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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 01 MAY 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k96sm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq9crg6l3b)
Apple charged over 'anti-competitive' app policies

Apple has been accused of abusing its dominant market position by the The Euroepan Commission .We'll look at what Apple has been doing.

And we will be heading to Brazil what has just annouced record unemployment figures.

Also, New Zealand Rugby has moved a step closer to selling a stake in the country 's national Rugby Team the All Blacks.

Plus - it seems more and more men are getting medical cosmetic procedures to try to improve their looks.

PHOTO: Apple logo/Getty Images


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k9bjr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4ppcyj0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4zpt4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbb)
IPL 2021: 'In Covid times, it's a Catch-22'

Alison Mitchell, Charu Sharma and Alister Nicholson are joined by the General Manager of cricket operations at the BCCI, Dhiraj Malhotra. He gives us the latest on where the IPL stands and whether the competition should be halted or is a welcomed distraction.

The team also hear from former Rajasthan Royals and Australia bowler AJ Tye, who tells the team why he felt it necessary to leave the IPL midway through the tournament and how bubble life left him feeling as though he had lost touch with the outside world.

Plus the domestic cricket season in the Netherlands is about to get underway and we go behind the scenes to see how teams are preparing for the new season and how Covid-19 has had an impact.

Photo: Chennai Super Kings captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni and his teammates arrive at the airport (Credit: AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k9g8w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dt)
Reporting India’s Covid-19 crisis

We take a journalist's eye view of reporting the current Covid-19 crisis in India, with stories from Delhi-based team leader Jugal Purohit, BBC Gujarati's Roxy Gagdekar Chhara, BBC Marathi's Anagha Pathak, and Kirti Dubey and Piyush Nagpal of BBC Hindi.

Trade by barter
Nkechi Ogbonna of BBC Lagos describes a market in Cross River State in Nigeria, which works on a trade by barter system. She tells us how it works and who benefits.

Ramadan in Nablus
Nablus, in the occupied West Bank, is famous for its sweet makers, and Ramadan is when they’re busiest. BBC Arabic’s Alaa Daraghme takes us to his home town to share some mouth-watering treats.

BBC Xtra: Ramadan-themed cooking and dialects
Karima Kouah from BBC Arabic's radio show BBC Xtra tells us about some of their Ramadan topics, like favourite recipes shared by social media influencers, and the misunderstandings that can arise when two people speaking different Arabic dialects get together to chat.

Image: Two Delhi residents wearing PPE mourn their relative who died from Covid-19 in April 2021
Credit: Adnan Abidi / Reuters


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyf)
The killing of Osama Bin Laden

The US tracked down the al-Qaeda leader to a city in northern Pakistan in May 2011. Special operations troops were sent to capture or kill Bin Laden in a top secret raid in the dead of night. The Americans did not tell their Pakistani allies about the raid beforehand. Gabriela Jones spoke to Nicholas Rasmussen who was in the White House situation room with President Barack Obama and US military chiefs as the raid took place.

Photo: Osama Bin Laden's fortified compound on the outskirts of Abbottabad in north-west Pakistan. Credit: BBC


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k9l10)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hs9)
Is the EU stifling AI innovation?

The European Commission has published draft proposals that will, if implemented, constitute the most expansive attempt to regulate the use of artificial intelligence. AI is becoming increasingly commonplace and automating jobs previously done by humans. From the algorithms that decide which social media posts to show you, to help desk chatbots capable of answering your questions, many AI applications make our lives easier and are set to receive fairly ‘light touch’ regulation.

Others, such as computer programmes capable of reading thousands of CVs and drawing up a shortlist of job applicants to be interviewed, have been accused of bias and will face extra scrutiny. But under the plan some more controversial technologies could be banned altogether - such as the deployment of real-time facial recognition systems in public spaces. Some in the industry welcome clear rules of the road, but others fear that restrictions will hamstring companies and force innovators to flee.

The United States is a global leader in the development of AI and the EU hopes it will adopt similar measures. But industry figures there are warning that Europe’s proposals go too far and would, if mirrored in America, result in China gaining dominance of the sector as it develops similar capabilities - but free from many of the regulations likely in the West. So, which AIs are good, which are bad, and how should they be regulated? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k9ps4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4ppd9rd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr5021j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct2dmj)
The Anti-Vax Files

Brazil’s bubble of bad information

A helicopter carrying vaccines is greeted in a by a crowd in an indigenous village – and the villagers are armed with bows and arrows.
It’s just one, thankfully rare incident. But it’s a symptom of the creeping misinformation hitting some of Brazil’s most remote communities.
But rather than being a vestige of traditional ideas or village life, rumours about health and vaccines are being spread in a very modern way.
Mobile phone operators in Brazil often include free data in their user plans, but the package is limited only to select social media platforms. These plans, popular in poorer, rural and indigenous communities, allow Brazilians to spend hours online for free – but limit access to other apps and alternative sources of online information.
It means Brazil’s poorest can find themselves unable to check what they’re reading on chat apps – and stuck in a misinformation bubble.
And the fact that some religious and political leaders – including President Jair Bolsonaro – have been spreading falsehoods and anti-vax messages doesn’t help either.
In Brazil, the uptake of vaccines in indigenous communities is now significantly lower than expected – but the news isn’t all bad. We meet indigenous people trying to convince their families to take the jab.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Juliana Gragnani
Producer: Jonathan Griffin


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2djw)
Bayes: the clergyman whose maths changed the world

Bayes’ Rule has been used in AI, genetic studies, translating foreign languages and even cracking the Enigma Code in the Second World War. We find out about Thomas Bayes - the 18th century English statistician and clergyman whose work was largely forgotten until the 20th century.


(German Wehrmacht Enigma machine used during WW2. Arterra/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k9tj8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt4cs8n6sc)
India records 400,000 coronavirus cases in 24 hours

On another grim day for India, we'll hear from our correspondent in Delhi about a small glimmer of hope, as the third phase of its coronavirus vaccination programme begins. So how long will it take to bring down the number of cases?

Also in the programme: in Israel, an inquiry will investigate the deaths of at least 45 people at a crowded Jewish festival; and we'll reflect on a tough week for the British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, but will voters turn away from his Conservative Party as a result?

(Picture: Flower garlands, fruits, and a pair of sandals of a woman who died from the coronavirus disease at a crematorium in New Delhi. Credit: REUTERS/Adnan Abidi )


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k9y8d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt4cs8nbjh)
India expands vaccine programme

As the government struggles to cope with thousands of death every day, people have been forced to build makeshift funeral pyres. We'll hear from Manish Pal Singh - he and his family run an organisation called Shaheed Bhagat Singh Sewa Dal, which provides basic emergency services and organisations cremations.

Also in the programme: new research has shown that the Brazilian part of the Amazon rainforest is now emitting more greenhouse gases than it absorbs; and Artificial Intelligence is with us for better, for worse - but can it be regulated at a global level?

(Picture: Two women try to relieve the suffering of a relative as he receives oxygen in Ghaziabad. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kb20j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt4cs8ng8m)
India records 400,000 daily cases

More than 3,500 deaths were also recorded in the past twenty-four hours. But the vaccination programme is expanding, so we'll ask Professor Srinath Reddy, President of the Public Health Foundation of India, what that means for attempts to contain the spread of the virus.

Also in the programme: we'll reflect on a court ruling in Germany this week that young climate activists see as an important victory; and what impact will the pandemic and lockdowns have on elections in the Spanish capital Madrid?

(Picture: A woman cries over the body of her husband, who died from the coronavirus disease in New Delhi. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr50f8x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct2f2t)
Biden’s first 100 days

President Joe Biden promised to restore the soul of America. He took office during a time of crisis. Can his administration pull the country together?

Since Franklin Delano Roosevelt, it’s become a tradition to take stock after a president’s first 100 days in office. While Washington DC has felt quieter, the president and his administration have been quick to work: from signing executive orders, to passing multi-trillion dollar legislation through Congress, and sailing past vaccination targets.

But the challenges are acute – with the pandemic dragging on, a crisis on the border, widespread racial justice protests, and a climate crisis, just to name a few. And with the 2022 midterm elections on the horizon, how likely is it that the Democrats will maintain control of Congress?

Katty and Carlos are joined by former congressman and 2020 presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke. He captured national attention when in 2018 he ran a hard fought campaign to unseat Texas Senator Ted Cruz.

They also speak to Jennifer Kerns, a long-time Republican who worked in the California state government. She says President Biden is reaping the success of foundations laid by his predecessor.

A BBC World Service and OZY Media co-production, presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kb5rn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5l)
Coronavirus: India

A second coronavirus wave is ravaging many parts of India and the health services continue to struggle. Two doctors in Delhi and Mumbai share their experiences of working under increasingly difficult circumstances. They tell us about the hurt they are feeling as they try to do their jobs and save lives.

And three BBC journalists in India reveal what it’s like to report on the ground in Ahmedabad, Delhi and Mumbai as their family and friends are infected by Covid-19. Both the doctors and reporters use the word “helplessness” to describe how many people are feeling.

We also hear from the young volunteers who are doing their best to help people in whatever way they can - from cooking and delivering food to Covid patients at home - to sourcing oxygen canisters or hospital beds for those in a more serious condition.

(Photo: Aanchal Sharma cries over the body of her husband, who died from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), inside an ambulance at a crematorium ground in New Delhi, India, April 30, 2021. Adnan Abidi/Reuters/ TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr50k11)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f8v)
1: The Interview

A comedy plot, Kim Jong-un and a devastating cyber-attack. The story of the Sony hack. How the Lazarus Group hackers caused mayhem in Hollywood and for Sony Pictures Entertainment.
And this is just the beginning…
#LazarusHeist

Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/lazarusheist


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l19)
The challenges of reporting a crisis in India

The challenges of reporting the crisis in India as Covid-19 infections devastate the country. We hear from the BBC’s Delhi bureau.
Plus: more of your feedback on the BBC’s coverage of the death of the Duke of Edinburgh.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kb9hs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0pxg1qsqjf)
The NFL’s miracle man: Alex Smith on overcoming life-threatening injury and his against-all-odds comeback

In the week the NFL draft takes place, former number one pick Alex Smith joins us to discuss how he overcame a life-threatening injury and two years out to end the 2020 season voted as “comeback player of the year”. In 2018 Smith suffered a serious leg injury during a game against the Houston Texans and following corrective surgery, infection was discovered. The focus then switched from saving his leg, to saving his life. Doctors managed to save both and what followed was two years of surgeries, gruelling rehab and question marks over whether he would ever play the sport again. He returned for the 2020 season and helped the Washington Football Team reach the play-offs before announcing his retirement. Smith talks us through the days his life was in danger, why he made a comeback and his plans for the future.

Kei Kato joins us after her rabbit went viral at a San Francisco Giants baseball game. Kato uses Alex the rabbit as a therapy pet after her business was forced to close due to the covid pandemic. Alex was a big hit at the baseball and even reduced one fan to tears of joy.

Swiss-American BMX freestyle rider Nikita Ducarroz explains how talking openly about her anxiety has helped her. Ducarroz – who is set to compete for Switzerland at the Tokyo Olympics – has struggled with anxiety since she was in Primary School and says finding her bike helped set her free. She’s now involved in helping other extreme sport athletes open up about their issues.

Former India cricketer Snehal Pradhan joins us live from Pune with the latest from the Indian Premier League after a number of Australian players left the tournament due to concerns over the coronavirus pandemic in the country.

In Sporting Witness – we tell the story of American college wrestler, Anthony Robles whose success was all the more remarkable because he achieved it with only one leg.

The BBC’s Snooker reporter Jamie Broughton joins us live with the latest from the World Championship and the BBC’s John Southall joins us live from Selhurst Park as Manchester City look to take another step towards the Premier League title against Crystal Palace.

Photo: Washington Football Team quarterback Alex Smith scrambles during his comeback game against the Los Angeles Rams. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kbf7x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4ppf175)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr50sj9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f31)
How are health workers coping in India's fresh wave?

Covid-19 is ravaging India. India is reporting more fresh cases everyday than any other country has during the pandemic. India also crossed the devastating figure of 200,000 coronavirus deaths this week. The real number of deaths is thought to be much higher. The country's crumbling healthcare system is battling an onslaught of fresh cases, and an acute shortage of resources like medical oxygen, hospital beds and essential medicines.

At the forefront of this fight are the health workers. They are working relentlessly with scare resources to go beyond the call of duty and save precious lives. How is the fresh wave affecting their health and wellbeing? How is it impacting their loved ones? How do they fight feelings of burnout, guilt and trauma?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we ask frontline health workers how they are coping in this deadly second wave and what can be done to help.

Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Dr Saswati Sinha, critical care specialist, AMRI Hospital; Dr Roma Kumar, senior consultant psychologist; Jibin TC, nurse, president, United Nurses Association (Maharashtra)


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kbk01)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9m)
Louise Penny: Still Life

This month World Book Club talks to acclaimed Canadian writer Louise Penny about the very first in her astonishingly successful series of Inspector Gamache crime novels.

When a much-loved inhabitant of the village of Three Pines in the Eastern Townships of Quebec is found dead in the woods during Thanksgiving, the locals are certain that it was just a tragic hunting accident.

But Chief Inspector Armand Gamache from Montreal suspects foul play and won’t rest until he’s rootled out the darkness at the heart of this seemingly peaceable and bucolic community. His always courteous but also insistent sleuthing gradually brings to light the family secrets and long-held grudges seething under its apparently serene surface.

(Picture: Louise Penny. Photo credit: Jean-Francois Berube.)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kbnr5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv522fstn1s)
Covid-19: India's vaccine shortage

India is launching an expanded vaccination programme, as it struggles to tackle an escalating coronavirus crisis. All adults are now eligible to receive a first dose of the vaccine. But many states have closed vaccine centres because of a shortage of supplies.

