Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 17 JULY 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0vvgv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqfcpxs6sk)
World leaders pledge to tackle effects of the pandemic

The 21 leaders of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation have met today (albeit virtually) to pledge urgent action to tackle the health and economic effects of the Covid-19 pandemic. Eric Martin of Bloomberg News in Washington DC gives us more context about what was discussed.

China has launched the world's largest carbon trading market in a bid to curb emissions. The BBC's Andrew Walker explains how such schemes work, and we ask Sha Hua of the Wall Street Journal whether the new market is likely to achieve its goal.

And how genuine are the online reviews for things we decide to buy - and what does this mean for the future of e-commerce? Our reporter Rebecca Kesby investigates the ways some sellers post fake reviews to boost sales.

Fergus Nicoll is joined throughout the programme by Colin Peacock of Radio New Zealand, who is in Wellington.

(Picture: New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0vz6z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv2)
No sign of it stopping: the spread of Covid in Bangladesh

Stories from Bangladesh, Eswatini, Russia and the US

When it comes to Covid, Bangladesh has had far less attention than its giant neighbour, India. And yet the situation in Bangladesh is critical; in this desperately poor country, a healthcare system which was struggling anyway has now been overwhelmed. Our correspondent, Akbar Hossein has witnessed people dying in the streets, and seen a cancer sufferer turned away from a hospital no longer able to offer treatment He also questions whether the government lockdown is working, or indeed, was ever expected to.

There was a time when kings ruled over much of Africa, as they did in other parts of the world. Now, there is only one African nation where a king holds sway: tiny Eswatini, sandwiched between South Africa and Mozambique. Formerly known as Swaziland, Eswatini is ruled over by King Mswati, a man with many wives, and many Rolls Royce cars to drive them around. Now, protests have broken out, with some telling our reporter Shingai Nyoka that they are no longer willing to accept such disparities in wealth.

How much would people care about a military hero born eight hundred years ago? Quite a lot if the country is Russia, and the hero is Alexander Nevsky. Nevsky is credited with repelling a whole string of foreign invaders, but it’s his role today that piqued the interest of our correspondent, Francis Scarr. As he watched a ceremony to honour Nevsky’s remains in a provincial Russian town, he reflected on why Vladimir Putin seems determined to remind Russians about Nevsky’s bravery, and his success in keeping foreigners at bay.

When she told people she had been living in a cave, most thought the writer Stephanie Theobald was speaking metaphorically. In fact, she has spent the past year as a troglodyte, in the Mojave Desert of Southern California, acquainting herself with lizards, coyotes and a very different way of life.

(Image: Garment workers in Dhaka, Bangladesh, where factories are allowed to remain open, despite a countrywide lockdown. Credit: Reuters/Mohammad Ponir Hossain)


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmkbhc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbp)
Michael Holding on racism, social media abuse and consequences

On this week’s Stumped with Alison Mitchell, Jim Maxwell and Charu Sharma, West Indies great Michael Holding discusses his powerful speech about racial injustice which went viral last year.

He speaks about his own experiences of racism, reacts to the social media abuse aimed at some of England’s footballers at the European Championships this week and discusses his new book 'Why We Kneel, How We Rise,' and whether it’s easier now for sports men and women to use their platform for change.

And with less than a week to go to the start of The Hundred, we discuss the implications of recent positive covid cases and look back at the India v England’s women multi-format series.

Photo: Former West Indies Cricketer Michael Holding shakes hands with West Indies captain Jason Holder. (Credit: ICC via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0w2z3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f5)
Women fighting to inherit

Why is it that so many women in the Arab world are deprived of their inheritance rights, even though local laws should protect them? Shereen Nanish of BBC Arabic has been looking at the pressures they face, and she’s met one Jordanian woman who is fighting back.

South Sudan’s first decade
The world's youngest country turned 10 this month. Nichola Mandil of BBC Africa reported from Juba in 2011, and again for the tenth anniversary. He reflects on his hopes and dreams as a brand new South Sudanese citizen back then, and how he feels now.

7,000 Chinese restaurants and counting!
BBC Chinese journalist Zhaoyin Feng shares the story of David Chan, a Chinese American who has eaten in over 7,000 Chinese restaurants since the 1950s, and has the whole thing logged on a spreadsheet!

School's out
Covid restrictions have had a devastating impact on children's education around the world. We hear from Aamir Peerzada in Indian-administered Kashmir, Shahnewaj Rocky of BBC Bengali in Bangladesh and Ishaq Khalid of BBC Hausa in Nigeria about the issues facing children and teachers in their countries.

It's a Hong Kong dog's life
Hong Kong is experiencing a rise in emigration after the introduction of the national security law, and it's had an unexpected knock-on effect - a rise in pet dogs being abandoned by their owners.  But BBC Chinese journalist Eunice Wang met one owner determined to bring her dog with her, whatever the cost: she booked a private jet.

Image: Signing a document
Credit: A Martin UW Photography/Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wys)
England's summer of riots

In the summer of 2001 race riots gripped towns in the north of England. They began in Oldham in late May 2001, spreading to Burnley in June, and Bradford in July. All had their own specific local triggers, but all involved clashes between men of white and of South Asian background. A report into the violence found communities were living in complete segregation, brewing suspicion and hatred. Barnie Choudhury reported on the riots for the BBC. He speaks to Farhana Haider about how they unfolded and their repercussions for the UK today.

Photo: Two youths pass by a burnt out car wreck, Oldham 29 May 2001. (Credit: ODD ANDERSEN/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0w6q7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsn)
Cuba at a crossroads

Unauthorised public gatherings are illegal in Cuba and protests are rare. But this week the island nation has witnessed its biggest demonstrations in decades. People took to the streets calling for an end to President Miguel Díaz-Canel's government. They blamed him for food and medicine shortages, price hikes and the government's handling of the Covid-19 pandemic. Mr Díaz-Canel described the demonstrators as 'counter-revolutionaries' and blamed the United States and its economic sanctions - in place in various forms since 1962 - for both the protests and Cuba's wider problems. So how big of a challenge do these demonstrations pose to Cuba's Communist government? Fidel Castro ruled for decades and was succeeded by his brother Raúl. How did their departure from the political stage change attitudes in the country and did it make protests more likely? And what is the Biden administration likely to do now? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts to discuss Cuba at a crossroads.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0wbgc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf7)
Water: Malian musician Inna Modja

This week, The Cultural Frontline is looking at a precious and vital resource: water. Chi Chi Izundu is finding out how issues of water scarcity, water sanitation and climate change are inspiring artists and musicians.

The Malian musician Inna Modja tells Chi Chi Izundu about an epic project to combat drought: the Great Green Wall. Spanning eleven countries in Africa’s Sahel region, the Great Green Wall is an initiative to grow an incredible 8000 kilometre wall of trees. Inna Modja talks about the film she’s made about the project and how the musicians she met on her journey along the wall inspired her.

Indian musician and activist Ditty combines her work as a musician with a career as an urban ecologist. She explains how the women working to collect and preserve water in northern India inspired her collaboration with the band Faraway Friends and their new album, Rain is Coming.

Nigerian writer Ben Okri has collaborated with British artists Ackroyd & Harvey to create an installation made entirely out of grass and float it down a river in London. He talks about how the living work of art will make us think about climate change.

Guatemalan artist Maria Diaz discusses her art installation made of oversized rain-sticks. Nostalgic for the rain of her homeland, whilst living in California with the threat of drought, Maria Diaz created this immersive piece to raise awareness about the importance of the vital resource, water.


(Photo: Inna Modja. Credit: Marco Conti Sikic)


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmkpqr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1q)
Spitfire: The People’s Plane

Scramble

15th September 1940 was the moment the Germans chose to drive the Spitfire from the battlefield. The people on the ground, guiding the Spitfires - spotters, plotters and fitters- will play a vital role in a day that changed the course of World War Two.

Presenter: Tuppence Middleton
Producers: Alasdair Cross and Emily Knight
Editors: Chris Ledgard and Kirsten Lass


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk7)
Long Covid and Vaccinating Children

The UK is preparing to lift remaining Covid restrictions in the face of a widespread outbreak of the highly-infectious Delta Variant. We look at two crucial questions the country is considering as it opens up: the risks of Long Covid, and the vaccination of children and young people.

With Professor Beate Kampmann from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and Dr Claire Steves from King’s College, London.

Producer: Nathan Gower


(Long Covid patient at a recovery clinic in Italy. Credit: Marco Di Lauro /Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0wg6h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt8cqr6vgl)
Biden accuses social media companies of 'killing people'

President Biden accuses social media companies of killing people by spreading misinformation about coronavirus vaccines.

Also, devastation in western Germany caused by this week's floods.

Plus, peace talks in Doha between the Afghan government and the Taliban - but as more of the country falls in to their hands, will the Taliban need to negotiate?

And Spain's tourist industry struggles with another rise in COVID-19 cases.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Lina Khatib, director of the Middle East and North Africa programme at the Chatham House international affairs think tank in London; and Koichi Nakano, Professor of Political Science at Sophia University in Tokyo.

(Image: U.S. President Joe Biden talks to the media as he departs for a weekend visit to Camp David. Credit: REUTERS)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0wkym)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt8cqr6z6q)
First case of coronavirus inside the Olympic Village in Japan

Organisers of the Olympics say they've found the first case of coronavirus inside the athletes' village, just six days before the Games open. We have reaction from Tokyo.

Also, rescuers are continuing efforts to find survivors of floods in Germany and the Benelux countries which have left more than a hundred-and-twenty people dead.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Lina Khatib, director of the Middle East and North Africa programme at the Chatham House international affairs think tank in London; and Koichi Nakano, Professor of Political Science at Sophia University in Tokyo.

(Image: Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic organizing committee president Seiko Hashimoto attends confirms the first COVID-19 case in the Olympic Village. Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0wppr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt8cqr72yv)
Prospects for Afghanistan's future in Doha

Senior Afghan leaders are in Doha to meet Taliban representatives, in an effort to speed up peace talks.

Also, President Joe Biden accuses social media companies like Facebook of killing people by allowing misinformation about the coronavirus pandemic on their platforms.

Plus, 'London Calling', a smashed guitar, and the best rock n'roll photo of all time.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Lina Khatib, director of the Middle East and North Africa programme at the Chatham House international affairs think tank in London; and Koichi Nakano, Professor of Political Science at Sophia University in Tokyo.

(Image: Chairman of Afghanistan's High Council for National Reconciliation, Abdullah Abdullah. Credit: REUTERS)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypml1z4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6s)
Women planting trees

Two women restoring forest in Brazil and Nepal tell Kim Chakanetsa about working with local communities to plant thousands of trees and restore the natural environment.

Francy Forero Sánchez is a Colombian primate researcher who volunteers with the environmental organisation Copaiba. It works with the community to restore parts of the Atlantic Forest in south eastern Brazil - one of the most endangered and biodiverse in the world. Run mainly by women the project produces native tree seedlings, plants trees and runs environmental education programmes.

Rachhya Kayastha fell in love with the natural world around her as a child in Nepal and would gather school friends to plant flowers in her neighbourhood. She's now National Director in Nepal for the US charity, Eden Reforestation Projects. The organisation sets up seed collection stations, develops plant nurseries and reforestation schemes giving work to local people, mostly women.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
Francy Forero Sánchez (courtesy Francy Forero Sánchez)
Rachhya Kayastha (courtesy Eden Reforestation Projects)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0wtfw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5y)
Coronavirus: England Unlocking

England is about to do what no country has done before during the coronavirus pandemic: open up in the face of rapidly rising infections, driven by the more transmissible Delta variant. The world is watching to see what happens.

Nearly all remaining Covid restrictions will end on 19th July. It will mean an end to legal requirements on social distancing, no limits on how many people can meet and face coverings will no longer be required by law.

England has high levels of immunity with significant numbers of the population vaccinated. The government’s plan is that this new so-called ‘natural’ wave of infections will be allowed to play itself out without lockdown restrictions. But many experts are warning that it is a gamble. Host Nuala McGovern hears from two doctors working for the National Health Service who share those concerns. One calls it ‘reckless’.

People who were seriously ill from Covid and continue to suffer the effects more than a year later explain why they are worried about the unlocking.

And, with the government saying that now is the time to repair the economic damage, two business owners share their challenges to regain customer confidence. One also explains how cake helped cure a few cases of vaccine hesitancy.

Picture: Shai Greenberg, CEO of Gielly Green, which runs two hair salons in London (Credit: Simon Brown)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypml5q8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2g70)
12: The Macau connection

“Dark arts” and murders. The investigation into the heist leads to a gambling mecca with a murky past – and a strong connection to North Korea. #LazarusHeist

Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/lazarusheist


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1n)
Outlook and the story of blackmail aimed at a former rugby star

The story of a former international rugby player who came out as gay and then faced being blackmailed about his HIV status. We hear reactions to this episode of Outlook and speak to the show’s presenter.

Plus, a listener wants to know why a show about Tanzania is heard across the whole of BBC Africa.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0wy60)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q1g06cc6n)
The last woman at the British Grand Prix

Divina Galica, on being the last woman to enter the British Grand Prix and how the former 4 time Olympian is still very much involved in the world of motorsport.

We talk to Australian pro cyclist Lachlan Morton, who has completed his remarkable journey of riding not only every stage of the Tour de France, but also cycling all of the transfers in between the stages too! He has completed a 5,500 km journey all by himself raised more than £450,000 for World Bike Relief.

Cuban born American Ileana Rodriguez talks to us about being Chef de Mission for the first ever refugee Paralympic team.

We hear from one athlete whose Olympic dream has been dashed by the pandemic. Jamaican swimmer Michael Gunning had achieved the qualifying time for Tokyo when the Games were postponed last year, fast forward to now and with a change to the number of places available on the team, he finds himself facing the cold, harsh reality that his Olympic dream is over.

Image: Divina Galica of Great Britain sits aboard the #14 Olympus Cameras with Hesketh Racing January 1978 at Silverstone (Photo by Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0x1y4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4znxd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmlf6j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3d)
What's the future of drones in India?

Across the world, drones are already being used to carry products, perform security surveillance or conduct warfare. It's becoming more common to hear the soft buzz of a drone flying overhead. India, which has so far trailed in adopting the technology, is now eager to ease norms and encourage the use of drones.

Does that mean getting your pizza delivered within 10 minutes with a drone flying in through your window? Would everyone welcome this trend? And how would it impact bigger scale applications in areas such as the military, healthcare and geospatial mapping?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how new policy rules could impact the drone industry's future.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Vipul Singh, co-founder, CEO, Aarav Unmanned Systems; Dr Ruchi Saxena, director, India Flying Labs; Smit Shah, director, Drone Federation of India


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0x5p8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gcz)
Breaking through

Breaking, also known as break-dancing, borne in New York City in the 1970s, is set to make its debut at the Olympic Games in Paris in 2024.

