to the Netherlands where descendants of African slaves are being allowed to change their westernised names free of charge.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvq7c3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2h)
Should the knowledge needed to make the Covid-19 vaccines be freely available to all?

In May, the Biden administration surprised the world by saying it would not object on an intellectual property waiver for Covid-19 vaccines.

America has been a staunch defender of patent protections, which bar new inventions being cheaply copied around the world. So, the first reactions to the announcement were - amazement, really. Second reactions tended to depend on which side of this debate you were on.

Who should be the gatekeepers of the knowledge which underpins the development of cutting edge pharmaceutical breakthroughs, like Covid-19 vaccines? In this week’s Inquiry, Sandra Kanthal finds out why the answer to that question really depends on who you ask.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal
Editor: Richard Vadon

(Logos of various companies producing the Covid-19 vaccine. Credit: Artur Widak/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gdlmh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9r)
The US and its trillion dollar infrastructure bill

The physical infrastructure of the United States is crumbling and businesses there are feeling the effects. So why is this bill that aims to restore roads, bridges and communications facing such a treacherous political road ahead? Successive Presidents have tried and failed to get something done about it. Now President Biden is having a go. A farmer in Mississippi tells Will Bain about the impact poor roads have on his business. He also hears from Emily Feenstra from the American Society of Civil Engineers who outlines just how bad the situation is and from the former Democratic Governor of Pennsylvania Ed Rendell who now co-chairs the infrastructure think-tank Building America's Future.
(Picture credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3l)
Christiania: Copenhagen’s hippy commune

In 1971 a group of squatters, artists and activists took over a disused military barracks on the edge of Copenhagen. They established a self-governing hippy commune called Freetown Christiania, after the surrounding district of Christianshavn. Residents began to build houses along their own experimental designs and soon Christiania had its own theatre, bakery and kindergarten. The semi-autonomous enclave is still there today and is one of the oldest and largest communes in the world. Viv Jones speaks to Danish filmmaker Jon Bang Carlsen, one of Christiania’s first settlers.

Photo: Christiania (Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvqc37)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gdqcm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvqgvc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlp)
Algorithms: From the ancients to the internet

Hidden from view, complex to understand and often controversial, algorithms are at the heart of computer coding that underpins modern society. Every time we search the internet, every time we pay by credit card, even the romantic partners suggested to us by online dating sites – they’re all powered by algorithms. And their reach is growing all the time, as some societies use them to automate decisions regarding criminal justice, mortgage applications and job recruitment.

The history of algorithms is surprisingly ancient, stretching back to the Babylonian empire where large societies required a systematic way to count and order different aspects of citizens’ lives. Today some people are questioning their use, as some algorithms have been shown to replicate bias and there are fears that algorithms have the potential to undermine democracy.

Bridget Kendall is joined by Ramesh Srinivasan, Professor in the Department of Information Studies at the University of California Los Angeles and the author of Beyond the Valley: How Innovators around the World are Overcoming Inequality and Creating the Technologies of Tomorrow; the French computational scientist, consultant and entrepreneur Aurélie Jean, who’s published From the Other Side of the Machine: A scientist’s journey in the land of algorithms; and Ian Stewart, Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at Warwick University who’s written more than 120 books on aspects of mathematics and science.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service

[Image: Digital data and binary code. Credit: Yuichiro Chino/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8q)
The Queen of Women's Beach Volleyball

America’s Misty May-Treanor is the winner of three Olympic gold medals and the most successful women’s beach volleyball player of all time. Misty formed an almost unbeatable team with Kerri Walsh-Jennings, but she faced a tough personal battle at the London games in 2012, which she had decided would be her last competition because of persistent knee and Achilles tendon injuries. Misty May-Treanor talks to Jeremy Inson about her challenges on and off the court. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: Misty May-Treanor in action at London 2012 (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvqllh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zt6kr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gdyvw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvqqbm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3l)
The epic road trip that taught me how to live again

After graduating from university, Suleika Jaouad had moved to Paris, found love and was starting to pursue her dream of becoming a foreign correspondent. But a leukaemia diagnosis at 22 put an end to all of this. She returned to the US and began life-saving treatment that would take an enormous toll. Determined to try and regain some sense of control, she began writing about her experience and eventually landed a regular column with the New York Times called "Life, Interrupted". Her words moved many readers, who inundated her with letters about their own experiences of disease and lives changed in an instant. After three gruelling years in and out of hospital, Suleika was better but realised that having survived she now needed to learn how to live again. She went on a 100-day road trip around the country to meet some of her readers in the hope that they could help her find her place in the world.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Kevin Ponniah

