Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 03 APRIL 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y95mc8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq7xp62znz)
US Capitol car ram attack

An attack at the US Capitol complex in Washington DC has left one police officer dead and another in hospital with injuries. A car crashed into a security barrier before the driver lunged towards the officers with a knife. The officers opened fire and the suspect was shot dead. We get the latest from the BBC's Larry Maduwo, who's in DC. Also in the programme, the US economy added almost a million new jobs in March, though employment remains well below pre-pandemic levels, as the BBC's Samira Hussain explains. We have an extended report from Ijeoma Ndukwe about the prospects for industrialisation of the cocoa sector in Ghana, the world's second largest exporter of the commodity. The idea of coronavirus vaccination passports is catching on in some countries. We examine the arguments for and against their introduction with Professor Melinda Mills of the University of Oxford, and Adrienne Murray talks us through Denmark's digital vaccine passport scheme, Coronapas, which will come into use there next week. Plus, Elizabeth Hotson considers the most effective way to make a complaint.#

All this and more discussed with our guest throughout the show, Karen Percy a senior freelance reporter in Melbourne, Australia.

(Picture: the car that rammed into a barricade at the US Capitol. Credit: Getty Images.)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y95r3d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmf8c2n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnww3cs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lb6)
IPL preview, cricket siblings & freak injuries

On this week's show Alison Mitchell, Jim Maxwell and Charu Sharma reflect on England's tour of India and look at what lessons can be learned from both sides.

Plus we preview the upcoming IPL and hear from England's director of cricket Ashley Giles, on how some of the players may miss their upcoming Test series against New Zealand due to scheduling.

Does having an older sibling benefit you in cricket? We hear from the co-author of a new book Tim Wigmore. on how statistically younger siblings outperform their older siblings in 2 out of 3 cases.

And we discuss bizarre cricketing injuries.

Photo: Brothers Sam and Tom Curran ahead of the 5th One Day International match between Sri Lanka and England at R. Premadasa Stadium on October 23, 2018 in Colombo, Sri Lanka. (Photo by Gareth Copley/Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y95vvj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dp)
The men making money from migrants

The sinking of a boat carrying illegal migrants across Lake Van in Turkey last year caused shockwaves in Afghanistan. Many of the passengers were Afghans, and while more than 60 bodies were recovered, others remain missing. BBC Afghan’s Hafizullah Maroof decided to investigate, telling the story of one of the victims, and gaining rare access to the people trafficker responsible for his journey.

An algorithm for the perfect biryani
Even throughout lockdown boredom, Aparna Alluri of BBC Delhi steered clear of cooking a biryani, a notoriously complex balancing act of meat, rice and spices. That is, until she found a cookbook that demonstrated how to do it with an algorithm rather than a recipe. She joins us to share her results.

The end of Vietnam's love affair with karaoke?
BBC Vietnamese recently ran a story about the possible banning of karaoke in Ho Chi Minh City. Karaoke is hugely popular in Vietnam, so who better to turn to to find out what's gone wrong than Bui Thu of BBC Vietnamese in Bangkok.

The deep-rooted tradition of dowry in Pakistan
BBC Urdu has been asking what happens to young Pakistanis who turn their backs on dowry. As reporter Sarah Atiq explains, there is huge pressure to conform, despite the financial burden and some cases of torture and even death when demands fail to be met.

Image: People trafficking has made 'Elham Noor' a wealthy man
Credit: 'Elham Noor'


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wy9)
Black Jesus

On Easter Sunday 1967 the Reverend Albert Cleage renamed his church in Detroit the Shrine of the Black Madonna. He preached that if man was made in God's image there was little chance that Jesus was white as most of the world's population is non-white. Reverend Cleage also pointed to the many depictions of black madonnas all over the world throughout history. Claire Bowes has been speaking to his daughter Pearl Cleage, a writer and activist, about her father's belief in black representation and self-determination.

Photo: Black Madonna and Child courtesy of BLAC Detroit.
Archive: Thanks to the Chicago History Museum and WFMT for the Studs Terkel Radio Archive.


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y95zln)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hs5)
What is the US plan for Africa?

US special operations forces have agreed to help “support Mozambique's efforts to prevent the spread of terrorism and violent extremism”, with dozens of people reported killed during an Islamist attack in the north of the country this week. Joe Biden’s Secretary of State Anthony Blinken and other members of the global coalition against the Islamic State militant group have warned of a “serious and growing threat” from radical Islamists across Africa. But American’s interests in the region don’t end with security. Over recent years China has been extending its economic and military presence there and critics of Donald Trump’s presidency claim he failed to prioritise Africa policy - symbolised by the fact he didn’t visit during his 4 years in office. So, if the Biden administration is re-engaging with Africa, what does that mean? What should the priority be for US foreign policy across the continent? And what does China’s growing influence mean for America’s diplomatic credibility in the region? Paul Henley is joined by a panel of expert guests.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y963bs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmf8qb1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwwgm5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct2dmd)
The Anti-Vax Files

South Africa's imported 'infodemic'

Recent surveys indicate that there might be rising scepticism about vaccines in South Africa. But
even before the coronavirus pandemic started, the Rainbow Nation was battling a tide of anti-vaccine misinformation online. And one study found that although there is a relatively small group of South African anti-vaccine activists, they are being bolstered by a wave of material coming from abroad.
We meet a pharmacist who has been tracking the alarming reach of that small group of hardcore anti-vaccinators for the last five years. And we hear how the country’s class system contributes to a big divide in willingness to take vaccines.
Plus we hear from the activists staging a fightback against the Covid-19 “infodemic”. Sarah is a mole in a number of anti-vax chat app groups and runs a pro-vaccine Facebook page aimed at countering their disinformation. But can she convince someone with questions about vaccines to actually get one?
Pres: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Jonathan Griffin
Additional production: Jack Goodman


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dn0)
Macron's Covid-19 crisis

French President Emmanuel Macron has announced a new national lockdown as hospitals struggle to cope with a third wave of coronavirus infections. Non-essential shops will close along with schools - a measure previously seen as a last resort. Ros Atkins considers how the situation got so bad, the role of vaccine scepticism and the leadership of President Macron.

