Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 05 JUNE 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc45ytt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqc6313b4j)
G7 nations 'millimetre away' from tax deal for tech companies

France and Germany's finance ministers said an agreement on a global minimum tax rate was very close. We have a round-up of the latest news from the G7 summit, and hear from Tove Maria Ryding from European Network on Debt and Development for her take on the plans.
Also in the programme, the BBC's Mike Johnson takes an extended look at the issue of where our plastic recycling waste really ends up.
Plus, we speak to the CEO of Boom Supersonic, Kathy Savitt, on the return of supersonic passenger air travel following the news that United Airlines has ordered 15 aircraft from the company.
And we're in the front row as Nigerian musicians finally get back in front of a live audience again.

Fergus Nicoll is joined in the programme by Colin Peacock of Radio New Zealand.

(Picture: The G7 summit. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc462ky)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz188pk6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qwfvb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbh)
Mental health: The relationship between the media and elite sport stars

We consider the fallout from the controversial historic tweets sent by England's Ollie Robinson when the bowler was much younger.

Plus following tennis player's Naomi Osaka's withdrawal from the French Open, we discuss mental health and the relationship between the media and elite sports.

And we hear from England women's wicket-keeper Amy Jones on how the team are preparing for their upcoming series against India.

Photo: David Warner of Australia laughs as a camera man fall over during the victory lap for the 2015 ICC Cricket World Cup final match between Australia and New Zealand at Melbourne Cricket Ground on March 29, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc466b2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dz)
Visiting Russia’s Arctic military base

Russia's northernmost military base, in the remote archipelago of Franz Josef Land, demonstrates its ambitions for the Arctic, as melting ice opens up new opportunities. The BBC Moscow news team were given rare access to the base, and Liza Shuvalova tells us what she saw there.

Venezuela and Trinidad
Between the 1960s and 90s, many people from the island of Trinidad made the 11 kilometre sea crossing to Venezuela in search of better lives. Today, the migration has reversed, with Venezuelans heading to Trinidad and Tobago. BBC Mundo’s Norberto Paredes tells us more about long-standing bonds between these two countries.

Saving Kenya's turtles
Watamu, on the Kenyan coast, is famous for its wildlife, including four species of sea turtle. But turtle numbers have declined due to poaching and habitat loss. Njoroge Muigai of BBC Nairobi visited Watamu to meet the people working hard to save them.

What two new buzzwords tell us about broken dreams in China
Chinese internet users have been using two buzzwords – which translate as “lying flat” and “involution” – to express growing frustration with competitiveness and powerlessness. Fan Wang of BBC Chinese explains the economic changes behind these terms.

My journey to journalism: Shekiba Habib
As part of our occasional series about our language service colleagues' routes into their jobs, we hear from Shekiba Habib of BBC Afghan. She was studying in Kabul to be a doctor, the career she had always dreamed of, when the arrival of the Taliban changed everything.

Image: Russia's Arctic military base in the Franz Josef Land archipelago
Credit: BBC


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyl)
How Switzerland defeated its heroin epidemic

In the 1990s, Switzerland decided to tackle one of Europe's worst drugs epidemics by trying radical new policy ideas including providing safe-injection rooms for addicts and even prescribing pure heroin. The new strategy dramatically cut overdoses, HIV infections and the number of new users, and in 2008 the Swiss voted in a referendum to enshrine the changes permanently in law. Zak Brophy talks to Andre Seidenberg, a Swiss doctor who worked with addicts for decades, and to former Swiss president Ruth Dreifuss, who campaigned for the change in policy.

PHOTO: Drug addicts in a disused railway station in Zurich in the 1990s (Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc46b26)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsg)
Israel divided

Israel will soon have its first new prime minister in over 12 years if a freshly formed coalition holds. Benjamin Netanyahu is the country's longest serving leader, but in recent years he’s presided over an increasingly fractious political system. In a recent speech Israel’s largely ceremonial president repeated his warning that the country's population has evolved into four unique groups, often attending separate schools and living in separate communities. Israel’s had four elections in two years and there’s talk of another before the end of 2021. Mr Netanyahu has been criticised from the right for failing to stop rockets being fired into Israel by the Palestinian group Hamas, and is accused from the left of encouraging extremist nationalists. But internationally he’s forged new alliances with Middle Eastern countries through the Abraham Accords, successfully persuaded the United States to pull out of the Iran nuclear deal, and celebrated the moving of the US embassy to Jerusalem. After 15 years of leadership by the man they call ‘Bibi’, Israel is at a crossroads - but where will it go next? Are the religious and cultural divisions making the country ungovernable? What changes are needed in order to encourage the formation of more stable governments? And what could such changes mean for the country’s Arab minority? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc46ftb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz1891sl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qwt2q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1j)
Spitfire: The People’s Plane

Makeshift wedding

Spitfire production is getting back on track, but the search for locations continues. Out into the surrounding countryside, from brickworks to country manors to empty fields, the dispersal continues.

Presenter: Tuppence Middleton
Producers: Alasdair Cross and Emily Knight
Editors: Chris Ledgard and Kirsten Lass


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk1)
Wales Vaccine Success

Wales has given one vaccination dose to a larger proportion of their population than almost anywhere else. In the UK as a whole, 75 percent of adults have received at least one dose of vaccine - which is among the largest proportions in the world. But Wales is well ahead even of that benchmark, at 85 percent. We look at the data to see how they achieved this.

Plus, a simple sum has been doing the rounds on social media recently: 28 + 47. Tim Harford talks to mathematician Katie Steckles about the different ways of tackling it in your head.


(Dining out in St Mary Street, Cardiff, Wales in sunny weather, June 2021. Photo: Huw Fairclough/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc46kkg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt663vjytk)
G7 : Global tax plan

G-7 finance minsters are set to agree a common approach to taxing multinational corporations that could raise revenues for governments around the world. We hear from a free market economist.

Also on the programme: Donald Trump has accused Facebook of censorship, after it said his suspension from the service would last for at least two years; and as Mexico goes to the polls tomorrow, we hear from those braving the violence to stand for office.

Joining Paul Henley on the programme is is Julia Buxton, a professor of criminology specialising in international drug policy at the University of Manchester here in the UK and Sune Engel Rasmussen, the London-based correspondent for the Wall Street Journal newspaper.

(Photo: Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak speaks at a meeting of finance ministers from across the G7 nations. Credit: Stefan Rousseau/Reuters)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc46p9l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt663vk2kp)
Trump accuses Facebook of censorship

Donald Trump has accused Facebook of censorship, after it said his suspension from the service would last for at least two years. We hear from a sympathiser.

Also on the programme: as Mexico goes to the polls this weekend we hear from those braving the violence to stand for office; and why the electric car represents the biggest revolution in the motor industry since the days of Henry Ford.

Joining Paul Henley on the programme are Julia Buxton, a professor of criminology specialising in international drug policy at the University of Manchester and Sune Engel Rasmussen, a London-based correspondent for the Wall Street Journal newspaper.

(Photo: Former US President Donald Trump; Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc46t1q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt663vk69t)
G7 Tax Deal

Finance ministers from the G7 group of leading economies say they're confident of striking a deal in London today on taxing multinational companies. We hear from a free market economist.

Also on the programme, as South Africa plans a total ban on smoking in public, we ask, can it be enforced?

Joining Paul Henley on the programme are Julia Buxton, a professor of criminology specialising in international drug policy at the University of Manchester and Sune Engel Rasmussen, a London-based correspondent for the Wall Street Journal newspaper.

(Photo: Britains Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak speaks at a meeting of finance ministers from across the G7 nations; Credit: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire/Pool via REUTERS)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qx5b3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6l)
Sold into sex work

Over 79% of the world's trafficking victims are subject to sexual exploitation, and an overwhelming number of them are women and girls. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women who not only survived and escaped that experience, but have gone on to change laws and create support networks for fellow survivors.

Shandra Woworuntu was a successful Indonesian banking analyst but lost her job when her firm ran into trouble. She applied for a job in a Chicago Hotel for six months to tide her family over - but when she arrived she was handed over to a trafficking ring. After months of forced sex work, she was able to escape her kidnappers by jumping out of a bathroom window. She went on to successfully prosecute her traffickers in court, and is now a campaigner against trafficking. She is the founder of Mentari USA, a non-profit organisation which helps survivor reintegrate with society.

Hungarian Timea Nagy grew up as the daughter of a strict policewoman, but became trapped in a trafficking circle after applying to become a baby-sitter in Toronto. Hours after her arrival, she was forced into sex work. Timea escaped home to Hungary after three months, but later returned to Canada to indict her traffickers. She has gone on to train police in Canada helping trafficking victims, as well as educating the financial sector on its role in preventing modern slavery. She is the founder of Timea's Cause, a for-profit organisation which employs survivors.

Produced by Rosie Stopher

IMAGE
(L) Shandra Woworuntu, credit Calvin Voon
(R) Timea Nagy


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc46xsv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5r)
Coronavirus: The Olympics

The Olympic Games now look certain to go ahead in Japan in July. However, some people in the country are against holding the event, as it tackles a fourth wave of coronavirus cases, low vaccination and the extension of a state of emergency in Tokyo and other areas. Two doctors in Tokyo share their observations, experiences and concerns.

As some countries, including Japan, struggle to vaccinate older members of their populations, host Nuala McGovern also hears from two 12-year-olds in Canada and the United States. They were among the first children in the world to receive a Covid vaccine. They discuss, along with their parents, what it’s like to receive the vaccine when there are so many people at greater risk in other countries still waiting for a jab.

(Photo: A giant Olympic rings monument is seen at Odaiba Marine Park in Tokyo, Japan. Credit: EPA/Franck Robichon)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qx927)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f90)
6: Billion dollar hack

A faulty printer, an empty room and the most daring cyber theft ever attempted.
The Bangladesh Bank heist begins.
#LazarusHeist

Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/lazarusheist


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1g)
A daring bank raid and a disinformation specialist’s radio diary

The Lazarus Heist tells the story of one of the most daring bank thefts ever attempted. We hear your thoughts and talk to the series editor.
Plus, a day in the life of a BBC disinformation specialist.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc471jz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0pz8d9pgkm)
Belarusian Yelena Leuchanka: 'Being in jail, I felt so proud'

As part of Belarus women's basketball team, Yelena Leuchanka twice represented her country at the Olympics, but last year she was jailed for protesting the re-election of President Alexander Lukashenko. She tells us about protesting, prison, and player power.

The Derby, one of the most famous horse races in the world takes place on Saturday. As well as previewing the race we’ll look at the new statue of suffragette Emily Davidson due to be unveiled at Epsom… More than 100 years ago Davidson lost her life, in one the most controversial moments in sport history moment, when she threw herself under the King’s horse to protest for woman’s equality

Chris Mosier reacts to Ron DeSantis, Republican Governor of Florida, signing a bill banning transgender girls and women from competing on female sports teams at high school and college level. Chris recently took part in the 50km walk for team Team USA at the Olympic trials. It was the first time a transgender male had competed in any Olympic qualifier alongside other men.

We chat to Toronto Raptors super fan Nav Bahatia who has become the first fan to ever be inducted into the basketball Hall of fame.

(Photo credit ANDREJ ISAKOVIC/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc47593)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz189s8c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qxjkh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f36)
Tackling India’s black fungus crisis

India is seeing a decline in the second wave of coronavirus infections, but a rare and deadly fungal infection is affecting patients recovering from Covid.

India has reported more than 11,000 cases of the black fungus infection, also known as mucormycosis. It has a mortality rate of over 50 per cent, and the drug needed for its treatment is in short supply. Missing a dose can result in removal of tissues or, in serious cases, bones and even the eye.

Doctors say there is a link between black fungus and indiscriminate use of steroids to treat Covid patients. Diabetics are said to be particularly at risk.

So, what are the treatment challenges, and what is happening to the families of patients faced with the double stress of health and finances?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss what can be done to tackle India’s black fungus crisis.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Dr Akshay Nair, oculoplastic surgeon; Dr Ramanan Laxminarayan, founder and director, Centre for Disease Dynamics; Iqra Khalid, lawyer, black fungus patient’s kin


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc47917)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9n)
Manu Joseph: Serious Men

Serious Men tells the intertwined stories of wily Ayyan Mani - who tries to pass off his son as a mathematical genius - and life at the Institute of Theory and Research in Mumbai, where Ayyan works, and where veteran scientists battle over their pet theories about how life began on Earth.

Serious Men won the Hindu Best Fiction Award in 2010 and the 2011 PEN Open Book Award and was shortlisted for the Man Asian Literary Prize. It’s an unsettling comedy about inequalities in Indian society; it’s a portrait of a man doing his best for his family with unorthodox methods and unexpected results, and it’s a look at the romance and frustrations of scientific research.

Manu Joseph is a novelist and columnist.

(Picture: Manu Joseph. Photo credit: Roberto Ricciuti/Getty Images.)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc47dsc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv53wscqd2z)
Rich nations back deal to tax multinationals

The G-7 group of leading economies has reached a deal on taxing multinational companies. Finance ministers from the group, meeting in London, have agreed to a minimum tax of 15%, in a deal described by the British finance minister as an historic agreement to reform the global tax system.

Also in the programme: It's 40 years since the first case of AIDS was reported and; we hear an astonishing account of the suffering in the embattled Tigray region of Ethiopia from a photo journalist who's just returned from there.

(Picture: Britain's finance minister, Rishi Sunak (R) and David Malpass (L), president of the World Bank Group at the G7 summit in London, UK. Credit: EPA/HOLLIE ADAMS / POOL)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc47jjh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t819qg589)
Live Sporting Action

We'll be live at Roland Garros for French Open commentary and we'll preview the European Championship football, after a year delay.


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc480j0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz18bmh8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qycsd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l87)
Denmark's shock Euros win

In June 1992, Denmark’s top footballers were relaxing on the beach when they received an urgent call to take part in the Euro 92 tournament. The Danes had failed to qualify for the championship, but were now needed as replacements for Yugoslavia, a country that no longer existed because it had descended into civil war. In a surprise to everyone, including themselves, Denmark then went on to win the tournament, defeating Holland and West Germany on the way. Will Yates talks to midfielder John Jensen, who scored one of the Danish goals in the final. The programme is a Whistledown Production, first broadcast in 2016.