Picture: Suleika Jaouad (Courtesy Suleika Jaouad)

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvqv2r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1ztg20)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gf6c4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvqytw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv59bt36y4h)
China denounces US-UK-Australia defence pact

China denounces US-UK-Australia defence pact. The pact will see the US and UK provide Australia with the technology to build nuclear-powered submarines for the first time. The accord is being widely viewed as an effort to counter China's influence in the contested South China Sea. China says the new alliance is part of a "cold-war mentality.

Also in the programme, four amateur astronauts are currently orbiting the earth in the first flight of its kind without a professional astronaut on board. And we hear from Australia where scientists have discovered a unintended positive consequence of wildfires, marine algae growth.

( Picture: US President Biden at podium with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison on either side. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvr2l0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gffvd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49c76qb8bs)
Indonesia president guilty of environmental negligence

An Indonesian court ruled President Widodo has been negligent over pollution in Jakarta. The ruling also criticised other top officials, and ordered monitoring stations and other measures to improve the capital's air, as BBC Asia editor Rebecca Henschke explains. Also in the programme, people in Uganda can now trade shares using their mobile phones for the first time. Nebert Rugadya is a business journalist in Kampala, and tells us about the likely impact of the new service from MTN, which runs Africa's biggest mobile phone network. Plus, the BBC's Fergus Nicoll explores the prospects for deep sea mining to access metals required in the production of batteries. Gerard Barron is chief executive of The Metals Company which aims to exploit polymetallic nodules, found on the seabed off southern Mexico, and recently listed on the NASDAQ. Michael Lodge is secretary general of the International Seabed Authority, and explains the rules around commercial exploitation of such resources. And we hear about the environmental issues involved from Dr Kirsten Thompson, lecturer in biosciences at the University of Exeter.

This edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Russell Padmore and Russell Newlove.

(Picture: A polluted Jakarta skyline. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvr6b4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxpvpz668l)
Indonesia: President found negligent over Jakarta air pollution

We'll look in depth at a court ruling in Indonesia that has found that president Joko Widodo and his cabinet have been negligent in tackling air pollution in the capital Jakarta. Our reporter explains the measures the court has ordered the officials to take, and we'll also hear from people in Jakarta affected by bad air quality.

In the Philippines, millions of children are facing a second year of remote schooling, and because of strict lockdown rules children are not allowed out of their homes either. Three parents talk about the impact of home-schooling and the restrictions on their children’s learning and wellbeing.

Epidemiologist Dr Emma Hodcroft from the University of Bern is our coronavirus expert who will answer your latest questions about the pandemic. We’ll also hear about the calls for further research into changes to periods some women have been experiencing after having a Covid vaccine.

And we’ll explain the new security pact in the Asia-Pacific by the UK, US and Australia.

(Photo: Environmental activists wearing protective masks hold placards outside the Central Jakarta Court following the hearing of a citizen lawsuit in Jakarta, Indonesia, September 16, 2021. Credit: Willy Kurniawan/Reuters)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvrb28)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxpvpz6b0q)
Coronavirus Philippines: How is home learning affecting children?

In the Philippines, millions of children are facing a second year of remote schooling, and because of strict lockdown rules children are not allowed out of their homes either. Three parents talk about the impact of home-schooling and the restrictions on their children’s learning and wellbeing.

Epidemiologist Dr Emma Hodcroft from the University of Bern is our coronavirus expert who will answer your latest questions about the pandemic.

We'll hear from Kenya where petrol prices have hit their highest peak ever.

And we’ll explain the new security pact in the Asia-Pacific by the UK, US and Australia.

We'll also look at a court ruling in Indonesia that has found that president Joko Widodo and his cabinet have been negligent in tackling air pollution in the capital Jakarta. We'll hear from people in Jakarta affected by bad air quality.