Four-time breaking world champion, BoxWon (Benyaamin Barnes McGee), traces how breaking went from Bronx block parties to NYC’s downtown art scene, to the world.

Speaking to legends of the scene, such as Rock Steady Crew's Ken Swift and B-Boy Glyde from Dynamic Rockers, BoxWon reveals how punk impresario, Malcolm McLaren, helped breaking become a worldwide craze in the 1980s - before it vanished. But breaking didn’t die. It just went back underground, only to re-emerge a decade later more extreme than ever.

When the International Olympic Committee proposed breaking as a new sport for the Olympic Games in Paris 2024, the general public were taken by surprise. As it attracts global corporate sponsorship and demands for more stringent rules and regulations, we hear about the scene’s own internal battle to maintain its integrity.

Presenter: BoxWon/Benyaamin Barnes McGee
Producer: Simona Rata
Research: Emmanuel Adelekun

(Photo: Break Dancer at The Venue, London 27 November 1982 Credit: David Corio/Redferns/Getty Images)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0x9fd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv562d8d8r0)
Europe floods: rescuers race to find survivors

Rescue crews are racing to find survivors of floods that have wreaked havoc across western Europe, killing more than 150 people. European leaders have blamed the extreme weather on climate change, which experts say makes torrential rainfall more likely.

Also in the programme: medical professionals in Myanmar face a double challenge of coping with Covid-19 patients and avoiding arrest by the military government; and Afghan peace talks have resumed in Qatar, as international concern mounts about the speed of the Taliban advance.

(Photo: a man carrying a shovel on his shoulder walks amid the debris near damaged cars after flooding in Bad Neuenahr-Ahrweiler, Germany. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0xf5j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tb6xm41xb)
Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0xx51)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n50j49)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmm8ff)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8f)
Stacy Dragila - Queen of the Women's Pole Vault

At the 2000 Sydney games, women were able to compete in the Pole Vault at the Olympics for the first time. It followed the emergence of a generation of vaulters led by America’s Stacy Dragila, who proved that women could master an event traditionally regarded as too physically demanding and too technically difficult for them. Stacy Dragila went on to win the first women’s Olympic gold medal in her discipline. She talks to Simon Watts.

PHOTO: Stacy Dragila competing in 1999 (Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0y0x5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gzl)
China in slogans

As the Chinese Communist Party celebrates its 100th anniversary, Celia Hatton looks at how party slogans reveal the turbulent history of modern China. Throughout its existence, the party has used key slogans to communicate policy and mobilise the country's vast population. These messages reflect not just the ambitions of party leaders but also have a profound impact on the lives of millions. Using the BBC archive Celia examines the story behind eight key Communist Party slogans, from their early years as a guerrilla movement to the campaigns of China's current all-powerful leader Xi XInping.

Contributors: Professor Vivienne Shue, Dr Jennifer Altehenger, Dr Olivia Cheung, author Lijia Zhang, Dr Rowena He, and New York Times correspondent Christopher Buckley.

(Photo: Chinese Communist Party poster with the slogan “Stop! And Hear The Message”. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0y4n9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt5)
Actor Olga Kurylenko

Hollywood actor Olga Kurylenko joins presenter Nikki Bedi on The Arts Hour to discuss her career and her role in the latest Marvel Universe film Black Widow.

We hear from the film’s director Cate Shortland about why working on the movie was like being in the middle of a tornado.

Nikki gets the lowdown on the movies making a splash at the Cannes Film Festival with Husam Asi from BBC Cinematic at BBC Arabic.

Actors Salma Hayek and Ryan Reynolds share the pitfalls of making an action film together.

Crime writer Karin Slaughter on what makes a good thriller.

Actor Stanley Tucci tells us about the importance of friendship on the set of his latest movie Supernova.

And we have music from violinist Randall Goosby, whose album Roots showcases pioneering black composers.


(Photo: Olga Kurylenko. Credit: Patrice Van Malder)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0y8df)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv562d8f7q1)
Search continues as over 170 confirmed dead in European floods

Many people are still missing as record rainfall led to severe floods in Germany and Belgium. A major rescue effort is ongoing.

German President Frank- Walter Steinmeier visited some of the worst hit areas and said that Germany stood together in the time of need.

Also in the programme: the winner of this year’s Palm D’Or at the Cannes Film Festival which has divided critics; and the world’s rarest postage stamp.

(Photo: North Rhine-Westphalia’s state premier and Christian Democratic Union (CDU) leader Armin Laschet speaks with volunteers as he visits the emergency accommodations for flood victims. CREDIT: Sebastien Bozon/Pool via REUTERS)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0yd4k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc3)
Giving voice to the voiceless with Ian Brennan, Alex Magaga, Van-Anh Vo and Gilbert Uwitonze

Producer Ian Brennan, Alex Magaga of the Tanzania Albinism Collective, Hanoi Masters musical director Van-Anh Vo and Rwandan folk musician Gilbert Uwitonze discuss how members of a community can intuitively start singing despite never having heard music before, accidents in the recording process (including a very loud cow), and music being a release from persecution.

Ian Brennan is a Grammy-winning producer, author, musician, and field recordist who’s been described as a “modern heir to the legendary ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax”, giving voices to the voiceless. His latest release, I've Forgotten Now Who I Used To Be, is a compilation of songs recorded in Ghana’s witch camps, settlements in which women persecuted as witches can find sanctuary.

Alex Magaga is a musician, activist, documentary producer, and member of the Tanzania Albinism Collective, which helps those who’ve been cast out from their communities, facing discrimination and violence. Van-Anh Vo is a musical director, zither player, and chief percussionist for Vietnamese project Hanoi Masters. The aim of the project is to “protect the heritage of traditional instruments” of Vietnam. Her father became a musician during the Vietnam-American war so that he didn’t have to fight. And Gilbert Uwitonze is part of the Rwandan band The Good Ones, who sing folk songs from their farming town of Kigali. All three members are survivors of the Rwandan genocide who turned to music to help with the healing process.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0yhwp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywqpxkbtfn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0shs60gw29)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmmw52)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Documentary (w3ct2gds)
Sporting heroines of history

Multi Gold-winning Paralympian Tanni Grey-Thompson explores the role of women in sport through history. In 2021, women’s sport is in the ascendancy. Women’s football is riding high after the 2019 World Cup, women’s snooker is reaching corners of the world it has never previously reached and darts is no longer a male preserve.

Meanwhile it is the 100th anniversary of the Women’s Olympiad – the first dedicated female sporting event in the world. Tanni looks at some of the milestones in sport for women over the decades and acknowledges several people who were pivotal in helping to make sure women were finally recognised – among them Alice Milliat, the French woman who organised that first international women’s sporting event in Monte Carlo in 1921.

Tanni reflects on some of those whose achievements really helped to change the course of history for women in sport – from athletes like Dale Greig, the first woman to run a marathon in under 3.5 hours, Russian Olgo Korbut who helped to change the perception of women in gymnastics, tennis player Althea Gibson, the first African-American to win a Grand Slam and the footballers who battled a five-decade ban on women playing on official grounds in England.
Tanni also assesses the contribution by women behind the scenes in sport.

(Photo: Tanni Grey-Thompson after finishing Fourth in the 200m T54 for Women at the 2004 Paralympic Games, Athens, Greece)



SUNDAY 18 JULY 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0yrcy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmn3nb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 01:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0yw42)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmn7dg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2g70)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0yzw6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gcz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0z3mb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dgz)
Is inflation back for good?

Some of the world’s biggest economies are starting to see the return of inflation after a long period of low prices and low interest rates. Central bankers seem pretty calm so far, but some economists are getting jittery. We’ll find out why prices are rising and what can be done to steady the global economic ship. As the EU announces dramatic plans to curb climate change we ask what more financial institutions can do to play their part.
We’ll hear how the fight against HIV/AIDS has progressed in the 40 years since it was first described in a medical journal.
With the Olympics just around the corner could shoes worn by some athletes be giving them an unfair advantage? We’ll be looking at so-called ‘mechanical doping’.
Plus, reporting from the garden of England, our reporter looks at the company developing new varieties of strawberries.
Business Weekly is produced by Clare Williamson and presented by Lucy Burton.
(Image: A gas station attendant fills a car in Peshawar, Pakistan, Image Credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0z7cg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmnlmv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0zc3l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt8cqr9rcp)
Death toll rises as flooding recedes in Europe

The scale of the damage from floods in Germany and Belgium is becoming clear, as rescue crews continue to look for victims.

Also, after unprecedented street demonstrations in Cuba we ask: have Cubans lost their fear?

Plus, an Italian journalist in London tells us why he was rooting for the English team during the European Football Championship.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are the journalist, Motoko Rich, New York Times Tokyo bureau chief; and Tom Holland, historian, author and broadcaster.

(Image: Rescue services clear wrecked cars and trucks from a federal highway in Erftstadt, Germany. Credit: EPA)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0zgvq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt8cqr9w3t)
‘I fear the worst for Afghanistan and my people’

As violence continues, Afghanistan’s young professionals, part of a generation that came of age and prospered in the new Afghanistan under the shield of the U.S. military, are weighing the danger of advancing Taliban forces. Many of them are now saying that staying put is no longer an option. Some have already left. We hear the story of one young couple who left last week.

Plus, Tokyo Olympics start this week. We’ll discuss what made these Games the most controversial in decades? We’ll hear from Satoko Itani, a professor of sport, gender, and sexuality studies at Kansai University and Laurence Halsted, two time Great Britain Olympic fencer

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are the journalist, Motoko Rich, New York Times Tokyo bureau chief; and Tom Holland, historian, author and broadcaster.

(Image: Families bury schoolchildren of blast that killed dozens in May, 2021. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0zllv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt8cqr9zvy)
Death toll rises as flooding recedes in Europe

The scale of the damage from floods in Western Europe is becoming clear, as rescue crews continue to look for victims. We’ll hear from one of the worst hit areas in germany

Also, two tales of sporting glory: Slovenian cyclist, Tadej Pogacar leading Tour de France and Great Britain’s artistic gymnast Amelie Morgan on her road to Tokyo Olympics.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are the journalist, Motoko Rich, New York Times Tokyo bureau chief; and Tom Holland, historian, author and broadcaster.

(Image: Dutch Prime Minister, Mark Rutte, speaks to the press in Venlo, the Netherlands, after heavy rains caused floods in many parts of the country. Credit: EPA)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmnyw7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr6)
Nigella Lawson: My life in five dishes

The internationally-acclaimed food writer and TV cook Nigella Lawson, tells her life story through five memorable dishes. Often filmed devouring food with a showy relish, she tells Emily Thomas how her mother’s bulimia sparked a life-long determination to enjoy eating.

Nigella explains how a series of bereavements has led her to memorialise her loved ones through recipes, and why she’s become more protective of her privacy in recent years.

Nigella’s books and TV shows often give the impression of a gregarious host, cooking for a multitude of family and friends, but her latest book ‘Cook, Eat, Repeat’ and its accompanying TV series, partly written and produced during lockdown, show her on her own. We find out how she’s coped.

(Picture: Nigella Lawson. Credit: Matt Holyoak/ BBC).


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0zqbz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmp2mc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx4)
Escape from our "metal coffin" on the ocean floor

In 1988, after colliding with a fishing trawler at the surface, the Peruvian submarine Pacocha sank to the bottom of the Pacific ocean. With 22 men trapped inside, with no water, a fire on board and depleting oxygen, First Lieutenant Roger Cotrina Alvarado was determined to save his crew. An escape plan was hatched, but getting out of the submarine was only the first step - they still had to find a way to make the 42-metre ascent to the surface. Would they make it out alive? Part 2 of 2.

Part 1 is available here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3ct1kx3

Presented by Clayton Conn
Produced by Clayton Conn and Mariana Des Forges
Interpreter: Martin Esposito

Picture: Collage of photographs of the Pacocha, crew, the submarine and Roger Cotrina Alvarado receiving a medal
Credit: all photos courtesy of Roger Cotrina Alvarado

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0zv33)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g98)
Two smiley faces: Episode three

We travel to California to find out who controls the emoji available on every single smartphone in the world - the mysterious Unicode Consortium. This secretive organisation decides what is included and what is left off the official emoji keyboard. But are they up to the job? Not everyone is convinced. (Episode 3 of 6.)

Presenters: Sarah Treanor and Vivienne Nunis


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmp6ch)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2gj2)
The Uighur Poets

Uighur poetry is and has been for centuries a fundamental part of the culture and members of the community write poetry and often recite part poems that have been passed down the generations and learn off by heart. As the community face widespread persecution by the Chinese authorities and at a time of great despair and fear for them, Uighurs speak to us about the ways in which poetry offers ways of support, succour and resistance.

The programme features the voices and works of Uighurs, poets and experts from across the world.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0zyv7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n52kth)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmpb3m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2g9n)
The Test

Covid and economic stimulus

Prior to Covid, the US economy had been declining compared with other countries, and the pandemic itself highlighted existing weaknesses. Now America’s economy is surging, powered by President Joe Biden’s massive financial stimulus plan. International economist Jim O’Neill hears from economists who argue that new fiscal policies could support a transformational moment for America’s economy - and from others who warn that dangerous inflationary pressures are being stoked.

(Photo: President Joe Biden delivers remarks on the state of his American Rescue Plan from the State Dining Room at the White House, Washington, D.C. Credit: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz102lc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gzl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz106bh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv562d8h5n3)
England to drop coronavirus restrictions amid soaring cases

England will lift most of its remaining pandemic restrictions on Monday, despite rapidly rising cases. The British Home Secretary, Sajid Javid, has tested positive for Covid and the prime minister is isolating at home. Is the dropping of rules realistic or reckless? We unpick the politics with our reporter Rob Watson and then debate the pros and cons with Oxford epidemiologist Sunetra Gupta and Walter Ricciardi, an advisor to the Italian and French governments and president of the World Federation of Public Health Associations.

Also in the programme: the latest on Germany's devastating floods, and a film about the forgotten 1969 Harlem music festival some are calling 'The Black Woodstock'.

(Photo: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Credit: Ian West/PA Wire)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz10b2m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rld)
Rain or shine? A short history of the weather forecast

How did we get from not having any reliable way of predicting the weather just 150 years ago, to today's accurate, tailor-made forecasts for places as small as a village? Bridget Kendall and guests trace the history of meteorology, from its first steps as an aid to quicker trans-Atlantic shipping to the latest methods which can help anticipate weather events as short-lived as a tornado.