(Photo: The Danish team celebrate. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc48484)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z6y)
The war on drugs

US President Richard Nixon declared illegal drugs 'public enemy number one' in 1971 and launched a worldwide 'war' on the narcotics trade. 50 years on we revisit key moments in the ongoing fight against the powerful criminal groups involved from Columbia to Afghanistan. We'll hear personal stories from the front line of drug addiction, plus journalist and author Ioan Grillo joins our presenter Max Pearson to discuss, what went wrong in the war on drugs?

Photo: US President Richard Nixon (BBC)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc48808)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rsz)
Actor Emma Stone

This week on The Arts Hour, Nikki Bedi is joined by Ugandan artist Leilah Babirye and American film critic Rich Cline

Oscar winning actor Emma Stone talks about her latest role in Cruella, the prequel to the Disney classic 101 Dalmatians

Hollywood director Zack Snyder explains his love of zombie movies

Jazz musician Cleveland Watkiss discusses what the term “Black Music” means to him

British actor Cush Jumbo on how playing a grieving mother affected her personally

Best-selling author Brit Bennett on her new novel about racial identity in 1950s America

Malian Kora maestro Toumani Diabate talks about playing with a symphony orchestra


(Photo: Actor Emma Stone. Credit: Emma McIntyre/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc48crd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv53wscrc20)
A tax deal to change the world?

Finance ministers of the G7 group of advanced economies have agreed that multinational companies should pay at least 15% in tax. How will the deal be received in the United States, and will it be passed by Congress? And what will the impact be on countries such as Ireland that currently offer firms lower rates of corporation tax?

Also in the programme: a judge in California overturns a 32-year ban on assault weapons; and the detained novelist who has redefined Uyghur literature.

(Photo: The G7 attendees posed for photos at Lancaster House. Credit: PA Media)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc48hhj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbx)
'Songwriting made me who I am' with Ice T, Aurora, Amy Lee and Oli Sykes

Amy Lee, Ice T, Aurora and Oli Sykes discuss how they how they got into music, how music has affected their personal growth, and how they work through creative differences with their collaborators.

Amy Lee from Grammy Award-winning US Rock band Evanescence is on hosting duties, and she’s invited some of her favourite artists and collaborators to join her, starting with seminal rapper and producer Ice T. Ice has recently teamed up with Evanescence on the track When I’m Gone, and collaborated with everybody from Snoop Dogg and Dr Dre, to Slayer and Public Enemy.

Oli Sykes is the lead singer and songwriter of British rock band Bring Me The Horizon, which formed in Sheffield in 2004 and went on to become one of the biggest bands on the planet. Aurora is a Norwegian singer-songwriter and producer whose music blends folk, electro and art-pop, and she has been cited by Billie Eilish as a major inspiration - as well as being one of our host’s favourite artists.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc48m7n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywnj9nnxsm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sfll3szf8)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qyzj1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf1)
Mukoma Wa Ngugi: How music inspired my writing

In his new book Unbury Our Dead With Song, Kenyan-American author Mukoma Wa Ngugi celebrates Ethiopian musicians in exile in the Kenyan capital Nairobi, as they search for the perfect performance of the iconic song of their homeland, the Tizita.

Sri Lankan Kanya D’Almeida has written a short story which is the Asia winner of the Commonwealth Short Story Prize and in the running for the global prize announced at the end of June. Kanya shares her story I Cleaned The – and reveals how it addresses universal issues such as motherhood, class and how we deal with our own bodily waste, as well as being firmly anchored in the country of her childhood.

In Lebanon, new public art has emerged from economic and political crisis. The street art movement, Art of Change, has been using murals as a powerful voice against corruption, inequality, high unemployment and increasing poverty. Reporter Frank McWeeny speaks to the artists behind the project.

Plus Nigerian Afrobeats star Joeboy talks about recording his debut album Somewhere Between Beauty and Magic during lockdown and why the music of Burna Boy inspires him



Presenter: Colleen Harris
Producers: Paul Waters, Kirsty McQuire, Anna Bailey, Frank McWeeny and Nancy Bennie


(Photo: Mukoma Wa Ngugi. Credit: Cornell University)



SUNDAY 06 JUNE 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc48vqx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yv7)
Zoonotic hotspots and where to find them

Researchers map where the riskiest areas are for viruses to jump from bats into humans. Also, synthetic bacteria with unnatural DNA, and the origin of the humble watermelon.

David Hayman of Massey University in NZ and colleagues have published in the journal Nature Food a study highlighting areas of the world where zoonotic transmission of coronaviruses are most likely to occur between humans and bats of the type most suspected of being the origin of the current SARS CoV2 virus. There are a lot of hotspots combining fragmented forest, livestock farming, human habitation, and populations of horseshoe bats. It is, as he says, just part of the evidence suggesting a natural origin in the areas of northern south-east Asia and southern China.

Jason Chin, Wes Robertson and team at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology have been tinkering with their work on synthetic organisms. By rewriting the dictionary of DNA itself, their new molecular alphabet is able to encode far more elaborate and innovative functions than even nature has ever produced. Publishing this week in the journal Science, their latest bacterium is even capable of being completely immune to viral infection. But as they describe, this could be just the start of what the new technology could deliver in terms of new materials and medicines.

Meanwhile, Susanne Renner has been tracking down some of human beings’ earliest genetic engineering. The selection and breeding of various fruits to produce sweet, sweet watermelon was long suspected to have originated in Africa, the question was where and when? Using a combination of genetic sequencing, ancient Egyptian art, and early modern paintings, she describes to Roland how what we now know as Sudan likely played a part in the story.

What is the point of menstruation?


It's a topic that's taboo in many cultures, yet it's also something nearly every woman experiences – on average upwards of 400 times throughout her life: menstruation.

Responding to a flood of questions from our CrowdScience listeners, Marnie Chesterton seeks to unpack how periods affect women physically, mentally and societally.

Why did humans evolve to have periods when fewer than two percent of mammals share our experience of menstrual cycles? Is it really a good use of our limited energy reserves? What can the little Egyptian spiny mouse teach us about PMS symptoms? We hear why periods may reduce the number of faulty embryos that implant and how more menstrual cycles may even increase our chances of developing certain types of cancer.

Finally, as the number of periods a woman has over the course of her life has more than quadrupled since the pre-industrial era, Marnie asks: Do we really still need to have them?



(Image: Horseshoe bat Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc48zh1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz18clg9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qzbrf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv9)
Black Fungus epidemic in India

Could over the counter Steroids be driving the Black Fungus epidemic in India? Claudia talks to Dr Awadhesh Singh from the GD Hospital and Diabetes Institute in Kolkata who explains the link between Steroid use and the shocking surge in cases of this deadly disease. Guest Matt Fox from Boston University discusses mass Covid testing in Vietnam and a trial of mask wearing in Bangladesh, plus the renaming of Covid variants using the Greek alphabet. And bestselling author Dr Jen Gunter on her new book The Menopause Manifesto – own your health with facts and feminism!

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: A doctor inspects a patient for mucormycosis inside a dedicated ward at MMG hospital in Ghaziabad, India. Photo credit: Sakib Ali/Hindustan Times/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc49375)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc496z9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtw)
Somaliland goes to the polls

Stories from Somaliland, Colombia, Singapore and France.

Elections have been held in Somaliland this week – quite an achievement given that this large stretch of coastal land on the Horn of Africa is not recognised as a country by most of the world. It broke away from Somalia thirty years ago, and has tried to function as a normal democracy ever since. The BBC’s Africa Editor, Mary Harper describes how voting in Somaliland is a colourful affair, but one where women and ethnic minorities still struggle to be heard.

Many in Colombia thought the divisions left by decades of civil war were beginning to fade. But protests which started as a complaint about tax and healthcare reforms have turned violent. With both the authorities and ordinary people now attacking demonstrators, Daniel Pardo warns that the past may be coming back to haunt the present.

Singapore is not normally thought of as a destination for wildlife fans. An island nation off the coast of Malaysia, it is known more for skyscrapers, shopping malls and high-rise homes. But Singapore is also home to a wide variety of tropical birds, and bird-watching enthusiasts or “twitchers” have long been going there to spot rare breeds. But the habitat of these natural wonders is now under threat, as Sharanjit Leyl explains.

France has a long tradition of powerful figures in local government, but few can claim to have the kind of influence enjoyed by the Mayor of Ligardes, in the country’s south-west. Pierre Dulong has a side-line working as a faith healer and exorcist, with people travelling hundreds of miles to be cured of ill health, or to have evil spirits cast out. Chris Bockman went to meet him.

(Image: Women queue to vote in Somaliland’s elections. Credit: Mustafa Saeed/AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qzl7p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc49bqf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz18cypp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qzpzt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2g6v)
Globalisation in reverse

Globalisation is about open trade, open doors and open borders. It is the way that Asia has grown its economy for the better part of the last half century. But the pandemic and tensions between the US and China have seen globalisation go into reverse - with many now saying it hasn’t benefited everyone. One of the biggest beneficiaries of globalisation has been Singapore. But the city-state is now an increasingly lonely voice calling for economies to stay open. It is being forced to reinvent itself and find new ways to grow its trade dependent and global economy. What lessons does Singapore – so often the canary in the coal mine for global economic trends - have for the rest of us?

Join Karishma Vaswani as she explores that question and many others in a wide-ranging interview with Singapore’s Prime Minister, Lee Hsien Loong.


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc49ggk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt663vmvqn)
El Salvador plans to make crypto-currency legal tender

The president of El Salvador has said his country will adopt the digital currency Bitcoin as legal tender, to improve the lives of low income families. We hear from the capital San Salvador.

Also on the programme: Mexico holds mid-term elections amid massive political violence; and why doctors in India are increasingly worried about the prevalence of black fungus cases.

(Photo :A banner that reads "We accept Bitcoin, free, fast and without contagion" is seen at a beach cafe on Punta Roca Beach in La Libertad, El Salvador; Credit: REUTERS/Jose Cabezas)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc49l6p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt663vmzgs)
G7: Landmark tax deal

A landmark deal struck by finance ministers of the world's richest nations - meeting here in London - to make multinational companies pay more tax, has been hailed as historic but do all nations agree with it?

Also on the programme: Regional elections take place in eastern Germany today ahead of the national vote in September; and Mexico holds its mid-term election amid massive political violence.

Joining Paul Henley on the programme is Márta Pardavi a Hungarian lawyer and co-chair of the Hungarian Helsinki Committee, a human rights advocacy group and Tom Nuttall, journalist and Berlin bureau chief for the Economist magazine.

(Photo: Finance ministers from across the G7 nations meet; Credit: Henry Nicholls/PA Wire)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc49pyt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt663vn36x)
77th Anniversary : D-Day landings

A ceremony will be held in France today to mark the official opening of the British Normandy Memorial, seventy-seven years after the D-Day landings in the Second World War. We hear from France.

Also on the programme: a UN Tribunal delivers the final verdict in the trial of the Bosnian Serb commander Ratko Mladic, who is appealing his genocide conviction; and we'll be speaking to the curator of this year's Venice Biennale of Architecture.

Joining Paul Henley on the programme is Márta Pardavi a Hungarian lawyer and co-chair of the Hungarian Helsinki Committee, a human rights advocacy group and Tom Nuttall, journalist and Berlin bureau chief for the Economist magazine.

(Photo: British Normandy Memorial; Credit: Royal British Legion/PA Wire)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2r0276)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfp)
Inside the mind of a kitchen gadget

Meet the unsung heroes of your kitchen drawers.

When you hold a vegetable peeler or potato masher, do you ever think about the person behind it?

We celebrate chefs and cookbook writers - but what about the people who make the tools that make it all easier?

Emily Thomas meets three product designers who explain the thinking behind the everyday objects we keep in our kitchens. We’ll hear about accessibility and segregation - but also art and beauty. Welcome to the philosophy of kitchen gadgets.

Contributors: Dan Formosa, Scott Jarvie, and Gavin Reay.


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc49tpy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2r05zb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kwy)
How I sang for my freedom

When Kurdish folk singer Nawroz Oramari was a teenager growing up in Saddam Hussein's Iraq, he was told he'd be executed if he was caught singing - he and his father even had to sign a pledge saying that they accepted the death penalty if they did so. Nawroz tells Anu Anand about his remarkable life - joining the Kurdish resistance, ending up in prison and even taking on multiple identities - including that of an Emirati Oil Tycoon - in his quest to be able to sing freely in his native language. This programme was first broadcast on 6th May 2021.

Presenter: Anu Anand
Producer: Mariana Des Forges

Picture: Nawroz Oramari in London
Credit: Courtesy of Nawroz Oramari

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc49yg2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Assignment Interview (w3ct2gb3)
Barbara Demick: True stories from North Korea

North Korea and Tibet are two of the most tightly-controlled societies on earth, and as a consequence their peoples are often misunderstood by the world’s media, caricatured respectively as aggressive communists and spiritual hermits. But Barbara Demick, former Los Angeles Times correspondent in Seoul and Beijing, confesses that she likes a challenge, and so set out to build a more nuanced picture of individuals’ real lives in both places. Moreover, she did this with minimal location reporting; indeed in the case of North Korea, she never visited the city she wrote about at all. Using an almost forensic level of investigation, Demick conducted lengthy and highly detailed interviews with people who had left both places, cross-referencing testimonies and drawing on additional research to corroborate their accounts. She then used the resulting material to inform a vivid, factual storytelling style that she calls narrative non-fiction. As she explains in conversation with Owen Bennett-Jones, it is a difficult process, but one that yields fascinating insight into places whose repressive leaders would rather we knew far less about.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2r09qg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2g6w)
The schools that chain boys

For 18 months reporter Fateh al-Rahman al-Hamdani filmed inside 23 Islamic schools, or khalwas, across Sudan for a BBC News Arabic investigation. He uncovered systemic child abuse, with boys as young as five years old routinely chained, shackled and beaten by the “sheikhs”, or religious men in charge of the schools. The investigation also found evidence of sexual abuse.

We visit some of the nearly 30,000 Sudanese khalwas, where children are taught to memorise the Koran. The schools receive money from the government and private donors both in Sudan and around the world. Because they charge no fees, many families consider them an alternative to mainstream education, especially in remote villages that may not have government-run schools. Students board there, only returning home for the holidays.