Australians in India risk imprisonment if they try to return home.

Also, how the deforestation of the Amazon is accelerating despite big words from the Brazilian President.

And the thirty year study of pregnant mothers and their children in the UK that has led to significant health policy changes.

(Photo credit: Getty Images)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kbsh9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t66z4kf73)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary as Brighton and Hove Albion take on Leeds United.

Lee James is joined by former Arsenal defender Lauren, Ivory Coast defender Sol Bamba and former Spurs defender Jenna Schillaci to discuss all the big talking points.

We'll also have reaction to the day's early match between Crystal Palace and Manchester City.

Elsewhere, we'll have updates on the Tennis Madrid Open, the Super Netball, Boxing and Formula 1.

Image: Leeds United (Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kc8gt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4ppfwg2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr51mr6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct2dmj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l82)
Anthony Robles

In March 2011, Anthony Robles won a national college wrestling title in the United States despite being born with only one leg. Relying on upper-body strength and a unique sense of balance, Robles went undefeated throughout the entire season and was voted the outstanding wrestler of the NCAA finals. He also holds the world record for the most pull-ups in one minute. Anthony Robles talks to Ian Williams.

PHOTO: Anthony Robles in action at the 2011 finals (Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kcd6y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fph)
Our story

For the past seven years, Marlo has been making a podcast about life as a single mum raising her transgender daughter. In the first programme, Marlo explains why she put her daughter’s story out for the world to hear. She says she felt compelled to tell their story, and to show people that ‘we exist’.


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kchz2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rst)
Actor Abhishek Bachchan

On this week’s Arts Hour Nikki Bedi talks to American film maker Luchina Fisher about her feature documentary Mama Gloria, celebrating the life and influence of Chicago’s black transgender icon Gloria Allen, and to film critic and commentator Kaleem Aftab.

British actor and rapper Riz Ahmed explains why playing a deaf drummer in his latest film Sound of Metal has made him a better listener

Australian actor Cate Blanchett tells us why she’s relished her role behind the camera, executive producing the Greek film Apples

Bollywood superstar Abhishek Bachchan talks about the changing expectations of movie audiences

Hollywood actors Octavia Spencer and Melissa McCarthy explain why they’ve been watching old Oscar winning films together

We have music from Imogen Heap to celebrate one of the UK’s most iconic concert venues, The Royal Albert Hall.

And there’s a live performance from singing sensation Dua Lipa


(Photo: Abhishek Bachchan. Credit: Kevin Winter/Getty Images for TIFF)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kcmq6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv522fsvm0t)
US military threatens retaliation in Afghanistan

The head of the US-led military mission in Afghanistan, General Scott Miller, warns against attacks on foreign troops as they start to withdraw, saying they had the means to "respond forcefully”. But an Afghan MP tells Newshour the US withdrawal "has given terrorist organisations even more motivation to keep up the fight".

Also in the programme: Why has the President of Somalia backed down on his plan to extend his mandate by two years; and 300 million Chinese prepare to travel during the Labour Day holiday, the first main opportunity since the outbreak of coronavirus a year and a half ago.

(Photo: American soldier, inside a building, aiming his rifle through the doorway, Kandahar, Afghanistan, 2012. Credit: Reuters/Baz Ratner/File Photo)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kcrgb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbr)
Influences and identity with Adrian Younge and Ali Shaheed Muhammad

Soul producer and composer Adrian Younge, A Tribe Called Quest's Ali Shaheed Muhammad, American harpist Brandee Younger, and Geneva-born, New York-based producer and bassist Alissia go deep on the decade that most inspired them musically, the fight for equality in the music industry, and using their music to show respect for what's come before.

Adrian Younge is a musician, broadcaster and DJ who founded the LA-based label Linear Labs. He has scored for film and TV and his production credits include collaborations with Kendrick Lamar and Jay-Z.

Joining Adrian is his close collaborator and fellow member of The Midnight Hour, Ali Shaheed Muhammad. Ali is an American DJ, producer and hip-hop legend, known for being a founding member of A Tribe Called Quest, as well as production collective the Ummah and R&B supergroup Lucy Pearl.

Brandee Younger is an American harpist whose sound is a blend of classical, jazz, soul and funk. Her latest album, Force Majeure, is a collaboration with her partner, the bassist Dezron Douglas, which they recorded in lockdown in their New York apartment.

Alissia is a producer, songwriter and bass player who is lauded as the future of funk. She has collaborated with the likes of Mark Ronson, Q-Tip, Anderson .Paak and Bootsy Collins, as well as releasing music under her own name.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kcw6g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywlpz2s5rf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0scs7jx7d2)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr527gv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pdw)
Experimental theatre in Tokyo

We go to Tokyo, where artists are creating theatre that interacts with the human body. At the experimental festival, Theater Commons Tokyo ‘21, the audience is centre stage and immersed in the action, even during a pandemic.

At Aya Momose’s Performing Acupuncture, needles turn the body into a stage. By combining art and therapy, she creates sensations which make us think about our body and relationships to one another.

Using VR headsets, Meiro Koizumi takes us into the nightmares of Tokyo’s marginalised migrant workers. In this unsettling virtual space, we are transported into their pandemic experiences.

And as the world adjusts to coronavirus, Akira Takayama and Port B use radio to transmit voices from Fukushima into the masked crowds of Tokyo streets. We are reminded of frightening contamination and radioactivity. A decade since the earthquake, and a year since the pandemic’s onset, both these stories are still unfolding.

Presenter: Kyoko Iwaki
Producer: Alice Armstrong

(Photo: Theater Commons Tokyo '21. Credit: Shun Sato)



SUNDAY 02 MAY 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kd3pq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yv2)
Melting glaciers, warming coffee and a Dragonfly on Titan

When Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins – who passed away this week – looked down on the earth from lunar orbit during those days in 1969, he saw more ice and a smaller liquid ocean than you would see today. Of the 200,000 glaciers outside of the polar and Greenland ice sheets, their melting in the last two decades accounts for about a fifth of the sea level rise we are also seeing. Thus according to a paper published this week in the journal nature by, amongst others Bob McNabb of Ulster University who describes to Roland how and why these numbers are more certain than others before. As fellow earth observation expert Anna Hogg adds, the work synthesises years of data from almost half a million images of glaciers taken from space, and provides our best handle yet on our accelerating loss of this finite and dwindling natural feature.

Researchers at Kew in the UK and in Sierra Leone have re-discovered a species of coffee plant once thought lost. As Marnie Chesterton reports, climate change threatens many coffee crops around the world as the most popular variety – arabica – needs cool high altitude conditions which are going to become more scarce. But after a long and arduous search, the researchers have discovered a more resilient variety that might not only save the morning brew for many, it may even prove agriculturally and even economically transformative for some African economies.

And whilst many of us watch the antics of NASA’s Martian helicopter, Ingenuity, as it whizzes across the distant plains of “Wright’s Field” aerodrome on Mars, some are watching with more trepidation than others. In 6 years’ time, Zibi Turtle, Principle Investigator of NASA’s Dragonfly mission, hopes to launch a much larger octocopter drone to Titan, moon of Saturn. As she describes to Roland, the challenges are huge, not least because dragonfly will carry all its instruments on board as it hops around, finding new landing sites autonomously. And communicating with Earth will take a whopping hour each way.

When eating a blackberry one day, CrowdScience listener Charles got a tiny seed stuck in his teeth. That got him wondering: why are seeds the size they are? Why does a blackberry have dozens of tiny pips, while a peach has one huge stone right in the middle?

Plant seeds have been around for hundreds of millions of years, so they’ve had plenty of time to shapeshift into wildly different forms: from dust-like orchid seeds to giant coconuts. This evolution has been a long and intricate dance with wind, water and animals; we ask how different kinds of seeds might respond to today’s environmental threats and rapidly changing ecosystems.

And we go in search of the world’s biggest seed, the coco de mer: native to just two remote islands in the Indian Ocean and weighing up to 18kg, how did this seed evolve to be so much bigger than any other?


(Image: The lunar module , carrying Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, ascends back up to the command module with Michael Collins. It is often said that Michael Collins is the only human, living or dead, who is not in this photograph.
Credit: Michael Collins / NASA)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kd7fv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4ppgvf3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr52lq7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct2f2t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kdc5z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kdgy3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtq)
US Turkey tensions

Stories from Turkey, Syria, St Vincent and Chile.

Last weekend, the US President, Joe Biden, departed from years of carefully calibrated statements to declare that the mass killings of Armenians in 1915 constituted genocide. The news was celebrated in Armenia and in the diaspora, but met with a firm riposte by Turkey, a NATO military ally. The Turkish President, Recep Tayyip Erdogan denounced the statement as “groundless” and harmful to bilateral ties. The move has brought relations to a new low. Orla Guerin is in Ankara.

Nearly 40 000 foreign fighters travelled to the self-declared Islamic State before it lost its stronghold in Raqqa – taking their wives and children with them. Now, their home countries are navigating the thorny issue of repatriating many of these families. Josh Baker followed the story of one of the women who flew out with her husband to Syria, taking her son, Matthew with her. He heard about their experience with the Islamic State Group and how Matthew survived more than two and a half years there before he and his mother eventually made their escape.

It’s been three weeks since the volcano in St Vincent, La Soufriere, erupted. As much as 15 percent of the population had to be evacuated and remain in temporary accommodation. While fortunately no one lost their lives, the island’s economy is in tatters. Its agriculture has been ruined and the government believes around half its GDP will be lost this year. Our correspondent, Will Grant, reached the red zone immediately around La Soufriere and saw the huge challenge the islanders face in trying to rebuild.

And in Chile, despite having one of the most successful vaccine rollouts in the world, there has been another spike in Coronavirus cases. Experts say that this is proof the vaccine alone can not keep down infection rates. It came as a blow to Chileans who had had that taste of a more normal life. Jane Chambers is in Santiago and found the whole experience could offer a cautionary tale for other countries.

(Image: Protest in Istanbul against US President Biden’s Armenian genocide statement, 26 April 2021. Credit: Reuters/Murad Sezer)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr52v6h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pdw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kdlp7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pph6nh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr52yym)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2d29)
Don't log off: My life, my world

Alan Dein follows Rohan, a young Jamaican farmer over the past 12 months as he is faced by the twin challenges of drought and the pandemic.

Producer: Mark Burman and Laurence Grissell

(Photo: Rohan crouches among crops. Credit: Craig Headley)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kdqfc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt4cs8r3pg)
Indian votes counted amid Covid surge

India's election commission has promised strict Covid safety rules during the counting, after it came under fire for allowing weeks of campaigning despite fast rising infections. A record 3,689 coronavirus-related deaths were reported on Sunday.

Also in the programme: in Myanmar, a health crisis has followed the coup with doctors refusing to go to work; and we'll be visiting Night Fever, an exhibition for club lovers. .


(Picture: A man wearing a face shield receives a vaccine in Mumbai.
Credit: REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kdv5h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt4cs8r7fl)
New daily Covid deaths record in India

A record 3,689 coronavirus-related deaths were reported on Sunday. Amid the surge in coronavirus cases, votes are being counted in 5 Indian states where elections to their assemblies took place last month.

Also in the programme: we assess President Biden's plans for a post-Covid economic recovery; and the importance of wasps. .


(Picture: A healthcare worker gives a dose of vaccine manufactured by Serum Institute of India to a woman at a hospital in New Delhi.
Credit: REUTERS/Adnan Abidi)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kdyxm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt4cs8rc5q)
India: Voting count starts while country hits new daily deaths record

Long:

India has reported nearly 3,700 new deaths in the last 24 hours, its highest total so far. This figure comes amidst state elections where campaigning has been controversial.

Also in the programme: Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan have agreed what they called a "complete ceasefire"; and we talk about the document (a documentary) showing the hard decisions a father in Iran needs to make in Iran for his 14-year-old daughter.

To discuss these stories and more, Julian Worricker is joined by Alida Vracic, a Bosnian-born political scientist and co-founder and director of the Sarajevo-based Populari policy think-tank, and Ramita Navai, a British-Iranian journalist and author based in London.

(Photo: A suspected COVID-19 patient receives oxygen supply at a Sikh shrine, or gurdwara, in New Delhi. Credit: EPA.)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr53b60)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfj)
America's 'food apartheid'

Millions of Americans live in so-called ‘food deserts’ - areas where it’s hard to access fresh affordable food. For people who aren’t able to travel to other neighbourhoods to do their food shopping, this might mean microwave meals bought from the local gas station are the only way to feed themselves. Emily Thomas meets two people who live in areas where fresh food is hard to come by in Albany, NY State and St Louis, Missouri. They explain why they reject the term food desert in favour of ‘food apartheid’ - which they say addresses the food system in its entirety, including race.

(Picture: two shopping trollies with food, credit: Getty/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk


Contributors:
Tyrean Lewis, Founder and CEO of Heru Urban Farming
Roni Minter


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kf2nr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr53fy4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Global Questions (w3ct2f7l)
Global Questions

After the conviction of a former police offer for the murder of George Floyd a year ago, are America’s racial divisions starting to heal, or are they as deep as ever? President Biden says the verdict is a giant step forward, but what more needs to be done in the fight for racial equality and justice in the United States and around the world?


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kf6dw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbp)
Sad Songs

Listening to sad songs is a weird, counterintuitive thing to do. Why listen to something that moves you to tears?

As someone who’s sensitivity to sad songs sometimes means pulling over until the tears clear Dessa mulls major versus minor, explores what melody may have in common with the sound of human crying, and quizzes a fellow songwriter about the power of screaming. Do sad songs secretly make us happier?


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr53kp8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2d33)
France and its faltering relationship with Islam

France is on its way to passing The Bill Comforting the Respect of Republican Principles, one of the most controversial laws of President Macron’s presidency. It aims to fight back against what Emmanuel Macron and his ministers are calling “Islamist separatism”, what he says is an assault by Islamist extremists on the values of the French Republic.