Bridget is joined by Kristine Harper, a former US Navy forecaster and now a history professor at Florida State University; Peter Gibbs who started out as a meteorologist with the British Antarctic Survey and the UK's Met Office before becoming one of the best known weather forecasters on BBC radio and television; and Peter Moore, a writer and historian with a particular interest in weather discoveries of the 19th century.

Photo: A hurricane is seen from the International Space Station. (Scott Kelly/NASA via Getty Images)


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz10ftr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz10kkw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tb6xm769p)
Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz10xt8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n53jsj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmq92n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2gj2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz111kd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dgz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz1159j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv562d8j4m4)
England prepares to lift coronavirus restrictions

England is preparing to lift almost all legal coronavirus restrictions tomorrow. It will mark an end to limits on how many people can meet. Self-isolation rules will remain in place.

The Prime Minister Boris Johnson is currently in self-isolation after coming into contact with Health Secretary Sajid Javid, who tested positive for Covid-19. Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak is also in self-isolation.

Also in the programme: Slovenian cyclist Tadej Pogačar wins the Tour De France; and the latest from the peace talks between the Afghan government and Taliban militants in Doha.

(Photo: Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson. CREDIT: REUTERS/Peter Nicholls/File Photo)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz1191n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmqnb1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2g70)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz11dss)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywqpxkfqbr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0shs60krzd)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmqs25)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 19 JULY 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b5hk6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl8rpjk3qg)
Covid rules ease in England

From 00:00 BST Monday, there will be no limits on how many people can meet or attend events, nightclubs can reopen, and table service will not be necessary in pubs and restaurants. And responsibility for ensuring people take precautions to prevent the spread of coronavirus while out shopping will be passed to owners of stores, but the fear is that shop workers face a bigger risk of getting infected as we hear from Andrew Goodacre, Chief Executive of the British Independent Retailers Association. So will people still wear masks now that it's no longer legally required? We get analysis from Doctor Katie Attwell, a vaccination, social science and policy expert at the University of Western Australia.OPEC and its allies, like Russia, have agreed to increase production from next month, aiming to keep a lid on rising crude prices, which could undermine economic recovery; independent economist Michael Hughes tells us whether these aims are likely to be achieved. China is banning the construction of very tall skyscrapers, after a 70 storey building in Shenzhen started to wobble; we get analysis from the BBC's Kerry Allen. Plus Dr David Whitehouse, a scientist and author of Space 2069, tells us about the influence of NASA'a shuttle project on companies investing in space travel. (Picture of a crowded bar, Picture credit, Getty Images).


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxvvtl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td6)
Apichatpong Weerasethakul: From Colombia to Cannes

Apichatpong Weerasethakul, the Palme d’Or award-winning Thai filmmaker and artist, is back at the Cannes Film Festival this year with his film, Memoria, which has just been selected for the main competition.

Starring Tilda Swinton, Memoria is Apichatpong’s first feature film to be shot outside his native Thailand.

Apart from being shot in the mountains of Colombia and centering on a widow, played by Swinton, who goes in search of her own identity after hearing a series of mysterious bangs, many details of the film have been kept under wraps.

With exclusive access to the Director, cast and crew, In the Studio joins Apichatpong on the shoot in Colombia and follows him through to the post-production in Thailand.

Join reporter Manuela Ochoa to find out more.

Reporter: Manuela Ochoa
Produced by Ella-mai Robey and Harry Parker for the BBC World Service


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b5m9b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5z)
Michael Holding: Can sport win its fight against racism?

HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to Michael Holding, the former West Indies cricket great who is now a prominent voice confronting racism. In England, there’s a fierce debate about how best to root out racism, following vile abuse aimed at black footballers. But it’s an issue confronting many sports. Is this a fight sport can win?

Image: Michael Holding (Credit: Mike Egerton/PA Wire)


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxvzkq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqn)
Why do my cables keep getting tangled?

Anyone who has ever taken the Christmas lights out of the cupboard, only to discover they’re hopelessly tangled, will sympathise with this week’s listener Eric. He has a 45m garden hose that always seems to snarl up and snag when he waters his garden, and he wonders what he’s doing wrong?

Marnie starts by discovering the important difference between tangles and knots, as she scales a cliff with an experienced climber who explains the way you tie rope is a matter of life and death.

Physicists are also fascinated in how string becomes jumbled up and one man has even won an IgNobel award for his work in this field. Doug E Smith discovered that if you put a piece of string in a box then spin it around, its length, thickness and how long you shake the box for, all determine whether it will tie itself up. Not only that, the more the string becomes twisted, the more likely it is to cross over itself and become impossible to untangle.

While tangles might be annoying in hair or cables, they’re also a fundamental part of human life. Our DNA is constantly folding itself to fit inside tiny spaces – there are two metres of the stuff inside every cell, where it’s packed down tightly, before it must untangle and duplicate for those cells to divide. It does this with the help of specific enzymes, and when the process goes wrong it leads to cell death. But scientists are also studying molecular tangles that might benefit us humans, and creating nano-sized knots that can be turned into nets or meshes with incredible properties.
Producer: Ilan Goodman
Presenter: Marnie Chesterton


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b5r1g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g98)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxw39v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2gj2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b5vsl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqr)
The North American heatwave

The heatwave that hit parts of the west coast of North America shattered records by several degrees. It affected parts of the United States and Canada that were unused to extreme heat. Hundreds of people died and emergency teams were pushed to their limits. In Lytton, Canada, temperatures reached 49.6 degrees celsius. Days later, the entire village burnt down.

Scientists say that climate change had made this heatwave 150 times more likely. They also warn that, if global warming continues, about one-third of the world’s population will become threatened by extreme heat.

So does our attitude to extreme heat need to change?

Joining presenters Neal Razzell and Manuela Saragosa:

Bob Ward, policy and communications director at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment
Dr Lipika Nanda, vice president, multisectoral planning in public health, Public Health Foundation of India
Dr Christienne Alexander, president of the Florida Academy of Family Physicians
Daniel Stevens, director, Vancouver Emergency Management Agency
Dallas Gonsalves, centre manager for Gathering Place Community Centre
Martin Paulson, operations chief of the Vancouver Fire Department.

Producer: Darin Graham
Series producer: Rosamund Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound engineer: Tom Brignell


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxw71z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6t)
Ghostwriters for hire

Some people live the most amazing lives but aren't always the best at putting those experiences into words. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two ghostwriters about collaborative writing - what do they enjoy about telling someone else's story?

Michelle Burford is a celebrity memoir collaborator who’s written for hugely successful women like Cicely Tyson, Alicia Keys and Simone Biles. Having carved out a niche writing with famous Black women she’s also collaborated on the traumatic memoir of Michelle Knight, kidnapped and held captive by Ariel Castro in Cleveland, Ohio for ten years – and TV carpenter, Clint Harp.

Ellen Banda-Aaku is an author from Zambia. She's written award winning books for children and adults and took up ghostwriting to bring in a steady income. She writes for StoryTerrace - a paid-for service which helps people write their autobiographies. This has included a woman smuggled out of Iran, another who left an abusive marriage and a man jailed in Somalia who later dedicated his life to humanitarian aid.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
(L) Michelle Burford, credit Meg Rybicki
(R) Ellen Banda-Aaku, courtesy Ellen Banda-Aaku


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b5zjq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2r3grm1kg)
England marks 'Freedom Day' as Covid infections surge

We hear from delighted nightclubbers and an aghast public health expert as restrictions are lifted.

Only days from the opening of the Olympic Games in the middle of Japan's fifth wave, the governor of Tokyo tells the BBC that they are more determined than ever for the games to go ahead.

And how the poison of the funnel web spider has a molecule which blocks the so-called "death signal" for heart attack victims.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b638v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2r3grm59l)
A doctor's perspective on England's 'Freedom Day'

A medic tells us that the National Health Service is threatened by the lifting of Covid restrictions: "We're literally at the top of the leader-board for the number of new cases each day".

The Olympics WILL go ahead despite a rise in covid cases in Japan and a growing number of athletes testing positive.

And a British court today decides which of the two men claiming to be the leader of Venezuela will get access to a billion dollars worth of gold bullion.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b670z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2r3grm91q)
British Prime Minister self-isolating on 'Freedom Day'

England's remaining Covid restrictions have been removed despite a spike in cases. The government is counting on high vaccination rates to protect the population.

We look at how private Israel spyware was used against activists and journalists around the world by governments.

And how Covid cases are going up in Israel - a country that vaccinated it's adult population at the fastest rate.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b6bs3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxwq1h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j4z)
Chefs call time on abusive practices

Is it time the old trope of the brilliant, angry chef gets retired for good? Michelin-starred chefs are often famous for their skill, precision and passion. But many of them are just as well-known for their tyrannical and belligerent behaviour towards staff. With ever more allegations surfacing of abuse and harassment in Michelin-starred restaurants, leaders in the industry are calling for the culture to change once and for all. Eric Rivera, owner and head chef at Addo in Seattle tells the BBC’s Tamasin Ford about the abuse he’s seen and experienced first-hand, and why he thinks it’s always white male chefs who get praised for this behaviour. Asma Khan, chef and owner of Darjeeling Express in London, says chefs should be stripped of their accolades if found to be abusive. Chef and TikTok star Poppy O’Toole says she’s worried that without positive change, an industry ravaged by Covid-19 might never fully recover. And Viviana Varese, chef and owner of Viva in Milan, tells Tamasin how she built an inclusive and supportive environment for her staff, while still achieving Michelin-star excellence.

Producer: Frey Lindsay

(Photo: Chef holding a pan in flames. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x12)
Domestic violence in Brazil

Ground-breaking legislation came into effect in Brazil in 2006. For the first time the courts were ordered to recognise different forms of domestic violence. The 'Maria da Penha law' was named after a women's rights activist who was left paralysed by her abusive husband. Maria told Mike Lanchin her chilling story.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Maria da Penha now.


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b6gj7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxwtsm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b6l8c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxwyjr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b6q0h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxg99zr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxx28w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b6trm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt9)
From songbird to birdsong expert

Professor Gisela Kaplan has had a lifelong bond with birds. As a lonely child in post-war Berlin, she would visit a family of swans for company. They made her feel safe and comfortable, offering some consolation during an otherwise hard childhood. This relationship formed a fascination with birds that eventually saw her becoming a highly-regarded ethologist, a specialist in animal behaviour, and an expert in Australian magpie warbles. Along the way, Gisela had a career in opera singing, before moving to Australia and becoming an academic. It was a surprise gift from her partner - a course in animal rehabilitation - that saw her hand-rear native birds, including an Australian magpie she named Maria Callas. Over the next 25 years, Gisela was to make some remarkable discoveries about how the species communicates, helped along by her operatic knowledge.

Protecting the embattled ocean is a tough job anywhere in the world, perhaps even more so in the coastal city of Lagos where piles of waste wash up on its shores every day. Doyinsola Igunye has been working hard to clean up Nigeria's beaches with the help of local children and in 2018, she told Outlook's Ijeoma Ndukwe how she's been saving sea turtles at the same time.
First broadcast in October 2018

Picture: Image of portrait of Gisela Kaplan by Raffaela Casadei 
Credit: Raffaela Casadei 

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x12)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b6yhr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxg9kh0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxx9s4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b727w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv56fnkq1kh)
England lifts nearly all Covid-19 restrictions

Most of England's legal restrictions to protect against the coronavirus have ended, despite a surge in cases. The British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said it is “now or never”. It means all businesses can re-open, and an end to mandatory mask-wearing and social distancing. Will the government's gamble pay off?

Also on the programme: a huge data leak suggests activists, politicians and journalists around the world have been monitored using spyware; and the governor of Tokyo tells us why the Olympics had to go ahead.

(Picture: Credit: PA Media)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b7600)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxxk8d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4814z8sf3v)
The collapse of Florida's Champlain Towers South

We examine the causes of last month's collapse of Champlain Towers South in Florida. Almost a hundred residents are now confirmed to have died in the disaster, and Steve Rosenthal, who lived in the building, tells us he was lucky to escape with his life. Ana Bozovic is a real estate broker and founder of Analytics Miami who works near the collapsed block, and discusses the red flags that were raised about Champlain Towers South in the past. And Benjamin Schafer, who is a structural engineer and professor at Johns Hopkins University explains one of the main theories about why the building's structure failed so catastrophically. Also in the programme, as most remaining coronavirus restrictions are lifted in England, the number of cases of coronavirus continues to rise. That's given rise to what's been dubbed the 'pingdemic', where hundreds of thousands of people are being asked to isolate by the official Test and Trace mobile phone app, because they came into contact with someone who subsequently tested positive for Covid-19. Tony Sophoclides is strategic affairs director at UK Hospitality, and explains the impact it is having on the bars, clubs and other leisure venues its members run. Plus, a news agency has been launched in Africa called Bird, which aims to find inspirational human interest and feature stories from across the continent. We find out more from Moky Makura, executive director of Africa No Filter, which has given its backing to the project.

(Picture: The partially collapsed Champlain Towers South. Picture credit: EPA.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b79r4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxlykfp9pl)
South Africa: Zuma corruption trial

We go to South Africa where former president Jacob Zuma has appeared today on a video link from prison to attend his corruption trial. The decision to sentence Mr Zuma to 15 months in jail sparked protests which quickly turned violent – leading to more than 200 deaths, and widespread looting and arson. We bring together three journalists who covered the protests in different parts of the country.

And the UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has urged the public to show caution, as most legal restrictions on social contact are lifted in England. Some scientists are predicting that UK infections - currently at about 50,000 a day - could reach 200,000 a day later in the summer. We hear how people in England are feeling, as well as talk to our regular health experts about the science behind the government’s decision making.

And all this week, as we near the start of the Tokyo Olympics on Friday, we continue our Coronavirus conversations series, focussing on the upcoming games. Today we hear from three Olympic athletes taking part.

(Photo: South Africa President Jacob Zuma 04/07/2021 Credit EPA)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b7fh8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxlykfpffq)
Heading for the Tokyo Olympics

As we near the start of the postponed Tokyo Olympics this Friday, we speak to three athletes who are heading to the Games. Adeline Gray is a wrestler for the United States, Catharine Pendrel is a mountain biker for Canada and Ankita Raina plays tennis for India. How do they feel about the prospect of no spectators and living in athlete bubbles?

Today is being called "Freedom Day" by some people in England. Nearly all legal limits on social contact end. Groups of any size can now meet both inside and outside. Face coverings are no longer required by law. The British government has defended its decision to go ahead with lifting Covid restrictions in England, despite a sharp rise in covid-19 infections from the Delta variant. We hear how people in England are feeling about the lifting of restrictions and we talk to our regular health experts.