(PHOTO: French President Emmanuel Macron talks to the press after a meeting with Libya's interim leaders in Paris on March 23, 2021. Credit: REUTERS/Benoit Tessier)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9672x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt2xq0jmc0)
Police officer dies in US Capitol attack

Police guarding the US Capitol building in Washington DC have shot a man dead after he ran over two police officers with his car, killing one of them; they say he also lunged at them with a knife. Dozens of National Guard troops, who have been stationed in the area since Donald Trump supporters stormed the Capitol building in January, were also deployed.

Also in the programme: We hear from Brazil's former health minister amid a political and Covid-19 crisis; and why campaigners in Belgium are calling for urgent reforms of the police.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other stories are Barnaby Phillips, former BBC and Al Jazeera correspondent, who is now with the Elephant Protection Initiative; and Noga Tarnopolsky, a journalist in Jerusalem who writes on the Middle East for the US media.

(Picture: Police officers at the site of the attack outside the US Capitol building in Washington D.C. Credit: REUTERS/Erin Scott)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y96bv1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt2xq0jr34)
Man shot dead outside US Capitol

Police guarding the US Capitol building in Washington DC have shot a man dead after he ran over two police officers with his car, killing one of them; they say he also lunged at them with a knife. Dozens of National Guard troops, who have been stationed in the area since Donald Trump supporters stormed the Capitol building in January, were also deployed.

Also in the programme: We hear the latest from the UN in Myanmar on the anti-coup protests; and the latest on an Islamist insurgency in northern Mozambique.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other stories are Barnaby Phillips, former BBC and Al Jazeera correspondent, who is now with the Elephant Protection Initiative; and Noga Tarnopolsky, a journalist in Jerusalem who writes on the Middle East for the US media.

(Picture: National Guard at the scene after a vehicle rammed a barricade outside the US Capitol in Washington DC. Credit: EPA/WILL OLIVER)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y96gl5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt2xq0jvv8)
Italy enters Easter lockdown

This evening, Pope Francis will celebrate the Easter Vigil in a near-empty St Peter's Basilica in the Vatican. That is because Italy has become the latest country to re-introduce stringent national lockdown measures over the Easter period. The country has reported more than 110,000 Covid-related deaths, Europe's second-highest tally after the UK.

Also in the programme: More on an insurgency on Myanmar's border with Thailand; and we find out how plants have made a major contribution to human history.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other stories are Barnaby Phillips, former BBC and Al Jazeera correspondent, who is now with the Elephant Protection Initiative; and Noga Tarnopolsky, a journalist in Jerusalem who writes on the Middle East for the US media.

(Picture: Soldiers carry out checks on passengers at the Central railway station in Milan, Italy. Credit: EPA/Paolo Salmoirago)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwwtvk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct2cc6)
US-China relations

With China on the rise, how will America react?
Chinese influence across the world is growing, in economic and political terms. This raises serious questions for the new Biden administration.
The US and China are economically interdependent, and need to have shared interests, particularly in trade and climate change.
But the rhetoric in recent weeks has been anything but friendly. The two superpowers are going head-to-head in trade wars, retaliatory sanctions, and accusations of human rights abuses.
Katty and Carlos take a step back and look at what is at stake for both sides, and whether there is a chance for a future of peaceful coexistence.

Katty and Carlos’ guests are:
Kaiser Kuo, Editor-at-Large at SupChina, a media company that focuses on explaining China to the West. He’s also founder and co-host of the Sinica podcast, a show that discusses all things China. He spent 20 years working and living in Beijing and is now back home in the US.
Robert Daly is the Director of the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States at the Wilson Centre. He’s a former diplomat who spent eleven years based in China where he worked on an array of cultural exchange programmes, including the translation of Sesame Street into Chinese.

A co-production from the BBC World Service and OZY Media.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y96lb9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5g)
Coronavirus: Brazilian doctors

Brazil's health service has been pushed to the brink as coronavirus cases continue to climb. Some 66,570 people died of Covid-19 in March, more than double the previous monthly record, and the total number of Covid-19 related deaths is over 320,000. Yet President Jair Bolsonaro continues to oppose lockdowns and has been heavily criticised for his handling of the pandemic. There have also been problems with the rollout of Covid vaccines.

Two Brazilian doctors, in Sao Paolo and the southern city of Porto Alegre, share their experiences during these challenging times. One hasn’t seen her family in 14 months and describes colleagues crying during shifts.

Host Karnie Sharp also hears from three midwives in Romania, Nigeria and the United States about overcoming women’s fears from giving birth during a pandemic - especially if they have Covid-19.