John Laurenson meets people on both sides of this fractious debate. He visits a closed-down Paris school that its head teacher says is an early victim of President Macron’s war against “Islamist separatism” and meets another teacher – also Muslim - who describes her struggle with what she says is religious extremism in the classroom.

John meets an MP and the head of a militant secularist organisation both keen on the law. He also goes to Trappes, a suburb of Paris that many say is a breeding ground for Islamic extremism, and drinks mint tea with a scholar of Islam. He meets an Islamic bookseller called John, goes to the mosque and talks to the mayor, eats a “halal ham” sandwich, meets an inhabitant who says she lives “Islamist separatism” every day and another who says the new law stigmatises Muslims in general and will separate them still further from the non-Muslim people of France.

(Photo: A woman holds a placard reading "Freedom leads all the people" as protesters demonstrate against a bill dubbed as "anti-separatism", in Paris. Credit: Geoffroy Van Der Hasselt/AFP/Getty Images)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kfb50)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pphy48)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr53pfd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2d2j)
Gambling: A Sure Bet?

Gambling: A Sure Bet? Albania

Albania was plagued by problems caused by gambling; high levels of debt, divorce and suicide triggered the government to ban it. But it did not have the desired effect. Instead the ban sent the industry underground and into the hands of organised criminal gangs. Dr Heather Wardle sets Fatjona Mejdini, a journalist who writes about Albania’s development, the task of investigating the state of gambling in her country and asks whether banning betting can solve the problems caused by it.


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kffx4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fph)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kfkn8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv522fsxjyw)
Indian PM under pressure as Covid-19 deaths rise

The Indian prime minister, Narendra Modi, faces calls for a national lockdown as India sees its highest daily rise in Covid-19 deaths. Meanwhile, five Indian states await local election results in what could be an early test of support for the government's handling of the pandemic. We hear the latest, and discuss the political impact of the Covid crisis with two local analysts.

Also in the programme: Poland's outgoing human rights ombudsman on his country's slide away from democratic norms; and a new exhibition showcasing contemporary art from both North and South Korea.

(Photo: Grieving family members of Covid-19 victims at a cremation ground in New Delhi. Credit: EPA/IDREES MOHAMMED)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kfpdd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rl1)
The census: A snapshot of life

Anyone who has ever researched their family tree will have most likely come across the census, the process by which every citizen or subject of a country is counted and classified. Data collected by the census, often carried out every ten years, has been invaluable to genealogists, both amateur and professional. And the census has also developed into an essential tool for governments and organisations to plan how and where they focus their investment in public services such as health care and schools.

Inventories of people are known to stretch back to antiquity in places such as Egypt and China, and asked for very basic information for the purposes of tax collection or military service. The modern-day census, however, focuses on questions that touch far more on an individual’s identity and has often been controversial. Now that modern technology makes population data easily accessible in a variety of forms, some are questioning whether there is a need for censuses at all.

Bridget Kendall is joined by Dr Kathrin Levitan, Associate Professor at William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia and the author of A Cultural History of the British Census: Envisioning the Multitude in the Nineteenth Century; sociologist Dr Tukufu Zuberi, the Lasry Family Professor of Race Relations at the University of Pennsylvania and head of the African Census Analysis Project; and data scientist and economist Andrew Whitby, author of The Sum of the People: How the Census Has Shaped Nations from the Ancient World to the Modern Age.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service.

(Photo: Campaigners protest outside the US Supreme Court in 2019 over the inclusion of a citizenship question in the 2020 US Census. Credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2djw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kft4j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kfxwn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t66z4nkmg)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary as Manchester United host Liverpool.

Delyth Lloyd is joined the former Liverpool and Switzerland defender Stephane Henchoz and will also be joined by the former Manchester United and Liverpool goalkeeper Siobhan Chamberlain to discuss all the big talking points.

We will also have reaction to day's early match between Newcastle and Arsenal.

Photo: James Milner Liverpool (Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kg941)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4ppjx39)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr54ndf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct2f2t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kgdw5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dgm)
Big promises of big spending

A "once in a generation" investment - that’s what Joe Biden offered the American people this week. He presented his American Jobs plan and American Families Plan to Congress to mark his first 100 days in office. Can he deliver? Also, will business travel resume once the pandemic has ended? Airlines and hotels are dependent on business travel - but now that so many people have adapted to virtual meetings, will frequent fliers ever want to get back to the departure lounges? And why do cities change their names? And what are the costs involved? The South African city of Port Elizabeth has rejected the colonial overtones of its former moniker - and is now called Gqeberha. The Chief Executive of Bollinger Champagne tells us why he’s bought up a vineyard in the United States and how the brand first became associated with James Bond. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Joe Biden addressing Congress, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kgjm9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv522fsyhxx)
India's governing BJP loses key state election amid Covid surge

The Indian prime minister's party, the BJP, has lost a fiercely-contested election in the state of West Bengal. Narendra Modi faces accusations of negligence after holding huge elections rallies in the state amid India's deepening coronavirus crisis.

Also in the programme: How protesters in Myanmar have changed their tactics to continue demonstrations despite a crackdown that has left hundreds dead; and why are Manchester United fans still so angry with the club's American owners?

(Image: Trinamool Congress party (TMC) supporters celebrate after winning an absolute majority in the West Bengal Assembly Election in Kolkata, India. Credit: Epa/Piyal Adhikary)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kgncf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr550mt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f8v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2djw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0kgs3k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywlpz2w2nj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0scs7k0495)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr554cy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kws)
I was the sole survivor of a plane crash

When a plane carrying 11-year-old Norman Ollestad, his father and his father’s girlfriend got caught in a snowstorm and crashed into the remote California mountains in 1979, Norman was the only survivor. Stranded on the edge of a cliff, the boy relied on the skills his father had taught him throughout his childhood to make it down the treacherous mountain to safety. This extraordinary tale of survival is being told in two parts.

Norman Ollestad’s memoir is called Crazy For the Storm. He has also written a short story called Formentera about the fraying relationship of a married couple.

The archive you heard comes courtesy of CBS.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Mariana Des Forges
Producer: Mariana Des Forges

Picture: Norman Ollestad
Credit: Jeff Lipsky



MONDAY 03 MAY 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vlvvz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl4rr1zh17)
Vaccines expected to dominate G7 meeting

Ahead of the full leaders' meeting later this year, the G7's foreign ministers will be hammering out their respective positions on global issues. The meeting will be held in London and alongside the seven; the UK, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, US - the EU and representatives from Australia, India, South Korea and South Africa will also attend. We hear from Graham Gordon, head of policy at CAFOD, an international development charity. And independent economist, Michael Hughes joins us with news of better than expected corporate results, plus, Kieran Maguire, a lecturer in football finance at Liverpool University, tells us what's behind a Manchester United fan protest which saw its game against Liverpool, postponed. And we'll hear about a dispute in the South China Sea from Professor Pankah Jha at the Jindal School of International Affairs in Delhi. Also in the programme, the EU has pledged to concentrate on what they call The Digital Strategy, billing it as a once in a generation plan. We hear from the man in charge, Dr Roberto Viola who leads the team responsible for delivering the bloc's digital vision. (Picture of vaccine needles via Getty Images).


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0g974c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Global Questions (w3ct2f7l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Sunday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vlzm3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyzpllc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0g9bwh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqd)
Why can't we crack our food waste problem?

From fruit rotting in fields, to retailers turning down funny shaped vegetables, and consumers scraping leftovers into the bin, food waste is everywhere. It’s estimated that around a third of all our food ends up not being eaten. If we could sort this, total greenhouse gas emissions would reduce by around eight percent. To put that in context, the only countries that are responsible for emissions of that size are China and the US.

So, what can be done? Graihagh Jackson and Jordan Dunbar discuss fixes - big and small - and hear from a farmer in Morocco turning apples that would otherwise rot into vinegar. The first thing that needs to happen for change to start is for governments to properly count the climate cost of food waste. And that, it seems, is a long way off.

Guests:
Dr Tammara Soma - Research director of the Food Systems Lab at Simon Fraser University
Dr Liz Goodwin - Senior fellow and director in food loss and waste at the World Resources Institute
Mahacine Mokdad – journalist

Presenters: Jordan Dunbar & Graihagh Jackson
Producer: Olivia Noon
Editor: Emma Rippon


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vm3c7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0g9gmm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f8v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l19)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vm73c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyzpv2m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0g9lcr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6g)
Nurses on the frontline: A year on

In April 2020, Kim Chakanetsa spoke to two young nurses who were putting their lives on the line by treating the sickest covid-19 patients in intensive care units. At that point, only a couple of months into a global pandemic, they were exhausted but optimistic about things getting better. Kim catches up with them and asks how they are coping a year on after another wave of infections and an incresing death toll.

Hannah Grey is a 24-year-old nurse based in London. She worked as a busy Intensive Care Unit for both waves of virus infections, but has since moved on to a children’s critical unit. She has launched her own podcast, What Makes a Nurse?, sharing the stories of the many skilled nurses she met during the pandemic, as they came to help on the ICU.

Bianca Dintino is a 27-year-old critical care nurse based at Tufts Medical Center in Boston. She was one of the first nurses to volunteer to care for coronavirus patients last year, and credits her colleagues with keeping her going. Bianca got married during the pandemic, and has been trying to find the joy in a difficult year.

Produced by Rosie Stopher

IMAGE DETAILS:
L: Bianca Dintino (credit Anne Marie)
R: Hannah Gray (credit Simi Sebastian)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vmbvh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2m3j91dw7)
US Secretary of State: China more aggressive

Antony Blinken tells CBS News Beijing, that a military conflict would not be in the interest of either nation.

The BBC has investigated corruption in the Nigerian pension system and finds the so-called 'Ghost Pensioners.

And we talk about Wandering Policemen in the US - allowed to quit one police forces, then rehired by another. One mother is campaigning to end the practice.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vmglm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2m3j91jmc)
US Secretary of State raises concern about US/China relationship

Antony Blinken accuses China of acting aggressively abroad and repressively at home.

France begins reopening today from its lockdown. President Emanuel Macron says he wants to resume the 'French way of life’.

And can we keep a good balance of male and female baby loggerhead turtles with a simple technique to change the temperature?


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vmlbr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2m3j91nch)
India vaccine manufacturer warns of shortages

The head of the Serum Institute says the government is to blame for not preparing for second wave.

How has Portugal turned its Covid fortunes round so dramatically? It was one of the European countries of greatest concern, but it's now getting back to some sort of normality.

And we hear why fans broke into Old Trafford to protest against the Glazer family's ownership of the club. A game being played by Manchester United against Liverpool had to be postponed.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vmq2w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5m)
In-depth, hard-hitting interviews with newsworthy personalities.


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gb2c8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j4m)
Making multinationals pay

It could be the biggest shake-up of corporate taxation in history. But can President Biden's push for a minimum global rate succeed? He wants multinational companies to pay a rate of at least 21%. The proposal is likely to face opposition from smaller economies. Tech consultant Pamela Newenham explains how Ireland's low tax regime has helped to transform the country's capital. Others say the proposal doesn't go far enough. We hear why from Nobel prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz. We also hear from the man leading the charge for reform at the OECD, Pascal Saint-Amans, and Danny McCoy, head of Ireland's biggest business group.

Picture: Stock photo of a yellow warning sign on a fence (Credit: Getty)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0q)
How Amsterdam became the cannabis smoking capital of Europe

How Amsterdam became the home of cannabis coffee shops .The Mellow Yellow Café set a pattern in 1973 of attracting customers, which hundreds of others would follow. Although selling and smoking the drug was illegal, possession of small quantities of cannabis was tolerated by the Dutch police. Bob Howard talks to the café’s owner, Werner Bruining.

Photo: Mellow Yellow Cafe, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Credit: Alamy


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vmtv0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gb63d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pq9)
Why are seeds such different sizes?

When eating a blackberry one day, CrowdScience listener Charles got a tiny seed stuck in his teeth. That got him wondering: why are seeds the size they are? Why does a blackberry have dozens of tiny pips, while a peach has one huge stone right in the middle?

Plant seeds have been around for hundreds of millions of years, so they’ve had plenty of time to shapeshift into wildly different forms: from dust-like orchid seeds to giant coconuts. This evolution has been a long and intricate dance with wind, water and animals; we ask how different kinds of seeds might respond to today’s environmental threats and rapidly changing ecosystems.

And we go in search of the world’s biggest seed, the coco de mer: native to just two remote islands in the Indian Ocean and weighing up to 18kg, how did this seed evolve to be so much bigger than any other?

With Professor Angela Moles, Dr Si-Chong Chen, Marc Jean-Baptiste, Dr Frauke Fleischer-Dogley and Dr Wolfgang Stuppy.


Presented by Marnie Chesterton
Produced by Cathy Edwards for the BBC World Service

[Photo: Different sized fruit seeds. Credit: Getty Images]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vmyl4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pdw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gb9vj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct2dmj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2djw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vn2b8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyzqp9j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gbfln)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vn62d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jsy)
The daring prison escape of an Argentine footballer

In November 1977 two men kidnapped minor league footballer Claudio Tamburrini. He was taken to a detention centre run by the Argentine Air Force where he was tortured and imprisoned. The country had just experienced a military coup and under the new regime many people suspected of left-wing sympathies were abducted and killed. Claudio and one of his cellmates felt they had to escape detention or they would be murdered. Using just bed sheets, leather straps and a metal bolt, they managed to climb out a window and scale the building. Meanwhile the 1978 FIFA World Cup was underway in Argentina. Claudio eventually emerged from hiding to celebrate the tournament, which he believes helped bring down the military junta.