(Photo: Parents queue to receive bags of supplies during school opening at the Taguig City Integrated School, Metro Manila, Philippines, 13 September 2021. Credit: FRANCIS R. MALASIG/EPA)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvrftd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvrkkj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zv5js)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gfxtx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nhtytvfcw)
2021/09/16 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvrp9n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gg1l1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l46)
Ebola can remain dormant for five years

An international team of researchers has discovered that an outbreak of Ebola in Guinea in February this year was the result of re-activated Ebola virus in someone who’d been infected at least five years ago during the earlier large Ebola epidemic that swept through Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. This means the virus can remain dormant in some Ebola survivors for five years or more. Virologists Alpha Kabinet Keita and Robert Garry talk to Roland Pease about the research and its implications.

Also in the programme:

The eruption of lavas from Iceland’s newest volcano Fagradalsfjall continues six months on. Geochemist Ed Marshall tells us how he gets up close to sample the molten rock with a long scoop and a bucket of water, and what he’s learning about this remarkable eruption.

NASA’s Katie Stack Morgan updates Science in Action on the Perseverance rover’s successful sampling of rocks from Jezero crater on the planet Mars. When the specimens are eventually returned to Earth, she says they may turn out to contain tiny samples of Mars’ water and atmosphere from early in the Red Planet’s history.







(Image credit: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvrt1s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv59bt37scd)
US-UK-Australia defend nuclear sub deal

The US Secretary of State, Antony Blinken, has sought to allay the European Union's concerns about a new nuclear security deal between the US, UK and Australia.

Also in the programme fuel relief in Lebanon; and filming a movie in space.

(Picture: U.S Secretary of State Blinken and U.S Defense Secretary Austin, host Australian counterparts at US State Department. Credit: Reuters)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvrxsx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gg929)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvs1k1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywtzbd5c30)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sm1lv9dqn)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73ggdtf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48yhvf0l35)
UN Secretary General in climate change warning

The UN Secretary General has warned that greenhouse gas in the atmosphere is rising relentlessly after a short dip during the pandemic. Antonio Guterres said he was alarmed how far the world was off course in tackling climate change. We speak to Barbara Davidson from Carbon Tracker who published a report that found many companies do not include their climate impact in their financial statements. Also, the BBC's Fergus Nicoll explores the prospects for deep sea mining to access metals required in the production of batteries. Gerard Barron is chief executive of The Metals Company which aims to exploit polymetallic nodules, found on the seabed off southern Mexico, and recently listed on the NASDAQ. Michael Lodge is secretary general of the International Seabed Authority, and explains the rules around commercial exploitation of such resources. And we hear about the environmental issues involved from Dr Kirsten Thompson, lecturer in biosciences at the University of Exeter. Plus showbiz reporter Beverly Lyons tells us why Elton John has delayed his UK and European tour until 2023. Rahul Tandon is joined by Patrick Barta from the Wall Street Journal in Thailand and Vonshay Sharpe, president of the Women's Institute for Science, Equity, and Race (WISER) in the US.

(Image:Coal powered power station in Tampa Florida, Getty Images)



FRIDAY 17 SEPTEMBER 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvs919)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqjn3rpnc0)
UN secretary general climate change warning

The UN secretary general has warned that greenhouse gas in the atmosphere is rising relentlessly after a short dip during the pandemic. Antonio Guterres said he was alarmed how far the world was off course in tackling climate change. We speak to Barbara Davidson from Carbon Tracker who published a report that found many companies do not include their climate impact in their financial statements. And the BBC's Fergus Nicoll explores the prospects for deep sea mining to access metals required in the production of batteries. Gerard Barron is chief executive of The Metals Company which aims to exploit polymetallic nodules, found on the seabed off southern Mexico, and recently listed on the NASDAQ. Michael Lodge is secretary general of the International Seabed Authority, and explains the rules around commercial exploitation of such resources. And we hear about the environmental issues involved from Dr Kirsten Thompson, lecturer in biosciences at the University of Exeter. Plus showbiz reporter Beverly Lyons tells us why Elton John has delayed his UK and European tour until 2023. Rahul Tandon is joined by Patrick Barta from the Wall Street Journal in Thailand and Vonshay Sharpe, president of the Women's Institute for Science, Equity, and Race (WISER) in the US.