We meet two 14-year-old boys, Ismail and Mohamed Nader, who were beaten so badly at one khalwa that doctors worried they might not survive, and hear how their families decide to take legal action. We join Fateh as he confronts the sheikh in charge of the school where they were assaulted. And we hear what Sudan’s new transitional government has to say about reforming khalwas.

Presented by Paul Bakibinga, narrating the words of Fateh al-Rahman al-Hamdani.

Photo: A young boy with his feet shackled and chained. Credit: Jess Kelly/BBC)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc4b266)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz18dp5g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2r0fgl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2g7h)
Automation Nation

Machines: What they do now that they did not do before

Technology has complemented our work since the invention of the wheel, but we may finally be approaching a point where automation stands to replace some human jobs entirely. Economist Dr Daniel Susskind explores how automation is affecting work in the United States, from fully automated restaurants to driverless trucks, and hears from the people whose livelihoods are being affected. A world without work could be a utopia, but without the correct policy to ensure people still have incomes and a sense of purpose, it could look more like a nightmare.

Daniel discovers just how advanced the field of robotic is becoming with a visit to the Oxford Robotics Institute, before heading to the US to hear how automation is already everywhere you look.

He delves into the surprising history of automation in supermarkets, from the first forays of the 1930s to the fully automated shops we are starting to see today, and hear how the advancement of artificial intelligence has brought us to this point.

Finally, we visit the Tyson Manufacturing Research Centre to hear how in America’s enormous meatpacking industry robots are increasingly doing work that until very recently could only be done by humans.

Producer: Ned Carter Miles


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc4b5yb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z20)
Do we need more nuclear power to help deal with climate change?

In November 2021, Britain will host the next UN Climate Change Conference, otherwise known as COP 26. Some 200 countries will come together to try to speed up attempts to make the world carbon neutral by the middle of the century.

But many countries are already struggling to ramp up renewable energy sufficiently to meet their greenhouse emission reduction targets. So is there another answer out there?

Around a tenth of the world's electricity is generated by nuclear reactors. Global generation has slowed in recent years after the nuclear accident in Fukushima a decade ago prompted governments to take a more cautious stance.

But with the urgent need to reduce carbon emissions, many prominent environmentalists are now taking another look at nuclear energy.

Tanya Beckett asks if nuclear energy can helps us transition away from fossil fuel power.

Produced by Soila Apparicio.


(Exhaust plumes from cooling towers at the coal-fired power station at Jaenschwalde Germany. Credit: Sean Gallup /Getty Images)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2r0k6q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxc)
Syria’s decade of conflict: Syria's secret library

Syrian born reporter Lina Sinjab presents a special series from Assignment’s award winning archive on the 10 years of civil war in her country.

This week an extraordinary story from 2016, reported by Mike Thomson, about a secret library stored in the basement of a crumbling house in the besieged Syrian town of Darayya. The library was home to thousands of books rescued from bombed-out buildings by local volunteers, who daily braved snipers and shells to fill its shelves.

In the town gripped by hunger and death after three years without food aid, Mike Thomson revealed how this literary sanctuary proved a lifeline to a community shattered by war. And now, 10 years on, Mike brings Lina up to date on the fate of some of those volunteers.

Produced by Michael Gallagher and additional research and translation by Mariam El Khalaf.

(Image: 14 year-old Chief Librarian Amjad in the Secret Library, Credit: Daraya Council Media Team)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc4b9pg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv53wsct902)
El Salvador president wants Bitcoin as legal tender

El Salvador's president says he will make the Bitcoin crypto-currency legal tender in the country. If his plan is backed by congress, the Central American country would be first in the world to formally adopt the digital currency.

The head of Israel's internal security service has warned that extreme political rhetoric on social media could lead to bloodshed.

And, a memorial honouring soldiers who died under British command on D-Day - and in the fighting that followed - has been unveiled in France on the 77th anniversary of the Normandy landings.

(Photo credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc4bffl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rl6)
X-rays: New ways of seeing

The discovery of X-rays by the German scientist Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895 was nothing short of ground-breaking, opening up a new era in medicine. For the first time, doctors could see inside the human body without the need for surgery, and diagnose many more living patients.

X-rays had major implications for physics as well, allowing scientists to study the structure and arrangement of molecules. Within wider society, they inspired artists to explore what these new rays could tell us about the representation of reality. It wasn’t long before X-rays were being used to scan baggage, in airport security and even in shoe shops to measure feet before exposure to radiation was properly understood. Huge strides in X-ray technology have given us the type of modern scans that are used today to detect conditions such as cancer.

Joining Bridget Kendall are Drs Adrian Thomas and Arpan Banerjee, both radiologists who’ve collaborated on publications about the history of X-rays, and artist Susan Aldworth who’s used brain scans in her work to investigate the nature of identity.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service

[Image: Cogito Ergo Sum 3. Credit: Used with kind permission of the artist, Susan Aldworth]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc4bk5q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc4bnxv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t819qk9nn)
Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc4c157)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz18fn4h)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2r1dfm)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2g6w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc4c4xc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dgs)
Chinese urged to have more babies

The Chinese government is pleading for young people to have more babies. On Business Weekly we’ll ask whether a new policy that allows families to have three children will defuse a demographic timebomb. Also in the programme, the growing industry of forensic genealogy is cracking decades old murder cases. Our reporter asks how much privacy do we have to surrender - and is it worth it? As the US marks 100 years since the Tulsa Race Massacre we head to a more recent place of protest and trauma, Minneapolis. The president of the Federal Reserve there tells us he wants to do more to fight racism and inequality - but a black businesswoman from the city says she’s not seen much sign of equality. And is the boozy power lunch back?

Business Weekly is produced by Matthew Davies and presented by Lucy Burton.

Picture: Stock photo of a happy baby playing on swing in playground (Credit: Getty)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc4c8nh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv53wscv7z3)
Mexicans vote after violent campaign

Mexicans vote in mid-term elections after a wave of political assassinations, and as the economy reels from the pandemic.

Also in the programme: leading Palestinian activists are detained for questioning in the Sheikh Jarrah neighbourhood of East Jerusalem, and a new memorial to commemorate the 77th anniversary of D-Day is unveiled in Normandy, France.

(Image: a community police officer keeps watch near a polling station as people queue to vote during mid-term election in Alyahualtempa, Guerrero state, Mexico, June 6, 2021 / Credit: REUTERS/Edgard Garrido)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc4cddm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Assignment Interview (w3ct2gb3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2r1rp0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f90)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc4cj4r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywnj9nrtpq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sfll3wwbc)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2r1wf4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kwy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 07 JUNE 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfhlx5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl6l2mw72f)
G7 agrees global tax deal

The G7 has agreed a deal to ensure multi-national companies pay a tax of 15% in the countries where transactions take place. But is it enough? We hear from
Jeeven Sander, an economist at Kings College in London, Pieter Baert a tax specialist at Business Europe in Brussels and Danny McCoy, the Chief Executive of IBEC in Ireland. Governments in East Africa will unveil their budget spending plans this week as the region struggles to recover from the impact of coronavirus. We hear from the BBC's Michael Kaloki in Nairobi and Razia Khan who follows the fortunes of economies in Africa for Standard Chartered Bank. A team of researchers in the UK has revealed that we usually only preserve the main gist of an event, because our memories become less detailed over time; we hear from Professor Maria Wimber, from the University of Glasgow, who's the lead author of the report. Independent economic commentator Michael Hughes tells us why China's yuan currency has continued to gain in value against the US Dollar. (Picture of G7 Finance Ministers meeting in London by Henry Nicholls via Getty Images).


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c15z5k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2g7g)
Patient zero: First outbreak

“Aboriginal people had a name for it... they called it ‘Devil Devil’...”

In 1789, a disease tore through Aboriginal communities around Sydney Cove, or Warrane, leaving dead bodies floating in the harbour, and scattered along the shorelines. The evidence points to this being smallpox, but there’s still debate
over how it got to Australia. Was it an accidental import with the arrival of European ships? Did it come from trading with other peoples in the region? Or was it deliberately introduced as a form of germ warfare?

In this episode, Olivia Willis and Nakari Thorpe ask Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people about this catastrophic moment in their history, and hear how their ancestors survived a cocktail of diseases they’d never before encountered.

Producers: Jane Lee, Cheyne Anderson
Senior Producer: Carl Smith
Executive Producer: Joel Werner
Sound Design: Tim Jenkins

Patient Zero is a production of ABC Science, Radio National, and the BBC World Service


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfhqn9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9klbmk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c162xp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqk)
What will it take for cities to go carbon neutral?

Cities emit around three-quarters of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions, according to the United Nations, and over half of the world’s population now live in one. Many have set ambitious targets to slash and offset their emissions, in the hope of neutralising their impact on the environment and slowing climate change.

Some are aiming to do this very soon. Copenhagen’s goal is 2025. More than 700 others have committed to targets over the following decades. But how does a city, choked with traffic and packed full of buildings that require huge amounts of energy, actually go about achieving carbon neutral goals?

Joining presenters Graihagh Jackson and Neal Razzell:

Nick Garnett, BBC reporter
Dr Seppo Junnila, professor of real estate business at Aalto University, Finland
Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr, mayor of Freetown, Sierra Leone
Mark Watts, executive director, C40 Cities

Producer: Darin Graham
Series producer: Rosamund Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound engineer: Tom Brignell


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfhvdf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Assignment Interview (w3ct2gb3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c166nt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f90)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfhz4k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kll3t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c16bdy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6m)
Skating my way through life

Skateboarding is no longer an outsider sport for rebellious young men: more women are getting on the board and embracing the lifestyle that comes with it. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women who are trying to make skating a more inclusive and welcoming community for women across the globe.

Annina Brühwiler is a 29-year-old Swiss downhill skateboarder – which means skating down hair-raising mountain routes at high speeds, sometimes getting up to 90 km/h. She started skating at 24 and within two years was competing on the international scene. She has been travelling the world following her passion, and uses the lessons learnt on the board to coach other women.

Teresa Batista is UK longboard dancing champion. She taught herself how to skate on the streets of East London before moving to Brazil, to explore how the skating culture meets salsa dancing. She choreographs dance moves on her board and runs a school for women and older adults who might feel intimidated by skate parks.

Produced by Alice Gioia

IMAGE:
(L) Annina Brühwiler (credit: Jorge Gonzales)
(R) Teresa Batista (credit: courtesy of Teresa Batista)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfj2wp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2nxvvy4xf)
Mexico elections: 89 politicians killed

Mexico's mid term vote has seen dozens of candidates murdered, while in Peru an election between the left and right sees the country split 50-50 in early counting.

In Haiti, residents are fleeing from gang violence in an area just yards from the Presidential Palace.

And a high profile special forces veteran is preparing to take some newspapers to court in Australia over stories alleging atrocities during the war in Afghanistan.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfj6mt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2nxvvy8nk)
Mexicans vote in country's most violent elections

President Andrés Manuel López Obrador is not himself in the running, but the elections have become a referendum on his populist agenda.

Thailand begins it's vaccination programme - the country is struggling to contain its most severe outbreak of Covid19.

And in Sudan, several activists have gone into hiding after highlighting the fact that the bodies of dozens of people killed during protests against president Omar al Bashir two years ago are STILL waiting for burial.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfjbcy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2nxvvyddp)
Pakistan train crash: more than 30 people killed

We speak to our correspondent on the rescue efforts and the likely causes for the crash between two passenger trains.

Why is El Salvador planing to make bitcoin legal tender?

And Qantas Airlines says it's "disturbed" by claims that some of its staff may have been involved in organised crime.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfjg42)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5s)
Michael Rosen: Surviving Covid-19

Last March, the author and educator Michael Rosen was placed into an induced coma after contracting Covid-19. He has now released a dark, sad and uplifting memoir about his experience, but how did he find the poetic in a pandemic?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c16tdg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j4s)
Noisy decision making

The Nobel prize-winning economist and professor of psychology Daniel Kahneman focuses his latest research on the high cost of inconsistent decision making. In Noise, co-authored with Oliver Sibony and Cass R Sunstein, he looks at why humans can be so unreliable, and what can be done about it. He tells Andrew Marr that people working in the same job often make wildly different judgements, influenced by factors like their current mood, when they last ate, even the weather. He argues that ‘noise’ is distinct from bias and has been neglected by organisations and businesses.

Gillian Tett is editor-at-large for the Financial Times and is also focused on transforming the world of business. But whereas Kahneman uses the methods of psychology, Tett argues for anthropology. For over a century anthropologists have immersed themselves in unfamiliar cultures, studying the hidden rituals at play. In her book Anthro-Vision, Tett uses similar techniques to reveal the underlying structures and human behaviour in our modern world – from Amazon warehouses to Silicon Valley to City trading floors.

Ann Cairns is the executive vice chair of Mastercard, which has hundreds of offices worldwide. She explores how psychology and anthropology can help to manage the company’s fortunes and employees through times of flux and change. Cairns started out as a research scientist before developing an interest in offshore engineering, becoming the first woman qualified to work offshore in Britain. She moved into banking in the late 1980s and joined Mastercard in 2011.

This programme is excerpted from Radio 4's Start The Week with Andrew Marr: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000w4nb

(Picture credit: Shannon Fagan via Getty Creative)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0w)
When Israel destroyed Iraq's nuclear reactor

On 7 June 1981 Israeli fighter jets launched a surprise attack on the Osirak nuclear reactor located outside Baghdad, killing 11 people. The French-built reactor was still under construction and there was no leakage of nuclear material, but the bombing was widely condemned internationally. Israel argued that it had effectively slowed down Saddam Hussein's nuclear programme by ten years, while the Iraqis insisted that the reactor was being built for purely scientific research. Mike Lanchin has been speaking to Dr Fadhil Muslim al Janabi, a former consultant for Iraq's nuclear agency and one of the first people to see the damaged reactor site.

Producer in Baghdad: Mona Mahmoud

Picture: The Tammuz light-water nuclear materials testing reactor under construction in Al-Tuwaitha, just outside of Baghdad, 1979. (Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfjkw6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c16y4l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqg)
What is the point of menstruation?

It's a topic that's taboo in many cultures, yet it's also something nearly every woman experiences – on average upwards of 400 times throughout her life: menstruation.