Ballaké Sissoko is a master of the kora - a stringed instrument found throughout West Africa. But his career was turned upside down when his instrument was broken during a journey from the US to Paris. With an outpouring of public support Ballaké has been able to have a new kora built, which he played in his new album Djourou.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Claudio (top right) and his football team in the 1970s
Credit: Supplied Claudio Tamburrini


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vn9tj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyzqxss)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gbp2x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pq9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vnfkn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv52fq34dw8)
India's pandemic: Delhi calls in the army

India has called the army in to help the capital Delhi cope with COVID-19; we hear from a government spokesperson, and from the head of the global vaccine alliance GAVI about the efforts to get vaccines where they are needed.

Also in the programme: the legacy of violence in Northern Ireland a hundred years after its creation, and a BBC Africa Eye Investigation exposes corruption in the Nigerian pension system.

(Picture: a man suffering from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is comforted by his daughter as he receives treatment inside the casualty ward at a hospital in New Delhi/ Credit: REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vnk9s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gbxl5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y47x50t6sfm)
Google fails to remove rip-off ads

Google has failed to remove adverts for websites that charge for free government services. The BBC's Chris Fox explains how a number of adverts found among search results go against Google's own policies prohibiting fees to change information such as driving licence addresses, despite a pledge from the search engine to remove them. And we get reaction from Gareth Shaw, head of money for the UK consumer organisation Which? Also in the programme, we examine the future of music and arts festivals, as the industry hopes it can bounce back from the coronavirus pandemic. Andrew Trendell of music magazine NME talks us through the thinking of festival organisers about what sort of events might proceed this summer. Rasto Pruzinec organises the Uprising reggae and world music festival in Slovakia, and tells us how difficult it is to plan his event in August, when the scope of government restrictions that will be in force then is not yet clear. And Grace Barrett of the Telluride Bluegrass festival in Colorado discusses how the pandemic will make this year's event a very different experience to before. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare considers the implications of the pandemic for how we eat at work.

(Picture: A Google building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vnp1x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxgylz3p0c)
India Covid crisis: Young medics

The coronavirus crisis in India is showing no signs of slowing down. Many junior doctors and medical students have been called on to help treat Covid-19 patients in the current wave. We have a conversation with three young medics about their experiences. We'll also speak to our correspondent about the concerns over the Covid vaccine shortage for Indian citizens.

Our regular coronavirus expert Dr Eleanor Murray from Boston University School of Public Health joins the programme to talk about how travel restrictions around the world can be safely lifted in the coming months. The European Union has proposed to lift restrictions for those who have been vaccinated and for those coming from countries with low infection rates.

Manchester United's Premier League game against Liverpool was postponed on Sunday after around 200 fans broke into Old Trafford to protest against the ownership of the club. We'll hear from fans about what's behind the protests.

(Photo: Dr Kamna Kakkar Credit: Kamna Kakkar)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vnst1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxgylz3srh)
EU looks to ease travel restrictions

We look at how travel restrictions may be safely lifted in the coming months. The European Union has proposed lifting restrictions on non-essential travel to the EU for fully vaccinated people and for people from countries with low infection rates. Meanwhile, Australia’s threat to jail citizens returning home from India has sparked condemnation. We get a view from our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Manfred Green in Israel.

The coronavirus crisis in India is showing no signs of slowing down. Many junior doctors and medical students have been called on to help treat Covid-19 patients in the current wave. We have a conversation with three young medics about their experiences.

And we explain what's expected in one of the most important court cases in Apple's history. Epic Games, makers of the hugely popular Fortnite, accuse Apple of being anti-competitive.

(Photo: A plane taking off at sunset. Credit: Steve Parsons/PA Wire)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vnxk5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jsy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vp199)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyzrn8k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gcdkp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n8xvtrx3n)
2021/05/03 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vp51f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gcj9t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2fns)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The noises that make us cringe

Why do some people find noises like a fork scraping a plate so terrible? asks Findlay in Aberdeenshire. Rutherford and Fry endure some horrible noises to find out the answer.

Warning - This episode contains some horrible sounds

Trevor Cox, Professor of Acoustic Engineering at the University of Salford, has run experiments to find out the worst, most cringe-making sound. He divided horrible sounds into three categories: scraping sounds, like nails down a blackboard; disgusting sounds like a snotty sniffy nose; and sounds that make us cringe because of what we associate them with, like the dentist’s drill. All horrible sounds have some sort of association whether it’s a primal scream or fear of catching a disease, and they’re dealt with in the ancient part of the brain – the amygdala.

Professor Tim Griffiths is a Cognitive Neurologist at Newcastle University’s Auditory Cognition Group. He has been studying people with misophonia, a condition where ordinary, everyday sounds, such as someone eating or breathing causes a severe anxiety and anger response. Misophonia may affect around 15% of the population and Tim thinks that different parts of the brain – the insula and the motor cortex - are involved in this fight or flight response to seemingly innocuous sounds.

Cat Thomas’s job is to make horrible sounds. She is a foley artist at Boompost. If you watch Call the Midwife or Peaky Blinders, all the incidental sounds are created by Cat and her team. She also created some of the sounds for the horror film Camilla, which involved evisceration and disembowelling with the aid of some squishy oranges and bananas. Adam Rutherford and Hannah Fry try their own horror sounds when they chop off a finger with the aid of some large pasta shells, an orange and a knife.

Presenters: Hannah Fry & Adam Rutherford
Producer: Fiona Roberts


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vp8sk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv52fq35835)
EU announces relaxation on travel restrictions

The European Commission has recommended easing restrictions on non-essential travel from overseas. Travellers must be fully vaccinated and new variants or a deteriorating health situation in non-EU countries will be closely monitored. Also in the programme: Australian citizens in India are banned from returning home, does it violate their human rights? And Christiana Figueres, former Executive Secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, explains why this year’s climate change conference is so important.

(Photo: People enjoy a Sunday at the beach in Tuscany as COVID-19 restrictions ease around Italy, May 2, 2021. Credit: REUTERS/Jennifer Lorenzini)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vpdjp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gcrt2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vpj8t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywm27d2tts)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sd4hv6wgf)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gcwk6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48qlrdy1ty)
Apple in Epic battle

The tech giant Apple, was in court on Monday defending itself against accusations that it is anti-competitive. The company making those claims is Epic Games which produces the hugely popular and lucrative, Fortnite. Adi Robertson, senior reporter for The Verge brings us the details. Plus, as a successor to Warren Buffett is announced at multinational conglomerate, Berkshire Hathaway, independent investment analyst Peter Jankovskis, tells us what this could mean for investors. Also in the programme, we examine the future of music and arts festivals, as the industry hopes it can bounce back from the coronavirus pandemic. Andrew Trendell of music magazine NME talks us through the thinking of festival organisers about what sort of events might proceed this summer. Rasto Pruzinec organises the Uprising reggae and world music festival in Slovakia, and tells us how difficult it is to plan his event in August, when the scope of government restrictions that will be in force then is not yet clear. And Grace Barrett of the Telluride Bluegrass festival in Colorado discusses how the pandemic will make this year's event a very different experience to before. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare considers the implications of the pandemic for how we eat at work.

(Picture: Fornite game and Apple logo via Getty Images)



TUESDAY 04 MAY 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vprs2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq9r0rm42s)
Bill and Melinda Gates to divorce

One of the world's most wealthy and famous philanthropic couples are to divorce and Theodore Schleifer from the Vox news website tells us how that could impact on the work of the Bill and Melinda Gates' Foundation. And the tech giant Apple, was in court on Monday defending itself against accusations that it is anti-competitive. The company making those claims is Epic Games which produces the hugely popular and lucrative, Fortnite. Adi Robertson, senior reporter for The Verge brings us the details. Plus the organisers of the Tokyo Olympics have sparked anger in Japan’s medical community after they asked 500 nurses to volunteer at this summer’s Games. And the BBC's Clare Williamson examines the future of music and arts festivals, as the industry hopes it can bounce back from the coronavirus pandemic. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare considers the implications of the pandemic for how we eat at work. And we're joined throughout the programme by Professor Peter Morici of the University of Maryland and Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus at Hitotsubashi University. (Picture of Melinda Gates and Bill Gates at The Robin Hood Foundation's 2018 benefit. Photo by Kevin Mazur via Getty Images for Robin Hood).


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vpwj6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyzshhg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gd7sl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2fzr)
Where is Jack Ma?

On the eve of what would have been the world's largest share listing, Ant Financial founder Jack Ma, the Chinese billionaire mysteriously disappeared. Things started to go wrong for Ma after he told a room full of banking regulators that their methods were out of date and not fit for purpose. Shortly afterwards, the Chinese government cancelled the listing and Jack went silent. The extroverted charismatic billionaire, who once flourished in the public eye, simply did not show up at key events.

It is happening more and more often in China; some of the country's most famous and powerful people are disappearing after coming into conflict with the Communist Party. China's most famous actress, the Chinese head of the international police agency Interpol and even a top news presenter all disappeared.

So what has happened to Jack Ma? Journalist Celia Hatton, who spent 15 years living and reporting in China, investigates.

(Photo: Jack Ma, founder of Alibaba Group. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vq08b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jsy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vq40g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyzsqzq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gdh8v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcw)
Camilo: The making of a Latin superstar

If there is a winning formula for moving from songwriter to performer, Camilo has found it.

At the time of writing, the 27-year-old Colombian star and Latin Grammy-winner has amassed 5.2 billion streams of his song Por Primera Vez and his album, Mis Manos – released just two months ago - has had over 2 billion streams worldwide.

Through his open, warm, and personal approach on social media he has gained 21 million Instagram followers and nearly 23 million TikTok followers - making him the most followed Latin artist on the platform. In 2021 he has already been nominated for a Grammy Award and made his late-night US television debut on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon.

As Mis Manos is released, Colombian reporter Natalia Guerrero talks to Camilo - and those working closest to him - as he prepares to break into the Brazilian market by recording his hit song, BEBÉ in Portuguese and dreams of his first ever show in front of a live audience. Will his dream come true?

Presented and Produced by Natalia Guerrero
Executive Produced by Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service
Photograph of Camilo by Cristian Saumeth


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vq7rl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2m3j949sb)
Bill and Melinda Gates to divorce after 27 years

What will this mean for their shared charitable foundation - one of the biggest in the world - which fights child poverty and gives out free vaccines?

Concern is raised for children who were separated from their parents by the conflict in Tigray, Ethiopia.

And the Swiss students who, thanks to Covid, are living in a luxury hotel.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vqchq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2m3j94fjg)
Gates divorce: how will it impact the couple's foundation?

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation spends billions worldwide on vaccines, poverty reduction and female empowerment.

G7 nation leaders meet today to agree an ambitious new target of sending 40 million more girls from poorer countries to school within five years.

And why a vivid blooming of a protected and isolated coral reef in the Indian Ocean is very bad news.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vqh7v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2m3j94k8l)
G7 leaders meet face-to-face (not on Zoom)

In one of the first in-person, high-level meetings since the pandemic started, foreign ministers will discuss the situation in Myanmar and relations with Russia, China and Iran.

Bill and Melinda Gates announce they are ending their marriage of 27 years - a partnership that defined modern philanthropy. So what will this mean for their Foundation?

And with Covid cases in India officially passing 20 million - we'll look at what all this is doing for Narendra Modi's political future.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vqlzz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkr)
The forest sound detectives

Scientists are checking up on the health of forests by analysing the sounds in them. They test their vital signs by measuring the croaks, tweets and hums of resident creatures. If they can hear a full range of animals they can be confident an ecosystem is doing well. However, if gaps start to appear, it’s a sign something is up.

Nick Holland hears more about how it works and how it’s being used to strike a balance between the needs of Papua New Guinea’s growing indigenous communities and the need to preserve the biodiversity of the forests they live off.

Produced and presented by Nick Holland
Image: The Nature Conservancy


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gdz8c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jfn)
Will Covid decimate India's middle class?

Millions of Indians risk being knocked back into poverty by the current explosion in coronavirus infections.

Rahul Tandon hears from Radhika, who abruptly lost her job in Mumbai when India went into lockdown last year, and has since struggled with thoughts of suicide. Newspaper columnist Sandip Roy discusses how Covid threatens to strip many self-identifying middle class of their sense of comfort and security. Meanwhile, many women who run their own businesses face ruin, according Renu Shah, who runs Shakti - an organisation that helps women entrepreneurs.

We also hear opposing views on how big a setback the middle class faces from Covid from two leading Indian economists - Pravin Krishna of John Hopkins University, and Jayati Ghosh of Jawaharlal Nehru University.

(Picture: A Covid-19 patient in Gurudwara, India; Credit: Naveen Sharma/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x57)
The IRA hunger strikes

In 1981 the British government was faced with prisoners dying on hunger strike in a jail in Northern Ireland. The Irish republican activists were demanding to be treated as political prisoners not criminals. Several of them died during the hunger strike, the first, Bobby Sands on May 5th 1981. Louise Hidalgo spoke to Laurence McKeown who took part in the protest but survived.

(Photo: Protestors wearing balaclavas in support of the hunger strike. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vqqr3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fzr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gf30h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2fns)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vqvh7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rst)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vqz7c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyztl6m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gfbhr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vr2zh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw6)
Hunting for my past in a Hong Kong stairwell

In 1960, Claire Martin was abandoned in a Hong Kong stairwell at just two days old. Like many babies at the time she was taken to the UK for adoption, but growing up, she became more and more determined to find her biological relatives. After years of searching, she's finally found family in a very surprising place.

After taking a break from Lucha Libre wrestling, Paola Medina decided to start cliff-diving in Acapulco, Mexico. Now, she transforms her wrestling moves into aerial shapes as she leaps from dizzying heights into the ocean. But it can be a dangerous activity, as she told Clayton Conn in 2019.