And we go to South Africa where former president Jacob Zuma has appeared on a video link from prison today to attend his corruption trial. The decision to sentence Mr Zuma to 15 months in jail sparked protests which quickly turned violent – leading to more than 200 deaths, and widespread looting and arson. We bring together three journalists who covered the protests in different parts of the country.

Picture: Canada's Catharine Pendrel during the Olympic Mountain Biking test event in Izu, Shizuoka in October 2019 (Takashi Aoyama / Getty Images)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b7k7d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x12)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b7nzj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxgb8ys)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxy17x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ndxt9bjsw)
2021/07/19 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b7sqn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxy501)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2gj0)
Dare to repair: The fight for the right to repair

Many electronics manufacturers are making it harder for us, to fix our broken kit. There are claims that programmed obsolescence is alive and well, with mobile phone batteries designed to wear out after just 400 charges. They claim it's for safety or security reasons, but it pushes constant replacement and upgrades. But people are starting to fight back. Mark Miodownik talks to the fixers and repairers who are heading up the Right to Repair movement which is forcing governments to act, and making sustainability and value for money part of the consumer equation.

Producer: Fiona Roberts

(Photo: A pile of discarded computer circuit board. Credit: Tara Moore/Getty Images)


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b7xgs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv56fnkqwsd)
China accused of cyber-attack on Microsoft

The UK, US, and EU have accused China of carrying out a major cyber-attack earlier this year.

The attack targeted Microsoft Exchange servers, affecting at least 30,000 organisations globally.

Also in the programme, as many Covid restrictions are lifted in England, is it time to celebrate or cower? And a ferocious drought in south-west Iran has sparked deadly protests.


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b816x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxydh9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b84z1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywr25vngj0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sj4g9sj4n)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxyj7f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48vlpwhpj5)
The collapse of Florida's Champlain Towers South

We examine the causes of last month's collapse of Champlain Towers South in Florida. Almost a hundred residents are now confirmed to have died in the disaster, and Steve Rosenthal, who lived in the building, tells us he was lucky to escape with his life. Ana Bozovic is a real estate broker and founder of Analytics Miami who works near the collapsed block, and discusses the red flags that were raised about Champlain Towers South in the past. And Benjamin Schafer, who is a structural engineer and professor at Johns Hopkins University explains one of the main theories about why the building's structure failed so catastrophically. Also in the programme, as most remaining coronavirus restrictions are lifted in England, the number of cases of coronavirus continues to rise. That's given rise to what's been dubbed the 'pingdemic', where hundreds of thousands of people are being asked to isolate by the official Test and Trace mobile phone app, because they came into contact with someone who subsequently tested positive for Covid-19. Tony Sophoclides is strategic affairs director at UK Hospitality, and explains the impact it is having on the bars, clubs and other leisure venues its members run. And travel expert Simon Calder tells us why the US is advising against travel to the UK. Plus, a news agency has been launched in Africa called Bird, which aims to find inspirational human interest and feature stories from across the continent. We find out more from Moky Makura, executive director of Africa No Filter, which has given its backing to the project. (Picture: The partially collapsed Champlain Towers South. Picture credit: EPA.)

(Picture: The partially collapsed Champlain Towers South. Picture credit: EPA.)



TUESDAY 20 JULY 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b8dg9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqfqz75rs0)
US advises citizens against UK travel

In a blow to the UK's tourist and aviation industries, the CDC has advised US citizens against travel to the country. We hear more from travel expert, Simon Calder. In Germany, catastrophic flooding has left at least 160 people dead and more than 170 others missing; later this week, Angela Merkel is expected to roll out an emergency aid package for those affected. We hear from the BBC's Damien McGuinness in the village of Nuerburg. And we examine the causes of last month's collapse of Champlain Towers South in Florida with Ana Bozovic, a real estate broker and founder of Analytics Miami and Benjamin Schafer, a structural engineer and professor at Johns Hopkins University. Plus, a news agency has been launched in Africa called Bird, which aims to find inspirational human interest and feature stories from across the continent. We find out more from Moky Makura, executive director of Africa No Filter, which has given its backing to the project. And we're joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the Pacific, Les Williams, associate professor at The School of Engineering at The University of Virginia and a co-founder of Risk Cooperative, and Lulu Chen, Asia Investing team leader for Bloomberg News in Hong Kong. (Picture of a Virgin Atlantic Boeing 787. Picture credit: Robert Smith via Getty Images).


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b8j6f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl3)
Unsung victories in the fight against disease

Recent years have seen remarkable successes against some of the most unpleasant illnesses on the planet.

While much of the world’s focus has been on the fight against Covid-19, the battle against other diseases rages on.

From the battle against hepatitis C in Egypt, to the war against metre-long parasitic worms, to the near elimination of sleeping sickness in the Ivory Coast, we hear the good news that you might have missed.

Produced and presented by Tom Colls

Image: Treating sleeping sickness in the Ivory Coast (Credit: Vincent Jamouneau)


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxywgt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 Discovery (w3ct2gj0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b8myk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x12)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b8rpp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdt)
Lex Gillette: A leap in the dark

Lex Gillette was seven years old when his eyes stopped working. At first, things were a little blurry, a little distorted. Then, after 10 operations to treat the retinas that kept detaching in both his right and his left, he saw nothing but darkness.

But that did not stop him: Lex learned to ride a bike. He learned to run around. And eventually, he learned to to jump - jump farther than any other blind person in the world. Lex Gillette - world record long jumper, four time Paralympic medal winner - is on his way to Tokyo in 2021 to get the gold medal he has wanted since he was a child.

The other half of the Lex Gillette Paralympic success story is his guide coach, Wesley Williams. He and Lex have trained and competed together for 14 years. Tokyo will be their third Games together. As Lex begins his approach, running the 16 steps towards the take-off point, amidst all the sound of stadium, Wesley will make as much noise as he can - clapping and shouting in the way they have practised over and over again - keeping Lex on target to jump from the right spot and fly as far as he can. Further than any blind man in history. So far, that’s 6.73 metres.

The key to their success is the record of their relationship. They share vulnerabilities in order to develop strength, they are humble in order to hear, and they have a clear, shared vision that becomes phenomenal success.

(Photo: Elexis Gillette of the United States competes the Men's Long Jump T11 Final, Paralympics Athletics Grand Prix, Rio 2016 Olympics. Credit: Buda Mendes/Getty Images)


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxz3z2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td7)
Designing football boots

Adidas senior design director, Dave Surace and senior category director Rob Ashcroft create the next pair of football boots for the years ahead. These boots - if a success - will sit on shop shelves across the world and grace the feet of the biggest footballing stars.

Football journalist Raphael Honigstein guides us through the duo's process, as they balance new, exciting ideas with tried and tested formulas. Dave sketches out the new design, discussing the materials he uses and the dream boots he has in his mind, and reflects on how designing links back to his childhood.

For Rob Ashcroft, his domain lies in what has worked before. Armed with the stats about which designs sell well and why, he guides Dave and his team towards a boot that not only looks good, but performs well on the pitch and the shop floor too.

But what is success for them both? A slick design? An impressed athlete? Or a sales boom? And which one of these takes precedence when designing a new football boot?

Raphael follows the process from rigorous testing to the storytelling of the product, and hears the final moment when Dave and Rob get to unbox their creation for the very first time.

Producer: Sean Allsop

(Image: A pair of Adidas X Speedflow boots, courtesy of adidas)


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b8wft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2r3grpygk)
Pedro Castillo declared president-elect of Peru

The country's election authority announced its verdict after reviewing claims of electoral fraud by his right-wing rival, Keiko Fujimori.

Another billionaire is about to blast off into space; this time it's the founder of Amazon Jeff Bezos.

And how Ghanaians are trying to protect their water from gold mining pollution


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b905y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2r3grq26p)
Peru: former village teacher becomes President

Son of peasant farmers, Pedro Castillo, takes power, promising to level up the economy for the country's poorest.

Ben and Jerry's end its sale of ice cream in occupied Palestinian territories. The Israeli Prime Minister calls the move "morally wrong".

And how a new treatment might be healing lungs scarred by Covid-19.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b93y2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2r3grq5yt)
Peru's new 'teacher President'

Pedro Castillo is declared president-elect of Peru - promising a new brand of socialism.

Dominic Cummings, the former adviser to Boris Johnson, has told the BBC that the British Prime Minister's Covid plans were "completely insane".

And we speak to a scientist who believes it's right to end lockdown in Britain now - despite the misgivings of many doctors and medical staff.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b97p6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxzlyl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jg0)
Vatican reforms see a cardinal on trial

Ten people, including an Italian cardinal, will face a Vatican trial for alleged financial crimes. Cardinal Angelo Becciu has become the highest-ranked cleric in the Vatican to be indicted over charges that include embezzlement and abuse of office. The charges relate to a multi-million-dollar property purchase with church funds in London. Ines San Martin, Rome reporter for Crux, outlines the charges and what we know about the trial so far. This will mark the first time such a high-ranking Vatican official will face trial over financial crimes, but Gerald Posner, an investigative journalist and author of God's Bankers: A History of Money and Power at the Vatican, explains financial scandals themselves are nothing new for the Vatican Bank. And Massimo Faggioli, Vatican historian and Professor of Theology and Religious Studies at Villanova University, explains how this trial sits among Pope Francis' larger efforts for reform.

(Picture: Cardinal Giovanni Angelo Becciu and Pope Francis. Picture credit: Reuters.)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5l)
The Battle of Gondar

In 1941, Italian colonial rule in East Africa ended when Mussolini’s soldiers made a dramatic final stand in the northern Ethiopian town of Gondar. After a bloody battle, General Guglielmo Nasi surrendered to troops from the British empire and Ethiopian fighters loyal to Emperor Haile Selassie. Simon Watts listens to an account in the BBC archive from Rene Cutforth, who was then a British army officer and later became a distinguished BBC war correspondent.

PHOTO: Italian soldiers surrendering in the build-up to the Battle of Gondar (Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b9cfb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxzqpq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2gj0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b9h5g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b9lxl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxgd6wv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yxzz5z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b9qnq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwk)
Seven months trapped in an airport

Hassan Al Kontar always dreamed of being a journalist, but it was a dream he felt he couldn't pursue in his native Syria, so in 2006 he moved to the United Arab Emirates. But when the Syrian conflict began in 2011, Hassan was faced with an agonising choice - either leave his job, go home, and face military service or stay in the UAE and risk losing his right to work. He chose the latter and spent over five years homeless before being deported to Malaysia where he could only stay for three months. Then Hassan's situation became even more difficult. He tried to fly to Ecuador but wasn't allowed to board the plane, and when he was denied entry to Cambodia, he found himself back in Malaysia’s Kuala Lumpur airport, confined to the transit area with no money, no passport and no way out. Hassan would end up living there for seven months. He's written a book about his experience called Man at the Airport.

News clips came courtesy of CNN, TVNZ and France 24

Picture: Hassan Al Kontar sitting on a chair at Kuala Lumpur airport. Credit:  Hassan Al Kontar

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b9vdv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxgdgd3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy06p7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2gj0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7b9z4z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv56fnksygl)
New Haitian Prime Minister to be sworn in

Ariel Henry was previously made Prime Minister by the assassinated President, Jovenel Moïse, but was not sworn into office. The current acting Prime Minister, Claude Joseph, has agreed to step down. A new government could be formed later today.

Also, Dominic Cummings, the ex-chief adviser to the UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson, has accused his former boss of almost putting the Queen in danger of infection by Covid-19; and a woman from Myanmar tells us how the politicised health system there led to the death of her uncle from Covid.

(Photo: Floral tributes to president Moïse Credit: EPA)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bb2x3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy0g5h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bhh52y79t)
Space tourism race gathers pace

As Amazon's Jeff Bezos blasts to space on his rocket, we look at the space tourism race. Bezos's Blue Origin joins Elon Musk and Richard Branson in the club of very rich people with big ambitions on the rest of the universe, and Dr Maggie Lieu, an astrophysicist at Nottingham University, brings us the background. Also in the programme, the Centre for Global Development claims that excess deaths in India are ten times higher than normal, meaning the death toll from coronavirus could be in the millions, rather than the official estimate of around 400,000. Professor Uma Kambhampati is head of the School of Politics, Economics and International Relations at the University of Reading, and discusses the implications. The BBC's Tamasin Ford reports on the Vatican trial of Cardinal Angelo Becciu, who has become the highest-ranked cleric in the Vatican to be indicted on charges that include embezzlement and abuse of office. Plus, our regular workplace commentator, Peter Morgan, considers the future of work after the pandemic, in a world where there is a difference between what boardrooms want, and what workers aspire to.

(Picture: Blue Origin's New Shepard rocket launches. Picture credit: Reuters.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bb6n7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxlykfs6lp)
Jeff Bezos launches into space

We get all the reaction to the first human space flight of New Shepard, a suborbital rocket system developed by Jeff Bezos’ aerospace company Blue Origin. The Amazon founder will be joined by his brother Mark, along with 82-year-old Wally Funk, one of the 13 women who passed NASA's astronaut training program in the 1960s but were denied the chance to become astronauts themselves because of their gender. We speak to a friend of Wally Funk.

And we look at the impact of the Pegasus malware, said to be being used in various countries to target rights activists, journalists and lawyers.

And Dr Isaac Bogoch, an infectious diseases physician and scientist from the University of Toronto, give his take on the latest Coronavirus headlines and answers questions from listeners. Send your questions in via WhatsApp on +447730 751925.

(Photo: Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and his brother Mark board ahead of their scheduled flight aboard Blue Origin"s New Shepard rocket near Van Horn, Texas, U.S. July 20, 2021. Credit: Blue Origin/Reuters)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bbbdc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxlykfsbbt)
Oregon fires prompts thousands of evacuations

We hear from people in the US state of Oregon, where the nation's largest active wildfire has burned through more than 300,000 acres, prompting thousands of evacuations. Over 2,000 firefighters are tackling the so-called Bootleg Fire - one of the largest blazes in Oregon's history.

And Dr Swapneil Parikh - an infectious disease researcher at the Kasturba Hospital of infectious diseases in Mumbai and author of The Coronavirus: What you Need to Know about the Global Pandemic - gives his take on the latest Coronavirus headlines and answers questions from listeners.

And, we speak to people in Japan as they prepare for the start of the 2021 Tokyo Olympics on Friday.