(Photo: Medical staff works in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the hospital of Clinicas, in Porto Alegre, Brazil, 21 March 2021. Credit: Marcelo Oliveira/EPA)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwwylp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6j)
I'm Not a Monster

10/10/2016 GMT

An American mother living in the heart of the ISIS caliphate. Her husband an ISIS sniper. Her 10-year-old son forced to threaten the U.S. president in a propaganda video shown around the world. She claims she was tricked into taking her young children to war-torn Syria, but where does her account end and the truth begin? Over four years journalist Josh Baker unravels a dangerous story where nothing is as it seems. From the depths of Raqqa’s infamous torture prison to an elk hunt in Idaho, he uncovers secrets, lies and the lasting consequences.

I’m Not A Monster is the story of one family’s journey from Indiana to the Islamic State group and back.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l15)
Exploring why do we do the things we do

What makes us Deeply Human? US rapper and writer Dessa answers listeners’ comments about a new series that asks: why do we do the things we do?
Plus, the Global News Podcast has released its annual listening figures - so what do they reveal about the way we consume the BBC’s news?

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y96q2f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0pvzzgp432)
'I wish I could give her a hug and tell her she’s going to be OK' – Mallory Weggemann on her younger self

US Paralympic Gold medal winning swimmer Mallory Weggemann joins us to discuss her hopes of competing in Tokyo and reflects on her turbulent journey in the sport following the release of her autobiography. Weggemann – who was 18 at the time - was left paralysed in 2008 after receiving an epidural injection to treat back pain. She went on to win gold at London 2012, before a serious arm injury in 2014 left her contemplating her future in the sport. Weggemann competed in Rio in 2016, but missed out on the podium. She’s since walked down the aisle on her wedding day and is targeting another gold medal in Tokyo.

Just over a week on from becoming a two-time Olympian and new dad at the age of 39 Great Britain marathon runner, Chris Thompson, joins us to reflect on clinching his place in Japan, balancing fatherhood with training and the prospect of competing in the Olympic Marathon as a 40-year-old.

This week marked World Autism Awareness Day and we hear how the Philadelphia Eagles have been doing their bit to help by hosting a coronavirus vaccination centre for people on the spectrum. Ryan Hammond from the Eagles Autism Foundation explains what went into hosting the event and how difficult the pandemic has been for people with autism.

Paris Saint Germain and Denmark forward Nadia Nadim tells us about the research she is conducting on the impact of urinary incontinence on female athletes. Nadim is currently studying to become a reconstructive surgeon and says she has been shocked by how many footballers are affected by the condition. She also says attitudes need to change around players being on their menstrual cycles.

We look ahead to the University Boat Race between Cambridge and Oxford, with Siobhan Cassidy, who was part of Cambridge women's winning crew back in 1995 and is now a director for the Boat Race Company. She explains why the race has been moved from its traditional route and the importance of it going ahead after last year’s cancellation due to the coronavirus pandemic.

In Sporting Witness, we tell the incredible story of how two of Ghana’s top sprinting talents defected during the 1990 Commonwealth Games in Auckland. The Maori family who helped them forge a new life in New Zealand remember the story for us.

Photo: Mallory Weggemann of USA competes in the women's 100m Breaststroke - SB7 at the 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y96ttk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmf9fst)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwx62y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f2x)
Should women be paid for housework?

Unpaid domestic work in India is nearly 40% of the country’s GDP, according to recent estimates. India’s homemakers, like many in different parts of the world, clean, cook and care for their families, accounting for nearly 300 minutes a day. Globally too, women still do the lion’s share of housework.

Should this work – largely seen as thankless household chores – be monetized? Or would it prevent women from stepping out of their homes and taking up formal professions? What could be the unintended consequences of guaranteed income for housewives?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss whether housework should get remunerated.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Mitali Nikore, development economist, founder of Nikore Associates; Dr Saundarya Rajesh, social entrepreneur, founder and president of Avatar; Prof Prabha Kotiswaran, professor of law and social justice, King’s College London


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y96ykp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9l)
Robert Seethaler: A Whole Life

Spanning much of the twentieth century and told with an elegant simplicity which belies the harshness of the tale it tells, Robert Seethaler's A Whole Life is the story of one man's relationship with an ancient landscape.

Andreas Egger knows every nook and cranny of the Alpine mountain valley that is his home and from which vantage point he witnesses the arrival of the modern world, in all its many and daunting forms.

A stark yet tender book about love, loss and endurance, and about finding dignity and beauty in solitude A Whole Life has already touched many thousands of readers with its message of solace and truth.

(Picture: Robert Seethaler. Photo credit: UrbanZintel.)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9729t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv50mcjq1mf)
Myanmar coup: At least five dead in new crackdown against protesters

The security forces in Myanmar are reported to have shot dead five people protesting against the military authorities. Local media opposed to the regime said three people had been killed in the central town of Monywa after police used teargas and live rounds against a crowd of demonstrators.

Also in the programme: a three- day national lockdown comes into force in Italy over Easter; and plans to understand and protect the marine environment include a network of camera systems

(Photo: A demonstrator flashes the three-finger salute as he and others march during an anti-military coup protest in Myanmar. Credit: EPA).


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9761y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t4rwwftsr)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary of Leeds United vs. Sheffield United at Elland Road>

Lee James is joined by former Chelsea and Netherlands right-back Mario Melchiot, ex-Tottenham defender Jenna Schillaci and the former Manchester City and Ivory Coast striker Wilfried Bony to discuss all the big talking points.

We'll have reaction to the day's early match between Chelsea and West Brom and we'll look ahead to the day's other matches with Leicester hosting Manchester City and Arsenal taking on Liverpool.

Elsewhere, we'll have the latest from the Women's Super League, the LPGA's first golf major of the year with the ANA Inspiration, the Women's Six Nations and the Miami Open tennis.