In 1965, 20-year-old Brian Robson left Wales for a new life in Australia. But he soon realised he'd made a mistake and was overcome with homesickness. He devised a risky plan to get home - at no cost - by hiding inside an air-freighted crate. But, as Brian told Matthew Bannister in 2015, his plan went drastically wrong and he almost died. Since then Brian has written a book about his experience called The Crate Escape and he's managed to track down one of the friends who helped nail him into the crate for his infamous journey.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Claire Martin
Credit: Claire Martin


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x57)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vr6qm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyzttpw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gfl00)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2fns)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vrbgr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv52fq379sc)
Many die in Mexico metro accident

The mayor of Mexico City has promised a full investigation into the collapse of a railway overpass; at least 23 people died when carriages plunged into the street below.

Also in the programme: we speak to the US's top infectious diseases expert, Anthony Fauci, about the Covid pandemic in India and the US; and why is New Zealand selling off a stake in the All Blacks rugby team to an American private equity firm?

(Picture: The site where a metro overpass partially collapsed with train carriages on it. Credit: Reuters/Henry Romero)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vrg6w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gfth8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bch6mclml)
Pandora stops selling mined diamonds

The world's biggest jeweller, Pandora, is switching from mined diamonds to lab-made. The firm's chief executive, Alexander Lacik, tells us what's behind the move. And we get reaction from David Kellie, chief executive of the Natural Diamond Council. Also in the programme, trade and investment deals worth $1.3bn have been announced between the UK and India. The BBC's Devina Gupta brings us the details, and we get analysis from Lord Karan Bilimoria, who is president of the Confederation of British Industry. Plus, as coronavirus lockdowns ease, we examine the changes in consumer behaviour that may be here to stay. Nick Fowler, founder of wholesale food supplier Smith and Brock, explains how he adapted the business to sell produce direct to customers. Itamar Srulovich is co-founder of London's Honey & Co restaurant, which started shipping meal kits across the UK when the business was forced to close, and tells us whether he expects the new trade to continue. And we get analysis of changes to the wider grocery sector from Daniel Laeubli of consultancy McKinsey's retail and consumer packaged goods division.

(Picture: A Pandora store. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vrkz0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxgylz6kxg)
Bill and Melinda Gates to divorce

Bill and Melinda Gates have announced their divorce after 27 years of marriage, saying "we no longer believe we can grow together as a couple". We hear from couples who have divorced after a similar length of time.

We continue to cover the Covid crisis in India and get reaction from cricket fans to the news that the Indian Premier League has been suspended after more players tested positive for Covid-19. And as ever, we're answering your questions about the pandemic, today with Dr Isaac Bogoch from the University of Toronto.

We also get the latest on the collapse of a metro overpass in Mexico City. At least 23 people have been killed and dozens others were injured.

(Photo: Bill and Melinda Gates Credit: Rick Wilking/File Photo/Reuters)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vrpq4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxgylz6pnl)
Cricket fans react as IPL 2021 is suspended

The Indian Premier League, which is run by the Board of Control for Cricket in India - the BCCI - has been suspended after an increase in coronavirus cases among players. The IPL is the richest franchise tournament in world cricket - with top players from all across the world taking part. We've been hearing from fans reacting to the news.

Bill and Melinda Gates have announced their divorce after 27 years of marriage, saying "we no longer believe we can grow together as a couple". We hear from couples who have divorced after a similar length of time.

We also get the latest on the collapse of a metro overpass in Mexico City.

(Photo: The main entrance of the Narendra Modi Stadium, following IPL's decision to suspend the tournament due to surge in coronavirus case. Credit: Sam Panthaky/AFP/Getty Images)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vrtg8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x57)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vry6d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyzvk5n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gg9gs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n8xvtvt0r)
2021/05/04 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vs1yj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fzr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0ggf6x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lry)
Tech does not impact teenage mental health

There is little association between tech use and mental health problems in teenagers, according to a new study by the Oxford Internet Institute. Lead author Dr Matti Vuorre explains how they analysed data from 430,000 UK and US teenagers and found little or no associations between adolescents’ tech use and mental health problems. But he says the data they were using is limited. Ideally, he wants to use the data that big tech companies hold on our tech use. The findings are published in the journal Clinical Psychological Science.

Africa Teen Geeks and Africa Tech Week
Founder and CEO of Africa Teen Geeks, Lindiwe Matlali, discusses her work in technology education and improving access for African children. During the pandemic she set up online schooling for South Africa, reaching over 600,000 children, and is working with Unicef to improve access to coding and robotics education across the continent. She also runs the ‘Knit2Code’ scheme that teaches women python coding through knitting, empowering mothers and grandmothers to support their daughters’ technology education.

AI colourisation of historical photos
Gwen Katz, a historical novelist and games designer, explains the problems of colourising historical photos. To test the efficacy of colourisation AI she compared the artificial colourisation of black and white photos with their colour originals and found that the bright colours of the original images were lost when colourised by an algorithm. Marta Mrak from BBC R&D discusses how the problem of loss of colours is being solved, by providing the algorithms with reference images, as well as future challenges for designing neural networks to colourise film.

Presenter: Gareth Mitchell
With expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington

Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Photo: Two girls wearing face masks looking at their phone. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vs5pn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv52fq38508)
Mexico City metro: Fears structural failure behind deadly crash

Mexican authorities have promised a full investigation into the collapse of a metro overpass in Mexico City, as questions mount over the line's safety.

Also in the programme: one of the world's top sports tournaments has been cancelled by Covid. And why the protests in Colombia are unlike anything the country has seen for years.

(Photo: The overpass collapsed as a train was travelling over it. Credit: AFP)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vs9fs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0ggnq5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vsf5x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywm27d5qqw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sd4hv9scj)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0ggsg9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48qlrf0yr1)
Pandora stops selling mined diamonds

The world's biggest jeweller, Pandora, is switching from mined diamonds to lab-made. The firm's chief executive, Alexander Lacik, tells us what's behind the move. In what to many seems to be a vacuum at the heart of the government response to the coronavirus crisis in India, charities have stepped in to fill the gap. In the capital Delhi, members of the Shahi Bagh Wali mosque have been distributing oxygen cylinders to patients in urgent need. We hear from Pavinda Nanda of the United Sikhs a charity affiliated to the United Nations. Also in the programme, trade and investment deals worth $1.3bn have been announced between the UK and India. The BBC's Devina Gupta brings us the details, and we get analysis from Lord Karan Bilimoria, who is president of the Confederation of British Industry. Plus, as coronavirus lockdowns ease, we examine the changes in consumer behaviour that may be here to stay. Nick Fowler, founder of wholesale food supplier Smith and Brock, explains how he adapted the business to sell produce direct to customers. Itamar Srulovich is co-founder of London's Honey & Co restaurant, which started shipping meal kits across the UK when the business was forced to close, and tells us whether he expects the new trade to continue. And we get analysis of changes to the wider grocery sector from Daniel Laeubli of consultancy McKinsey's retail and consumer packaged goods division.

(Picture: A Pandora store. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 05 MAY 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vsnp5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq9r0rq0zw)
India's coronavirus battle intensifies

In what to many seems to be a vacuum at the heart of the government response to the crisis charities have stepped in to fill the gap. In the capital Delhi, members of the Shahi Bagh Wali mosque have been distributing oxygen cylinders to patients in urgent need. We hear from Pavinda Nanda of the United Sikhs a charity affiliated to the United Nations. Meanwhile, trade and investment deals worth $1.3bn have been announced between the UK and India; we get analysis from Lord Karan Bilimoria, who is president of the Confederation of British Industry. Janet Yellen the US Treasury Secretary has been talking about inflation, suggesting that it would rise and that interest rates might have to go up too; we talk to Nobel prize-winning economist Professor Joseph Stiglitz from Columbia University. And the world's biggest jeweller, Pandora, is switching from mined diamonds to lab-made. The firm's chief executive, Alexander Lacik, tells us what's behind the move. Plus, as coronavirus lockdowns ease, the BBC's Victoria Craig examines the changes in consumer behaviour that may be here to stay. And we're joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the world; Jeanette Rodrigues Bureau Chief for Bloomberg in Mumbai, India and political commentator Erin Delmore in New York. (Picture of a woman receiving her Covid-19 vaccine in New Delhi, India. Photo by Rebecca Conway via Getty Images).


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vssf9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyzwddk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gh4pp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2d2k)
Gambling: A Sure Bet?

Gambling: A sure bet? USA

Native American Tribes have flipped their fortunes by building casinos on their land, but that is under threat from the new players in the market - the online sports betting companies. Dr Heather Wardle meets Greg Sarris, Chairman of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria in Northern California, who shows her why his tribe’s casino is a lifeline to the local community, and how online betting on smartphones is the new threat to his tribe’s survival.

(Photo: USA Graton Casino, owned by the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vsx5f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x57)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vt0xk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyzwmwt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0ghd5y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8h)
Goal 15: Life on land

In 2015 the United Nations announced a radical plan to change the world.

Global leaders drew up a list of 17 "sustainable development goals" to create a blueprint for a better future. The goals cover things like gender equality, health provision, a good education and much more. We've asked 17-year-olds from 17 different countries tell us what they think needs to change if the world is to meet those goals by 2030.

“We're not going to be able to feed future generations if we don't fix this problem” says the chief scientist at the UN Convention to Combat Desertification, Barron Orr. He says cutting down trees and planting the wrong crops in the wrong place, mean it’s becoming harder and harder to grow food. In Morocco’s dry regions, climate change has compounded the problem. Seventeen-year-old Afrae Boutoub hears how life is getting harder for her family living on the edge of the desert in Errachidia and meets the people who are fighting for the survival of Morocco’s oases.

Presenter: Sana Safi
Producer: Phoebe Keane

Project 17 is produced in partnership with The Open University.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vt4np)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2m3j976pf)
The killer of George Floyd asks for a new trial

The lawyers for Derek Chauvin, the white former Minneapolis police officer, have asked for a new trial - while he is in jail awaiting sentencing for the murder of George Floyd. We go live to Minnesota.

The G7 foreign ministers of rich countries are going to talk about global vaccine distribution. We speak to a campaigner for vaccine equality who's organised a concert.

And we look back at Napoleon's legacy, 200 years since his death.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vt8dt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2m3j97bfk)
US: Derek Chauvin calls for a new trial

The legal team for Derek Chauvin, who was found guilty of the murder of George Floyd last month, argue that the process was not impartial because of pre-trial publicity. We ask Jonathan Turley, Professor of Public Interest Law at George Washington University in Washington DC for his assessment.

As G7 leaders discuss their response to the pandemic former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown urges them to do more to give up their vaccine stockpiles to poorer nations.

And Tanzania's new president heads to Nairobi, a visit seen as a sign of warming relations between the two East African neighbours. We're live in the Kenyan capital.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vtd4y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2m3j97g5p)
G7 meeting urged to share Covid-19 vaccines fairly

There are calls on the G7 ministers meeting in the UK to share Covid-19 vaccines more fairly around the world. Critics say just one percent of all doses administered has so far gone to low-income countries.

The lawyers of former US policeman Derek Chauvin, convicted of the murder of George Floyd, are seeking a new trial citing misbehaviour on the part of prosecutors and a juror.

And Uganda has just passed a law criminalising human sacrifice. We speak to someone who pushed for this to happen and has dealt with cases involving the killing of children.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vthx2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb4)
Mohamedou Ould Slahi: What is the Guantanamo legacy?

Stephen Sackur interviews Mohamedou Ould Slahi, a Mauritanian citizen who was once identified as a high value al-Qaeda terrorist, serving 14 years in America’s Guantanamo Bay prison. He was eventually released without charge, and now a film, The Mauritanian, has been released telling this remarkable story. What is the Guantanamo Bay legacy?

(Photo: Mohamedou Ould Slahi appears via videolink on Hardtalk)


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0ghw5g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnf)
Electric vehicles hit the big time

The car industry is preparing to go fully electric sooner than you might imagine - and not just because of the climate crisis.

Justin Rowlatt speaks to Bjorn Annwall, head of Volvo Cars in Europe, about why his company is one of a string of major carmakers to rush out plans in recent months to electrify their business. They intend to stop selling internal combustion engine cars as soon as 2030. What's driving it is the rapid improvement and collapsing cost of the batteries at their heart, according to Madeline Tyson of the clean energy technology research group RMI.

But how willing will people be to give up the glamour and roar of their engines for the silent speed of electric vehicles? Norway-based researcher Schalk Cloete fears that despite the technical advances, their limited range remains a deal-killer for many families. But EV fanatic and former Top Gear presenter Quentin Willson says give people a couple of days' test drive and they will soon be won over.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Electric car logo; Credit: Lya Cattel/Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7h)
Ursula Le Guin

The American writer, Ursula Le Guin, was one of the most influential authors of the second half of the 20th century, publishing 20 novels in genres from science fiction to young adult. Le Guin pioneered feminist science fiction with The Left Hand of Darkness and created the enduringly popular Earthsea series of fantasy novels. She died in 2018. Simon Watts introduces the memories of Ursula Le Guin, as recorded in the BBC archives.

PHOTO: Ursula Le Guin in the 1980s (BBC/Marion Wood Kolisch)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vtmn6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2d2k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0ghzxl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lry)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vtrdb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vtw4g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyzxh3q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gj7dv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vtzwl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyg)
The surfer who fought apartheid to become a world champion

Cass Collier grew up surfing with his dad in apartheid South Africa, where signs designated the beaches as "whites-only", "blacks-only", or "coloureds-only" areas. The rules were enforced, often brutally, not only by the police but also by white surfers who would tell the Collier family to "go to your own beach" if they tried to surf in areas reserved for white people. But Cass's dad Ahmed, a pioneering South African surfer and member of the ANC, never backed down, teaching Cass that he had a right to be on the sand and in the water at any beach he chose. Cass eventually became a world-class surfer and went on to win the International Surfing Association Big Wave championships in Mexico in 1999, alongside his friend and fellow Rastafarian Ian Armstrong. He tells Anu Anand about the joy of big waves, and remembers the heartbreak and sacrifices he and his family faced en route to the world title.