Produced by Philippa Goodrich

(Picture: Power plant. Picture credit: PA Media.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvsdsf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zw0rp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73ggs1t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tzk)
From 9th tier to Serie A – Chievo phoenix club dreams

Chievo Verona legend Sergio Pellissier tells us about the formation of a new phoenix club, after the original club went out of business in August. Plus Hugo Alvarado explains how his eye for talent has taken him from being a frustrated fan to becoming the first ever full time scout for El Salvador’s national teams.

Photo: Sergio Pellisier of AC Chievo competes for the ball with Nenad Tomovic of ACF Fiorentina during a Serie A match between the sides. (Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvsjjk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvsn8p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zw87y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gh0k2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2ptx)
The Pope's astronomer

Br. Guy Consolmagno calls himself a 'Sputnik Kid'. He started school the year the Russians launched the world's first satellite. Growing up in Detroit during the space race he remembers the excitement he felt watching Nasa launch rockets into space, "I grew up at a time when anything was possible." He was always fascinated with astronomy. In fact, his father always wanted to be an astronomer but could never turn it into a career. He would show Guy the stars at night and point out the different constellations. Little did he know back then that his son would not only go on to be an astronomer, lecturing at the prestigious colleges of Havard and MIT, but he would go on to become the director of one of the oldest observatories in the world - The Vatican Observatory.

The Vatican Observatory has been gazing at the stars since 1582. The church started the observatory to study the heavens in order to make changes to the church calendar. Over the years it became a way for the church to marry science and faith and explore the points where they intersect. The first telescopes were placed right on top of the Vatican, but as Rome grew bigger and brighter, the view of the stars started to fade and so in the 1930s the Vatican built a new large telescope at the Pope's summer residence at Castel Gandolfo 25km south of Rome, and also one in Arizona in the US!

There are twelve astronomers working at the Vatican observatory, but Br. Guy, the director, is unique as he is the only one who was appointed by a pope and saint, Saint Pope John Paul II. He worked under JPII, Pope Benedict, and now Pope Francis. He still wears his MIT ring, as well as his white priest's collar.

For this Heart and Soul special on the BBC World Service, we will visit the Vatican Observatory to hear about its fascinating history and meet the 'Sputnik Kid' who is passionate about showing the world that science and faith are not as opposed as you might think.


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvss0t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2v0m96v1k)
Russia elections: How democratic are they?

Russians go to the polls for a three day long election. But many opposition parties and politicians are not able to stand.

The International Criminal Court wants to look into President Duterte's bloody war on drugs in the Philippines. But what can it achieve?

And we'll hear why the world is missing some key targets to reduce climate change


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvswry)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2v0m96ysp)
Russia starts three days of elections

Many opposition politicians and parties have not been able to stand.

Scared of the needle? Scientific research means you may soon be able to take vaccines by mouth.

And a legal case starts over who was to blame for the super-spreader event at a ski resort in Austria near the start of the pandemic.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvt0j2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2v0m972jt)
Russia: polls open for three days of voting

With much of the opposition unable to stand, Putin's allies are expected to win easily.

Meanwhile there's some strong reaction to stories of Russian mercenaries being invited into Mali to fight Islamist extremists.

And we'll hear how scientists in Spain pretended to be Neanderthals to explore how they caught some of their food.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvt486)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1q)
Naomi Campbell, supermodel and businesswoman

In an exclusive interview for the BBC’s 100 Women season, Zeinab Badawi speaks to supermodel Naomi Campbell.

(Photo: Naomi Campbell smiles at Zeinab Badawi)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73ghhjl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0q)
The business of seed banks

Increasingly scientists are using genetic material from wild plants to make agricultural crops more resilient to climate change. To find out how, Rebecca Kesby heads to the Millennium Seed Bank for the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, in the south of England. There she meets Dr Chris Cockel, one of their project coordinators. We also hear from Asmund Asdal of the Global Seed Vault, which is located in a mountain on the archipelago of Svalbaard, between mainland Norway and the North Pole. We speak to Dr Shivali Sharma, who is developing climate resistant varieties of pigeon pea, a staple crop in many parts of rural India. And Mohamed Lassad Ben Saleh, farmer in Tunisia, tells us how breeding crops that combine properties of indigenous wild varieties has improved the quality and yield of his crops.