Photo: Leeds United winger Raphinha (Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y97p1g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmfb90q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwy19v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21mn)
Martha Chaves and Gastor Almonte

Hilarious comedians from around the world join Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini to take on the global headlines.

This week, Jess and Eman are joined by Nicaraguan Canadian comedian Martha Chaves and one of New York City’s finest stand-ups Gastor Almonte.

They’ll be finding out why the Nicaraguan government has set up an agency for Extra-Terrestrial Space Affairs and asking what’s so controversial about a US rapper’s new pair of sneakers?


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y97ssl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkl)
Watching out for Gran with help from her toaster

As many countries contemplate the best way to care for an ageing population, a common question is how to support the elderly to continue living in their own homes for as long as possible. One idea is to monitor their use of home appliances, such as kettles and ovens.

Advocates say NILM – non-intrusive load monitoring – offers family and carers an insight into a person’s daily life without invading their privacy. It could even be used to track or help diagnose long-term health conditions.

Reporter William Kremer road-tests the technology with his own parents and finds out about a NILM project in Japan.

Picture: Getty Images


SAT 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwy51z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:32 Global Questions (w3ct2f7k)
Sexism and Violence Against Women

This year thousands of people around the world have taken to the streets to denounce violence against women. Global Questions talks to two former female presidents, one from Africa and one from Europe, who’ve both been trailblazers for women’s rights for decades. Mary Robinson, Ireland’s first female president, and Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, former president of Liberia and the first female head of state in Africa, take your questions on why women in so many countries continue to endure sexism and sexual violence, and why change seems so difficult to achieve.

Panel:
Mary Robinson
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y97xjq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rsp)
Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival

Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival is one of the leading new music events in Europe, which gives a platform to cutting-edge and experimental compositions and performances. Held annually each November, this hugely popular ten day event hosts around seventy concerts and sees more than four hundred musicians descending on the market town of Huddersfield in West Yorkshire in the north of England.

However due to the global pandemic, HCMF’s 2020 season had to be a virtual affair and Nikki Bedi talks to some of the artists and composers who took part.

Music and Sound Artist Auclair tells us about how her mother’s escape from Rwanda has inspired her piece Munganyinka is a Transformer.

Clarinettist Heather Roche on the challenges of playing duets when your musical partner is stuck in another country

Percussionist Lamine Sonko explains the rhythms of hyenas and why they’re important symbols of Senegalese culture.

Pianist Noriko Kawai on how Greek mythology inspired her interpretation of the piece Echo the Angelus during lockdown.

GBSR Duo, George Barton and Siwan Rhys, explain making music out of a children’s game

And Artistic Director Graham McKenzie tells us what it’s like putting on a major international series of concerts in the middle of a pandemic

Produced for the BBC World Service by Andrea Kidd and Nancy Bennie



(Photo: Auclair. Credit: Sophia Schorr-Kon)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9818v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv50mcjr0lg)
German President calls for unity amid ‘crisis of trust’

The German president, Frank-Walter Steinmeier, has warned of a crisis of trust in politics linked to the coronavirus pandemic. In a televised national address, he's urged political leaders to "get it together" in response to public frustration and feelings of powerlessness.

Mr Steinmeier acknowledged the country had made mistakes in handling the pandemic, but urged people to pull together, and to get vaccinated.

Also on the programme: the latest from Myanmar where ethnic rebel groups have expressed support for the protests against military rule; and a look at a historic day in Egypt, where the mummified remains of eighteen kings and four queens have been carried in gold coffins on custom-made vehicles to a new museum.

(Picture: President Steinmeier speaks to the nation, Credit: EPA/Sandra Steins)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9850z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbm)
Muted musicians with Liraz and Bedouine

Liraz, Bedouine, Daniel Smienk and Tolga Boyuk discuss the link between music and heritage, turning the past into the future through music, and how to be creative whilst navigating obstacles.

Liraz is an Israeli singer, actress and dancer of Iranian descent, whose latest album, Zan (which translates to "women" in Farsi), features collaborations recorded in secret with Iranian artists. Her music combines the traditional sounds of the Bağlama, a Middle Eastern stringed instrument, with 1970s disco and funk rhythms.

Joining Liraz is Bedouine, a folk singer and guitarist born in Syria, who spent time living in Saudi Arabia and across the USA before settling in Los Angeles. Her inspirations range from her childhood to her travels, and the feeling of wanderlust. Tolga Boyuk is a producer and founder of electro-acoustic trio Islandman, whose music combines Turkish psychedelia with African roots. Daniel Smienk is the drummer of Amsterdam-based band Altın Gün. The group’s name translates to ‘Golden Day’, and their music seamlessly blends Turkish psych and traditional folk songs.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y988s3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywk7wtnlb2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sbb58smyq)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwyn1h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pdr)
Emilia Clarke: My lockdown discovery

During lockdown, BAFTA-winning actor Emilia Clarke discovered the work of the late British novelist and essayist Jenny Diski. Jenny had been a fan of Game of Thrones, the TV series in which Emilia starred as Daenerys Targaryen. Emilia speaks to poet and academic Dr Ian Patterson, who was married to Jenny until her death in 2016, to discuss Jenny’s work and their shared love of cultural escapism.

Nigerian author Oyinkan Braithwaite was long-listed for the Booker Prize in 2019 for her debut novel My Sister, the Serial Killer. Lockdown has not slowed her down, and has in fact provided inspiration for the plot of her latest novella The Baby is Mine. She shares how her love of Japanese animation, or anime, has shaped her writing during this time.