(Photo: Flames burn in a forest at night from the Bootleg Fire, Oregon, July 16, 2021. Credit: InciWeb / NWCG)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bbg4h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bbkwm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxgf5vw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy0y50)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ndxt9ffpz)
2021/07/20 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bbpmr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy11x4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls9)
Internet shutdowns in Latin America

As protests continue in Cuba, so do its internet shutdowns. Anti-government protesters are demonstrating against food shortages, power cuts and coronavirus restrictions. In response Cuban authorities have been shutting down internet connections in an attempt to stop protests. Meanwhile Venezuela is becoming known for its frequent online restrictions. David Aragort from Latin American tech rights NGO RedesAyuda updates us on what has been going on.
The world’s first 3D printed smart bridge
The world's first 3D-printed steel bridge has been unveiled in Amsterdam. Pedestrians can now use it to cross over the Oudezijds Achterburgwal canal. Sensors will continuously monitor how the bridge is used and its ongoing safety. This data will influence how other 3D-printed structures could be built in the future. Professor Leroy Gardner and Dr. Craig Buchanan from Imperial College’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering tell us more.

Ecosystem soundscape monitoring with AI
One way to monitor the health of an ecosystem is through sound. Anthea Lacchia reports on how scientists are using machine learning to monitor these ecosystem sounds. From Okinawa to Borneo, they can listen to the sounds of the forest without having to be physically present.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson

Studio Manager: Nigel Dix
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


(Image: Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bbtcw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv56fnktsph)
India Covid deaths may be ten times the official rate

The Covid-19 pandemic has caused excess deaths in India to surpass four million, a new study has found.

The Centre for Global Development, a Washington-based research institute, says as many as four and a half million may have died. If correct, this would make it India's worst humanitarian disaster since independence.

Also in the programme: the UK prime minister's former chief advisor turns his fire on his ex-boss in an exclusive BBC interview; and we hear from an Afghan interpreter who worked with the US military and is now desperate to leave his country.


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bby40)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy19dd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bc1w4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywr25vrcf3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sj4g9wf1r)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy1f4j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48vlpwllf8)
New York reaches opioid settlement

New York's attorney general has reached a $1.1bn settlement with a number of pharmaceutical firms over their alleged role in the prescription opioid epidemic. We hear more from Carl Tobias, a Professor of Law at the University of Richmond. As Amazon's Jeff Bezos blasts to space on his rocket, we look at the space tourism race. Bezos's Blue Origin joins Elon Musk and Richard Branson in the club of very rich people with big ambitions on the rest of the universe. Also in the programme, the Centre for Global Development claims that excess deaths in India are ten times higher than normal, meaning the death toll from coronavirus could be in the millions, rather than the official estimate of around 400,000. Professor Uma Kambhampati is head of the School of Politics, Economics and International Relations at the University of Reading, and discusses the implications. The BBC's Tamasin Ford reports on the Vatican trial of Cardinal Angelo Becciu, who has become the highest-ranked cleric in the Vatican to be indicted on charges that include embezzlement and abuse of office. Plus, our regular workplace commentator, Peter Morgan, considers the future of work after the pandemic, in a world where there is a difference between what boardrooms want, and what workers aspire to. (Picture of pills. Picture credit: Getty Images).



WEDNESDAY 21 JULY 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bc9cd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqfqz78np3)
India's coronavirus deaths could be in the millions

The Centre for Global Development claims that excess deaths in India are ten times higher than normal, meaning the death toll from coronavirus could be in the millions, rather than the official estimate of around 400,000. We hear from Arvind Subramanian, one of the study's authors; he's a former chief economic adviser to the Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. New York's attorney general has reached a $1.1bn settlement with a number of pharmaceutical firms over their alleged role in the prescription opioid epidemic. We hear more from Carl Tobias, a Professor of Law at the University of Richmond. As Amazon's Jeff Bezos blasts to space on his rocket, we look at the space tourism race. Bezos's Blue Origin joins Elon Musk and Richard Branson in the club of very rich people with big ambitions on the rest of the universe, and Dr Maggie Lieu, an astrophysicist at Nottingham University, brings us the background. Plus, our regular workplace commentator, Peter Morgan, considers the future of work after the pandemic, in a world where there is a difference between what boardrooms want, and what workers aspire to. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Hayley Woodin, executive editor of Business in Vancouver, and in New Delhi, we're joined by Sushma Ramachandran an independent business journalist and columnist for The Tribune newspaper. (Picture a health worker inoculates a man with a Covid-19 vaccine in Ahmedabad. Photo by Sam Panthaky via Getty Images).


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bcf3j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbh)
Laurent Lamothe: Can anything be done to end Haiti's suffering?

Stephen Sackur speaks to former Haitian Prime Minister, Laurent Lamothe. Pity the eleven million people of Haiti; it is hard to think of a nation more comprehensively shattered by many decades of misrule and the ravages of natural disaster. In the latest lurch toward chaos the president Jovenel Moïse was assassinated earlier this month. Who ordered the hit is not clear but a protracted struggle for power seems certain. Can anything be done to end Haiti’s suffering?

(Photo: Laurent Lamothe appears via video link on Hardtalk)


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy1scx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bcjvn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bcnls)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Compass (w3ct2g9p)
The Test

Inflation and challenges to the dollar

International economist Jim O’Neill explores the implications for the dollar of America’s response to the Covid-driven economic crisis. With help from economists and historians, he asks if China can challenge the dollar's dominant place in the global economy - or whether digital currencies, such as bitoin, could prove more disruptive in the long term?

(Photo: Representations of the Ripple, Bitcoin, Etherum and Litecoin virtual currencies on a PC motherboard. Credit: Reuters)


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy20w5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6q)
Sakshi Malik

One of only four Indian women to ever have won an Olympic medal, wrestler Sakshi Malik has has inspired a generation to pursue success in a field they thought wasn't open to them. She tells us how she fought back in the very last moment to snatch a bronze medal in the Rio Games, and in doing so changed not only the trajectory of her life, but attitudes to women, women's sport and women in wrestling in India.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bcsbx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2r3grsvcn)
China floods: people trapped on subway trains

Underground stations flooded, cars and people swept away, bodies seen floating in the water. We'll get an update on China's flash floods in the city of Zhengzhou, a city of 10 million. The city saw more rain fall in one hour than the amount which fell in a day in Germany's deadly floods last week.

Following those floods, the US heat dome and forest fires, and the extreme heat warnings in the UK, America's Climate envoy John Kerry says world leaders have a hundred days to save the next hundred years.

And we also have a report on the ongoing violence in Darfur, Sudan after the departure of the peacekeepers.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bcx31)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2r3grsz3s)
China flooding: people up to their necks on the subway

Our top story today: the deadly flooding in China's Henan province. Astonishing footage has emerged of trapped passengers on inundated subway trains, bodies and cars floating down roads, and people up to their necks in muddy water. And the heavy rains are set to continue for another few days. We'll get a live update.

Several Western European countries are dealing with the aftermath of floods too. Our correspondent has been to meet some of the victims in Germany as they start to rebuild.

We'll go live to Kabul as the Taliban continue to make advances in Afghanistan.

And presidents, prime ministers and at least one king were on a list of potential hacking targets. We'll look at the spy software, Pegasus.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bd0v5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2r3grt2vx)
China floods: thousands evacuated from submerged subway trains

Severe flash floods have hit central China. The city of Zhengzhou saw more rain in one hour than the flood-stricken parts of Germany had in a day, and the forecast is for yet more rain.

The floods in Europe and China follow extreme heat in the US and elsewhere. The US Climate envoy John Kerry says world leaders must act now to avoid even worse natural disasters.

And France is seeing a new spike in Covid cases. Can a controversial health pass help to contain it?


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bd4l9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy2hvp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jns)
The long shadow of Covid on kids' education

The pandemic has left an indelible mark on the education of children around the world. Today on Business Daily, the BBC's Nisha Patel speaks with young people in the UK and India about how their futures have been affected by missing education. We'll also hear from Maya Sukumaran, Principal of Gitanjali Senior School in Hyderabad, India, for her thoughts on how online learning is changing students' relationships and behaviour. And Hans Sievertsen, an economist at the University of Bristol, lays out some of the expected impacts to the economy of all this lost learning.

(Picture credit: Getty Creative.)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7v)
Surviving Norway's day of terror

On 22 July 2011 Norway suffered its worst terror attacks in recent history. A far-right extremist, Anders Breivik, launched a bomb attack on government offices in Oslo, and then, two hours later, attacked a summer camp for young political activists on the island of Utøya, 38 kms from the Norwegian capital. In total 77 people were killed that day - the majority on the island. Mike Lanchin has been speaking to one of the camp's leaders Lisa Husby, who was 19-years-old at the time . Lisa hid under a bed in a small cabin as the gunman roamed the island looking for his next victim. 'It was 50-50 that day', she says. 'Either you found a good hiding place, or you didn't...it was just random'.

Photo:A wounded young woman is brought ashore after the attacks on Utøya island. (Credit: Svein Gustav Wilhelmsen/AFP via Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bd8bf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2g9p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy2mlt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bdd2k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gcz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bdhtp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxgh3sy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy2w32)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bdmkt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyt)
Punk, God, and my search for truth

When 17-year-old Paloma Romero travelled to the UK in the early 1970s, she was in search of freedom and opportunities that didn't exist in her native Spain, ruled at the time by the dictator Franco. Soon, Paloma fell in with the world of punk music, and (following a mix-up over her name) called herself Palmolive. She started a relationship with Joe Strummer from The Clash, taught herself to play drums and joined a band with Sid Vicious. When he kicked her out for refusing his advances, she formed a band of her own - The Slits. With their all-female line-up and collaborative approach to song-writing, The Slits are now regarded as iconic punk pioneers. Later, Paloma would play drums in another highly influential all-female punk band, The Raincoats - before turning her back on music altogether to seek spiritual truth. Now a retired teacher living in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, Paloma is thinking about a return to music. She tells Anu Anand about punk, faith, and the art of walking away.

Producer: Laura Thomas
Presenter: Anu Anand
Image: Getty Images


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bdr9y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxghc96)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy33lb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bdw22)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv56fnkwvcp)
China: commuters die in flooded train tunnel

The number of people officially confirmed dead from the flooding across China's Henan province has risen to 25. Many died after being trapped by rising floodwater on subway trains in the provincial capital, Zhengzhou. What could have contributed to such a massive rainfall?

Also today: The debate in France as access to museums and cinemas is barred unless people can prove they're vaccinated or Covid-negative; and a battle begins over gold mining on an Indonesian island.

(Photo: An aerial view shows a flooded road section following heavy rainfall in Zhengzhou, Henan province. Credit: China Daily via Reuters)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bdzt6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy3c2l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cqn8022vv)
China faces extreme flooding

Following several extreme weather events we ask if businesses can adapt to climate change. Victoria Crawford is from the World Business Council for Sustainable Development. Also in the programme, to visit a French museum, gallery or cinema from today, you will need a Covid passport demonstrating vaccination, a recent negative test, or recovery from coronavirus in the past six months. Foulques d'Aboville is administrator of the Jacquemart-Andre museum in Paris, and gives us his reaction to the development. The electric car maker Tesla says it will open up its 25,000 strong global network of fast chargers to electric cars made by other companies. Jaap Burger of the Regulatory Assistance Project in the Netherlands advises governments on how to decarbonise their economies, and tells us how significant a move this is by Tesla. Plus, the BBC's Nisha Patel reports on the potential future economic impact of school coronavirus closures on the next generation of the world's workforce, whose education was impacted since the start of the pandemic.

(Picture: A flooded road in Zhengzhou. Picture credit: EPA.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bf3kb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxlykfw3hs)
China floods: 25 dead and thousands evacuated

Record levels of rainfall in China has led to flooding across Henan province. At least 25 people have died and over 200,000 have been evacuated from the area. People have also died after flooding trapped them in underground railway tunnels. In the provincial capital Zhengzhou, the equivalent of a year's average rainfall has fallen in just three days. We'll hear from people in the city who have been affected and speak to our correspondent for the latest updates.

Also, it's been a week since flooding in Europe killed at least 180 people. People in the worst affected regions of Germany and Belgium are now facing the clean-up, and starting to rebuild their homes and businesses. We'll speak to two people who were hugely affected by the floods to hear how they feel about what happened and their futures.

And every day on we are joined by a health expert to answer your questions about Covid-19, the pandemic and the vaccine. Today our guest is Dr Maria Sundaram - infectious disease epidemiologist in Canada.

(Photo: Man carrying a woman wades through a flooded road following heavy rainfall in Zhengzhou 21/07/2021. Credit: Reuters)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bf79g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxlykfw77x)
OS conversations: Europe floods

It's been a week since flooding in Europe killed at least 180 people. People in the worst affected regions of Germany and Belgium are now facing the clean-up, and starting to rebuild their homes and businesses. We'll speak to two people who were hugely affected by the floods to hear how they feel about what happened and their futures.

Also, record levels of rainfall in China has led to flooding across Henan province. At least 25 people have died and over 200,000 have been evacuated from the area. People have also died after flooding trapped them in underground railway tunnels. In the provincial capital Zhengzhou, the equivalent of a year's average rainfall has fallen in just three days. We'll hear from people in the city who have been affected and speak to our correspondent for the latest updates.

And every day on we are joined by a health expert to answer your questions about Covid-19, the pandemic and the vaccine. Today our guest is Dr Maria Sundaram - infectious disease epidemiologist in Canada.

(Photo: Residents clear debris out of the way after heavy flooding of the river Erft caused severe destruction in the village of Bad Muenstereifel, Germany 20 July 2021. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bfc1l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bfgsq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxgj2rz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy3v23)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ndxt9jbm2)
2021/07/21 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bfljv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2g9p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy3yt7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvj)
Could the flu vaccine protect against severe Covid-19?

A really intriguing finding on flu vaccines - that they might offer some protection not just against flu, but against the most serious effects of Covid-19 – even though it is of course a completely different virus. Claudia Hammond talks to Dr Devinder Singh who led the research using anonymous medical records from countries including Singapore, Germany, Italy and Israel, which medical researchers can use.

Summer viruses
And why are some countries in the middle of the summertime, seeing a surge of infections with viruses usually found in winter? In the northern hemisphere there are fears that we’ll see a surge of cases of flu next winter – a twindemic. Why is that? And is this something that will follow the seasons around the world? We hear from Lorna and her daughter Willow on Willow’s persistent cough and from Dr Michelle Jacobs who’s a consultant in paediatric and adult emergency medicine at Watford General Hospital in the UK on concerns of RSV and viral wheeze, and Tracy Hussell, professor in immunology at the University of Manchester on children’s long-term immunity especially for babies who are seeing all these infections for the first time.