Marwa al-Sabouni is an architect from Homs in Syria. When the war began, she was running an architectural practice with her husband. But as mortar shells and bombs devastated the very buildings around them – and even their own studio –  it became impossible to keep working. She bunkered down in her home with her family, not even seeing the moon for two years. Now, 10 years after the conflict, more than 60% of Homs has been destroyed. Marwa and her husband have reopened their practice and want their work to feature the most inclusive ways to rebuild Syria. Marwa’s written a book called Building for Hope: Towards an Architecture of Belonging.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Cass Collier surfs at Hout Bay, Cape Town, South Africa in June 2002
Credit: Grant Ellis/Getty Images


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vv3mq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyzxqlz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gjgx3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lry)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vv7cv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv52fq3b6pg)
G7 discusses fairer access to vaccines

The G7 meeting of foreign ministers looks at new ways to ensure fairer access to vaccine stockpiles and increase support for the global vaccine distribution scheme, Covax. Meanwhile, India's delegation at the meeting in London is self-isolating after two members tested positive for coronavirus.

Also in the programme: opponents of Myanmar's military government say they are forming an armed force to protect their supporters and eventually replace the army; and the Facebook Oversight Board upholds ban on former President Trump's Facebook account.

(Picture: British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab (L) and German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas at the G7 meeting. Credit: EPA/Andy Rain)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vvc3z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gjqdc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cln9jhg5m)
European Union updates industrial strategy

The European Union has revealed an updated industrial strategy for a post-pandemic world. The BBC's Andrew Walker talks us through the plan, which aims to cut dependency on Chinese supply chains in areas like semiconductors and pharmaceuticals. The EU also wants to become a leader in electric vehicle batteries, and Diego Pavia, chief executive of Innoenergy, which coordinates the European Battery Alliance, assesses that goal. And we examine the possible environmental impact of the new approach with Doreen Fedrigo of the Climate Action Network Europe. Also in the programme, college sports in the United States are a big business, but the athletes taking part have typically been compensated through scholarships rather than salaries. But there's now a drive across the country to pass laws enabling college sports stars to earn money through sponsorship, or name, image and likeness deals. Courtney Altemus is CEO of Team Altemus, a Philadelphia based firm who advise professional and college athletes around financial literacy. Hayley Hodson is a former Stanford University volleyball star who was part of the push for a name, image and likeness law that has now been passed in California. And Iowa state senator Brad Zaun tells us why there is now a race on to pass such laws in states across the US. Plus, the Swedish furniture retailer Ikea has launched a scheme in the UK to buy unwanted furniture back from its customers, in a bid to save items from going to landfill. Hege Saebjornsen is the company's sustainability manager for the UK and Ireland explains how it works.

(Picture: A Volkswagen electric car assembly line. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vvgw3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxgylz9gtk)
Donald Trump's Facebook ban upheld

Donald Trump's ban from Facebook and Instagram has been upheld by Facebook's Oversight Board. The former president was banned from both sites in January following the Capitol Hill riots. We'll explain more about the decision and what it means.

Also, we continue to bring together people from across the world to hear how they have been affected by the coronavirus pandemic. Today we hear from pharmacists in hospitals in India. They'll share their experiences of working on the frontline during this current wave of Covid.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to answer your questions about coronavirus. Today our guest is Dr Maria Sundaram, infectious disease epidemiologist at ICES Ontario in Toronto.

(Photo: Donald Trump in the White House 12/03/20. Credit: Niall Carson/PA Wire)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vvlm7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxgylz9lkp)
What's behind the protests in Colombia?

We go to Colombia, where widespread protests are running for a second week. The demonstrations started over tax reform that the government said was key to mitigating the country's economic crisis. At least 19 people have died since the protests started, and the UN has urged the security forces to refrain from using firearms.

Also, Donald Trump's ban from Facebook and Instagram has been upheld by Facebook's Oversight Board. The former president was banned from both sites in January following the Capitol Hill riots. We'll explain more about the decision and what it means.

And we connect to hospital pharmacists in India as cases of Covid-19 continue to surge in the country, to find out how their work has been impacted by the pandemic.

(Photo: Demonstrators participate in a protest against poverty and police violence, in Bogota, Colombia. Credit: Reuters/Nathalia Angarita)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vvqcc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vvv3h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyzyg2r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gk6cw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n8xvtypxv)
2021/05/05 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vvyvm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2d2k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gkb40)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv5)
Tanzania's new Covid prevention measures

As Tanzania announces new Covid prevention measures after the new president instigates a change in response to the pandemic, correspondent Rhoda Odhiambo discusses the implications for the country. And celebrating the Windrush generation in theatre - nurses who came to the UK from the Caribbean to work in the NHS share their memories in a new play. Plus Claudia talks to Mohsen Rajabi about his new research surveying Mental Health in Iran - both parents and children - after 16 months of school closures and hears from 18 year old Parnia Abharian about her first hand experience. And the science of a baby's first poo!

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: People come to wash their hands with chlorinated water in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania in March 2020. Photo credit: Ericky Boniphace/AFP/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vw2lr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv52fq3c1xc)
Facebook's Trump ban upheld by Oversight Board

Facebook's oversight board has upheld the company's decision to suspend Donald Trump's account following posts he made during the attack on the US Congress by his supporters in January.

Also in the programme: President Emmanuel Macron has laid a wreath at the tomb of Napoleon, to mark the two- hundred years since his death. And Anuna de Wever is a 19 year old Belgian activist but already a veteran of inspiring international protests.


(Photo: Donald Trump. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vw6bw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gkkm8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vwb30)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywm27d8mmz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sd4hvdp8m)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gkpcd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48qlrf3vn4)
Biden administration backs lifting vaccine patent protections

The US government has backed a temporary suspension of intellectual property rights for Covid-19 vaccines in a move likely to enrage the pharmaceutical industry, which strongly opposes a so-called waiver. Shares of the major coronavirus vaccine companies were hit by the announcement but is it just an empty gesture? We speak to Jorge Contreras, Chair of the Open Covid Pledge, a group that is lobbying organisations to share their patents and copyrights in relation to vaccine efforts. And there's no status update for Donald Trump anytime soon; Facebook decides to uphold it's ban of the former US president. But is it up to big tech to decide who's on their platforms? We speak to Issie Lapowsky, Senior Reporter at tech site Protocol. Also in the programme, college sports in the United States are a big business, but the athletes taking part have typically been compensated through scholarships rather than salaries. But there's now a drive across the country to pass laws enabling college sports stars to earn money through sponsorship, or name, image and likeness deals. Courtney Altemus is a financial advisor who discusses how college sports worked til recently. Hayley Hodson is a former volleyball star who was part of the push for a name, image and likeness law that has now been passed in California. And Iowa state senator Brad Zaun tells us why there is now a race on to pass such laws in states across the US. Plus, the Swedish furniture retailer Ikea has launched a scheme in the UK to buy unwanted furniture back from its customers, in a bid to save items from going to landfill. Hege Saebjornsen is the company's sustainability manager for the UK and Ireland explains how it works. (Picture: coronavirus vaccine. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 06 MAY 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vwkl8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq9r0rsxwz)
Biden administration backs lifting vaccine patent protections

The US government has backed a temporary suspension of intellectual property rights for Covid-19 vaccines in a move likely to enrage the pharmaceutical industry, which strongly opposes a so-called waiver. Shares of the major coronavirus vaccine companies were hit by the announcement but is it just an empty gesture? We speak to Jorge Contreras, Chair of the Open Covid Pledge, a group that is lobbying organisations to share their patents and copyrights in relation to vaccine efforts. We also hear from Thomas Cueni, of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers & Associations. And there's no status update for Donald Trump anytime soon; Facebook decides to uphold it's ban of the former US president. We speak to Issie Lapowsky, Senior Reporter at tech site Protocol. Also in the programme, college sports in the United States are a big business, but the athletes taking part have typically been compensated through scholarships rather than salaries. But could that change? The BBC's Will Bain reports. Plus, the Swedish furniture retailer Ikea has launched a scheme in the UK to buy unwanted furniture back from its customers, in a bid to save items from going to landfill. Hege Saebjornsen is the company's sustainability manager for the UK and Ireland explains how it works. And we're joined throughout the programme by Tony Nash, chief economist at Complete Intelligence in Texas and the writer, Rachel Cartland in Hong Kong.

(Picture: coronavirus vaccine. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vwpbd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyzz99n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gl1ls)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gx7)
Myanmar: The spring revolution

More than 750 people have been killed by the Myanmar military since they seized power in a coup three months ago. Mass protests demanding a return to democracy and the release of elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi have been met with brutal force. Borders are closed and the internet effectively blocked. This is a story the military does not want the world to hear. But people are bravely documenting their resistance. We follow three young activists now in a fight for their future. As their options close…Can they win back democracy?

Produced and presented by Rebecca Henschke with Kelvin Brown
Reporting team: Banyol Kong Janoi, Phyu Zin Poe and Zarchi

(Image: Bhone at a pro-democracy demonstration in Myanmar. Credit: BBC)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vwt2j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vwxtn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhyzzjsx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gl931)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfk)
The blind cooks

Three people who lost their vision as adults tell Emily Thomas how they learnt to cook again, becoming so accomplished in the kitchen that they became restaurateurs, cookbook writers, food podcast makers and Masterchef winners. They explain how their relationships with food have changed, and why cooking with just four senses can make you a better chef.

(Picture: Payal Kapoor, Simon Mahoney, Christine Hà. Credit: BBC/Julie Soefer Photography)

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Contributors:

Christine Hà, chef, writer and owner of ‘The Blind Goat’ restaurant
Payal Kapoor, host of ‘Rasoi ke Rahasya’ YouTube channel
Simon Mahoney, author ‘First Catch Your Rabbit!: Or Cooking Without Fear’


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vx1ks)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2m3j9b3lj)
US supports waiving intellectual property protections for Covid vaccines

The US has made a surprise announcement: it wants to waive intellectual property protections for coronavirus vaccines. So could the jabs be made all around the world? We take you through the medical and political implications.

We go to a country desperate for vaccines right now - Nepal. The Prime minister says they need them to help ward off a collapse of the health system

And we hear about the release of twenty-seven Nigerian students who had been abducted in March.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vx59x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2m3j9b7bn)
Reactions to the US backing the waving of Covid vaccines intellectual property rights

The US has lent its support to a call by India and South Africa, among others, to waive intellectual property protections for coronavirus vaccines. The move could mean more production and better access for less wealthy countries. We get a reaction from India.

We have an interview with the US Secretary of State Anthony Blinken discussing what is driving US foreign policy.

And we take a look at the rampant insecurity in Nigeria. It's in all corners of the country and the President Buhari as commander in chief is accused of having lost control.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vx921)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2m3j9bc2s)
What effect could the US support of waiver on Covid vaccine patents have?

Many poorer countries around the world are struggling to get Covid vaccines. So the news that US President Joe Biden says they should be able to make their own copies free of charge, as the US now supports a waiver to intellectual property protections for coronavirus vaccines, will come as a huge relief. We get the reaction of the President of the Public Health Foundation of India.

As the withdrawal of international troops from Afghanistan approaches, one of the concerns is the situation of women in a country where, as we hear, poverty and access to health care still dominate their lives.

And relief in Nigeria as 27 students abducted in Kaduna state walk free - but how did their release come about?


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vxdt5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1w)
Is peace under threat in Northern Ireland?

It was on Good Friday, 2nd of April 2021, that rioting erupted in a corner of Northern Ireland’s vibrant capital Belfast. In days, violence spread. It was on a scale that hadn’t been seen for years. With fears of a return to the troubled period of violence from Northern Ireland’s past, Tanya Beckett asks if the fragile peace is under threat.

Produced by Beth Sagar-Fenton and Soila Apparicio.

'A previous version of this programme gave an incorrect title to Northern Ireland’s First Minister Arlene Foster this has been corrected.'


(Nationalists attack police on Springfield Road in Belfast, Northern Ireland, April 08 2021. Photo: Charles McQuillan/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gls2k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j94)
Life after Jack Ma

What next for China's giant tech companies? Ed Butler speaks to China watcher Richard McGregor at the Lowy Institute in Sydney about why China's leaders have clipped the wings of Jack Ma, the country's most famous business leader and founder of the tech giant Alibaba. Chinese tech sector analyst Rui Ma argues that closer regulation of China's giant tech companies will be good for competition, while Rebecca Fannin, author of Tech Titans of China, worries about the impact on innovation. Eswar Prasad, economics and trade policy professor at Cornell University in the US, outlines the challenge China faces in balancing its desire for control over its tech entrepreneurs with its need for innovation and growth.

(Photo: Jack Ma pictured in Paris in 2019, Credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2z)
The Great Wine Fraud

In the early 2000s, Rudy Kurniawan was a newcomer to the hedonistic world of wine auctions in the US. He quickly became well-known for his warm and friendly manner and his profligate spending on wines. But where was all his money coming from?

Josephine Casserly tells the story of one of the most high profile cases of wine fraud and speaks to Laurent Ponsot, French winemaker, turned Sherlock Holmes.


(Corks, foil capsules and wine labels used as evidence in the trial. Photo: Stan Honda/Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vxjk9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gx7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0glwtp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vxn9f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rl2)
Tadeusz Kosciuszko, groundbreaking fort builder

The American president Thomas Jefferson called Tadeusz Kosciuszko ‘as pure a son of liberty as I have ever known’. Kosciuszko was born in what is today Belarus, trained as an engineer in Poland and France and went on to become one of the important military players in the American War of Independence. This was when he wasn’t pursuing his dream of a free Polish republic against the might of a conservative aristocracy and neighbouring Russian and Prussian armies. Or campaigning against slavery and feudalism. Testimonials like that of Jefferson’s lauding his humility, energy and high moral principles flowed from around the world. He was toasted as a celebrity in London by the likes of Keats and Coleridge. In the USA and Europe there are bridges, statues and monuments in his name. And yet today Kosciuszko is relatively unknown outside of Poland.