After a hiatus of ten years, Hong Kong director Yonfan returned to filmmaking with an animation debut, No 7 Cherry Lane. He reveals how he turned to the work of American director Stanley Kramer when its release was impacted by the Covid-19 outbreak.

Plus we hear from our listeners across the world about the art that has changed them during the pandemic.



Presented by Tumi Morake

Produced by Lucy Wai, Kirsty McQuire, Lucy Collingwood and Nancy Bennie.

(Photo: Actor Emilia Clarke. Credit: VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images)



SUNDAY 04 APRIL 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y98j8c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yty)
Post-Covid outcomes after release from hospital

After last year’s first wave of covid-19 in the UK, individuals who had been discharged after hospitalisation suffered higher rates of coronary and respiratory disorders, and even diabetes subsequently over 140 days. As Dr Ami Banerjee of University College London explains, out of 48,000 cases, patients who had had acute covid-19 were four times more likely to be readmitted and 8 times more likely to die. Ami’s team suggests in their paper published in the British Medical Journal that diagnosis, treatment and prevention of post-covid syndrome needs an integrated approach.

In France, researcher Xavier Montagutelli describes how his team has observed that unlike the original virus, some of the newer Variants of Concern can infect mice in laboratories. They do not show serious illness, but nevertheless host the virus in their lungs. Whilst infection is unlikely in natural environments and not yet observed in the wild, it does show how the viral variants can extend the host range, perhaps leading to more opportunities for mutation. But this finding, posted as a pre-print, also perhaps represents an avenue for deeper gene-specific research that has not so far been possible.

Over in Colombia, Monica Carvalho of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute describes her team’s findings regarding the origins of the diversity and habitat of rainforests in south America. Looking at leaf fossils and pollen grains from 60 million years ago, they have found significant differences between the forests of the dinosaurs, and the ones we see today. As they write in the journal Science, it all changed when the Chixulub meteor hit the Gulf of Mexico and the global lights went out. The rainforests that grew back were simply not the same.

But much further back in time, some billion years ago, the forests of the world that were changing the chemistry and making seas inhabitable allowing complex multicellular life, consisted of pencil-lead sized algae quietly photosynthesizing in the shallows of an ocean in what is today remote Canada. Katie Maloney of University of Toronto Mississauga spotted fossils of just these when out on a field trip in Yukon territory. Publishing in Geology Magazine this week, her eagle-eyed finds shed light on this crucial epoch in life history of which there are scant fossilized remains.

If a tree falls in a forest, and no-one is there to hear it, does it make a sound? This is an age-old debate that listener Richard and his family have been arguing about for years. Can CrowdScience settle it once and for all?

Caroline Steel speaks to experts in hearing, biology, philosophy, physics and sound design, which takes her to some unexpected places.

Professor Stefan Bleek is an expert in psychoacoustics who says that sounds only exist in our heads.
Dr Eleanor Knox and Dr Bryan Roberts are philosophers that make her question if anything exists outside our own perception. Professor Lilach Hadany wonders if it’s limited to humans and animals - could other plants hear the falling tree too?
And Mat Eric Hart is a sound designer who says that sound is subjective – it’s always tangled up with our own interpretations.

Things get truly weird as we delve into the strange implications of quantum physics. If there is such a thing as reality, doesn’t it change when we’re there to observe it? Does the tree even fall if we aren’t there?

Image: Rainforest canopy
Credit: Universal Images Group via Getty Images


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y98n0h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmfc7zr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwz08w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct2cc6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y98rrm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y98whr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtl)
Germany’s leadership crisis

Germany is confronting a third wave of Covid-19. Chancellor Angela Merkel was credited last year with her clear communication and decisive leadership as the pandemic spread across Europe. But the government is now struggling to navigate both the rising infections and a delayed vaccine rollout, not helped by concerns over the safety of the AstraZeneca jab. Regional leaders have challenged the Chancellor’s more cautious approach and her ruling party is losing support. Jenny Hill looks at what next for the German leadership.
The Festival of Nowruz, meaning “New Day”, is a two week long celebration which heralds the beginning of Spring and the start of the Persian New Year. In the ancient town of Akre in the Kurdish mountains of Iraq, Iranians, Syrians, Kurds and Iraqis all gather to mark the occasion, lighting beacons, dancing and holding torchlight processions. Leila Molana-Allen attended the festivities.
On Liberia’s coast, we hear about the business of farming sea cucumbers. The marine animals are mainly sold to China where they are seen as an edible delicacy and used in traditional medicine. The sea cucumber stocks in neighbouring Sierra Leone have been over-fished and there are concerns that Liberia will go the same way. Lucinda Rouse met one man who runs a farming business - she watched the haul of sea cucumbers being brought in.
We’re in Bamiyan province in Afghanistan, high in the mountains for the annual ski challenge. The area is probably best known for its vast, standing Buddha statues that were destroyed by the Taliban in 2001. Now, organisers of this ski event are hoping the region can attract more tourists, despite the on-going threat of violence and unrest in the country. Charlie Faulkner paid a visit.


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwz7s4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pdr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9907w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmfcm74)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwzcj8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2crt)
Women dying for work

Karoshi, or death from overwork, has been common in Japan for decades. It is often seen as part of ‘salary man’ culture where men commit themselves above all else to their employer. However little is ever said about women who die from Karoshi. Now the plight of women is coming more into focus following high profile deaths and signs more women are suffering.