Responding to a flood of questions from our CrowdScience listeners, Marnie Chesterton seeks to unpack how periods affect women physically, mentally and societally.

Why did humans evolve to have periods when fewer than two percent of mammals share our experience of menstrual cycles? Is it really a good use of our limited energy reserves? What can the little Egyptian spiny mouse teach us about PMS symptoms? We hear why periods may reduce the number of faulty embryos that implant and how more menstrual cycles may even increase our chances of developing certain types of cancer.

Finally, as the number of periods a woman has over the course of her life has more than quadrupled since the pre-industrial era, Marnie asks: Do we really still need to have them?
Contributors:
Dr Nadia Bellofiore, Hudson Institute of Medical Research at Monash University
Dr Deena Emera, Buck Institute
Lameck Kiula, Jambo for Development
Sally King, Menstrual Matters & King's College London
Dr Diana Mansour, New Croft Centre & Newcastle University

Presented by Marnie Chesterton
Produced by Sam Baker and Melanie Brown for the BBC World Service


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfjpmb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c171wq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfjtcg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kmfbq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c175mv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfjy3l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt3)
Keeping up with Australia's rebellious Buddhist nun

Robina Courtin grew up in Melbourne, Australia. As a teenager attending Catholic school she felt she was both holy and a rebel. Eventually she became a hippie, then a radical feminist, and then got into martial arts. One day, after a car accident meant she couldn't practice karate, she came across some Buddhist monks. Immediately she knew following Buddhism would be her path. Many years after she was ordained a Buddhist nun, she got an unexpected letter from a prisoner in the US. That led to her corresponding with other inmates and even befriending people on death row.

Do you have a favourite food that other people think is gross? Sweden's Disgusting Food Museum puts so-called disgusting dishes on display - from pickled herring to maggot-infested cheese to dried stinkbugs. While the museum has been controversial, director Andreas Ahrens told Outlook that it's not meant to be a freak show, but in fact encourage people to be more open-minded about which foods they would consider eating.

In Culpeper, Virginia there's one of the largest film archives in the world. During the Cold War, billions of dollars in cash were stashed there in case conflict broke out. But these days it houses a nitrate film vault, which is owned by the US Library of Congress. It's looked after by a full-on film enthusiast called George Willeman. Outlook's Colm Flynn has been to meet him. (This story was first broadcast in 2018)

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Robina Courtin in 2005
Credit: Fairfax Media via Getty Images


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfk1vq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kmntz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c17f43)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfk5lv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5481p14xg)
Mexico elections: President's majority to shrink after crime-hit poll

Many voters say the president failed to boost the economy and curb crime. A severed head was lobbed into a polling station and five workers were killed on the eve of the vote. The election was seen as a referendum on the government of 67-year-old Mr López Obrador, who is almost half-way through a six-year term.

Also on the programme: We will look at the results of Peru's Presidential election; hear a report from Texas, on the anniversary of the murder of a black man which sparked outrage, but whose name has largely been forgotten - James Byrd Junior and an investigation into sexual assault inside the Afghan police force.

(Picture: A man casts his vote at a polling station during mid-term elections in Morelia, Mexico Credit: Reuters/Alan Ortega)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfk9bz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c17nmc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y47yzcd3jgt)
Google fined $267m in France

Search giant Google is to pay a $267m fine in France because of its advertising dominance. Laura Kayali is technology reporter for Politico in Paris, and explains the background to the case. Also in the programme, protesters voiced their anger over environmental concerns as a giant cruise ship set sail from Venice on Saturday. The MSC Orchestra was the first cruise ship to leave the city since coronavirus restrictions were imposed in early 2020, and Tom Parry of the Travel Trade Gazette tells us whether the global cruise industry is getting the wind back in its sails. Production of the luxury jet plane Learjet is set to end later this year, and the BBC's Russell Padmore takes an in-depth look at the global market for private jets. Plus, as people around the world return to the office, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan discusses the experience of those who have to try and fit into traditional office attire again, after spending time at home wearing baggy loungewear.

(Picture: A Google office building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfkf33)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjryk0f1k)
Coronavirus: Thailand begins mass vaccination

Thailand is beginning a mass vaccination programme, as it battles its third and the worst wave of the Covid-19 outbreak. We hear about the impact the absence of foreign tourists have had on the economy and people's lives.

Dr Eleanor Murray – assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health – will answer audience questions about the pandemic and look at the latest lines on the virus.

Nigeria’s government has imposed a ban on Twitter and says it will arrest and prosecute anyone found using the social media platform. We explain what’s behind the decision and hear about the reaction in the country.

We’ll also hear from those who paid to watch the exhibition boxing match between Floyd Mayweather and the YouTuber Logan Paul.

(Photo: Thai people receive a dose of AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria) vaccine during a mass vaccination against COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic at a gymnasium turned to non-hospital vaccination center in Bangkok, Thailand, 07 June 2021. Credit: RUNGROJ YONGRIT/EPA)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfkjv7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjryk0jsp)
OS conversations: Iran elections

We'll be bringing you the first in the series of conversations on Iran. The country is due to choose a new president this month. We'll explain - with the help of journalists from the BBC's Persian Service - what is at play and why this election matters.

We'll hear from people in Uganda where the government has re-imposed a strict lockdown as the country faces a surge in coronavirus cases.

Professor Manfred Green, a medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel, will give the latest information on the virus.

And after Nigeria’s government imposed a ban on Twitter, it now says it will arrest and prosecute anyone found using the social media platform. We explain what’s behind the decision and hear about the reaction in the country.

We’ll also get an update on the elections in Peru and Mexico over the weekend.

(Photo: Supporters of Iranian presidential candidate Ebrahim Raisi hold pictures depicting him, during an election campaign rally in city of Eslamshahr, southern of Tehran, Iran, 06 June 2021. Credit: EPA/ABEDIN TAHERKENAREH)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfknlc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfksbh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9knd9r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c184lw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nbr6dnn4v)
2021/06/07 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfkx2m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c188c0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct1m7t)
Peter Goadsby on migraine

neurological condition is far more common than you might think, affecting more people than diabetes, epilepsy and asthma combined.

While medications, to help relieve the symptoms of migraine, have been around for some time, they haven’t worked for everyone. And what happens in the brain during a migraine attack was, until recently, poorly understood.

Peter Goadsby is Professor of Neurology at King's College London’s Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience and is a true pioneer in the field of migraine.

Over the course of his career, he has unravelled what happens in the brain during a migraine attack and his insights are already benefiting patients - in the form of new medications that can not only treat a migraine, but also prevent it from occurring.

Peter shares this year’s Brain Prize, the world's largest prize for brain research, with three other internationally renowned scientists in the field.

Producer: Beth Eastwood

Picture: Woman with head in hands, Credit: Ivan Nanita/EyeEm/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfl0tr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5481p204c)
US regulators approve new Alzheimer's drug

The first new treatment for Alzheimer's for nearly 20 years has been approved by regulators in the United States, but there has been controversy around aducanumab. Also in the programme: Google agrees to change its advertising model after France fines it a quarter of a billion dollars; and what space travel does to your world-view.


(Picture: Aldo Ceresa, who took part in the international trials of aducanumab Credit: BBC)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfl4kw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c18hv8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfl8b0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywnwkyzkvz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sfyvf3mhm)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c18mld)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48sf2ztsw4)
Google fined $267m in France

Search giant Google is to pay a $267m fine in France because of its advertising dominance. Katrin Schallenberg is an antitrust expert with Clifford Chance, and explains the background to the case. Also in the programme, protesters voiced their anger over environmental concerns as a giant cruise ship set sail from Venice on Saturday. The MSC Orchestra was the first cruise ship to leave the city since coronavirus restrictions were imposed in early 2020, and Tom Parry of the Travel Trade Gazette tells us whether the global cruise industry is getting the wind back in its sails. Production of the luxury jet plane Learjet is set to end later this year, and the BBC's Russell Padmore takes an in-depth look at the global market for private jets. Plus, as people around the world return to the office, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan discusses the experience of those who have to try and fit into traditional office attire again, after spending time at home wearing baggy loungewear. (Picture: A Google office building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

(Picture: A Google office building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 08 JUNE 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmflht8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqckcbhw3z)
Google fined $267m in France

Search giant Google is to pay a $267m fine in France because of its advertising dominance. Katrin Schallenberg is an antitrust expert with Clifford Chance, and explains the background to the case. As some companies turn to anthropology to balance the insights of algorithms and AI, should all businesses now have an anthropologist on their books? We hear from Gillian Tett the author of Anthro-Vision: A New Way to See in Business and Life. Production of the luxury jet plane Learjet is set to end later this year, and the BBC's Russell Padmore takes an in-depth look at the global market for private jets. Plus, as people around the world return to the office, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan discusses the experience of those who have to try and fit into traditional office attire again, after spending time at home wearing baggy loungewear. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Alison Van Diggelen, in Silicon Valley; she's host of Fresh Dialogues. And Sushma Ramachandran, an independent business journalist and columnist for The Tribune newspaper, joins us in Delhi.

(Picture: A Google office building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmflmkd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kp7jn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c18zts)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2g6x)
Being mum

Are children always better off in a two-parent family? Ateira Griffin, daughter of a single mother and the director of non-profit organisation that supports black single mothers and their daughters, explores what it is like for a family to be headed by a mum without a dad, a family structure that is on the rise in her native United States.

The label ‘single mum’ can provoke pretty strong reactions and judgements, especially for Black women and Women of colour. Statistics tell us that children of single mothers are less likely to do well at school and more likely to struggle with substance abuse or turn to criminal activity. Ateira challenges the assumptions and goes beyond the statistics, speaking to black single mothers in her home city of Baltimore.

Baltimore on the East Coast of America has one of the highest rates of single mums – nearly 60% of households with children are led by single parents, and of those, the majority are Black single mums. In fact children in single mum households account for half of all African-American kids growing up in America and Ateira explores the context for this historically and in terms of contemporary social policy.


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmflr9j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmflw1n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kph0x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c197b1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td1)
Making Midge Ure’s new guitar with Jimmy Moon

Scottish guitar maker Jimmy Moon receives an order to make a custom-built acoustic guitar from musician Midge Ure, as the craft of handmade musical instrument making is put in the spotlight in this edition of In the Studio.

We follow the process from Midge’s initial specifications of size and finish, to the picking of wood, joinery, engineering work and finishing by Jimmy and his assistant Stephen Devine, to final delivery to Midge.

Midge needs a new acoustic to use on stage for a series of shows where he’s stripping back his solo hits and those as front man with electronic 80s band Ultravox to perform them with just an acoustic guitar.

Jimmy has eight weeks before Midge returns to Glasgow, and we follow this master instrument maker as he creates the guitar that will accompany Midge’s catalogue of classic tunes including If I Was, Vienna, Dancing with Tears in My Eyes and the Band Aid classic Do They Know It’s Christmas.

Along the way, Midge talks to guitarist supremo Martin Taylor about the different requirements for him as a jazz guitarist compared to Midge’s rock style. Midge throws up a challenge requesting an all-black matt finish, a first for Jimmy’s order book, so he has to juggle design as well as creating musical tonal perfection.

A Demus production for BBC World Service
this programme was originally broadcast in January 2019.
Producer: Nick Low
Image: Jimmy Moon (Credit: Struan Adam)


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmflzss)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2nxvw11tj)
Colonial Pipeline: US recovers most of ransom paid

The US Department of Justice says it's seized much of the $4.4m ransom paid in bitcoin to the cyber-criminal Dark Side group responsible for taking the Colonial Pipeline offline last month.

Meanwhile police in Australia say they've made more than 200 arrests in a sophisticated sting operation against organised crime using a messaging app secretly developed by the FBI.

And scientists are reporting what they say is the longest sediment avalanche yet measured in action underwater off West Africa.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfm3jx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2nxvw15kn)
Australia: An0m app snares more than 200 mafia members

Police in Australia use an app - secretly developed by the FBI - to break up major organised crime rings in the country's largest ever police sting operation.

UN judges will give their verdict on an appeal by former Bosnian Serb military chief Ratko Mladic against his genocide conviction over the 1995 Srebrenica massacre.

As restrictions are eased across Europe ahead of the summer break, how can tourists travel safely, and avoid repeating the surge in cases which happened last summer?


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfm791)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2nxvw199s)
Hundreds arrested in global crime sting operation

Australia announces the arrests after an operation based on a messaging app secretly developed by the FBI.

The former Bosnian Serb commander -- Ratko Mladic gets his final day in court after he appealed against his life sentence for genocide and war crimes.

And we hear from the former US President - Bill Clinton - on using his insider knowledge to co-write thrillers.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfmc15)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkx)
The helpline for jealous and violent men

This week we hear from Colombia, where a helpline with a difference recently opened. Its aim is to stop domestic violence, but instead of targeting victims, it targets the perpetrators.

The idea is to get men in particular, who are struggling with jealousy, anger and other strong emotions, to phone in and get help.

Produced and presented by Craig Langran

Picture: Getty Images


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c19q9k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jft)
The booming ransomware business

Hackers are making millions from ransomware attacks. What can be done to stop them? Ed Butler speaks to professional ransomware negotiator Kurtis Minder, about the increasing professionalisation of the ransomware business. Kimberly Grauer, head of research at Chainalysis explains why following the bitcoin trail may be the best way of bringing ransomware gangs to justice and Vishaal Hariprasad, boss of cyber insurance company Resilience, tells us why the ransomware threat means there needs to be a stepchange in how companies view cyber security.

(Photo: Illustration of ransomware attack, Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5d)
Tunisia’s legal brothels

For decades, Tunisia has had a system of legal, state-regulated brothels. But in the last ten years they have been under attack and many have been forced to close. Josephine Casserly has been talking to Professor Abdelmajid Zahaf, a Tunisian doctor who has been working with legal sex workers for 35 years. The voice-over of Professor Zahaf is by Raad Rawi.