Rajan Datar aims to change that with the aid of three Kosciuszko experts: Dr. Betsey Blakeslee, President of the Friends of the American Revolution at West Point, an organisation that works to preserve the fortifications Kosciuszko designed and built at West Point. She earned her PhD in American Studies at the University of Maryland; Kamil Ruszala, Assistant Professor of History at Jagiellonian University in Kraków whose research focuses on the modern history of Central Europe; and writer and Pulitzer-prize-winning journalist Alex Storozynski, Chairman of the Board of the Kosciuszko Foundation and author of Kosciuszko's biographies both in a book and film form.

[Image: A portrait of Tadeusz Kosciuszko. Credit: Bettmann / Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l83)
Indonesia's badminton heroine

In 1992, badminton legend Susi Susanti won the first ever Olympic Gold medal for Indonesia. It was the first time that badminton had been included as an Olympic sport in the games, giving them a special significance for Susi's badminton-obsessed home country. For Susi, it was also a moment when she could show her national pride as an Indonesian who hailed from the nation's ethnic Chinese minority. She talks to Jill Achineku. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: Susi Susanti in action (AFP/Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vxs1k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhz00d0t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gm49y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vxwsp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2z)
How I sang for my freedom

When Kurdish folk singer Nawroz Oramari was a teenager growing up in Saddam Hussein's Iraq, he was told he'd be executed if he was caught singing - he and his father even had to sign a pledge saying that they accepted the death penalty if they did so. Nawroz tells Anu Anand about his remarkable life - joining the Kurdish resistance, ending up in prison and even taking on multiple identities - including that of an Emirati Oil Tycoon - in his quest to be able to sing freely in his native language.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Picture: Nawroz Oramari in London
Credit: Courtesy of Nawroz Oramari


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vy0jt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhz00mj2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gmct6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vy48y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv52fq3f3lk)
Blinken urges Russia to end 'reckless actions' towards Ukraine

The US Secretary of State has urged Russia to end what he called its reckless and aggressive actions towards Ukraine. Antony Blinken was speaking after talks in Kyiv with the Ukrainian president. In an interview with the BBC, Mr Blinken said the Biden administration "would prefer a more stable and predictable relationship".

Also in the programme: The EU says it is prepared to discuss waiving patent protection on coronavirus vaccines, after Washington backed the move; and how will Afghan women's health be affected by a lack of donor funding?

(Image: US Secretary of State Antony Blinken speaks to the media during a meeting with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy. Credit: Efrem Lukatsky/Pool via REUTERS)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vy812)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gmm9g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y494b3qjfsv)
World reacts to US stance on vaccine patents

The EU has responded to the US favouring a waiver of coronavirus vaccine patents. European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen says the bloc is prepared to discuss how a suspension could work. We get reaction to the development from Thomas Cueni, director general of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations. And we get further analysis from Dr Ayoade Alakija, co-chair of the AU Africa Vaccine Delivery Alliance for Covid-19. Also in the programme, almost all of the UK's 50 biggest employers questioned by the BBC have said they do not plan to bring staff back to the office full time. We discuss the implications with the BBC's business editor, Simon Jack. Plus, two Royal Navy ships and two French vessels are patrolling near Jersey as a protest by French fishing boats escalates over their post-Brexit fishing rights. Freddie Miller of BBC Jersey explains the background to the dispute.

(Picture: Coronavirus vaccine vials. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vycs6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxgylzdcqn)
India Covid crisis: Is aid reaching those in need?

We report on the latest in India, as countries around the world have begun sending emergency medical supplies to help stem the Covid-19 surge there. However there are concerns about delays in supplying the aid to those most in need. We speak to a woman who has spent the last week trying to find oxygen for her sick husband. It’s one story among many in India’s second wave of coronavirus. We’ll also explain why oxygen is important in treating Covid patients and the different methods of administering it to those who need it.

Also we continue to bring together people facing the coronavirus pandemic with shared experiences. We hear the story of three anaesthetists in different parts of the world.

And we’ll explain how temporarily removing patent restrictions on Covid vaccines could help global supply. The United States is now backing a proposal from India and South Africa.

(Photo: A healthcare worker gives a dose of Covishield vaccine in New Delhi, India, May 4, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Adnan Abidi)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vyhjb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxgylzdhgs)
Coronavirus conversations: Anaesthetists

We continue to bring together people facing the coronavirus pandemic with shared experiences. We hear the story of three anaesthetists in different parts of the world.

Also we report on the latest in India, as countries around the world have begun sending emergency medical supplies to help stem the Covid-19 surge there. However there are concerns about delays in supplying the aid to those most in need. We speak to a woman who has spent the last week trying to find oxygen for her sick husband. It’s one story among many in India’s second wave of coronavirus.

And we’ll explain how temporarily removing patent restrictions on Covid vaccines could help global supply. The United States is now backing a proposal from India and South Africa.

(Photo: Anaesthetist anaesthetising a patient prior to surgery. Credit: Jim Varney/Science Photo Library)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vym8g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vyr0l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhz01bzv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gn38z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n8xvv1lty)
2021/05/06 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vyvrq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gx7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gn713)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3l)
Africa’s oldest burial

Analysis of the 78,0000-year-old fossil of a Kenyan boy reveals he was likely buried with care and attention, the body wrapped and laid to rest supported on a pillow. Maria Martinon-Torres, of the National Research Centre on Human Evolution in Burgos, Spain, and a team from Kenya and Germany used techniques from paleontology and forensic science to reveal his story from the fragile remains.

A promising malaria vaccine is to enter trials which could lead to it being used globally to vaccinate children. Merheen Datoo, Oxford University’s Jenner Institute, explains malaria vaccines have been in development for 100 years. Research from these helped covid vaccine development and the success of covid vaccines may now help to speed up the rollout of malaria vaccines.

Covid vaccines may also help to treat those who have symptoms of long covid – a range of immune system issues that develop sometimes months after the initial infection. Yale University immunologist Akiko Kawasaki is embarking on a research project to assess the impact. If you’d like to take part, have yet to be vaccinated, and live in Connecticut in the US, email covidrecovery@yale.edu.

And in India scientists are calling on the government to make all data on Covid more widely available. At present Indian bureaucracy means statistics on infection rates, variants and recovery are not distributed widely. Science journalist TV Padma says greater access to the data could help more scientists come together to work on solutions to India’s Covid crisis.





(Image: An artist’s interpretation of Mtoto’s burial Credit: Fernando Fueyo)



Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vyzhv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv52fq3fytg)
Would waiving patents on Covid19 vaccines work?

The World Trade Organization has urged member states to start negotiations in earnest on proposals to temporarily waive international patent protections for coronavirus vaccines. We hear from its Director-General, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala.

Also on the programme: a police shoot-out in Rio leaves 25 people dead; and the government in Malawi orders thousands of refugees to move back to a single refugee camp, however long they've been in the country.

(Picture: COVID-19 vaccinations at a Sikh Gurudwara in Mississauga, Ontario Credit: Reuters/Carlos Osorio)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vz37z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gngjc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vz703)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywm27dcjk2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sd4hvhl5q)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gnl8h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48qlrf6rk7)
World reacts to US stance on vaccine patents

The EU has responded to the US favouring a waiver of coronavirus vaccine patents. European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen says the bloc is prepared to discuss how a suspension could work. We get reaction to the development from Thomas Cueni, director general of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations. And we get further analysis from Dr Ayoade Alakija, co-chair of the AU Africa Vaccine Delivery Alliance for Covid-19. Also in the programme, almost all of the UK's 50 biggest employers questioned by the BBC have said they do not plan to bring staff back to the office full time. We discuss the implications with the BBC's business editor, Simon Jack. Plus, two Royal Navy ships and two French vessels are patrolling near Jersey as a protest by French fishing boats escalates over their post-Brexit fishing rights. Freddie Miller of BBC Jersey explains the background to the dispute.

(Picture: Coronavirus vaccine vials. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 07 MAY 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vzghc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq9r0rwtt2)
WHO urges members to start vaccine patent negotiations

There is still disagreement between countries over whether to waive Covid vaccine patents, in an attempt to boost production globally. Germany is the latest country to voice its opposition to the proposal. We hear from leaders around the world, and both sides of the argument for waiving patents.
Also in the programme, we speak to Shannon Poulin, corporate vice president at Intel, about how the company is dealing with the current shortage of semi-conductors.
And we hear how delivery drivers in Indonesia are using apps to conceal their real locations in order to secure more business, from Vice reporter Rida Qadri.

Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Alexis Goldstein, activist and financial reform advocate in Washington, and by Simon Littlewood, President of AC Growth Delivered, who's in Singapore.

(Picture: A syringe with vaccine. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vzl7h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhz0266r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gnyhw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tyy)
Kelechi Iheanacho: Faith, goals and more goals

Leicester City's in-form striker Kelechi Iheanacho reflects on a great season, in which he's become one of the Premier League's leading goal scorers. We discuss the UEFA Champions League and Jose Mourinho's return to Italy. Plus, we mark the 50th anniversary of the first ever women's FA Cup final.


Picture: Kelechi Iheanacho of Leicester City celebrates after scoring against Southampton (Shaun Botterill - The FA via Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vzpzm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vztqr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhz02fq0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gp604)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2fnq)
Black Jewish Lives Matter

The death of George Floyd Jr in May 2020 started a wave of unforeseen protests. As these protests consumed the United States, groups of people from various beliefs, backgrounds and origins came out in support of the Black Lives Matter movement, which started in 2014. A year later, under a new US president, the US still faces the same challenges even though police officer Derek Chauvin has been found guilty with murder, many still believe that they are still fighting against institutionalised racism in the US.

Monitoring the news in the US, journalist Amie Liebowitz has repeatedly seen images of groups of Jewish people stand side by side, holding placards and wearing t-shirts that said “Tzedek Tzedek Tirdof” (Deuteronomy 16:20) – a passage from the Torah meaning “Justice, Justice you shall pursue”. This message has been adopted by the Jews for Black Lives Matter movement which has always been associated with the act of social justice. This made her reflect on her own context as a white, Ashkenazi Jew from Australia and what this movement meant for her religious community.

In this episode of Heart and Soul, Amie Liebowitz reconciles with her lack of knowledge about the black Jewish experience and reflects upon the need for further understanding of both privilege and antisemitism. She speaks to four black Jewish community members in the United States who speak frankly about identity dynamics and misconceptions, racism, activism and the support needed to help resolve the issues they face.

Presenter and producer: Amie Liebowitz
Executive Producer: Rajeev Gupta

Audio clip contributions: Hannah Roodman, Jews for Racial and Economic Justice (JFREJ), Nissim Black, Westside Gravy, Drake and CBS

(Picture: April N. Baskin at the Women's March in Washington DC in January 2019 representing Jewish Women of Color / Courtesy of April N. Baskin)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8vzygw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2m3j9f0hm)
Covid: Concern increases over India variant

As infections in India reach 21 million, a Sikh temple in Delhi becomes a free temporary hospital.

At least 25 people are killed in a shoot-out during a police operation against drug dealers in Rio de Janeiro in Brazil,

And we'll hear why it's proving difficult for Kenyan teachers to get the Covid vaccines they were promised.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w0270)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2m3j9f47r)
Covid-19 in India: the rural hospitals struggling to cope

Our reporter visits a rural area in Uttar Pradesh where there's only one hospital to treat people travelling in from kilometres away.

A former female Afghan mayor talks to us about three assassination attempts on her life by the Taliban - but says it’s not stopping her from standing for office.

And Serbia has decided to offer $30 to persuade people to get vaccinated against Covid. Many have been sceptical about coming forward.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w05z4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2m3j9f7zw)
Covid-19: The Sikh temple made into a hospital

A gurdwara in Delhi has set up 250 beds in its hall as people struggle to find treatment.

A lack of oxygen has been a huge problem in India - we hear about an alternative method to produce it.

And two British Royal Navy ships were dispatched to monitor a flotilla of protesting French fishermen... so what's behind this flare up around the island of Jersey?


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w09q8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n13)
Mohammed Alyahya: Does Saudi Arabia still have America's support?

Month by month, US President Joe Biden is shifting away from Trump-era foreign policy positions. But how dramatic will the pivot be? In the Middle East, there are signs of a changed approach to the region's two oil-rich adversaries Saudi Arabia and Iran; more pressure on the Saudis, more engagement with Tehran. Stephen Sackur speaks to the influential boss of Saudi Arabia’s Al Arabiya English news channel, Mohamed Alyahya. Have the Saudis forfeited America’s unstinting support?

(Photo: Mohamed Alyahya appears via video link on Hardtalk)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gpnzn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j03)
Who owns colour?

Scientists, artists and some of the world’s biggest companies are carving up the visual spectrum, and claiming certain colours as their own, so who does have a right to use the colours of the rainbow? We explore the ongoing rift over the worlds “blackest black” Vantablack, which was created by engineering firm Surrey Nanosystems, and can only be used by the artist Anish Kapoor. Contemporary British artist Stuart Semple argues that creativity should not be limited by commercial agreements, while Surrey Nanosystems executive Ben Jensen explains that the material is not suitable for general use. Author Kassia St Clair explores the meaning and history of colour, and we hear how interpretations of colour have changed from Julie Irish, an assistant professor specialising in colour, at the College of Design in Iowa.

Note: Surrey NanoSystems has clarified their material Vantablack isn’t toxic, as described by one speaker in this programme, but can be an irritant.

This programme is a repeat from January 2021.

(Picture of a colour splash via Getty Images).