Yoshie Matsumoto examines how an overwork culture is affecting women in Japan. She hears from the parents of journalist Miwa Sado who died at the age of 31 after putting in more than 150 hours in overtime a month. She also hears from the mother of 24-year-old Matsuri Takahashi who had been working 20 hours a day.

Pressure on women to achieve in life is multi-faceted in Japan. It’s not just about climbing the corporate ladder but also about upholding traditions still expected of women including managing the home, prioritising male domestic needs and rearing children responsibly.

Yoshie hears how people contacting the national Karoshi hotline has jumped dramatically during Covid-19 with the number of women calling almost doubling. The pandemic has seen some women take on multiple jobs just to make ends meet and cover their basic costs.

The Government is attempting to change the overwork culture by introducing a shorter working week but is the commitment to work ethic too engrained in Japanese culture? Meanwhile Yoshie finds out how some companies are developing their own ways of combatting overwork by introducing napping rooms.

If you have been affected by the issues raised in this programme and you'd like to talk someone, there is information available by going to help.befrienders.org


(Photo: Yukimi Takahashi beside her daughter Matsuri’s shrine at her home in Mishima. Credit: Makiko Segawa)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y99400)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt2xq0mj83)
Jordan's Prince Hamzah "under house arrest"

The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan has been thrown into turmoil after the arrest of several senior figures, amid reports of a possible coup attempt against the ruling monarch. King Abdullah's half-brother, the former crown prince Hamzah bin Hussein, has meanwhile said that the armed forces have put him under house arrest.

Also in the programme: An extraordinary address from Germany's president and we hear from a doctor in Myanmar on violence following a military coup.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other stories are Milica Pesic, Serbian-born journalist and executive director of the Media Diversity Institute; and Mark Vernon, a British psychotherapist and author with the research network Perspectiva.

(Picture: Jordan's former Crown Prince, Hamza bin Hussein. Credit: REUTERS/Ali Jarekji/File Photo)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y997r4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt2xq0mn07)
Jordan's former crown prince 'under house arrest'

The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan has been thrown into turmoil after the arrest of several senior figures, amid reports of a possible coup attempt against the ruling monarch. King Abdullah's half-brother, the former crown prince Hamzah bin Hussein, has meanwhile said that the armed forces have put him under house arrest.

Also in the programme: A surge in coronavirus infections in Papua New Guinea and we hear from an athlete hoping to compete in the Tokyo Olympic Games.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other stories are Milica Pesic, Serbian-born journalist and executive director of the Media Diversity Institute; and Mark Vernon, a British psychotherapist and author with the research network Perspectiva.

(Picture: Jordan's former Crown Prince Hamza bin Hussein. Credit: REUTERS/Majed Jaber)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y99ch8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt2xq0mrrc)
Ex-Crown Prince of Jordan put 'under house arrest'

The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan has been thrown into turmoil after the arrest of several senior figures, amid reports of a possible coup attempt against the ruling monarch. King Abdullah's half-brother, the former crown prince Hamzah bin Hussein, has meanwhile said that the armed forces have put him under house arrest.

Also in the programme: Germany's President speaks of a "crisis of trust" in the country's handling of the coronavirus pandemic and find out what's special about the musician's mindset.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other stories are Milica Pesic, Serbian-born journalist and executive director of the Media Diversity Institute; and Mark Vernon, a British psychotherapist and author with the research network Perspectiva.

(Picture: King Abdullah and his wife Queen Rania (pictured far right) attend the wedding ceremony of Prince Hamzah and Princess Noor (left) alongside Hamzah's mother Queen Noor (centre). Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwzqrn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfd)
A year in the life of a Chinese restaurant

Anti-Asian hate has surged since the coronavirus outbreak, and some of the most common targets have been Chinese food businesses.

Tamasin Ford speaks to three people who’ve witnessed the rise of Sinophobia first hand and seen it damage not only their livelihoods, but also their families.

They explain why they’re not prepared to stay silent, as was often the case for previous generations, and how they plan to use food in the fight against racism and ignorance.

Producers: Simon Tulett and Sarah Stolarz

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: A person holds a sign during a rally against anti-Asian hate in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Credit: Kerem Yucel/AFP/Getty/BBC)

Contributors:

Patrick Mock, manager of 46 Mott bakery in New York;
John Li, owner of Dumpling Shack, London;
Ying Hou, owner of ShanDong MaMa, Melbourne


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y99h7d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwzvhs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Africa Life Clinic (w3ct21gc)
Can we eradicate leprosy?

Despite the myths and fear which surround leprosy it can be treated and prevented with a short course of antibiotics. The disease is spread by a bacteria which is easily killed with these drugs. Although this stops the virus spreading it doesn’t help those who have been disfigured by the parasite, they are still viewed negatively even though they are no longer infectious.
As Seydina Alioune Djigo reports, Senegal has embarked on a campaign to both treat Leprosy with drugs and educate more widely on the condition. They have also removed restrictions on those banished to former leper colonies.
Also if you died would you donate your eyes to help some else see? Oyeyemi Gbenga-Mustapha reports from Nigeria on an eye banking project there, which uses donated eyes to restore the sight of people affected by corneal blindness. However as with many forms of organ donation the practice is not widely accepted yet.
Presented by Priscilla Ngethe.
(Picture: a man suffering from leprosy. Credit: Life Clinic TV)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y99lzj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbk)
The Standing Line

Why we're such raging moralists when it comes to waiting our turn.