Downs Syndrome and Covid-19
There’s new research just published in the British Medical Journal looking at how both adults and children with Downs Syndrome have been affected if they contract Covid. Some countries such as India are prioritising vaccination against Covid-19 for adults with Downs Syndrome. University College London’s Professor Monica Lakhanpaul’s work has been instrumental in helping clinics to start vaccinating people in India. And in the UK it’s just been announced that children with Downs Syndrome will be able to get vaccinated, which isn’t the case for all children. Monica explains the relevance of the research and her work in highlighting the issue.


Image: Vaccine bottles in a row
Credit: Helder Faria/Getty Images

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bfq8z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv56fnkxpll)
Thousands evacuated in China floods

Twelve people are known to have died after record-breaking rainfall flooded underground railway tunnels in China, leaving passengers trapped in rising waters.

Days of rain have caused widespread damage and led to 200,000 evacuations. China's president Xi Jinping said on Wednesday that there had been "significant loss of life and damage to property".

Why was the city of Zhengzhou overwhelmed? And will China now do more to tackle man-made climate change?

Also in the programme, the US announces it's reached an agreement with Germany over a highly contentious gas pipeline from Russia and President Biden's climate envoy tells the BBC that we're facing a global climate catastrophe.


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bfv13)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy469h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bfys7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywr25vv8b6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sj4g9z9yv)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy4b1m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48vlpwphbc)
China faces extreme flooding

Following several extreme weather events we ask if businesses can adapt to climate change. Victoria Crawford is from the World Business Council for Sustainable Development. Also in the programme, to visit a French museum, gallery or cinema from today, you will need a Covid passport demonstrating vaccination, a recent negative test, or recovery from coronavirus in the past six months. Foulques d'Aboville is administrator of the Jacquemart-Andre museum in Paris, and gives us his reaction to the development. The electric car maker Tesla says it will open up its 25,000 strong global network of fast chargers to electric cars made by other companies. Jaap Burger of the Regulatory Assistance Project in the Netherlands advises governments on how to decarbonise their economies, and tells us how significant a move this is by Tesla. Plus, the BBC's Nisha Patel reports on the potential future economic impact of school coronavirus closures on the next generation of the world's workforce, whose education was impacted since the start of the pandemic.

(Picture: A flooded road in Zhengzhou. Picture credit: EPA.)



THURSDAY 22 JULY 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bg68h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqfqz7ckl6)
China faces extreme flooding

Zhengzhou, a central Chinese city, with 10,000,000 inhabitants has been paralysed by record-breaking floods and more rain in one day than it usually gets in a year. So how the climate crisis be tackled? We get analysis from Micheal Mann, distinguished professor of atmospheric science at Penn State University and the author of The New Climate War. Also in the programme, UNESCO has decided to strip Liverpool of World Heritage status, saying new developments resulted in a "serious deterioration" of the historic site. But do these titles mean that much to a city’s prospects or prosperity? We get analysis from Liam Thorp of the Liverpool Echo newspaper. And Peter Jankovskis brings us the latest news from the financial markets.. Also in the programme, UNESCO has decided to strip Liverpool of World Heritage status, saying new developments resulted in a "serious deterioration" of the historic site. But do these titles mean that much to a city’s prospects or prosperity? We get analysis from Liam Thorp of the Liverpool Echo newspaper. Also in the programme, to visit a French museum, gallery or cinema from today, you will need a Covid passport demonstrating vaccination, a recent negative test, or recovery from coronavirus in the past six months. Foulques d'Aboville is administrator of the Jacquemart-Andre museum in Paris, and gives us his reaction to the development. Plus, the BBC's Nisha Patel reports on the potential future economic impact of school coronavirus closures on the next generation of the world's workforce, whose education was impacted since the start of the pandemic. And we're joined throughout the programme in Manilla by Karen Lema, Reuters Bureau Chief for the Philippines and in Washington DC, activist and financial reform advocate Alexis Goldstein.


(Picture: A flooded road in Zhengzhou. Picture credit: EPA.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bgb0m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z27)
Can China raise its birth rate?

China’s decades-long One Child Policy has led to a low birth rate, and a shrinking workforce. It has also been placing a heavy burden on the younger generations who will have to support two parents and four grandparents. It’s predicted that in five years’ time, a quarter of the population will be over 65. With a smaller workforce, the country risks becoming poorer.

China tried to address the problem by allowing couples to have two children instead of one, but except for an initial uptick, the birth rate has continued to fall regardless. So now China has introduced a three-child policy. But couples continue to worry about the lack of affordable childcare, and the high financial and emotional cost of raising children. So in this edition of The Inquiry, Tanya Beckett asks: can China raise its birth rate?

Producer: Arlene Gregorius

(A mother and her child waving Chinese flags near Tiananmen Square in Beijing, China. Photo: Peter Parks/Getty Images)


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy4p90)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bgfrr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bgkhw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxl)
Dangerous liaisons in Sinaloa

The Mexican state of Sinaloa is synonymous with drug trafficking. With the profits from organised crime a driver of the local economy, the tentacles of ‘narco cultura’ extend deep into people’s lives – especially those of women. In the city of Culiacan, plastic surgeons service demand for the exaggerated feminine silhouette favoured by the men with guns and hard cash. Often women’s surgery will be paid for by a ‘sponsor’ or ‘godfather.’ Meanwhile, a group of women trackers spend their weekends digging in isolated parts of the state, looking for the remains of loved ones who disappear in Sinaloa’s endless cycle of drug-fuelled violence.

Producer / presenter: Linda Pressly
Producer in Mexico: Ulises Escamilla
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Photo: Lawyer Maria Teresa Guerra advocates for women in Sinaloa. Credit: BBC/Ulises Escamilla)


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy4xs8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfx)
Should 'junk food' sponsor sport?

Sugary drink and fast food sponsors have become almost inseparable from sporting superstars and major events like the Olympics. But why are these epitomes of health and exercise aligning themselves with products linked to obesity, heart disease and diabetes?

Simon Tulett explores the reasons for this relationship's long history and hears about the damage it could be doing to young, impressionable fans.

If this sponsorship is a problem, whose job is it to end it, and can it be done without leaving event organisers, athletes and grassroots sport facing a financial black hole?

Producer: Sarah Stolarz

Contributors:

Michael Payne, former IOC marketing executive;
Dr Sandro Demaio, VicHealth;
Tuhin Mishra, Baseline Ventures;
Tammy Aitken

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Composite of an American football player catching a burger. Credit: Lew Robertson, Rubberball/Mike Kemp, Getty Images/BBC)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bgp80)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2r3grwr8r)
Death toll climbs in China floods

The Chinese province of Henan experienced a year's worth of rain in just a few days, the subsequent flooding has left at least 25 people dead. We'll have the latest on the rescue operation.

In France a new wave of coronavirus infections has triggered a new wave of restrictions, to try and keep the disease at bay.

And a complex of unexplained buildings neat St Petersburg in Russia, prompts suspicions of a 'private prison'. But no sooner were they discovered than they were mysteriously bulldozed.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bgt04)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2r3grww0w)
Rescue operation underway after China floods

After the shocking images coming out of the Chinese province of Henan, which suffered catastrophic flooding after unprecedented downpours, we'll have the latest as rescuers attempt to find missing people.

Is US President Biden living up to his pledge to close the Guantanamo Bay prison? A Morrocan inmate has just been released, and others could follow soon.

And it's ten years since a gunman killed 77 people at a political gathering on the Norwegian island of Utoya. We'll hear how the massacre shocked and changed the country.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bgxr8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2r3grwzs0)
The search for missing people in China's floods

China is our top story again today. After the dramatic pictures of people on flooded underground trains following record-breaking rainfalls in Henan province, our correspondent joins us from there as the search for those still missing continues.

The campaign to vaccinate the Indian population faces massive logistical challenges, we hear from the mountainous region of Arunachal Pradesh.

And yet more problems in the run-up to the Tokyo Olympics as the creative director of tomorrow's opening ceremony is sacked.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bh1hd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy5drs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9h)
The future of the Afghan economy

What will the US withdrawal from Afghanistan mean for the economy? The relative security provided by US forces and others over the past 20 years not only helped many grow successful family enterprises but also attracted foreign investors and larger business ventures. Rebecca Kesby speaks to Saad Mohseni, Chief Executive of MOBI, a media company that launched the first private radio station playing pop music in Afghanistan, which had been banned under the Taliban. What does he make of the sudden withdrawal of American troops? Among those with the most to fear are businesswomen. Under the US influence women and girls enjoyed greater freedom, access to education and many built successful companies of their own including Ayeda Shadab who has her own fashion brand. In the past few weeks she has received several death threats just for running her own business. And Iskander Akylbayev, Executive Director of the Kazakhstan Council on International Relations, tells Rebecca that increased instability in Afghanistan may affect the whole regional dynamic.

Photo: A vendor displays a traditional outfit at a shop in Koch-e Morgha street in Kabul on June 15, 2021. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3b)
When war came to Darfur

In the early 2000s, rebels in Sudan's Darfur region took up arms against the government. In response, the Khartoum regime launched a scorched earth campaign along ethnic lines. The Sudanese military allied to a local militia, the Janjaweed, laid waste to villages across the region, killing and raping as they went. Some 300,000 people are believed to have been killed in the conflict, more than 2 million displaced from their homes. We hear the story of Debay Manees, a young boy at the time, who's life was changed by the war.

Photo: A young Darfurian refugee walks past a Sudan Liberation Army Land Rover filled with teenage rebel fighters on October 14 2004 in the violent North Darfur region of Sudan. (Photo by Benjamin Lowy/Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bh57j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy5jhx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bh8zn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlf)
Ida Pfeiffer: 19th Century globetrotter

Ida Pfeiffer's desire to see the world was like many childhood fantasies - destined to remain just that. And yet at the age of 44 once her sons had reached adulthood, she set off from her home in Vienna on a series of journeys that no woman of her time or background had contemplated.

Beginning with a trip to the Middle East, Pfeiffer travelled mostly alone, documenting her voyages and collecting specimens that she later sold to help finance her adventures abroad. Budget travel was her mantra, as she was not a wealthy aristocrat like many travellers of that time. On her journeys Pfeiffer was attacked, kidnapped, robbed and almost drowned. She met head-hunters and endured extreme conditions to pursue her dream. Defying all convention, Pfeiffer became celebrated as the most travelled woman on the planet, circumnavigating the globe twice. But despite her trailblazing attitude, she was no feminist, believing that women should be either professionals or home-builders, not both.

Rajan Datar discusses the life of this most unlikely traveller with the social and cultural anthropologist Hiltgund Jehle; Ulrike Brisson, whose research has focused on 19th and early 20th-Century European women's travel writing; and John van Wyhe, senior lecturer in the department of biological sciences at Tembusu College in Singapore, and author of Wanderlust: The Amazing Ida Pfeiffer, the first female tourist.

Producer: Fiona Clampin

(Image: Portrait of the Austrian traveller Ida Pfeiffer (1797-1858), from Il Giro del mondo (World Tour), Journal of geography, travel and costumes, Volume XVII, Issue 8, February 23, 1873. Credit: DEA /Biblioteca Ambrosiana/Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8g)
The first Tokyo Olympics

The first Olympic Games in Japan were held in 1964, less than 20 years after the country lost the Second World War. The bombed-out centre of Tokyo had been virtually rebuilt following the Allied Occupation, and the Japanese took the opportunity to showcase new technology such as the Bullet Train and colour TV broadcasts. Ashley Byrne talks to wrestling gold medallist, Yojiro Uetake, about his memories of the games. The programme is a Made In Manchester Production.

PHOTO: Japanese student Yoshinori Sakai about to light the Olympic Cauldron in October 1964 (Keystone/Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bhdqs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxgl0q1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy5s05)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bhjgx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3b)
Recording my first album as a man

Cidny Bullens is a singer-songwriter whose career first took off in the 1970s, touring with Elton John and singing on the soundtrack for the movie Grease. Solo success would follow with two Grammy nominations. Cidny's style was androgynous - big hair, jumpsuits, flares, leather jackets... topped off with an electric guitar. But hidden behind the accolades were years of struggling with gender identity, something Cidny confronted aged 61. Ten years later he recorded his first album as man.

Picture: Cidny Bullens
Credit: Travis Commeau

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bhn71)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxgl869)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy60hf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bhrz5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv56fnkzr8s)
China floods: a Zhengzhou resident's story

The Chinese authorities have moved nearly 400,000 people to safer ground in Henan province following deadly floods; we hear what happened to one resident of the city of Zhengzhou. Also: on the tenth anniversary of the mass shooting at Utøya in Norway, we'll speak to one of the survivors; and two sisters prepare for their first Olympics.

(Picture: People wade through floodwaters at a residential compound following heavy rainfall in Zhengzhou, Henan province Credit: Reuters/Aly Song)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bhwq9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy67zp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y498b2632h2)
Concerns over US-German Nord Stream 2 deal

We hear why Ukraine is concerned by a US-German deal over the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline. The pipeline will bring gas from Russia to Germany, bypassing Ukraine, and Thierry Bros of the Paris Institute of International Studies explains the background. And we get reaction to the new agreement between the US and Germany aimed at preventing Russia from using the pipeline to exert political leverage over Europe, from Ukrainian politician Hanna Hopko, who previously chaired the parliamentary committee on foreign affairs in Kiev. Also in the programme, the Saudi Aramco oil giant has been hacked, and now faces demands to pay a ransom to avoid stolen data being released. We find out more from Chris Kubecka, who is a computer security researcher who got Saudi Aramco's network back up and running after a cyber attack in 2012. A day before the opening ceremony of the Tokyo Olympics, the BBC's Sasha Twining reports on what the event has cost Japan, and how much of that money it is likely to be able to recoup. Plus, we hear from Caroline Casey, who has successfully persuaded the chief executives of 500 major corporations to commit their boards to disability inclusion, and is discussing the achievement at this year's One Young World Summit.

(Picture: A pipe with the Nord Stream 2 logo. Picture credit: Reuters.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bj0gf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxlykfz0dw)
Aftermath of China floods

We continue to follow the floods in China as more details emerge on the destruction in Henan province caused by the year's worth of rainfall that fell in three days. We've been speaking to two people in the provincial capital Zhengzhou.

Our colleague from the BBC's Persian Service will be telling us about protests in the southwest of Iran, sparked by frustration at severe water shortages.

Our correspondent in India has travelled to a remote district in the state of Arunachal Pradesh where more than 80% of the adults have had their first Covid vaccine.

On the eve of the opening ceremony of the Olympics, Tokyo has recorded its highest daily number of Covid infections for six months. We've brought together in conversation people who have joined the Games as volunteers.