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyg)
Surviving Guantanamo

After 9/11 the USA began a programme of 'extraordinary rendition', moving prisoners between countries without legal representation. Mohamedou Ould Slahi from Mauritania was one of those detained at the US military facility in Cuba, Guantanamo Bay. He tells Rebecca Kesby how he was tortured by American military personnel, and held for 15 years without charge. He's written a best-selling book about his experiences, 'Guantanamo diary', which has recently been made into a film.

(PHOTO: Mohamedou Ould Slahi, a Guantanamo Bay prisoner who wrote a book about his experiences in the military prison, poses on October 18, 2016 in Nouakchott, after he was reunited with his family in his native Mauritania. (Photo credit STRINGER/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w0fgd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1ngv)
Trump question comes back to Facebook

The platform’s external Oversight Board says Facebook was right to suspend Donald Trump’s account after the January riot in Washington DC, but wrong to do it indefinitely and without enough explanation. It says Facebook itself must now rule on whether to reinstate or ban permanently Mr Trump. Plus, how personalised music playlists might help reduce anxiety and pain in medical patients. And the robots are coming … to solve your crossword puzzles. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with senior BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: President Donald Trump next to a Facebook logo, Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gpsqs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w0k6j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsb)
Germany after Merkel

Angela Merkel is the longest serving leader in the European Union. Known as Mutti, or mother, to her supporters, Merkel is credited with keeping Germany stable in the midst of global and European crises with her steely yet non-confrontational style of leadership. But the German Chancellor is stepping down later this year when the country goes to polls. Voters will then decide whether to choose a successor who'll maintain her style, or back more dramatic change. Support for Mrs Merkel’s CDU has dropped after a series of unpopular lockdowns and a patchy coronavirus vaccine rollout. The Greens, who are promising more climate-friendly policies at home and a pivot towards Nato and the United States abroad, are polling well. And the far right still garners hundreds of thousands of votes. So what does the future hold for Germany after 16 years of Angela Merkel? Will it now enter a period of uncertainty after years of stability? Does it have the right leadership to navigate the uncertainties of a post-Covid economic recovery? And how will it balance the economic and strategic interests of the United States and EU on one side, and Russia and China on the other? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w0nyn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhz038xx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gq171)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tyy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w0sps)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dv)
Women and peace in Afghanistan

The BBC Media Action team in Afghanistan recently went on the road with their programme Open Jirga to hear about women’s hopes and fears for any peace deal between the Afghan government and the Taliban. Presenter Shazia Haya heard from the ambitious young women of Herat’s all-female robotics team, and from women in the Taliban heartland city of Kandahar who risked their lives to have their voices heart.

Baghdad's graffiti artists
A group of graffiti artists in the Iraqi capital Baghdad have been painting murals and portraits in poor, rundown areas of the city. The artworks feature famous people and local folk heroes, as BBC Arabic’s Haddad Salih explains.

Who is the new president of Tanzania?
President Samia Suluhu Hassan took office less than two months ago after the sudden death of her predecessor, John Magufuli. She has already shown a very different style of leadership. Zuhura Yunus of BBC Swahili introduces us to Tanzania's first female president.

Egypt's female folk singers
Folk music in Egypt has traditionally been the domain of men. But an all-female folk group called Tablet El Sitt, 'the woman's drum', is reviving old songs sung by and about women. Aya Hashim of BBC Arabic has been investigating.

A short walk in the Russian woods
Another chance to hear Oleg Boldyrev of BBC Russian enjoying last year's Spring lockdown in the company of fallen trees, fungi, and beaver dams.

Image: 'Open Jirga' presenter Shazia Haya with all female audience in Kandahar
Credit: BBC Media Action


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w0xfx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhz03jf5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gq8q9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w1161)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv52fq3j0hn)
India: Coronavirus infections surge past 21 million

India's Supreme Court has ordered the government to increase oxygen supplies to Delhi and Karnataka, as the crisis rages on. We’ll hear how rickshaws in Delhi are being turned into makeshift ambulances.

Also on the programme: The British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Conservative Party has won a resounding victory in its first electoral test since Brexit; and China says a rocket rocket that is plunging back to Earth is very unlikely to cause any harm.

(Picture: Coronavirus testing in India, Credit: Reuters)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w14y5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n13)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gqj6k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46nzxxkff2)
US adds fewer jobs than expected

The US economy added 266,000 jobs in April, far fewer than economists had predicted. The BBC's Samira Hussain in New York talks us through the latest figures, and we get reaction from Harvard economist Jason Furman, who was also chair of the US Council of Economic Advisers under President Obama. Also in the programme, the BBC's Justin Rowlatt finds out whether electric cars are likely to become dominant more quickly than had previously been expected. Plus, Qatar's finance minister Ali Shareef al-Emadi has been arrested over allegations of misuse of public funds. We get the background from Hussein Ibish of the Arab Gulf States Institute.

(Picture: A 'now hiring' sign in the US. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w18p9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxgylzh8mr)
Coronavirus conversations: Airline pilots

We continue to bring people together facing the coronavirus with shared experiences. Today we hear from two pilots who lost their jobs because of the collapse of the air travel industry during the global pandemic. We hear about the impact it had on them emotionally and how they are adapting.

And we continue to look at how India's devastating outbreak of Covid-19 is affecting its neighbouring countries. Today we hear from Bangladesh, where cases are rising and the nationwide lockdown has been extended until mid May. We speak to our BBC Bengali reporter in Kolkata, the capital of India’s West Bengal state.

And our regular coronavirus expert Dr Megan Murray, professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard University will explain some of the latest stories about the virus. We discuss the myth circulating that vaccinated people can ‘’shed’’ the virus, and the benefits and ethics of governments offering incentives to people to get a Covid jab.

(Photo: Steve Zago Credit: Steve Zago)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w1dff)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxgylzhdcw)
Brazil violence: Allegations of abuse by Rio police

We hear from Brazil, where 25 people were killed in a shootout in Rio de Janeiro during a police raid against suspected drug traffickers. The loss of life in the raid has been criticised by the United Nations human rights office. Our reporter in Sao Paulo has the latest on the story. And we hear from people living in the poorest neighbourhoods of Rio.

We continue to bring people together facing the coronavirus with shared experiences. Today we hear from two pilots who lost their jobs because of the collapse of the air travel industry during the global pandemic. We hear about the impact it had on them emotionally and how they are adapting

And our regular medical expert Professor Marc Mendelson, Head of Infectious Diseases and HIV Medicine at Groote Schuur Hospital, University of Cape Town will explain some of the latest stories about the virus. We discuss the myth circulating that vaccinated people can ‘’shed’’ the virus, and the benefits and ethics of governments offering incentives to people to get a Covid jab.

(Photo: Members of the Police carry out a police operation against a gang of drug traffickers, in the Jacarezinho favela of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 06 May 2021. At least 25 people died, including a police officer. Credit: EPA/Andre Coelho)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w1j5k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w1mxp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfhz047wy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gr062)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n8xvv4hr1)
2021/05/07 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w1rnt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1ngv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0gr3y6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqb)
Why is learning stuff harder as you get older?

Have you taken classes to learn a new sport or musical instrument or a language? It’s hard work! Why is it that as children we effortlessly absorb new skills and we don’t as adults?

That’s what 50-something listener Gary Grief wondered about playing guitar. Do you need to play more frequently as an adult to attain the same level of expertise? Does the 10,000-hours theory still apply?

Presenter and budding tabla-player Anand Jagatia embarks on a musical journey to discover what neuroscience can tell us about muscle memory and learning. Do musicians and sportsmen share the same challenges? By understanding what’s happening in the brain, can we learn how to learn better?

With tabla-teacher Satvinder Sehmbey, neuroscientist Dr Jessica Grahn, viola-player Dr Molly Gebrian and sports scientist Prof Yannis Pitsiladis.

Presented by Anand Jagatia
Produced by Dom Byrne for the BBC World Service

[Image: Adult and Child learning Piano. Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w1wdy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv52fq3jvqk)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w2052)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n13)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0grcfg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tyy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjhw8w23x6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywm27dgfg5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sd4hvlh2t)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbb0grh5l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48qlrf9ngb)
US adds fewer jobs than expected

The US economy added 266,000 jobs in April, far fewer than economists had predicted. The BBC's Samira Hussain in New York talks us through the latest figures, and we get reaction from Harvard economist Jason Furman, who was also chair of the US Council of Economic Advisers under President Obama. Also in the programme, the BBC's Justin Rowlatt finds out whether electric cars are likely to become dominant more quickly than had previously been expected. Plus, Qatar's finance minister Ali Shareef al-Emadi has been arrested over allegations of misuse of public funds. We get the background from Hussein Ibish of the Arab Gulf States Institute.

(Picture: A 'now hiring' sign in the US. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gx7)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d5l)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxgylz3p0c)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j4m)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvq9crg6l3b)

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Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dgm)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pq9)

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Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct2cbp)

Deeply Human 22:06 SUN (w3ct2cbp)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lry)

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Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lry)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2fns)

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Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct2fns)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mtq)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mtq)

Global Questions 09:32 SUN (w3ct2f7l)

Global Questions 01:32 MON (w3ct2f7l)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n5m)

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Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nv5)

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Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nv5)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2d33)

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In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tcw)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tcw)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1tcw)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2djw)

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Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hbr)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hbr)

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Outlook 18:06 WED (w3ct1jyg)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct1k2z)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3ct1k2z)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3ct1k2z)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l19)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l19)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pkr)

People Fixing the World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pkr)

People Fixing the World 22:06 TUE (w3ct1pkr)

Project 17 04:32 WED (w3ct0x8h)

Project 17 11:32 WED (w3ct0x8h)

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Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l3l)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3ct1l3l)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0n8xvtrx3n)

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Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172y0n8xvv1lty)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172y0n8xvv4hr1)

Sporting Witness 18:50 SAT (w3ct1l82)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3ct1l83)

Sports News 23:20 SAT (w172y0scs7jx7d2)

Sports News 23:20 SUN (w172y0scs7k0495)

Sports News 23:20 MON (w172y0sd4hv6wgf)

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Sports News 23:20 WED (w172y0sd4hvdp8m)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172y0pxg1qsqjf)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0t66z4kf73)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172y0t66z4nkmg)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lbb)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3ct1ngv)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3ct1ngv)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rst)

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The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2dqd)

The Climate Question 09:06 MON (w3ct2dqd)

The Climate Question 20:06 MON (w3ct2dqd)

The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct2d2j)

The Compass 02:32 WED (w3ct2d2k)

The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct2d2k)

The Compass 20:06 WED (w3ct2d2k)

The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct1p6g)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p6g)

The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3ct1p6g)

The Cultural Frontline 23:32 SAT (w3ct1pdw)

The Cultural Frontline 04:32 SUN (w3ct1pdw)

The Cultural Frontline 10:06 MON (w3ct1pdw)

The Documentary 19:06 SAT (w3ct2fph)

The Documentary 05:32 SUN (w3ct2d29)

The Documentary 12:06 SUN (w3ct2fph)

The Documentary 02:32 TUE (w3ct2fzr)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct2fzr)

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The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct20dt)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct1rfj)

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The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3ct1rfk)

The Food Chain 22:32 THU (w3ct1rfk)

The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rl1)

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The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3ct1z1w)

The Inquiry 15:06 THU (w3ct1z1w)

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The Lazarus Heist 09:32 SAT (w3ct2f8v)

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The Lazarus Heist 03:32 MON (w3ct2f8v)

The Newsroom 02:06 SAT (w172xyxf4ppcyj0)

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The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1hs9)

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The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3ct1yv2)

Trending 05:32 SAT (w3ct2dmj)

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Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172xyt4cs8n6sc)

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Weekend 08:06 SAT (w172xyt4cs8ng8m)

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Weekend 07:06 SUN (w172xyt4cs8r7fl)

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When Katty Met Carlos 08:32 SAT (w3ct2f2t)

When Katty Met Carlos 02:32 SUN (w3ct2f2t)

When Katty Met Carlos 19:32 SUN (w3ct2f2t)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wyf)

Witness History 08:50 MON (w3ct1x0q)

Witness History 12:50 MON (w3ct1x0q)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3ct1x0q)

Witness History 03:50 TUE (w3ct1x0q)

Witness History 08:50 TUE (w3ct1x57)

Witness History 12:50 TUE (w3ct1x57)

Witness History 18:50 TUE (w3ct1x57)

Witness History 03:50 WED (w3ct1x57)

Witness History 08:50 WED (w3ct1x7h)

Witness History 12:50 WED (w3ct1x7h)

Witness History 18:50 WED (w3ct1x7h)

Witness History 03:50 THU (w3ct1x7h)

Witness History 08:50 THU (w3ct1x2z)

Witness History 12:50 THU (w3ct1x2z)

Witness History 18:50 THU (w3ct1x2z)

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Witness History 08:50 FRI (w3ct1wyg)

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WorklifeIndia 11:32 SAT (w3ct2f31)

World Book Club 12:06 SAT (w3ct1x9m)

World Book Club 03:06 SUN (w3ct1x9m)

World Book Club 10:06 WED (w3ct1x9m)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzl4rr1zh17)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y47x50t6sfm)

World Business Report 23:32 MON (w172y48qlrdy1ty)

World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172y4bch6mclml)

World Business Report 23:32 TUE (w172y48qlrf0yr1)

World Business Report 15:32 WED (w172y4cln9jhg5m)

World Business Report 23:32 WED (w172y48qlrf3vn4)

World Business Report 15:32 THU (w172y494b3qjfsv)

World Business Report 23:32 THU (w172y48qlrf6rk7)

World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172y46nzxxkff2)

World Business Report 23:32 FRI (w172y48qlrf9ngb)

World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct1tyy)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3ct1tyy)

World Football 22:32 FRI (w3ct1tyy)