Budging! Cutting in line! Skipping! Butting! Ditching! Queue-jumping! Don’t it make your blood boil? The standing line evokes strong feelings about justice— breaking what we see as the rules for waiting in line can arouse such anger and even violence in a way that feels totally out of proportion to the length of our wait.

Dessa finds out what queueing theory can reveal about social status and hidden power dynamics - and that the serpentine line in her local supermarket is a good thing.

(Image: A queue. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwzz7x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2d31)
Pope Francis in Iraq: The historic pilgrimage

The world watched on as Pope Francis embarked on what he called a pilgrimage to the Middle East, a journey that could possibly be the Holy Father's legacy. Despite worries of the Covid pandemic and the real threat of a terrorist attack, Pope Francis became the first pontiff in history to visit Iraq. Standing among rubble and ruins in the devastated city of Mosul where ISIS took root and threatened to behead him, Pope Francis proclaimed "hope is more powerful than hatred, that peace more powerful than war."

In this programme Colm Flynn travels on the papal flight to Iraq to talk to Iraqi Christians and Muslims who have come out to welcome Pope Francis to their nation. The programme will bring you behind the scenes on a papal trip, and let you experience real moments with the Iraqi people who hope that the Pope's visit will bring long-lasting healing and peace to their land.

Presenter and Producer: Colm Flynn

Additional audio supplied by EWTN
Picture credit: Colm Flynn /EWTN


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y99qqn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmfdbpx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnx0301)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct29by)
Water: Too Much And Not Enough

Water as a resource

Journalist Alok Jha shows how the way we are using freshwater has made it a precious finite resource. And it’s a resource on the edge of collapse. By 2050, over half the world’s population will live in a water-scarce region. But rather than working together to manage crucial water supplies, powerful states are manoeuvring to control the remaining stocks for themselves.

Beginning with one family’s well drying up in the desert of Arizona, and following the story all the way to political tensions in the Middle East, Alok argues that we need to recognise water as the most important shared resource in the world and take advantage of its cross-border nature to encourage international cooperation.

(Photo: The Jordan river on mountainside. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y99vgs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1q)
How will the concussion issue affect the future of sport?

Concussion is now a powder-keg issue in world sport, as concerns deepen about the potential links to brain disease.

The long-term effects of careers spent making and taking heavy tackles are being revealed in ever-increasing detail, but the risks are not exclusive to so-called full contact sports.

Some governing bodies have sprung into action, implementing new rules and safety measures. But others turn a blind eye.

So, we’re asking – how will the concussion issue affect the future of sport?

Presenter: Paul Connolly
Producer: Stefania Okereke

(Photo: Denver Broncos wide receiver Wes Welker (83) lays on the field after getting a concussion in the second quarter. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnx06r5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Global Questions (w3ct2f7k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:32 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y99z6x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv50mcjsyjj)
Jordan's Prince Hamzah bin Hussein 'under house arrest'

The former crown prince of Jordan says in a video sent to the BBC he has been placed under house arrest as part of a crackdown on critics. The military earlier denied Prince Hamzah was under house arrest.

Also on the programme: Pope Francis uses his Easter message to call for a vaccine speedy distribution to poorer countries; and the Cuban musicians whose protest song has riled the island's Communist government.

(Photo: Jordan"s Crown Prince Hamzah bin Hussein during a speech in Amman in August 2004. Credit: Jordan.)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9b2z1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rkx)
Pauline Viardot: 19th-Century diva

While the name of Pauline Viardot may be unfamiliar to many, in her lifetime she was one of the most celebrated performers in Europe. Her interpretation of Orpheus in a revival of Gluck’s opera made the writer Charles Dickens weep, and the novelist George Sand said that whenever she heard Pauline Viardot sing, nothing else mattered. In addition to her vocal talents, Pauline Viardot dazzled in high society. She knew almost everybody who came to define 19th Century European culture, thanks to the regular salon she held with her husband in their Parisian townhouse. Acclaimed poets, musicians, composers, artists and even royalty would come to take tea, listen to music, network, perform and share ideas.

Alas there are no recordings of her magnificent voice, even though her later years coincided with the beginning of the recording industry. But today Pauline Viardot’s legacy is being rediscovered as a composer, with works that were performed at her salons reaching new audiences.

Bridget Kendall is joined by Hilary Poriss, associate professor of music history at Northeastern University in Boston who is writing a monograph on Pauline Viardot to be published by the University of Chicago Press; Patrick Barbier, emeritus professor at the West Catholic University in Angers, and author of a biography of Pauline Viardot and her sister; and Richard Langham Smith, who has published widely on 19th and early 20th Century French music and is currently research professor at the Royal College of Music in London.

Producer: Fiona Clampin


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2djr)
Too fast for Minecraft?

The impressive speed records of a well-known gamer called Dream for the video game Minecraft have come under scrutiny. Many say that Dream has completed speed runs in such a fast time that it doesn’t seem possible. Are these suspicions correct? We speak to stand-up mathematician Matt Parker who has looked at the probabilities on the elements of chance in the game to see if these records seem plausible.


(Minecraft image on screen.Photo: Frederic J.Brown/Getty Images)


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9b6q5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9bbg9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t4rwwjz63)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary as Aston Villa take on relegation-threatened Fulham at Villa Park.

Maz Farookhi is joined by South Africa midfielder Dean Furman to discuss all the big talking points.

We'll have reaction to the day's early games, with Southampton playing Burnley and Newcastle hosting Tottenham.

Elsewhere, we'll bring you the latest from the ANA Inspiration, the LPGA's first golf major of the year, the Women's Six Nations, Miami Open tennis and the start of the Major League Baseball season.