(Photo: Rescuers evacuate people from a hospital where about 3,000 people were trapped by the flood in Zhengzhou, central China"s Henan province, 22 July 2021. Credit: STRINGER CHINA OUT/EPA)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bj46k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxlykfz450)
OS conversations: Tokyo Olympic volunteers

On the eve of the opening ceremony of the Olympics, Tokyo has recorded its highest daily number of Covid infections for six months. We've brought together in conversation people who have joined the Games as volunteers.

We continue to follow the floods in China as more details emerge on the destruction in Henan province caused by the year's worth of rainfall that fell in three days. We've been speaking to two people in the provincial capital Zhengzhou.

Millions of Angolans are on the brink of starvation, because of the worst drought in decades in the country. Our Africa regional editor tells us more.

Our correspondent in India has travelled to a remote district in the state of Arunachal Pradesh where more than 80% of the adults have had their first Covid vaccine.

(Photo: A member of personnel ahead of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. Credit: Reuters/Maxim Shemetov)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bj7yp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bjcpt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxglzp2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy6qz6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ndxt9m7j5)
2021/07/22 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bjhfy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy6vqb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3y)
Your molecular machinery, now in 3D

Back in November it was announced that an AI company called DeepMind had essentially cracked the problem of protein folding – that is they had managed to successfully predict the 3D structures of complex biochemical molecules by only knowing the 2D sequence of amino acids from which they are made.

They are not the only team to use machine learning to approach the vast amounts of data involved. But last week, they released the source code and methodology behind their so called AlphaFold2 tool. Today, they are publishing via a paper in the journal Nature, a simply huge database of predicted structures including most of the human proteome and 20 other model species such as yes, mice. The possibilities for any biochemists are very exciting.

As DeepMind CEO Demis Hassabis tells Roland Pease, they partnered with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory to make over 350,000 protein predictions available to researchers around the world free of charge and open sourced. Dr Benjamin Perry of the Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative told us how it may help in the search for urgently needed drugs for difficult diseases such as Chagas disease. Prof John McGeehan of the Centre for Enzyme Innovation at Portsmouth University in the UK is on the search for enzymes that might be used to digest otherwise pollutant plastics. He received results (that would have taken years using more traditional methods) back from the AlphaFold team in just a couple of days.

Prof Julia Gog of Cambridge University is a biomathematician who has been modelling Covid epidemiology and behaviour. In a recent paper in Royal Society Open Science, she and colleagues wonder whether the vaccination strategy of jabbing the most vulnerable in a population first, rather than the most gregarious or mobile, is necessarily the optimal way to protect them. Should nations still at an early stage in vaccine rollout consider her model?

And did you know that elephants can hear things up to a kilometre away through their feet? And that sometimes they communicate by bellowing and rumbling such the ground shakes? Dr Beth Mortimer of Oxford University has been planting seismic detectors in savannah in Kenya to see if they can tap into the elephant messaging network, to possibly help conservationists track their movements.

Image: Protein folding
Credit: Nicolas_/iStock/Getty Images

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producers: Alex Mansfield and Samara Linton


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bjm62)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv56fnl0lhp)
Japan prepares for Olympic Ceremony

Japan will open the 32nd Olympiad despite Tokyo recording its highest number of new coronavirus infections in six months. The show director of Friday's ceremony, Kentaro Kobayashi has been dismissed after footage emerged in which he appears to be making jokes about the Holocaust.

Also in the programme: a human rights group says Angola faces its worst drought in 40 years and more on fatal flooding in China.

(Picture: The National Stadium, the main venue of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics. Credit: EPA/AYANO SATO)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bjqy6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy736l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bjvpb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywr25vy579)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sj4gb26vy)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy76yq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48vlpwsd7g)
Concerns over US-German Nord Stream 2 deal

We hear why Ukraine is concerned by a US-German deal over the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline. The pipeline will bring gas from Russia to Germany, bypassing Ukraine, and Thierry Bros of the Paris Institute of International Studies explains the background. And we get reaction to the new agreement between the US and Germany aimed at preventing Russia from using the pipeline to exert political leverage over Europe, from Ukrainian politician Hanna Hopko, who previously chaired the parliamentary committee on foreign affairs in Kiev. Also in the programme, the Saudi Aramco oil giant has been hacked, and now faces demands to pay a ransom to avoid stolen data being released. We find out more from Chris Kubecka, who is a computer security researcher who got Saudi Aramco's network back up and running after a cyber attack in 2012. A day before the opening ceremony of the Tokyo Olympics, the BBC's Sasha Twining reports on what the event has cost Japan, and how much of that money it is likely to be able to recoup. Plus, we hear from Caroline Casey, who has successfully persuaded the chief executives of 500 major corporations to commit their boards to disability inclusion, and is discussing the achievement at this year's One Young World Summit.

(Picture: A pipe with the Nord Stream 2 logo. Picture credit: Reuters.)



FRIDAY 23 JULY 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bk35l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqfqz7ggh9)
Major firms hit by global internet outage

Several popular websites were sent offline due to a problem connecting users, or a DNS error. Companies affected included AirBnB, McDonald's, HSBC and British Airways. We speak to Jason Crabtree, founder and CEO of cybersecurity company Qomplex, who explains what happened.
More and more people in the UK are being notified - or 'pinged' - by a Covid tracing app that they should self-isolate, causing labour shortages for many industries and food shortages in supermarkets. The BBC's technology reporter Rory Cellan-Jones explains the technology behind the app.
Also in the programme; a day before the opening ceremony of the Tokyo Olympics, the BBC's Sasha Twining reports on what the event has cost Japan, and how much of that money it is likely to recoup.
Plus, we hear from Caroline Casey, who has successfully persuaded the chief executives of 500 major corporations to commit their boards to disability inclusion, and is discussing the achievement at this year's One Young World Summit.

Sasha Twining is joined throughout the programme by Andy Uhler, reporter for our sister programme Marketplace on American public radio in Austin, Texas, and by Robin Harding, Tokyo bureau chief for the FT.

(Picture: A computer keyboard. Picture credit: Getty)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bk6xq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1g)
Fikile Mbalula: Is South Africa's government being confronted with its own failure?

South Africa is facing its deepest political crisis of the post-apartheid era. Days of violence and looting saw more than 200 people killed and thousands arrested. Stephen Sackur speaks to Fikile Mbalula, the country's transport minister. Is the ANC government being confronted with its own failure?


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy7l63)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bkbnv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bkgdz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh6)
Fresh questions over Pegasus spyware

How the Pegasus software from Israel’s NSO Group has kept ahead of smartphone makers’ attempts to block it. Plus, can Zoom’s new app features keep people video-conferencing post-pandemic, or has everyone had enough of virtual meetings? And the AI designed to help wine producers take more risks with what they make. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill.


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy7tpc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 World Football (w3ct1tz9)
Serial winner Pitso Mosimane and El Salvador's Joaquín Rivas

We hear from Pitso Mosimane, the South African coach who keeps on adding trophies to his collection. His most recent one was the African Champions League which he won with Egypt's Al-Ahly last weekend. He reveals the secret of his success.

We also hear from Salvadoran striker Joaquin Rivas. El Salvador are hoping to make history at the Concacaf Gold Cup.

Picture: Al Ahly coach Pitso Mosimane on the side lines during a match against Bayern Munich at the FIFA Club World Cup (Photo by Mohamed Farag/FIFA via Getty Images)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bkl53)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2r3grzn5v)
Can the Tokyo Olympics win round the Japanese population?

It's just hours before the 2020 Olympic Games start in Tokyo - amid high covid cases, controversy and sackings.

We'll find out why US President Biden has imposed sanctions targeting Cuba's security forces.

And Lebanon's economic crisis is continuing with power outages and spiralling food prices - forcing many people into poverty.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bkpx7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2r3grzrxz)
2020 Olympics: Opening ceremony in a few hours time

We get the personal reflections of our correspondent, and count the economic cost to Tokyo of holding the games.

In France a lawsuit is brought against the police, accusing them of racial profiling Black and Arabic citizens. Will the police be held accountable for discriminatory practices?

And the iconic blue gingham dresses worn by Judy Garland in The Wizard of Oz has been rediscovered after 40 years... after a clear-out of offices in Washington DC.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bktnc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2r3grzwp3)
Hours till 2020 Olympic opening ceremony

A year late, and despite Covid and scandals, some Tokyo residents are now looking forward to the games finally starting.

After the high profile murder of a young woman at the hands of a serving policeman, the UK is launching a new strategy to tackle violence against women.

And a report looks at how rising temperatures could pose a threat to the health of pilgrims during the annual Hajj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bkydh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy89nw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0g)
Will the Tokyo Olympics pay off?

Japanese businesses are struggling with the lack of tourists during the Tokyo Olympics. Despite delaying the games by a year, the authorities have still been forced to hold the games without spectators, as Covid cases rise. Seijiro Takeshita at the University of Shizuoka explains why the Japanese were hoping for a successful Olympics, and why it’s now become so controversial. Also in the programme, we’ll hear from a number of businesses affected by the lack of tourists. And Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus at Hitotsubashi University, describes how big sponsors have resisted pressure from the Tokyo government not to withdraw support for the games.

(Picture: The logo for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. Picture credit: Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyt)
The paintings of Vincent Van Gogh

In a rare interview, a member of the Van Gogh family talks about growing up in the shadow of the famous artist and playing as a child among some of Vincent Van Gogh's most iconic works. These paintings belonged to Vincent Van Gogh's only nephew who was just a few months old when his uncle died in July 1890. His grandson Willem Van Gogh tells Louise Hidalgo how for years the paintings hung in his grandfather's home, before his grandfather transferred the entire collection to the Dutch state to be housed in the Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam.

Picture: Almond Blossom, painted in 1890 by Vincent van Gogh to celebrate the birth of his only nephew (Credit: DeAgostini/Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bl24m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy8ff0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bl5wr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsp)
What's China doing to fight climate change?

This week a year’s worth of rain fell in just three days in China’s Henan province, flooding roads and public transport systems, killing dozens and displacing thousands. Floods are common in China’s rainy season, but this event is being linked to the climate crisis. China is the biggest emitter of greenhouse gases in the world – and many of its most carbon-intensive sectors employ vast numbers of people. At the same time the country has led efforts to develop green technologies like solar and wind, bringing down prices and encouraging the global shift away from fossil fuels. China says it shouldn’t be expected to follow the same decarbonisation timetable as major Western economies. But the US Climate Envoy John Kerry this week insisted that efforts to keep global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius will be "essentially impossible" without faster action from Beijing. So how crucial is China to the fight against climate change? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bl9mw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxgnxm4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy8nx8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tz9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7blfd0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f6)
Khuzestan: Iran's thirsty province

Protests have swept through Iran's Khuzestan province.  Severe water shortages and a lack of drinking water have brought demonstrators to the streets, shouting 'I am thirsty'.  BBC Persian's Parham Ghobadi explains why water has become such a flashpoint.

My Home Town:  Sahaspur, India
Khadeeja Arif of BBC Urdu takes us to her home town in Uttar Pradesh, a place to chat with neighbours under mango trees.

Doctor without Stigma 
An Indonesian doctor is campaigning to remove the stigma many women face when they visit a gynaecologist.  If they say they are unmarried, they may be refused treatment.  Callistasia Wijaya of BBC Indonesian shares the story of the Doctor without Stigma initiative.

The Tokyo Olympics in 5 words
Mexican Lourdes Heredia was a student in Japan 25 years ago, and has returned to work on the BBC's Olympic coverage.  It's been bittersweet, with the triumph of the Olympics dimmed by Covid.  She shares five Japanese words which perfectly describe her impressions.

Brazil's illegal gold miners
Conflict between illegal gold miners and the indigenous Yanomami people has reached levels of violence not seen for decades with an attack on a remote village in the Amazon rainforest.  BBC Brasil's Hugo Bachega has been following the story.

Image:  Women in Khuzestan Province
Credit: TASNIM AGENCY


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7blk44)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxgp53d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy8xdj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7blnw8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv56fnl2n5w)
Tokyo holds Olympics opening ceremony

The opening ceremony highlighted the isolation endured by athletes battling to train during the pandemic and remembered the millions who have died of coronavirus. Also on the programme: the assassinated president of Haiti is to be buried in the northern city of Cap-Haïtien; and a Chinese leader visits Tibet for the first time in more than thirty years.

(Picture: Torch bearers pass on the Olympic flame in Tokyo Credit: Reuters/Edgar Su)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7blsmd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy94ws)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46szwd4239)
Bangladesh imposes strict lockdown

Bangladesh has imposed strict lockdown measures, after a spike in coronavirus infections. The BBC's Nagib Bahar in Dhaka explains the new restrictions. During previous lockdowns the important garment sector was allowed to continue production, but factories have been told they must also close for a fortnight, and we get reaction from Rubana Huq of Mohammadi Group, which makes products including shirts and blouses. Also in the programme, we hear about a sharp rise in the share price of Indian food delivery app Zomato, which listed on the Mumbai stock exchange today. Segun Lawson is chief executive of Thor Explorations, and he tells us about the process of setting up Africa's first industrial-scale gold mine. Plus, we find out why Crocs shoes are proving more popular than ever from Teo van den Broeke, who is GQ magazine's style and grooming director.

(Picture: Security personnel enforce lockdown in Dhaka. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7blxcj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxlykg1x9z)
Tokyo Olympics: Your questions answered

Our expert answers your questions on the Tokyo Olympics, as the opening ceremony takes place. More than 11,300 athletes from 207 nations will compete over the next couple of weeks in Japan, but there will be no crowds in the stadiums due to Covid-19.

Also, we speak to two Olympians about how they are feeling ahead of the games. Liberian sprinter Joseph Fahnbulleh and Australian equestrian Mary Hanna will both be competing in Tokyo.

And we go through the latest coronavirus stories with Dr Megan Murray, who is Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard University.

(Photo: The Tokyo 2020 Olympics Opening Ceremony. Credit: Reuters/Peter Jebautzke)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bm13n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxlykg2123)
Tokyo Olympics: Games under way after opening ceremony

The Tokyo 2020 Olympics is under way, with the opening ceremony taking place on Friday. So what can we expect from the games? Our expert answers audience questions and we get reaction to the opening ceremony from people in Japan.

Also, we speak to two Olympians about how they are feeling ahead of the games. Liberian sprinter Joseph Fahnbulleh and Australian equestrian Mary Hanna will both be competing in Tokyo.

And we go through the latest coronavirus stories with Marc Mendelson, who is Professor of Infectious Diseases at the University of Cape Town.