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfmgs9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g6x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c19v1p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct1m7t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfmljf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rsz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfmq8k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kqb7t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1b2jy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfmv0p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwc)
Saving the songs of the Sahara

Fadimata Walet Oumar learned how to sing and dance in northern Mali under the light of the desert moon. Her people, the Tuaregs, traditionally lived as nomads on the fringes of the Sahara but successive wars, droughts and famines have fundamentally changed their lives. However her love of music never waned. As a teenager, Fadimata was given the nickname Disco after winning dance battles on the streets of Timbuktu. In 1995 she created a band called Tartit with other women who had been forced to flee into refugee camps due to conflict. It was the first woman-led group in the burgeoning desert music scene and received global acclaim. In 2012, Tuareg culture was put into peril when Islamist militants took over northern Mali and banned music. Fadimata had to flee her homeland for the third time in her life but vowed to return.

Viggó Sigurðsson is a rescue man in the Icelandic coast guard. It's a treacherous job - facing roaring winds, rolling seas and ferocious blizzards. And it's Viggo's job to go out in this weather - he drops out of the side of a helicopter and attempts to save people from the sea, the top of volcanos and cracks in glaciers. Saskia Edwards went to meet him in 2017, when this story was first broadcast.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Fadimata Walet Oumar performs in 2012
Credit: -/AFP via Getty Images


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfmyrt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kqkr2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1bb16)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct1m7t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfn2hy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5481p41tk)
Anom: FBI app lures global criminals into police arms

More than 800 suspected criminals have been arrested worldwide after being tricked into using an FBI-run encrypted messaging app. Drugs, weapons, luxury vehicles and cash were also seized in the operation, which was conducted across more than a dozen countries.

Also in the programme: UN court ruling on former Bosnian Serb commander Ratko Mladic's appeal against his conviction for genocide and crimes against humanity; and, on World Ocean Day, we look into the causes for the so called ‘sea snot’ spreading in the sea in north western Turkey.

(Photo: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks to the media during a press conference about Operation Ironside operation in Sydney, Australia. Credit: EPA).


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfn682)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1bkjg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bf9k68bns)
FBI app lures criminals into police hands

Hundreds of suspected criminals have been arrested after using an FBI-run messaging app. The joint operation with 16 law enforcement agencies worldwide was an effort to crack down on serious organised crime. Joseph Cox, technology reporter with the US website Vice, tells us how the sting operation worked. Also in the programme, US authorities say they've recovered part of a multimillion dollar Bitcoin ransom paid to a gang of cybercriminals who forced one of America's most important energy links, the Colonial Pipeline, to be taken offline last month. Kim Grauer is head of research at Chainalysis, and explains how those using Bitcoin leave a digital trail of their activities. The BBC's Samira Hussain reports from New York on the challenges young people are experiencing with finding jobs. Plus, on World Oceans Day, Christina Dixon of campaign group the Environmental Investigation Agency discusses what role business can play in helping to prevent what is currently around eight million tonnes of plastic waste entering the sea each year.

(Picture: Australian Federal Police Commander Jennifer Hurst speaks to the press. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfnb06)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjryk39yn)
ANOM: Hundreds arrested in global crime sting

We get details of the operation by Australia and the FBI that involved devices with the ANOM app that were secretly distributed among criminals, allowing police to monitor their chats about drug smuggling, money laundering and ever murder plots. We also discuss the verdict by a UN tribunal in The Hague on the appeal by the former Bosnian Serb military leader, Ratko Mladic, against his conviction for genocide.

As Iran prepares to hold its presidential election to select a replacement for Hassan Rouhani, we are running a series of conversations bringing together Iranians to hear about their lives and thoughts. In our second part, BBC Persian presenter Rana Rahimpour talks to two of her colleagues about what it is like for journalists to cover Iran inside and outside the country.

Our medical expert Dr Isaac Bogoch joins us from Toronto to explain some of today’s coronavirus stories.

And we speak our reporter in Canada about the killing of a Muslim family, which the police have called a premeditated hate crime.

(Photo: Commissioner Reece Kershaw (R) and Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison (L) attend a press conference in Sydney, Australia, 08 June 2021. Credit: DEAN LEWINS AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND OUT/EPA)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfnfrb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjryk3fps)
OS conversations: Iranian journalists

As Iran prepares to hold its presidential election to select a replacement for Hassan Rouhani, we are running a series of conversations bringing together Iranians to hear about their lives and thoughts. In our second conversation, BBC Persian presenter Rana Rahimpour talks to two of her colleagues about what it is like for journalists to cover Iran inside and outside the country.

We discuss the verdict by a UN tribunal in The Hague on the appeal by the former Bosnian Serb military leader, Ratko Mladic, against his conviction for genocide.

We also learn about a joint operation by Australia and FBI that led to arrests of 800 suspected criminals who were tricked into using an FBI-run encrypted messaging app.

We speak to our regular coronavirus expert Dr Swapneil Parikh in Mumbai India about the latest coronavirus stories.

(Photo: Iranian presidential candidate Ebrahim Raisi speaks during an election campaign rally in city of Eslamshahr, southern of Tehran, Iran, 06 June 2021. Iranians will vote in a presidential election on 18 June 2021. Credit ABEDIN TAHERKENAREH/EPA)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfnkhg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfnp7l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kr96v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1c1hz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nbr6drk1y)
2021/06/08 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfnszq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g6x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1c583)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls3)
NFT? That’ll do nicely

‘Non-fungible tokens’ are a kind of digital asset that can be bought and sold. They have captured the imagination of many artists. Art pieces can be given a digital identity as an NFT. However, they have also been used to successfully sell viral videos.
Musician Imogen Heap has released a number of works to be auctioned as NFTs
Tim Shaw from Endlesss is working with artists who see NFTs as a useful way to market their work.

And hyper-reality meets traditional art in the form of opera. A new immersive experience has been pioneered by London’s Royal Opera House, placing the audience firmly in the centre of the production as our reporter Hannah Fisher discovered.

Which web browser do you use? Does it matter? Most browsers now rely on the same underlying technology, but Firefox is different. It's one of the favourites of computer engineers but has been losing market share. There are concerns that the growing sameness of browser technology could have a negative impact on the web. As Firefox relaunches we speak to their Senior Vice President Selena Deckelmann,



(Image: First NFT. Credit ImogenHeapxEndlesss)



The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager:
Producer: Julian Siddle


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfnxqv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5481p4x1g)
Ratko Mladic: UN court upholds life sentence

The former Bosnian Serb military leader Ratko Mladic is to spend the rest of his life behind bars after losing his appeal against a genocide conviction. A UN tribunal in The Hague confirmed his responsibility for the systematic campaign to carve out a greater Serbia from the fragments of Yugoslavia at the expense of Muslims and Croats. We hear from the prosecutor who led the case against Ratko Mladic.

Also in the programme: hundreds of suspects are arrested around the world after they spent years communicating on an app developed by the FBI to entrap them; and can supersonic planes ever be environmentally sustainable?

(Image: Ratko Mladic at the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague. Credit: EPA/Jerry Lampen / POOL)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfp1gz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1cdrc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfp573)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywnwkz2gs2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sfyvf6jdq)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1cjhh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48sf2zxps7)
FBI app lures criminals into police hands

Hundreds of suspected criminals have been arrested after using an FBI-run messaging app. The joint operation with 16 law enforcement agencies worldwide was an effort to crack down on serious organised crime. Professor Robert Chesney the Chair of The University of Texas's school of law, tells us how the sting operation worked. Also in the programme, US authorities say they've recovered part of a multimillion dollar Bitcoin ransom paid to a gang of cybercriminals who forced one of America's most important energy links, the Colonial Pipeline, to be taken offline last month. Kim Grauer is head of research at Chainalysis, and explains how those using Bitcoin leave a digital trail of their activities. The BBC's Samira Hussain reports from New York on the challenges young people are experiencing with finding jobs. Plus, on World Oceans Day, Christina Dixon of campaign group the Environmental Investigation Agency discusses what role business can play in helping to prevent what is currently around eight million tonnes of plastic waste entering the sea each year. (Picture: Australian Federal Police Commander Jennifer Hurst speaks to the press. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 09 JUNE 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfpdqc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqckcbls12)
FBI app lures criminals into police hands

Hundreds of suspected criminals have been arrested after using an FBI-run messaging app. The joint operation with 16 law enforcement agencies worldwide was an effort to crack down on serious organised crime. Professor Robert Chesney the Chair of The University of Texas's school of law, tells us how the sting operation worked. Plus, the BBC's Samira Hussain reports from New York on the challenges young people are experiencing with finding jobs. And one of the world's largest fast food companies has taken a not so subtle jab at one of its rivals. Burger King has used Pride Month to take aim at Chick -fil -A; we hear from Curtis Wong, senior culture reporter at the HuffPost. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Peter Landers, Japan Bureau Chief for the Wall Street Journal and Sarah Birke, The Economist’s Bureau Chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.

(Picture: Australian Federal Police Commander Jennifer Hurst speaks to the press. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfpjgh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9ks4fr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1cwqw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2g7j)
Automation Nation

Automation and the future of jobs

Economist Daniel Susskind asks what the new wave of high-tech automation means for jobs. He hears from a company leading the way in the development of driverless trucks, and a long-haul truck driver who’s deeply worried about it. If jobs like trucking disappear, many of America’s millions of drivers may be forced into sectors like the service industry, but, as we hear on our visit to the world’s first automated restaurant, that isn’t immune to automation either. With technology already encroaching on traditionally white collar jobs as well, there’s only so much education and retraining can do.


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfpn6m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfpryr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kscy0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1d474)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6j)
Maarten van der Weijden

When Maarten van der Weijden was diagnosed with leukaemia at the age of 19, he thought it was not only the end of his sporting career, but his life. According to Maarten, he was a “lazy” patient and didn’t “win a fight” against cancer; he says he survived simply because he was “lucky”. But having been given a second chance at life, he was determined to make the most of it.

Just a few years after recovering from cancer, Maarten won open-water swimming gold at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. He reveals the techniques and mindset that got him through his darkest days, and the significance of setting goals in order to achieve things, whether that be in sport or life.

He retired from competitive swimming after winning Olympic and World championship gold in 2008, and dedicated himself to raising funds for other leukaemia sufferers by completing the most severe of swimming challenges. So far, he has raised more than $15 million.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfpwpw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2nxvw3yqm)
Nicaraguan opposition figures arrested

A dramatic series of arrests of opposition figures in Nicaragua include the main candidates expected to challenge President Ortega in the next election.

We'll hear a warning about the impact of long Covid on employment - we go to Zimbabwe and Spain to discuss effect the pandemic will have on the prospects of the under 25s.

The Brazilian Supreme Court is going to consider whether to allow the Copa America to go ahead.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfq0g0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2nxvw42gr)
Tax details of US super-rich allegedly leaked

How much tax do America's billionaires pay? Not much, it appears. We speak to an investigative journalist who says some have been paying NO tax - and even been receiving tax credit for their children.

Tax is also on the agenda for the G7 rich countries who have plans to do away with tax havens. We'll be finding out if they can really achieve that.

Also a new report says climate change not only threatens species and our oceans - it threatens our homes too. Hundreds of millions of them face destruction thanks to the changing weather. We'll be finding out exactly why they are under threat.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfq464)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2nxvw466w)
How US billionaires avoid paying income tax

How much tax do America's billionaires pay? Details claiming to show how little income tax the most wealthy pay have been leaked to a news website. We speak to an investigative journalist who says some have been paying nothing at all.

Are citizens of the European Union about to get a digital Covid certificate as proof they've been vaccinated? We'll speak to a member of the European Parliament which is deciding on it now.

And we go to South Africa to hear about the corruption probe against the health minister - did two of his aides syphon off Covid funds?


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfq7y8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb9)
McKrae Game: Outlawing 'gay conversion' therapy

In some countries, attitudes towards homosexuality have moved from prejudice and persecution to acceptance and legal protection. But very few nations have specifically outlawed 'gay conversion' therapy, a practice usually linked to religious movements which still demonise homosexuality. Stephen Sackur speaks to McKrae Game, who founded an organisation which told thousands of young gay Americans their sexual orientation was a “sin they must reject”. Four years ago, he quit. Now, he says he is sorry for the harm he did, but is it too little, too late?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1dm6n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnl)
The global youth unemployment crisis

The UN has predicted it could take two years for the world job market to recover from the Coronavirus pandemic. The hardest hit could be young jobseekers, who had almost got a foot in the door before it closed. We’ll hear from young people around the world, who have found their employment prospects shattered by the pandemic. We’ll also hear from Guy Ryder, Director-General of the International Labour Organisation, about how the pandemic could exacerbate inequality around the world. At the same time, Mamta Murthi of the World Bank breaks down how progress for young women in the workplace could be rolled back by decades. Finally, Daniel Susskind from Oxford University, explains why those lost jobs might never come back.

Producer: Frey Lindsay

(Image credit: Getty Creative)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7n)
Benjamin Britten's War Requiem

Regarded as one of the most important pieces in 20th Century English music, Benjamin Britten's War Requiem was first played in the newly-built Coventry Cathedral in 1962. The original had been destroyed during World War II. In 2013, Simon Watts spoke to Maggie Cotton, one of the orchestral performers who took part, and to composer Michael Berkeley, Britten's godson.

(Photo: Benjamin Britten in 1964 - BBC copyright)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfqcpd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2g7j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1dqys)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfqhfj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfqm5n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kt74x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1dzg1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfqqxs)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jym)
The doctor treating children 8000 miles away

Meena Said is an endocrine surgeon working in California. Her days are spent treating and operating on patients, many of whom have very complex medical needs. But after a hard day at work, rather than relaxing at home, Meena switches on her phone and begins to care for her other patients: critically-ill children who live many thousands of miles away in Afghanistan. Meena's own family fled the country as refugees when she was just a baby. She spent many years trying to build her career in LA, but was uncomfortable with how privileged her life was in comparison to those that stayed behind. Two years ago, a photo of a family with severe burns motivated her to help. She set up a network of volunteer doctors called Wellness Worldwide whose expertise she draws on to confirm diagnoses and formulate treatment plans. Sadly, it can sometimes be too late to save the children, but as Meena tells Emily Webb knowing their children are being helped often brings much needed peace to the families involved.

The renowed Sri Lankan artist Laki Senanayake has died at the age of 84. In 2016, he gave Outlook's Nicki Paxman a tour of his much-loved forested water garden where real animals, including snakes and crocodiles, lived alongside animal sculptures.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Dr Meena Said
Credit: Courtesy of Dr Meena Said


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfqvnx)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9ktgn5)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1f6y9)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfqzf1)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5481p6yqn)
Can the US rebuild trust among its allies?