Producers: Clare Williamson and Benjie Guy

(Picture: a hand holding seeds. Credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz2)
The Peter Principle

In 1969 a satirical book, The Peter Principle, suggested that promotion led to incompetence. Written by a Canadian Professor of Education, Dr Laurence J. Peter and playwright Raymond Hull, the book was a parody of management theory but it's core message struck a chord with many. It became an instant classic, selling millions of copies around the world. We present a rare archive recording of Dr Peter, explaining his theory that “In a hierarchy every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence".
Photo: Dr Laurence J. Peter on the BBC in 1974 (BBC)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvt80b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhg)
Wikipedia’s editing war

Can the online encyclopaedia be impartial in a world of hotly-contested narratives? Plus, is Apple struggling to innovate? And the privacy implications of Facebook’s smart sunglasses. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73ghm8q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l46)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvtcrg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsy)
Canada votes: Is Trudeau in trouble?

On Monday Canadians will vote in a snap election called by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau just two years after they last voted. He hopes to turn his minority in parliament into a majority having previously enjoyed favourable reviews for his handling of the pandemic. But since calling the election, a fourth wave of Covid infection has gathered pace in parts of the country prompting claims that he is putting his own political interests ahead of the public’s by going ahead with the vote. Some polls even show the governing Liberal Party slipping behind its main rival the Conservatives, led by Erin O’Toole. The PM also faces a strong challenge from the left in the form of New Democratic Party leader Jagmeet Singh, and Quebec-nationalist party the Bloc Québécois is also polling strongly. So, what are the main issues that will decide the election and are Canadians in the mood for change?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.

Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvthhl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zx3gv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73ghvrz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tzk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvtm7q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fg)
The Kenyan men campaigning against FGM

Campaigns to end female genital mutilation usually focus on women’s experiences for obvious reasons: women bear the lifelong physical and psychological scars. But in Kenya the Men End FGM Foundation is adding men’s voices to the anti-FGM movement. Esther Ogola is the women’s affairs reporter in Nairobi who covered the story.

Arabic coffee and health
BBC Arabic has been investigating the health risks of the strong dark coffee traditionally drunk in Greece and Turkey and across the Arab world. Omar Abdel-Razek tells us what the experts say, and also shares the pleasures of the culture around coffee.

Taiwan’s pineapple politics
Earlier this year China halted its imports of Taiwanese pineapples overnight. China is Taiwan’s biggest export market, so a huge political effort was launched to promote the island’s pineapples. Benny Lu is a journalist with BBC China in Hong Kong, and explains what pineapples reveal about regional geopolitics.

Thailand's celebrity monks
Two Buddhist monks have attracted a huge social media following among young Thais for their humorous, informal style. But as BBC Thai’s Issariya Praithongyaem tells us, not everyone likes it, and they have been asked to up the religious content and cut down on the giggling.

VR helps Indians and Pakistanis visit their lost homes
India's violent partition in 1947 displaced some 15 million people who were never able to return home. But for some, a new project called Dastaan is providing customised virtual tours around villages they haven't seen for over 70 years, as Bushra Owaisy from BBC Delhi explains.

Image: Kenyan men campaigning against FGM
Credit: Men End FGM Foundation


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvtqzv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zxbz3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gj387)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l46)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvtvqz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv59bt39v1l)
Polls open in Russia's parliamentary election

Polls open in Russia’s three-day parliamentary election. Fourteen parties are taking part in the vote, which the Kremlin insists is fair. Also in the programme, the Austrian government is being sued for failing to stop covid spreading across Europe from an Apline ski resort and Sir Clive Sinclair, the creator of the Sinclair ZX Spectrum has died aged 81.


(Picture: A man votes in the 2021 Russian parliamentary election Credit: Stanislav Krasilnikov\TASS via Getty Images)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvtzh3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gjbrh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46wx0xc7z0)
Google and Apple accused of bowing to censorship

As the Russian election gets underway Google and Apple have removed a tactical voting app. Opposition activists have accused the tech giants of bowing to pressure from the Kremlin, and we get reaction to the move from Leonid Volkov, who ran jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny's campaign in 2018. Also in the programme, the BBC's Rebecca Kesby finds out how scientists are using genetic material from wild plants to make agricultural crops more resilient to climate change. Plus, we look back on the life of the British inventor, Sir Clive Sinclair, famous for developing the pioneering ZX Spectrum personal computer. Henrique Olifiers runs computer game development firm Bossa Studio, and gives us his perspective.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Lucy Burton, Deborah Weitzmann and Russell Newlove.