(Photo: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi talks to World Health Organization director general Tedros Adhanom during the opening ceremony. Credit: Reuters/Leon Neal)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bm4vs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bm8lx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxgpwl5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy9mw9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ndxt9q4f8)
2021/07/23 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bmdc1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yy9rmf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqp)
Am I a psychopath?

One CrowdScience listener finds herself unconcerned about much of the world’s problems, it leaves her wondering: am I a psychopath?

Inspired by a previous episode on empathy, this listener asked is it true that psychopaths don’t empathise and what are the character traits of psychopathy?

Marnie Chesterton talks with a diagnosed pro-social psychopath to find out.

She also pays a visit to the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and gets into an MRI scanner to discover what is happening in her brain when she empathises.

Studies suggest around 1 percent of the general population exhibit traits associated with psychopathy and that rises to 3-4 percent in the world of business. But is this really the case?

Why is there so much stigma associated with psychopathy and do psychopaths even exist or is it just a convenient term to label those whose emotional range sits outside of the “norm”?

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and produced by Caroline Steel for the BBC World Service.

Guests:
Julia Shaw
Jim Fallon
Valeria Gazzola
Kalliopi Ioumpa


[Image credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bmj35)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv56fnl3hds)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bmmv9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yyb03p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tz9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bmrlf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywr25w124d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sj4gb53s1)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yyb3vt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48vlpww94k)
Bangladesh imposes strict lockdown

Bangladesh has imposed strict lockdown measures, after a spike in coronavirus infections. The BBC's Nagib Bahar in Dhaka explains the new restrictions. During previous lockdowns the important garment sector was allowed to continue production, but factories have been told they must also close for a fortnight, and we get reaction from Rubana Huq of Mohammadi Group, which makes products including shirts and blouses. Also in the programme, we hear about a sharp rise in the share price of Indian food delivery app Zomato, which listed on the Mumbai stock exchange today. Segun Lawson is chief executive of Thor Explorations, and he tells us about the process of setting up Africa's first industrial-scale gold mine. Plus, we find out why Crocs shoes are proving more popular than ever from Teo van den Broeke, who is GQ magazine's style and grooming director.

(Picture: Security personnel enforce lockdown in Dhaka. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 04:06 THU (w3ct1gxl)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gxl)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gxl)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkfypmkbhc)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkfypmkpqr)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkfypml1z4)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkfypml5q8)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkfypmlf6j)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkfypmm8ff)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzkfypmmw52)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SUN (w172xzkfypmn3nb)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkfypmn7dg)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkfypmnlmv)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkfypmnyw7)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzkfypmp2mc)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzkfypmpb3m)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkfypmq92n)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzkfypmqnb1)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkfypmqs25)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzkg9yxvvtl)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzkg9yxzz5z)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzkg9yy06p7)

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BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkg9yy1scx)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzkg9yy20w5)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172xzkg9yy2hvp)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzkg9yy2w32)

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BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkg9yy4p90)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzkg9yy4xs8)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzkg9yy5drs)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzkg9yy5s05)

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BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172xzkg9yy7tpc)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkg9yy8nx8)

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BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjmhz0vvgv)

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BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172xzjmhz0yrcy)

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BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjmw7b5hk6)

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BBC News 23:00 MON (w172xzjmw7b84z1)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjmw7b8dg9)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172xzjmw7b8j6f)

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BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172xzjmw7b8rpp)

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BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172xzjmw7b9cfb)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172xzjmw7b9h5g)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzjmw7b9lxl)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172xzjmw7b9qnq)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172xzjmw7b9vdv)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172xzjmw7b9z4z)

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BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172xzjmw7bb6n7)

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BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172xzjmw7bbg4h)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172xzjmw7bbkwm)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172xzjmw7bbpmr)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzjmw7bbtcw)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172xzjmw7bby40)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzjmw7bc1w4)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bc9cd)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bcf3j)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bcjvn)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bcnls)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bcsbx)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bcx31)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bd0v5)

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BBC News 09:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bd8bf)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bdd2k)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bdhtp)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bdmkt)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bdr9y)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bdw22)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bdzt6)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bf3kb)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bf79g)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bfc1l)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bfgsq)

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BBC News 21:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bfq8z)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bfv13)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjmw7bfys7)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bg68h)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bgb0m)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bgfrr)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bgkhw)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bgp80)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bgt04)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bgxr8)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bh1hd)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bh57j)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bh8zn)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bhdqs)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bhjgx)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bhn71)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bhrz5)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bhwq9)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bj0gf)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bj46k)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bj7yp)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bjcpt)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bjhfy)

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BBC News 23:00 THU (w172xzjmw7bjvpb)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172xzjmw7bk35l)

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BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172xzjmw7bkgdz)

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BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172xzjmw7bkydh)

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BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172xzjmw7bl9mw)

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BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172xzjmw7blxcj)

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BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172xzjmw7bmmv9)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172xzjmw7bmrlf)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d5y)

BBC OS Conversations 02:06 SUN (w3ct2d5y)

BBC OS Conversations 22:06 SUN (w3ct2d5y)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxlykfp9pl)

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BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172xxxlykg2123)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j4z)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jg0)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jns)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1j9h)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvqfcpxs6sk)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqfqz75rs0)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvqfqz78np3)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172xvqfqz7ckl6)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvqfqz7ggh9)

Business Weekly 04:06 SUN (w3ct2dgz)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dgz)

CrowdScience 02:32 MON (w3ct1pqn)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pqn)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pqn)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1pqp)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1ls9)

Digital Planet 02:32 WED (w3ct1ls9)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1ls9)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1ls9)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2gj0)

Discovery 02:32 TUE (w3ct2gj0)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct2gj0)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct2gj0)

From Our Own Correspondent 02:06 SAT (w3ct1mv2)

From Our Own Correspondent 05:06 SUN (w3ct1mv2)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mv2)

HARDtalk 02:06 MON (w3ct1n5z)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n5z)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n5z)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3ct1n5z)

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HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3ct1n1g)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3ct1n1g)

HARDtalk 22:06 FRI (w3ct1n1g)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nvj)

Health Check 02:32 THU (w3ct1nvj)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nvj)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nvj)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2gj2)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2gj2)

Heart and Soul 03:32 MON (w3ct2gj2)

In the Studio 01:32 MON (w3ct1td6)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1td7)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1td7)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1td7)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dk7)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dk7)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2dk7)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dk7)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hc3)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hc3)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2r3grm1kg)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172xv2r3grm59l)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172xv2r3grm91q)

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Newsday 06:06 WED (w172xv2r3grsz3s)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172xv2r3grt2vx)

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Newsday 06:06 THU (w172xv2r3grww0w)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172xv2r3grwzs0)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172xv2r3grzn5v)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172xv2r3grzrxz)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172xv2r3grzwp3)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172xv562d8d8r0)

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On the Podium 04:32 WED (w3ct2g6q)

On the Podium 11:32 WED (w3ct2g6q)

On the Podium 22:32 WED (w3ct2g6q)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kx4)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct1k3b)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3ct1k3b)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3ct1k3b)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1n)

Over to You 01:50 SUN (w3ct1l1n)

People Fixing the World 02:06 TUE (w3ct1pl3)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pl3)

People Fixing the World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pl3)

People Fixing the World 22:06 TUE (w3ct1pl3)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l3y)

Science in Action 02:32 FRI (w3ct1l3y)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3ct1l3y)

Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3ct1l3y)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 05:32 SAT (w3ct0t1q)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 18:32 SAT (w3ct0t1q)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 01:32 SUN (w3ct0t1q)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 10:32 MON (w3ct0t1q)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0ndxt9bjsw)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172y0ndxt9ffpz)

Sport Today 19:32 WED (w172y0ndxt9jbm2)

Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172y0ndxt9m7j5)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172y0ndxt9q4f8)

Sporting Witness 18:50 SAT (w3ct1l8f)

Sporting Witness 02:50 SUN (w3ct1l8f)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3ct1l8g)

Sports News 23:20 SAT (w172y0shs60gw29)

Sports News 23:20 SUN (w172y0shs60krzd)

Sports News 23:20 MON (w172y0sj4g9sj4n)

Sports News 23:20 TUE (w172y0sj4g9wf1r)

Sports News 23:20 WED (w172y0sj4g9z9yv)

Sports News 23:20 THU (w172y0sj4gb26vy)

Sports News 23:20 FRI (w172y0sj4gb53s1)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172y0q1g06cc6n)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tb6xm41xb)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172y0tb6xm769p)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lbp)

Tech Tent 04:06 FRI (w3ct1nh6)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3ct1nh6)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3ct1nh6)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rt5)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3ct1rt5)

The Climate Question 04:06 MON (w3ct2dqr)

The Climate Question 09:06 MON (w3ct2dqr)

The Climate Question 20:06 MON (w3ct2dqr)

The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct2g9n)

The Compass 04:06 WED (w3ct2g9p)

The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct2g9p)

The Compass 20:06 WED (w3ct2g9p)

The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p6s)

The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct1p6t)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p6t)

The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3ct1p6t)

The Cultural Frontline 05:06 SAT (w3ct1pf7)

The Cultural Frontline 01:06 SUN (w3ct1pf7)

The Cultural Frontline 10:06 MON (w3ct1pf7)

The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct2gcz)

The Documentary 19:06 SAT (w3ct2gzl)

The Documentary 23:32 SAT (w3ct2gds)

The Documentary 03:06 SUN (w3ct2gcz)

The Documentary 10:06 SUN (w3ct2g98)

The Documentary 12:06 SUN (w3ct2gzl)

The Documentary 03:06 MON (w3ct2g98)

The Documentary 04:06 TUE (w3ct2gdt)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct2gdt)

The Documentary 20:06 TUE (w3ct2gdt)

The Documentary 10:06 WED (w3ct2gcz)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct20f5)

The Fifth Floor 12:06 FRI (w3ct20f6)

The Fifth Floor 18:06 FRI (w3ct20f6)

The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjr6)

The Food Chain 04:32 THU (w3ct1rfx)

The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3ct1rfx)

The Food Chain 22:32 THU (w3ct1rfx)

The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rld)

The Forum 10:06 THU (w3ct1rlf)

The Inquiry 02:06 THU (w3ct1z27)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3ct1z27)

The Inquiry 15:06 THU (w3ct1z27)

The Inquiry 22:06 THU (w3ct1z27)

The Lazarus Heist 09:32 SAT (w3ct2g70)

The Lazarus Heist 02:32 SUN (w3ct2g70)

The Lazarus Heist 22:32 SUN (w3ct2g70)

The Newsroom 11:06 SAT (w172xyxk4n4znxd)

The Newsroom 18:06 SAT (w172xyxk4n50j49)

The Newsroom 23:06 SAT (w172xywqpxkbtfn)

The Newsroom 11:06 SUN (w172xyxk4n52kth)

The Newsroom 19:06 SUN (w172xyxk4n53jsj)

The Newsroom 23:06 SUN (w172xywqpxkfqbr)

The Newsroom 11:06 MON (w172xyxkhxg99zr)

The Newsroom 13:06 MON (w172xyxkhxg9kh0)

The Newsroom 19:06 MON (w172xyxkhxgb8ys)

The Newsroom 23:06 MON (w172xywr25vngj0)

The Newsroom 11:06 TUE (w172xyxkhxgd6wv)

The Newsroom 13:06 TUE (w172xyxkhxgdgd3)

The Newsroom 19:06 TUE (w172xyxkhxgf5vw)

The Newsroom 23:06 TUE (w172xywr25vrcf3)

The Newsroom 11:06 WED (w172xyxkhxgh3sy)

The Newsroom 13:06 WED (w172xyxkhxghc96)

The Newsroom 19:06 WED (w172xyxkhxgj2rz)

The Newsroom 23:06 WED (w172xywr25vv8b6)

The Newsroom 11:06 THU (w172xyxkhxgl0q1)

The Newsroom 13:06 THU (w172xyxkhxgl869)

The Newsroom 19:06 THU (w172xyxkhxglzp2)

The Newsroom 23:06 THU (w172xywr25vy579)

The Newsroom 11:06 FRI (w172xyxkhxgnxm4)

The Newsroom 13:06 FRI (w172xyxkhxgp53d)

The Newsroom 19:06 FRI (w172xyxkhxgpwl5)

The Newsroom 23:06 FRI (w172xywr25w124d)

The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1hsn)

The Real Story 10:06 FRI (w3ct1hsp)

Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172xyt8cqr6vgl)

Weekend 07:06 SAT (w172xyt8cqr6z6q)

Weekend 08:06 SAT (w172xyt8cqr72yv)

Weekend 06:06 SUN (w172xyt8cqr9rcp)

Weekend 07:06 SUN (w172xyt8cqr9w3t)

Weekend 08:06 SUN (w172xyt8cqr9zvy)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wys)

Witness History 08:50 MON (w3ct1x12)

Witness History 12:50 MON (w3ct1x12)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3ct1x12)

Witness History 03:50 TUE (w3ct1x12)

Witness History 08:50 TUE (w3ct1x5l)

Witness History 12:50 TUE (w3ct1x5l)

Witness History 18:50 TUE (w3ct1x5l)

Witness History 03:50 WED (w3ct1x5l)

Witness History 08:50 WED (w3ct1x7v)

Witness History 12:50 WED (w3ct1x7v)

Witness History 18:50 WED (w3ct1x7v)

Witness History 03:50 THU (w3ct1x7v)

Witness History 08:50 THU (w3ct1x3b)

Witness History 12:50 THU (w3ct1x3b)

Witness History 18:50 THU (w3ct1x3b)

Witness History 03:50 FRI (w3ct1x3b)

Witness History 08:50 FRI (w3ct1wyt)

Witness History 12:50 FRI (w3ct1wyt)

Witness History 18:50 FRI (w3ct1wyt)

WorklifeIndia 11:32 SAT (w3ct2f3d)

WorklifeIndia 05:32 SUN (w3ct2f3d)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzl8rpjk3qg)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y4814z8sf3v)

World Business Report 23:32 MON (w172y48vlpwhpj5)

World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172y4bhh52y79t)

World Business Report 23:32 TUE (w172y48vlpwllf8)

World Business Report 15:32 WED (w172y4cqn8022vv)

World Business Report 23:32 WED (w172y48vlpwphbc)

World Business Report 15:32 THU (w172y498b2632h2)

World Business Report 23:32 THU (w172y48vlpwsd7g)

World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172y46szwd4239)

World Business Report 23:32 FRI (w172y48vlpww94k)

World Football 04:32 FRI (w3ct1tz9)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3ct1tz9)

World Football 22:32 FRI (w3ct1tz9)