The US charm offensive by the Biden administration ahead of this weekend's G7 summit centres around a fairly simple message: that America is back after four years of looking inwards and ready to engage with its international partners. But how easy will that be given the damage done to many of its key alliances? We hear from President Biden's National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan - a key foreign policy aide.

Also on the programme: Allegations that some of the richest people in the US pay little or no income tax; and the new threat of explosive-laden drones facing international forces in Iraq.

(Photo: National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan speaks during a press briefing at the White House Credit: EPA/Yuri Gripas)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfr355)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1fgfk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cngn3d66t)
US Senate passes bill to counter China tech

The US Senate has approved a $250bn spending plan to boost tech research and production. Aimed at countering China’s growing influence in the sector, Mark Montgomery, of the Center on Cyber and Technology Innovation at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies tells us why he believes the legislation is so important. Also in the programme, the Nigerian government’s ban on the use of Twitter has run into widespread opposition in the country. Nicholas Ibekwe is head of investigations at Premium Times, and explains the background to the dispute. Plus, the BBC’s Laura Bicker reports from Thailand on the challenges young people there face in making a living, in the absence of the country’s vital tourism sector, as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

(Picture: A silicon wafer. Picture credit: IBM via Reuters.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfr6x9)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjryk66vr)
OS conversations: Young women in Iran

In the run up to next week’s elections in Iran we continue to hear conversations out of the country. Today three young women discuss their lives – their families and their futures.

We hear from voters in Peru as the fall-out from Sunday’s election continues. The right-wing candidate in Peru's presidential election, Keiko Fujimori, alleges there have been "signs of fraud" in the run-off election. Our reporter will give us the latest.

And, we are joined by Dr Maria Sundaram - infectious disease epidemiologist at ICES Ontario in Toronto. She is one of our regular health experts and will answer audience questions about the latest developments with the global coronavirus pandemic.

(Photo: Iranian women walk past a huge poster depicting Iranian presidential conservative candidate Ebrahim Raisi, in Tehran, Iran, 30 May 2021. Iranians will vote in a presidential election on 18 June 2021. Credit: ABEDIN TAHERKENAREH/EPA)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfrbnf)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjryk6blw)
Afghanistan mine clearers killed

At least 10 mine clearers working for Halo Trust in Afghanistan's northern province of Baghlan have been shot dead, and more than a dozen wounded. Afghan officials have blamed the Taliban, saying militants "started shooting everyone" in the compound. We speak to a former mine clearer about the dangers of the job.

We are joined by Dr Pedro Hallal - an epidemiologist from the Federal University of Pelotas in the south of Brazil. He is one of our regular health experts and will answer audience questions about the latest developments with the global coronavirus pandemic.

And, in the run up to next week’s elections in Iran we continue to hear conversations out of the country. Today three young women discuss their lives – their families and their futures.

(Photo: A person looking to detect hidden explosive mines Credit: Reuters)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfrgdk)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfrl4p)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kv63y)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1fyf2)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nbr6dvfz1)
Sport Today

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfrpwt)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2g7j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1g256)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvb)
FDA approves new Alzheimer’s drug

Aducanumab the controversial new drug for Alzheimer’s disease, just approved by the FDA in the US is the first approved breakthrough in nearly 20 years. But, as Sarah Boseley explains, scientists dispute the drug’s effectiveness.

Good news from a study published in Lancet Healthy Longevity looking at protection levels from getting Covid. It studied the risk of COVID reinfection in care home staff and occupants up to 10 months after first being unwell and showed substantial levels of protection is retained.

And a new paper on Vitamin D deficiency in Africa – the first large prevalence study in children on the continent.

Plus bestselling author and gynaecologist Dr Jen Gunter on her Menopause Manifesto, part two in our mini-series on Health Check. Dr Gunter unpicks the facts and feminism of how society’s focus on what happens to women’s bodies has shaped and hindered treatment for the menopause.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

Image: Abstract medical icon of head showing Alzheimer's memory loss due to dementia and brain disease
Credit: wildpixel/Getty Images


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfrtmy)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5481p7syk)
Opposition leaders arrested in Nicaragua

Four potential challengers to President Daniel Ortega have now been arrested in Nicaragua, in what some have called a hunt for critics of the president. In response, the US has imposed sanctions on four Nicaraguans close to the leadership.

Also in the programme: El Salvador adopts Bitcoin as legal tender, making it the first country to use it as an official national currency; and two accounts from Belarus on what it's like to fall foul of the authorities - the arts organiser separated from her family and the student writing from prison.

(Photo: Félix Maradiaga was planning to run as an opposition candidate in the November presidential election. He spoke to reporters outside the public prosecutor's office prior to his arrest. Credit: Reuters)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfryd2)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1g9ng)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfs246)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywnwkz5cp5)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sfyvf9f9t)
Sports News

BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1gfdl)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48sf300lpb)
US Senate passes bill to counter China tech

The US Senate has approved a $250bn spending plan to boost tech research and production. It's aimed at countering China’s growing influence in the sector and Scott Kennedy, the senior advisor and trustee chair in Chinese business and economics at the Center for Strategic and International Studies gives us more details. Also in the programme, the Nigerian government’s ban on the use of Twitter has run into widespread opposition in the country. Nicholas Ibekwe is head of investigations at Premium Times, and explains the background to the dispute. Plus, the BBC’s Laura Bicker reports from Thailand on the challenges young people there face in making a living, in the absence of the country’s vital tourism sector, as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. (Picture: A silicon wafer. Picture credit: IBM via Reuters.)



THURSDAY 10 JUNE 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfs9mg)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqckcbpny5)
US Senate passes bill to counter China tech

The US Senate has approved a $250bn spending plan to boost tech research and production. It's aimed at countering China’s growing influence in the sector; Scott Kennedy, the senior advisor and trustee chair in Chinese business and economics at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, gives us more details. Also in the programme, the Nigerian government’s ban on the use of Twitter has run into widespread opposition in the country. Nicholas Ibekwe is head of investigations at Premium Times, and explains the background to the dispute. Plus, the BBC’s Laura Bicker reports from Thailand on the challenges young people there face in making a living, in the absence of the country’s vital tourism sector, as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. The Tribeca Film Festival has got underway and the organisers hope it will show the world that the city is back in business; Tom Brook from the BBC's Talking Movies brings us a report. And we're joined throughout the programme by financial professional Jessica Khine in Malaysia and markets analyst, Ralph Silva in Toronto. (Picture: A silicon wafer. Picture credit: IBM via Reuters).


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfsfcl)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kw1bv)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1gsmz)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxd)
Syria’s decade of conflict: Islamic State’s most wanted

Chloe Hadjimatheou tells the astonishing story of a group of young men from Raqqa, Syria, who chose to resist the so-called Islamic State, which occupied their city in 2014 and made it the capital of their ‘Caliphate’. These extraordinary activists risked everything to oppose ISIS; several were killed, or had family members murdered. ISIS put a bounty on the resistance leaders’ heads forcing them to go into hiding. But the group continued its work, under the banner Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently. Chloe met the group’s founders, who were organising undercover activists in Raqqa from the relative safety of other countries. Despite the passing of the years these men are still in hiding from the militants who occupied their city in 2014.

(Photo: Four activists from the group working under the banner Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfsk3q)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfsnvv)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kw8v3)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1h147)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfq)
Raymond Blanc: My life in five dishes

The celebrated French chef Raymond Blanc tells Emily Thomas about his life through five dishes.

From a childhood roaming magical forests in Eastern France, to the rather less enticing restaurant scene of 1970s England, Raymond describes how with little grasp of the language and no formal training, he quickly became one of the UK’s best known chefs. His restaurant, Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons, has been thriving for almost 40 years and during that time he has added a string of cookbooks, TV shows and brasseries to his name. Raymond explains how he balances being a gastronome and perfectionist with running a large business.

But we also hear another side to the exuberant chef. The past year has been perhaps one the most difficult of Raymond’s life - closing his restaurants, the isolation of lockdown, the death of his mother and being hospitalised with coronavirus for a month. He tells us why he thinks it will make him a better man.


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfsslz)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2nxvw6vmq)
President Biden's first foreign trip

Joe Biden has begun his first foreign visit as US President. He will be attending the G7 summit, but ahead of that he has a meeting with Prime Minister Boris Johnson and an opportunity to refresh America's relationship with Britain.

In the Caribbean, many islands have been reasonably successful in combating the coronavirus pandemic, but Trinidad has been hit harder than most. What are the factors that weakened their response ?

And Kenya farming company renews its legal battle with human rights organisations following allegations of abuse.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfsxc3)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2nxvw6zcv)
President Biden's first overseas trip

Is it time for a renewal of the 'special relationship' ? President Biden is in the UK and will meet with Prime minister Boris Johnson as the two nations move on from the Trump years.

A new report says child labour around the world has increased for the first time in two decades, with nine million children now at risk due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

And China and India have tens of thousands of troops facing off across the high Karakoram mountains.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmft137)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2nxvw733z)
President Joe Biden's first overseas visit since taking office

US President Joe Biden is on his first overseas visit since taking office. He arrived in the UK where he will meet Britain's prime minister Boris Johnson ahead of the G7 Summit. Is this an opportunity to reset transatlantic relations?

Thailand’s massive tourism sector has taken a huge hit as a consequence of pandemic restrictions, leaving many businesses and workers desperate for the travellers to return.

And the former civilian leader of Myanmar faces new charges from the military government which forcibly removed her from office. Aung San Suu Kyi is now also accused of corruption.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmft4vc)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z21)
Belarus: Can President Lukashenko be overthrown?

Over his 26 years in power, Belarus’s president Alexander Lukashenko has taken more and more control.

He has detained protesters and tortured political opponents for years. He is emboldened by his last ally in Europe - Vladimir Putin. And his regime of terror is spilling over into the continent.

But, Tanya Beckett asks if Europe’s last dictator can cling on to power for much longer.

Produced by Soila Apparicio.

(image: Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko at a meeting with Commonwealth of Independent States officials in Minsk May 28 2021. Credit: Dmitry Astakhov/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1hj3r)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j99)
Diversity in the US tech industry

Ibrahim Diallo got his first computer when he was five, which triggered a lifelong passion for programming. He has worked as a software engineer in the US for 12 years. A Guinean citizen, who went to French school in Saudi Arabia, and now lives in California, Ibrahim says he can count on one hand the number of black people he has worked alongside. He shares his experience of being a black programmer in the US with Vivienne Nunis. (Photo: Ibrahim Diallo at his office in LA. Credit: BBC)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x34)
The elections that Hamas won

Palestinians in Gaza, the West Bank and East Jerusalem voted in legislative elections in 2006. The Islamist Hamas movement stood against the Fatah party for the first time - and won. It was an outcome that surprised everyone. Zak Brophy has been hearing from Hazem Balousha who was working for the Palestinian Election Commission at the time.

(Image: A Palestinian Hamas activist (L) and Fatah activist (R) stand together outside a polling station on January 25, 2006 in the West Bank Village of Abu Dis. Photo by Uriel Sinai/Getty Images.)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmft8lh)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1hmvw)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmftdbm)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rl7)
Aramaic: an imperial language without an empire

Aramaic is a language that for some three thousand years facilitated the exchange of ideas across large tracts of the Middle East and Asia. In its heyday it was the main official and written language across the Neo-Assyrian and Achaemenid empires. It was the language in which several sections of the Old Testament Bible were written. A Galilean dialect of Aramaic was probably the language Jesus spoke. Different dialects of Aramaic still exist today but numbers of speakers are dwindling and there are fears that it could die out.

So what is the story of Aramaic? Why did it become so influential and then go into decline? And how much has it changed over its long history?

Bridget Kendall is joined by three distinguished scholars of Aramaic: Professor Holger Gzella from Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich is the author of numerous publications on Aramaic as well as being an expert on other Old Testament languages.

Professor Alison Salvesen from Oxford University works on ancient interpretations of the Hebrew Bible including its Aramaic versions. She is also an authority on Jacob of Edessa, a leading religious scholar who wrote in one of the many variants of Aramaic.

Dr. Alinda Damsma teaches Biblical Hebrew at University College London and Aramaic at the Ecole Rabbinique in Paris. She studies medieval Aramaic dialects, especially in Jewish mystical literature, and has also done field research on the current use of the language.

[Image: Aramaic script on a stone slab from Palmyra, Syria. Credit: mtcurado/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l88)
The Van Basten wonder goal

In June 1988, Holland finally won a major international football tournament when they defeated the Soviet Union in the final of the 1988 European Championship. The Dutch sealed victory with an almost-impossible volley by striker Marco Van Basten. Matthew Kenyon talks to Arnold Muhren, the veteran midfielder who set up one of the greatest goals in football history.

PHOTO:


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmftj2r)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kx420)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1hwc4)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmftmtw)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k34)
‘Aids Angel’ – I gave love in a time of prejudice and fear

As a young woman in the mid-1980s, Ruth Coker Burks had a chance encounter with a man with Aids, who had been left to die alone in a quarantined hospital room in Hot Springs, Arkansas in the US. She stepped in to comfort him in his final hours, and word soon spread that she was the only person willing to help such men in this deeply conservative town. At the height of the Aids crisis she developed a huge support network for gay men with HIV who had been abandoned by their families, even burying some of those who died in her own family cemetery. Ruth tells Emily Webb how she was vilified by her church and community for her work, but became a vocal campaigner and Aids educator.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Ruth Coker Burks
Credit: Caroline M. Holt


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x34)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmftrl0)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kxck8)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1j3vd)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmftwb4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5481p9vmr)
President Biden meets British PM

President Biden is in the UK for the G7 summit -- we hear what he wants from Europe and why his meeting today with prime minister Boris Johnson is being overshadowed by a row over Northern Ireland.

Also in the programme: the mosquito hack that can dramatically reduce cases of dengue fever; and a new film tells the story of the Zimbabwean refugees who took the world of wine by storm.