(Picture: Logos for the Google and Apple app stores. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvv377)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxpvpz935p)
Russia voting app removed

With the help of BBC Monitoring we learn more about the tactical voting app in Russia that has been removed from Google and Apple stores. Russian authorities had threatened to fine the two companies if they refused to drop the app, which told users who could unseat ruling party candidates. The Smart Voting app was devised by jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny.

We'll talk about a court case in Austria against the government over its handling of a coronavirus outbreak at a ski resort. Thousands got infected helping Covid spread across Europe.

We'll go through some of the latest coronavirus stories with our regular expert Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University.

And we also look in detail at one of the of the biggest stories in news. Today Ros Atkins explains the debate over ethics and Covid booster jabs.

(Photo: The Russian opposition politician Alexei Navalny's Smart Voting app is seen on a phone, in Moscow, Russia September 16, 2021. Credit Shamil Zhumatov/File Photo/Reuters)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvv6zc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxpvpz96xt)
Germany climate change strike

We speak to supporters of six climate change activists in Germany who are on hunger strike and camping outside the parliament. They are demanding more action from politicians on climate change.

We'll also hear about a new UN report that says despite all the promises to take action on climate change, the world is still on course to heat up to dangerous levels.

We'll go through some of the latest coronavirus stories with our regular expert Marc Mendelson, Professor of Infectious Diseases and Head of the Division of Infectious Diseases & HIV Medicine at the University of Cape Town.

And we also look in detail at one of the of the biggest stories in news. Today Ros Atkins explains the debate over ethics and Covid booster jabs.

(Photo: Sympathizers of a so called "hunger strike of the last generation" camp taking place in Berlin, protest with signs reading "hunger strike 21" during the speech of Green party co-chairwoman and top candidate for the upcoming federal elections Annalena Baerbock Credit: EPA/CLEMENS BILAN)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvvbqh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvvggm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zy2fw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gjtr0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nhtytyb8z)
2021/09/17 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvvl6r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gjyh4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqy)
How Did Eyes Evolve?

Look into my eyes. What do you see? Pupil, lens, retina… an intricate set of special tissues and mechanisms all working seamlessly together, so that I can see the world around me. Charles Darwin called the eye an ‘organ of extreme perfection’ and he’s not wrong!

But if the eye is so complex and intricate, how did it evolve? One listener, Aloyce from Tanzania, got in touch to pose this difficult question. It’s a question that taxed Darwin himself, but CrowdScience is always up for a challenge!

The problem is that eyes weren’t ever designed - they were cobbled together over millions and millions of years, formed gradually by the tweaks and adaptations of evolution. How do you get from the basic detection of light to the wonderful complexity - and diversity – of visual systems we find throughout the animal kingdom?

CrowdScience sent Marnie Chesterton on an 800 million year journey to trace how the different elements that make up the human eye gradually came into being; from the emergence of the first light-sensitive proteins to crude eye-cups, from deep sea creatures with simple pinhole eyes to the first light-focusing lenses, all the way to the technicolour detail of the present day.

Produced by Ilan Goodman for the BBC World Service.

With contributions from: Dr Adam Rutherford, Dr Megan Porter, Professor Dan Nilsson, Dr Samantha Strong

(Photo Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvvpyw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv59bt3bp8h)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvvtq0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gk5zd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tzk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvvyg4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywtzbd8803)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sm1lvd9mr)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gk9qj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48yhvf3h08)
Google and Apple accused of bowing to censorship

As the Russian election gets underway Google and Apple have removed a tactical voting app. Opposition activists have accused the tech giants of bowing to pressure from the Kremlin, and we get reaction to the move from Leonid Volkov, who ran jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny's campaign in 2018. Also in the programme, the BBC's Rebecca Kesby finds out how scientists are using genetic material from wild plants to make agricultural crops more resilient to climate change. Plus, we look back on the life of the British inventor, Sir Clive Sinclair, famous for developing the pioneering ZX Spectrum personal computer. Henrique Olifiers runs computer game development firm Bossa Studio, and gives us his perspective.