(Image: U.S. President Joe Biden waves upon arrival at Cornwall Airport Newquay, near Newquay, Cornwall, Britain June 9, 2021 / Credit: Reuters/Phil Noble/Pool)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfv028)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z21)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1jcbn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4964g9f5v1)
Yantian Port operations hit by coronavirus

A Covid-19 outbreak has brought China's Yantian port to a standstill, threatening trade. Tom Hale of the Financial Times in Hong Kong explains the background to the disruption, and we consider the potential impact on global trade with Nils Haupt, senior director at German shipping firm Hapag-Lloyd. Also in the programme, earlier this week El Salvador decided to adopt the cryptocurrency Bitcoin as legal tender. Nic Carter is founding partner at Castle Island Ventures, and his Twitter event on cryptocurrency was joined by El Salvador's President Bukele just as the country's parliament passed the new law. Finance ministers across the largest member states of the East African Community, such as Kenya and Tanzania, present their national budgets for 2021/22 today. Dario Kenner is a development economist with the Catholic charity Cafod, and discusses the budgetary challenges the countries face. Plus, the BBC's Shingai Nyoka reports from Zimbabwe on efforts in the country to bring down its high 28% youth unemployment rate.

(Picture: Shipping containers at Yantian port. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfv3td)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjryk93rv)
Biden Johnson meeting ahead of G7

President Joe Biden, who has started his first official overseas trip in the UK, will meet Prime Minister Boris Johnson today to discuss US-UK relations after the Trump years as well as challenges with climate change and security. We’ll hear from our reporters covering the meeting.

We continue to hear conversations from Iran ahead of next week’s presidential elections. Today Rana Rahimpour from BBC Persian Service talks to a doctor and a pharmacist about their experiences of the pandemic.

Our regular coronavirus expert Dr Emma Hodcroft in Switzerland will answer more audience questions about the virus.

We’ll also learn about the “groundbreaking” trial that has cut dengue fever cases by 77% by manipulating the mosquitoes that spread it.

(Photo: U.S. President Joe Biden waves upon arrival at Cornwall Airport Newquay, near Newquay, Cornwall, Britain June 9, 2021. Credit: Phil Noble/Pool/Reuters)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfv7kj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjryk97hz)
OS conversations: Coronavirus in Iran

We continue to hear conversations from Iran ahead of next week’s presidential elections. Today Rana Rahimpour from BBC Persian Service talks to a doctor and a pharmacist about their experiences of the pandemic.

President Joe Biden, who has started his first official overseas trip in the UK, will meet Prime Minister Boris Johnson today to discuss US-UK relations after Trump years as well as challenges with climate change and security. We’ll hear from our reporters covering the meeting.

Our regular coronavirus expert Dr Emma Hodcroft in Switzerland will answer more audience questions about the virus.

The American reality TV show, Keeping Up With The Kardashians, airs its final episode today. We'll discuss the impact of the show.

(Photo: An elderly woman receives the Sinopharm COVID-19 vaccine in a vaccination station at the Iran Mall shopping centre, in Tehran, Iran, 24 May 2021. Iran started vaccination of elderly people of up to 70 years old against COVID-19. Credit: ABEDIN TAHERKENAREH/EPA)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfvc9n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k34)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x34)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfvh1s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9ky311)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1jvb5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nbr6dybw4)
Sport Today

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfvlsx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1jz29)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3r)
Evolving viral variant trickery

Dr. Clare Jolly and colleagues have been looking at how the first of the major covid variants – alpha - evolved to be more transmissible. Whilst a lot of attention has been on the spike binding areas of the virus and the effectiveness of antibodies from either vaccine or prior infection, their preprint paper this week reports how the virus evolved an ability to inhibit our bodies innate virus response once it has infected a cell.

Prof David Shugar and colleagues have been studying the conditions that led to the tragic rock and ice avalanche in February in Chamoli, Uttarakhand. 27 million cubic meters of rock and ice broke off the steep mountainside and plummeted almost 2km down into the valleys below. Using satellite, seismic and video data the scientists have investigated the sequence of events that led to the tragic deaths of 204 people in the floods that followed.

It was a thankfully rare combination of geography and geology and events, but highlights the care that should be taken when building the growing number of hydroelectric plants in high mountainous areas.

But avalanches don’t just happen in mountains. A year before in a canyon under the sea near the outflow of the Congo river, a sediment avalanche rumbled on for almost 2 days along some 1,100km of the ocean floor. And as Prof Pete Talling describes, whilst it didn’t trigger a tsunami, it did sever cables supplying internet connectivity between South Africa and Nigeria.


And the BBC’s Samara Linton reports on research into a type of DNA you perhaps haven’t heard of – Z-DNA. It winds the other way to what we consider normal DNA, and scientists are finally beginning to understand its role in many human diseases, including cancer, with some future promise of novel therapeutics.



Presented by Roland Pease
Produced by Alex Mansfield.




(Image: Getty Images)


Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfvqk1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5481pbpvn)
President Biden promises to donate half a billion Covid vaccines to countries in need

Ahead of the G7 summit, President Joe Biden announced plans to donate half a billion Pfizer vaccine doses to over 90 of the world's poorest countries. We’ll hear from former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown about what he thinks the G7 should do to ensure effective vaccine distribution. Also in the programme: Amnesty International has produced a new report with more evidence of human rights abuses in China’s Xinjiang province; and how we can use cow manure in crypto-currency mining.

(Photo: US President Joe Biden ahead of the G7 summit in Cornwall. Credit: Toby Melville/PA Wire)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfvv95)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z21)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1k6kk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfvz19)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywnwkz88l8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sfyvfdb6x)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1kb9p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48sf303hlf)
Yantian Port operations hit by coronavirus

A Covid-19 outbreak has brought China's Yantian port to a standstill, threatening trade. Tom Hale of the Financial Times in Hong Kong explains the background to the disruption, and we consider the potential impact on global trade with Nils Haupt, senior director at German shipping firm Hapag-Lloyd. Also in the programme, earlier this week El Salvador decided to adopt the cryptocurrency Bitcoin as legal tender. Nic Carter is founding partner at Castle Island Ventures, and his Twitter event on cryptocurrency was joined by El Salvador's President Bukele just as the country's parliament passed the new law. Finance ministers across the largest member states of the East African Community, such as Kenya and Tanzania, present their national budgets for 2021/22 today. Dario Kenner is a development economist with the Catholic charity Cafod, and discusses the budgetary challenges the countries face. Plus, the BBC's Shingai Nyoka reports from Zimbabwe on efforts in the country to bring down its high 28% youth unemployment rate.

(Picture: Shipping containers at Yantian port. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 11 JUNE 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfw6jk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqckcbskv8)
Major countries outline vaccine donation plan

The group of seven industrialised nations are to donate one billion coronavirus vaccines to the rest of the world by the end of next year – we look at how realistic that aim is. One big US business says it paid cyber hackers a multi-million dollar ransom. But should companies pay up? Ireland's finance minister tells the BBC’s Rob Young why he'll be arguing to lower the global minimum corporate tax rate that world leaders recently agreed. Plus, we look at the international row over the name of a type of rice with food historian Lindsay Middleton from the University of Glasgow and Aberdeen. We discuss all this with live guests Les Williams, Associate Professor at The School of Engineering at The University of Virginia and Mehmal Sarfraz, co-founder of the website, The Current PK and a journalist for Geo TV in Lahore, Pakistan.

(Image: President Biden. Credit: AFP Pool/ Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfwb8p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kyy7y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1kpk2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tz3)
Euro 2020: The long wait is over

Hungary midfielder Adam Nagy, Finland goalkeeper Lukas Hradecky and Denmark's Christian Eriksen look ahead to Euro 2020.

(Photo: Teemu Pukki scores against Liechtenstein in Helsinki. Credit: Antti Yrjonen/NurPhoto/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfwg0t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k34)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x34)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfwkry)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9kz5r6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1ky1b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2g6s)
Ministering behind bars

Can the prison be a “citizen factory” where the rebellious soul goes in and comes out as a demure, indoctrinated model citizen? Is the God of Punishment the same as the God of Salvation? How do priests, imams and rabbis work with inmates who wish to return to faith?

Lipika Pelham examines whether the Foucauldian phrase “soul is the prison of the body” offers a guideline to the modern criminal system for its rehabilitation programme. Traditionally, religious beliefs have inclined to the opposite, that the body imprisons the soul. Earlier ways of dealing with outlaws often involved extreme physical stress to achieve the docility of the body. This was believed to be the key to making prisoners conform to social norms and become good citizens. Lipika asks representatives of major world religions if they think the pathway to correction is through faith. She hears conversations between an inmate and his Christian worker; reflections of a rabbi, an imam, and a Buddhist meditation teacher about their methods to stop offenders from committing further crimes.


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfwpj2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2nxvw9rjt)
World leaders gather in person in the UK for the G7 summit

We hear about US President Joe Biden's goals - from a man who who has worked with him.

The United Nations say a third of a million people are facing famine in Ethiopia.

And the Copa America football tournament will go ahead in Brazil - despite a legal challenge.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfwt86)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2nxvw9w8y)
G7: what are Biden's goals at summit?

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson calls the American president "a breath of fresh air" but will that goodwill continue into the negotiations?

A group of lawyers are presenting evidence to the International criminal Court which they say proves genocide against China's Uyghur community.

And today sees the kick off of Euro 2020 - the biggest football tournament to take place since the start of the pandemic.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfwy0b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2nxvwb012)
G7 in Cornwall: Ice creams and vaccines

G7 leaders will be discussing vaccine diplomacy, climate action and Northern Ireland as they meet in a British seaside town.

A court rules that it can't stop the Copa America going ahead in Brazil, while the delayed Euro 2020 gets underway in a few hours time.

And a new study finds that almost half the plastic polluting the seas comes from takeaway food and drinks.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfx1rg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n18)
Ben Rhodes: President Biden's foreign policy challenges

Stephen Sackur speaks to former Deputy National Security Advisor to President Obama, Ben Rhodes. He has written a new book, After the Fall, reflecting on his time in the White House, the legacy of President Trump and the foreign policy challenges facing President Biden. With the rise of authoritarian, nationalist trends around the world, is the US in any position to lead a much touted global alliance of democracies?

(Photo: Ben Rhodes appears via video link on Hardtalk)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1lf0v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j08)
Rich and frugal?

Why do some of the super rich describe themselves as frugal? Is it something about the inner psyche that makes us natural savers or spenders? Elizabeth Hotson speaks to Dolly Parton, who despite earning millions, doesn’t particularly enjoy spending it. We also hear from Karam Hinduja, banker and scion of the billionaire Hinduja family. Tech entrepreneur, Richard Skellett tells us why he sees being wealthy as a responsibility, plus we hear from big savers, Tim Connor and Francesca Armstrong. We're also joined by Sarah Fallaw, author of The Next Millionaire Next Door, Rachel Sherman, author of Uneasy Street: The Anxieties of Affluence and Elin Helander, behavioural economist, neurologist and Chief Scientific Officer at Dreams, a money-saving app.

Producers: Elizabeth Hotson and Sarah Treanor.
(This episode is a repeat from 10 Aug 2020)

(Picture: piggy bank via Getty Images).


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wym)
The Fall of Madrid

In 1939, the Spanish capital, Madrid, finally fell to the fascist forces of General Franco – spelling the end of a brutal Civil War in which hundreds of thousands of troops and civilians were killed. The city had been under siege for more than two years and had become a symbol of resistance for the defeated Spanish Republic. Simon Watts has been listening to the memories of Rene MacColl and William Forrest, two British war correspondents who reported from Madrid.

PHOTO: Franco's troops entering Madrid in 1939 (Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfx5hl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh0)
Tech victories for law enforcement

The FBI recovers Bitcoins paid in the Colonial Pipeline ransomware attack, and separately, tricks organised crime suspects into using a messaging app they could monitor. Plus leading researcher Prof. Kate Crawford argues that AI is neither artificial, nor intelligent. And we hear about the chat-bot based gadget for recording your audio biography. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Stock photo of the FBI logo and person wearing a jacket with the initials. Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1ljrz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfx97q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsh)
Iran’s presidential election: What do the people want?

Iranians go to the polls next week to decide who’ll be the country’s next president. Hundreds of potential candidates were disqualified, some of whom represent the reform movement, leaving just seven men in the running. Whoever wins will inherit a dire economy, with one-in-ten Iranians unemployed, inflation running at roughly 50%, and growing queues to buy everyday items like chicken. The victor will also have to share power with Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps (IRGC), and parliament. So what kind of mandate will he have? How democratic are the country’s elections? And what impact will the new leader’s policies have on Iran, its people and its place in the world? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of Iranian guests.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfxdzv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9l00z3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1ls87)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tz3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfxjqz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f0)
Germany's apology to Namibia

The German state has formally recognised that its colonial troops committed genocide in what's now Namibia at the start of the twentieth century. It is also paying $1.3 billion towards development projects in affected communities, but as BBC Africa's Pumza Fihlani reports, the offer has not been welcomed by descendants of the Nama and Herero survivors.

South Korea's 'flower prescription' tattooist
A tattoo artist in South Korea is using her art to help clients who have struggled with their mental health. She works with them to design flower tattoos which cover self-harm and traumatic scars. BBC Korean's Julie Yoon has been to meet her.

A Fifth Floor guide to Cornwall
Leaders from the G7 nations are meeting in the Cornish holiday resort of Carbis Bay to discuss the world's biggest issues. It's a packed agenda, but should they have a few hours off, we asked our colleagues on the Fifth Floor for their tips on where to go, what to do, and what to pack. Suggestions from Issariya Praithongyaem of BBC Thai, BBC Brasil's Eric Camara, Janina Litvinova of BBC Russian and Dahami Ranaweera of BBC Sinhala.

Returning cheetahs to India
Cheetahs are set to make a comeback in India, where they became extinct more than half a century ago. They have a rich history in the country, and were bred for sport under the Mughals. BBC correspondent Soutik Biswas tells us about the efforts to get the world’s fastest cat back into the wild.

Israeli, Jewish and Moroccan
BBC Arabic’s Fethi Benaissa recently made a short film about Israeli Moroccan singer Neta Elkayam. Her music gives a clue to her background, born in Israel to Jewish Moroccan parents, and with a grandmother from Morocco’s indigenous Amazigh community. It’s a rich cultural mix – one that appealed to Fethi.