(Picture: Logos for the Google and Apple app stores. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Wish for Afghanistan 04:32 WED (w3ct2jn9)

A Wish for Afghanistan 11:32 WED (w3ct2jn9)

A Wish for Afghanistan 22:32 WED (w3ct2jn9)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gxv)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gxv)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gxv)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkjvv4sjc2)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkjvv4swlg)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkjvv4t7tv)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkjvv4tckz)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkjvv4tm27)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkjvv4vg94)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzkjvv4w20s)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkjvv4wf85)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzkjvv4wnrf)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkjvv4wshk)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkjvv4x4qy)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzkjvv4x8h2)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172xzkjvv4xd76)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzkjvv4xhzb)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkjvv4ygyc)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzkjvv4yv5r)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkjvv4yyxw)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzkk73g31p9)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172xzkk73g35ff)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172xzkk73g395k)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172xzkk73g3dxp)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172xzkk73g3wx6)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172xzkk73g40nb)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172xzkk73g44dg)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172xzkk73g484l)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzkk73g4hmv)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172xzkk73g4r43)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172xzkk73g573m)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzkk73g5bvr)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172xzkk73g5lc0)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkk73g5q34)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkk73g62bj)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzkk73g69ts)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172xzkk73g6st9)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172xzkk73g6xkf)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzkk73g751p)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzkk73g7djy)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172xzkk73g7n16)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzkk73g840q)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172xzkk73g87rv)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172xzkk73g8h83)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzkk73g8m07)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkk73g8z7m)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzkk73g96qw)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172xzkk73g9pqd)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172xzkk73g9tgj)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzkk73gb1ys)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172xzkk73gb9g1)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172xzkk73gbjy9)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172xzkk73gc0xt)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172xzkk73gc4ny)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzkk73gcd56)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzkk73gchxb)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkk73gcw4q)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzkk73gd3mz)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzkk73gdlmh)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172xzkk73gdqcm)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzkk73gdyvw)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172xzkk73gf6c4)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172xzkk73gffvd)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzkk73gfxtx)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172xzkk73gg1l1)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172xzkk73gg929)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzkk73ggdtf)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkk73ggs1t)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172xzkk73gh0k2)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172xzkk73ghhjl)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172xzkk73ghm8q)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkk73ghvrz)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172xzkk73gj387)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172xzkk73gjbrh)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172xzkk73gjtr0)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172xzkk73gjyh4)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172xzkk73gk5zd)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzkk73gk9qj)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k31bk)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k352p)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k38tt)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k3dky)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k3jb2)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k3n26)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k3rtb)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k3wkg)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k409l)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k441q)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k47sv)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k4cjz)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k4h93)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k4m17)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k530r)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k56rw)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k5bj0)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k5g84)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k5l08)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172xzjqf3k5prd)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k5y7n)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k61zs)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k65qx)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k69h1)

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BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k6jz9)