Image: Graves next to the Swakopmund Concentration Camp Memorial in Namibia
Credit: Christian Ender/Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfxnh3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9l08gc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1m0rh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfxs77)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5481pdrjv)
G7 leaders meet in Cornwall

Global leaders are meeting in the English region of Cornwall for the first such gathering since the start of the pandemic. Will they step up on vaccines and climate change? We hear from a Big Pharma representative and a public health activist on whether COVID vaccine patents need to be waived.

Also in the programme, the UN human rights chief warns of further bloodshed in Myanmar amid a military build-up.

And as Hong Kong's film censors get new powers under the national security law, what will the impact be on the territory's film industry?

(Photo shows the UK"s Prime Minister Boris Johnson greeting France"s President Emmanuel Macron as they arrive for the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, Cornwall. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfxwzc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n18)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1m87r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46qt8hg5g8)
Acute food shortages in northern Ethiopia

The UN warns of food shortages in Ethiopia's Tigray region, so is famine being concealed? Freelance journalist Samuel Getachew has visited the affected areas in recent weeks, and tells us what he saw. And we get wider context from Peter Smerdon of the UN's World Food Programme. Also in the programme, following last week's agreement by G7 finance ministers to harmonise corporate tax policies around the world, Ireland's finance minister Paschal Donohoe explains why Dublin wants to see changes to the plan. The BBC's Maddy Savage visits Northvolt's new electric car battery factory in northern Sweden. Plus, as Hong Kong introduces strict new movie censorship rules as a result of the territory's new national security law, former civil servant Rachel Cartland, who still lives in Hong Kong, gives us her reaction.

(Picture: A man in Tigray collects a box of food provided by USAID. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfy0qh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjrykd0ny)
G7 leaders discuss climate and vaccines

The G7 summit is expected to donate a billion doses of Covid vaccines to the developing world. We look at how many doses are needed in order to vaccinate the world. Our regular coronavirus expert Dr Megan Murray from Harvard Medical School will answer some audience questions about the virus.

We also continue to hear conversations around the world about the pandemic and today bring together two people in Fiji where health officials have been warning of a severe coronavirus outbreak.

Euro 2020 football tournament gets underway tonight and we’ll speak to fans and journalists about how the games are being made Covid-secure.

And we explain what is expected at the world's most influential gaming event this weekend.

(Photo: Britain"s Prime Minister Boris Johnson greets Italy"s Prime Minister Mario Draghi, during the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, Cornwall, Britain, June 11, 2021. Credit: Phil Noble/Pool/Reuters)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfy4gm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjrykd4f2)
Coronavirus conversations: Covid in Fiji

Fiji - a country on a group of islands in the South Pacific - is currently seeing daily coronavirus infections in double figures. The health ministry has urged people in and around the capital, Suva, to be cautious, saying they've never been at higher risk. We hear from two reporters there.

We bring the latest from the G7 summit in the UK and look at the global vaccine distribution after the US and the UK pledged to donate millions of doses to poorer countries.

We’ll look at today’s other coronavirus stories with our regular expert Dr Marc Mandelson in Cape Town, South Africa.

And after warnings of famine in Ethiopia’s Tigray region, we hear from people outside the country whose family members are affected.

(Photo: This picture taken on April 24, 2021 shows residents wearing face masks walking through the fish market in the Fijian capital Suva ahead of an expected lockdown in the capital due to a Covid-19 spike. Credit: Leon LORD / AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfy86r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfycyw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9l0zy4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1mr78)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nbr6f17s7)
Sport Today

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfyhq0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1mvzd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqh)
Why do I have such a sweet tooth?

They say life is sweet. Well that’s certainly the case for CrowdScience listener Trevor in Poland who wonders why he can’t stop reaching for the cookie jar. He grew up drinking fruit juice with added sugar but wonders whether his genes could be as important as his environment when it comes to his sweet tooth, especially since his wife seem to be satisfied with mainly savoury snacks. The World Health Organisation says added sugar should constitute a maximum of 5% of our daily energy intake because it can contribute to diabetes, heart disease and obesity. But that’s tricky when you consider it’s now in everything from salad dressings, to savoury sauces.

Manufacturers have been promoting sugar alternatives for decades but recreating the unique taste and feel of it in the mouth are a challenge. Marnie Chesterton gets to try a brand new innovation – a so-called ‘rare’ sugar that has 70 percent of the sweetness but almost none of the calories. In nature, allulose is found in figs, but one producer has discovered a way to make it in the lab. Does it taste as good as it claims? Whilst switching to alternative sugars and sweeteners may reduce the calories, some researchers claim that tasting sweetness, wherever it comes from, can disrupt the body’s mechanism for regulating blood-sugar levels, increasing the risk for conditions like diabetes.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and produced by Marijke Peters for the BBC World Service


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfymg4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5481pflrr)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfyr68)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n18)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1n3gn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tz3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfyvyd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywnwkzc5hc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sfyvfh740)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1n76s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48sf306dhj)
Acute food shortages in northern Ethiopia

The UN warns of food shortages in Ethiopia's Tigray region, so is famine being concealed? Freelance journalist Samuel Getachew has visited the affected areas in recent weeks, and tells us what he saw. And we get wider context from Peter Smerdon of the UN's World Food Programme. Also in the programme, following last week's agreement by G7 finance ministers to harmonise corporate tax policies around the world, Ireland's finance minister Paschal Donohoe explains why Dublin wants to see changes to the plan. The BBC's Maddy Savage visits Northvolt's new electric car battery factory in northern Sweden. Plus, as Hong Kong introduces strict new movie censorship rules as a result of the territory's new national security law, former civil servant Rachel Cartland, who still lives in Hong Kong, gives us her reaction.

(Picture: A man in Tigray collects a box of food provided by USAID. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 12:32 SUN (w3ct1gxc)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gxd)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gxd)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gxd)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkcs2qwfvb)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkcs2qwt2q)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkcs2qx5b3)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkcs2qx927)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkcs2qxjkh)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkcs2qycsd)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzkcs2qyzj1)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkcs2qzbrf)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzkcs2qzl7p)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkcs2qzpzt)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkcs2r0276)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzkcs2r05zb)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172xzkcs2r09qg)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzkcs2r0fgl)

BBC News Summary 12:30 SUN (w172xzkcs2r0k6q)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkcs2r1dfm)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzkcs2r1rp0)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkcs2r1wf4)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzkd4c15z5k)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172xzkd4c162xp)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172xzkd4c166nt)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172xzkd4c16bdy)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172xzkd4c16tdg)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172xzkd4c16y4l)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172xzkd4c171wq)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172xzkd4c175mv)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzkd4c17f43)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172xzkd4c17nmc)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172xzkd4c184lw)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzkd4c188c0)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172xzkd4c18hv8)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkd4c18mld)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkd4c18zts)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzkd4c197b1)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172xzkd4c19q9k)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172xzkd4c19v1p)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzkd4c1b2jy)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzkd4c1bb16)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172xzkd4c1bkjg)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzkd4c1c1hz)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172xzkd4c1c583)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172xzkd4c1cdrc)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzkd4c1cjhh)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkd4c1cwqw)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzkd4c1d474)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172xzkd4c1dm6n)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172xzkd4c1dqys)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzkd4c1dzg1)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172xzkd4c1f6y9)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172xzkd4c1fgfk)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172xzkd4c1fyf2)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172xzkd4c1g256)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzkd4c1g9ng)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzkd4c1gfdl)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkd4c1gsmz)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzkd4c1h147)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzkd4c1hj3r)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172xzkd4c1hmvw)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzkd4c1hwc4)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172xzkd4c1j3vd)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172xzkd4c1jcbn)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzkd4c1jvb5)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172xzkd4c1jz29)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172xzkd4c1k6kk)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzkd4c1kb9p)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkd4c1kpk2)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172xzkd4c1ky1b)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172xzkd4c1lf0v)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172xzkd4c1ljrz)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkd4c1ls87)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172xzkd4c1m0rh)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172xzkd4c1m87r)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172xzkd4c1mr78)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172xzkd4c1mvzd)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172xzkd4c1n3gn)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzkd4c1n76s)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc45ytt)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc462ky)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc466b2)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc46b26)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc46ftb)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc46kkg)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc46p9l)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc46t1q)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc46xsv)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc471jz)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc47593)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc47917)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc47dsc)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc47jjh)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc480j0)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc48484)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc48808)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc48crd)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc48hhj)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172xzjkbc48m7n)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc48vqx)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc48zh1)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc49375)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc496z9)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc49bqf)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc49ggk)

BBC News 07:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc49l6p)

BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc49pyt)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc49tpy)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc49yg2)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc4b266)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc4b5yb)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc4b9pg)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc4bffl)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc4bk5q)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc4bnxv)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc4c157)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc4c4xc)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc4c8nh)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc4cddm)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172xzjkbc4cj4r)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfhlx5)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfhqn9)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfhvdf)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfhz4k)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfj2wp)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfj6mt)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfjbcy)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfjg42)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfjkw6)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfjpmb)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfjtcg)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfjy3l)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfk1vq)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfk5lv)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfk9bz)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfkf33)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfkjv7)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfknlc)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfksbh)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfkx2m)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfl0tr)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfl4kw)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172xzjkpmfl8b0)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmflht8)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmflmkd)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmflr9j)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmflw1n)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmflzss)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfm3jx)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfm791)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfmc15)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfmgs9)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfmljf)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfmq8k)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfmv0p)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfmyrt)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfn2hy)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfn682)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfnb06)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfnfrb)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfnkhg)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfnp7l)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfnszq)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfnxqv)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfp1gz)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzjkpmfp573)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfpdqc)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfpjgh)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfpn6m)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfpryr)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfpwpw)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfq0g0)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfq464)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfq7y8)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfqcpd)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfqhfj)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfqm5n)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfqqxs)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfqvnx)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfqzf1)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfr355)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfr6x9)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfrbnf)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfrgdk)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfrl4p)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfrpwt)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfrtmy)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfryd2)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjkpmfs246)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjkpmfs9mg)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172xzjkpmfsfcl)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172xzjkpmfsk3q)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172xzjkpmfsnvv)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172xzjkpmfsslz)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172xzjkpmfsxc3)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172xzjkpmft137)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzjkpmft4vc)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172xzjkpmft8lh)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzjkpmftdbm)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjkpmftj2r)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172xzjkpmftmtw)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172xzjkpmftrl0)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172xzjkpmftwb4)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172xzjkpmfv028)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzjkpmfv3td)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172xzjkpmfv7kj)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172xzjkpmfvc9n)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172xzjkpmfvh1s)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172xzjkpmfvlsx)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172xzjkpmfvqk1)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172xzjkpmfvv95)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172xzjkpmfvz19)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfw6jk)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfwb8p)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfwg0t)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfwkry)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfwpj2)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfwt86)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfwy0b)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfx1rg)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfx5hl)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfx97q)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfxdzv)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfxjqz)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfxnh3)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfxs77)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfxwzc)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfy0qh)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfy4gm)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfy86r)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfycyw)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfyhq0)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfymg4)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfyr68)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172xzjkpmfyvyd)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d5r)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxjryk0f1k)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172xxxjryk0jsp)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172xxxjryk39yn)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172xxxjryk3fps)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172xxxjryk66vr)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172xxxjryk6blw)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172xxxjryk93rv)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172xxxjryk97hz)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172xxxjrykd0ny)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172xxxjrykd4f2)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j4s)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jft)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jnl)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1j99)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3ct1j08)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvqc6313b4j)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqckcbhw3z)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvqckcbls12)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172xvqckcbpny5)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvqckcbskv8)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dgs)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pqg)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pqg)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1pqh)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1ls3)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1ls3)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1ls3)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct2g7g)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct1m7t)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct1m7t)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct1m7t)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mtw)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mtw)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n5s)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n5s)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3ct1n5s)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3ct1nb9)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3ct1nb9)

HARDtalk 22:06 WED (w3ct1nb9)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3ct1n18)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3ct1n18)

HARDtalk 22:06 FRI (w3ct1n18)

Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nv9)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nvb)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nvb)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nvb)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2g6w)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2g6w)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct2g6s)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1td1)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1td1)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1td1)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dk1)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dk1)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2dk1)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dk1)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hbx)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hbx)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2nxvvy4xf)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172xv2nxvvy8nk)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172xv2nxvvyddp)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172xv2nxvw11tj)

Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172xv2nxvw15kn)

Newsday 07:06 TUE (w172xv2nxvw199s)

Newsday 05:06 WED (w172xv2nxvw3yqm)

Newsday 06:06 WED (w172xv2nxvw42gr)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172xv2nxvw466w)

Newsday 05:06 THU (w172xv2nxvw6vmq)

Newsday 06:06 THU (w172xv2nxvw6zcv)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172xv2nxvw733z)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172xv2nxvw9rjt)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172xv2nxvw9w8y)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172xv2nxvwb012)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172xv53wscqd2z)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172xv53wscrc20)

Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172xv53wsct902)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172xv53wscv7z3)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172xv5481p14xg)

Newshour 21:06 MON (w172xv5481p204c)

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Newshour 21:06 TUE (w172xv5481p4x1g)

Newshour 14:06 WED (w172xv5481p6yqn)

Newshour 21:06 WED (w172xv5481p7syk)

Newshour 14:06 THU (w172xv5481p9vmr)

Newshour 21:06 THU (w172xv5481pbpvn)

Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172xv5481pdrjv)

Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172xv5481pflrr)

On the Podium 04:32 WED (w3ct2g6j)

On the Podium 11:32 WED (w3ct2g6j)

On the Podium 22:32 WED (w3ct2g6j)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kwy)

Outlook 23:32 SUN (w3ct1kwy)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3ct1jt3)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3ct1jt3)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3ct1jt3)

Outlook 12:06 TUE (w3ct1jwc)

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Outlook 12:06 WED (w3ct1jym)

Outlook 18:06 WED (w3ct1jym)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct1k34)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3ct1k34)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3ct1k34)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1g)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l1g)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pkx)

People Fixing the World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pkx)

People Fixing the World 22:06 TUE (w3ct1pkx)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l3r)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3ct1l3r)

Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3ct1l3r)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 05:32 SAT (w3ct0t1j)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 18:32 SAT (w3ct0t1j)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 10:32 MON (w3ct0t1j)

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