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BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k6sgk)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k6x6p)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k70yt)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k74py)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k78g2)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k7d66)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k7hyb)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k7mpg)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k7rfl)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k83nz)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k87f3)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k8c57)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k8gxc)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172xzjqf3k8lnh)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjqscvdpdx)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172xzjqscvdt51)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172xzjqscvdxx5)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172xzjqscvf1n9)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172xzjqscvf5df)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172xzjqscvf94k)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172xzjqscvfdwp)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172xzjqscvfjmt)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172xzjqscvfncy)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172xzjqscvfs42)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172xzjqscvfww6)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172xzjqscvg0mb)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172xzjqscvg4cg)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172xzjqscvg83l)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172xzjqscvgcvq)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172xzjqscvghlv)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172xzjqscvgmbz)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172xzjqscvgr33)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172xzjqscvgvv7)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172xzjqscvgzlc)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172xzjqscvh3bh)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172xzjqscvh72m)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172xzjqscvhbtr)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvhlb0)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvhq24)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvhtt8)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvhykd)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvj29j)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvj61n)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvj9ss)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvjfjx)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvjk91)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvjp15)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvjss9)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvjxjf)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvk18k)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvk50p)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvk8rt)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvkdhy)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvkj82)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvkn06)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvkrrb)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvkwhg)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvl07l)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvl3zq)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzjqscvl7qv)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjqscvlh73)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172xzjqscvllz7)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172xzjqscvlqqc)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172xzjqscvlvgh)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172xzjqscvlz6m)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172xzjqscvm2yr)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172xzjqscvm6pw)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172xzjqscvmbg0)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172xzjqscvmg64)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172xzjqscvmky8)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjqscvmppd)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172xzjqscvmtfj)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172xzjqscvmy5n)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172xzjqscvn1xs)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172xzjqscvn5nx)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172xzjqscvn9f1)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172xzjqscvnf55)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172xzjqscvnjx9)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172xzjqscvnnnf)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172xzjqscvnsdk)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172xzjqscvnx4p)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172xzjqscvp0wt)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjqscvp4my)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjqscvpd46)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172xzjqscvphwb)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172xzjqscvpmmg)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172xzjqscvprcl)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172xzjqscvpw3q)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172xzjqscvpzvv)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172xzjqscvq3lz)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzjqscvq7c3)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172xzjqscvqc37)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzjqscvqgvc)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjqscvqllh)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172xzjqscvqqbm)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172xzjqscvqv2r)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172xzjqscvqytw)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172xzjqscvr2l0)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzjqscvr6b4)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172xzjqscvrb28)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172xzjqscvrftd)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172xzjqscvrkkj)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172xzjqscvrp9n)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172xzjqscvrt1s)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172xzjqscvrxsx)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172xzjqscvs1k1)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvs919)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvsdsf)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvsjjk)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvsn8p)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvss0t)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvswry)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvt0j2)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvt486)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvt80b)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvtcrg)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvthhl)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvtm7q)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvtqzv)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvtvqz)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvtzh3)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvv377)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvv6zc)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvvbqh)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvvggm)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvvl6r)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvvpyw)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvvtq0)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172xzjqscvvyg4)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d66)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxpvpyxhk9)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172xxxpvpyxm9f)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172xxxpvpz0dgd)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172xxxpvpz0j6j)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172xxxpvpz39ch)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172xxxpvpz3f3m)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172xxxpvpz668l)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172xxxpvpz6b0q)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172xxxpvpz935p)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172xxxpvpz96xt)

BBC Proms on the World Service 19:06 SAT (w3ct2gdj)

BBC Proms on the World Service 12:06 SUN (w3ct2gdj)

Bad Cops 10:06 SUN (w3ct2g78)

Bad Cops 22:06 SUN (w3ct2g78)

Bad Cops 03:06 MON (w3ct2g78)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j57)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jg8)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jp1)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1j9r)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3ct1j0q)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvqj8vg0dn8)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqjn3rdymq)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvqjn3rhvjt)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172xvqjn3rlrfx)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvqjn3rpnc0)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dh7)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pqx)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pqx)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1pqy)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lsk)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1lsk)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lsk)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct1m87)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct1m88)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct1m88)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct1m88)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mvb)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mvb)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (p04xtpwr)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (p04xtpwr)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (p04xtpwr)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3ct1nbr)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3ct1nbr)

HARDtalk 22:06 WED (w3ct1nbr)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3ct1n1q)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3ct1n1q)

HARDtalk 22:06 FRI (w3ct1n1q)

Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nvr)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nvs)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nvs)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nvs)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2kyh)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2kyh)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct2ptx)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tdh)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tdh)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1tdh)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dkh)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dkh)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2dkh)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dkh)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hcc)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hcc)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2v0m8v7f5)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172xv2v0m8vc59)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172xv2v0m8vgxf)

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Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172xv2v0m8y82d)

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Newsday 05:06 WED (w172xv2v0m9117c)

Newsday 06:06 WED (w172xv2v0m914zh)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172xv2v0m918qm)

Newsday 05:06 THU (w172xv2v0m93y4g)

Newsday 06:06 THU (w172xv2v0m941wl)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172xv2v0m945mq)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172xv2v0m96v1k)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172xv2v0m96ysp)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172xv2v0m972jt)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172xv58zjsmglq)

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Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172xv59bt3bp8h)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kxd)

Outlook 23:32 SUN (w3ct1kxd)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3ct1jtk)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3ct1jtk)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct1k3l)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3ct1k3l)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3ct1k3l)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1x)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l1x)

People Fixing The World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1plc)

People Fixing The World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1plc)

People Fixing The World 22:06 TUE (w3ct1plc)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l46)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3ct1l46)

Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3ct1l46)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0nhtytkqnl)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172y0nhtytnmkp)

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