Photo: Fulham manager Scott Parker (Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9bppp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmff9ny)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnx11z2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct2cc6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9btft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dgh)
Financial industry rocked by Archegos affair

Some of the world’s biggest investment banks have been left exposed as a hedge fund collapsed, leaving multi-billion dollar losses in its wake. Archegos Capital Management was a secretive personal wealth fund - we find out why banks like Goldman Sachs, Credit Suisse and Nomura dealt with it. We hear why a European Union ban on palm oil in biofuel has left both Indonesia and Malaysia upset and as Bangladesh celebrates its 50th birthday we ask whether the textile industry will be able to support the country into the future. Plus, we celebrate 30 years of business programmes on the BBC World Service. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Stockmarket screen, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9by5y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv50mcjtxhk)
Jordan: Prince Hamzah accused of plot to destabilise kingdom

Jordan's deputy prime minister has accused the King's half-brother Prince Hamza of plotting to destabilise the country, a day after the prince said he had been placed under house arrest.

Also on the programme: The latest from Mozambique following a deadly attack by IS-linked insurgents; and a look at New York’s newly released vaccine passport app – will the rest of the world follow suit?

(Picture: Prince Hamzah, Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9c1y2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnx1f6g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2djr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9c5p6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywk7wtrh75)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sbb58wjvt)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnx1jyl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21mn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]



MONDAY 05 APRIL 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lh8fm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl39nsvwlw)
England to trial vaccine passports

The British Prime Minister on Monday will announce details of a covid status certification scheme that is being developed in England to enable concerts and sporting events to resume. Meanwhile, in India, Maharastra state goes back into lockdown after a spike in coronavirus cases and the Pope, in his Easter message, urges a faster vaccine rollout for the developing world. We hear from Charlie Roberston at Renaissance Capital about the global inequality resulting from the pandemic and mining analyst John Meyer tells us about how President Biden's infrastructure spending plans will impact global commodities. Chandrashekhar Dasgupta, a member of of the Indian Prime Ministers Council on Climate Change, says that India will not be pushed into meeting targets and a British musician, Verity White.
(Image: AZ vaccine in vial and syringe Image credit:BBC)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy65mq0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2cck)
Patient zero: Coronavirus and contact tracing

Today’s episode is about the history we’re still living. From Melbourne to Munich, Lombardy to Wuhan and all the way back again, this episode is about what happened when we faced those first coronavirus cases. Where things went well, where they didn’t, and where contact tracing was effective — and whether there’s anything we could have done to stop it.

Presented by Olivia Willis of ABC Australia.

(Picture: Coronavirus particles spreading in a crowd of people, Credit: Peter Howell/Getty Images)


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lhd5r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wql050)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy65rg4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dq8)
Is science fiction holding back climate action?

For centuries, we’ve been reading, watching and listening to science fiction. And all too often, it’s pretty pessimistic about our future, especially when it touches on the topic of climate change.

This is leading some to ask whether these doom and gloom stories are doing the climate fight more harm than good - causing us to feel so anxious and powerless that we don’t take action.

So for this week's climate question, we’re asking: Is sci-fi holding us back?

Graihagh Jackson is joined by:

Amy Brady, editor-in-chief of the Chicago Review of Books, where she writes a monthly column called Burning Worlds. In it she explores how fiction addresses climate change.

Cheryl Slean is a playwright, filmmaker and educator working with the National Resource Defense Council’s Re-write the Future campaign to increase accurate climate stories in film and television.

Ken Liu is a futurist and author of speculative fiction. He has won the Nebula, Hugo, and World Fantasy awards. His debut novel, The Grace of Kings, is the first volume in a silkpunk epic fantasy series.


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lhhxw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy65w68)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l15)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lhmp0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wql7n8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy65zyd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6b)
Women in law

In many countries around the world more women than men take law degrees but they're still much less likely to make partner or become a judge. Kim Chakenetsa talks to two lawyers from Egypt and the UK about the discrimination they face and the need for a more diverse legal profession.

Omnia Gadalla is a professor of law and sharia at Al-Azhar University. She founded an initiative called Her Honour Setting the Bar which aims to encourage and support female law graduates and to challenge discrimination which prevents Egyptian women from becoming judges.

Alexandra Wilson is a barrister in the UK. She's complained about times she's mistaken for a defendant because she's Black and is highlighting the racism she faces in her workplace. She argues that the law profession needs to include more women and people from different ethnic and class backgrounds.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
Left: Omnia Gadalla (courtesy Omnia Gadalla)
Right: Alexandra Wilson (credit Laurie Lewis)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lhrf4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2kng0xtfw)
Covid-19: India's Maharashtra state tightens restrictions

India records more than 100,000 daily infections - the highest in the world.

We go to Taiwan, where the driver whose runaway truck caused the island's worst train accident is behind bars.

And now the small Caribbean island of St Vincent is under the threat from its volcano, as the lava dome continues to slowly grow.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lhw58)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2kng0xy60)
Covid-19: India tops 100,000 cases

The Indian state of Maharashtra introduces a weekend shut-down and evening curfew following a sharp spike in cases.

Jordan accuses Prince Hamzah of plotting to destabilise the kingdom. He denies conspiracy, but accuses Jordan's leaders of corruption and incompetence.

And we'll find out more about the world's largest network of underwater wildlife monitoring systems. What is it and how will it work?


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lhzxd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2kng0y1y4)
Covid-19 in Maharashtra: what's behind the spike?

India sees daily cases of more than 100,000 for the first time.

Israel's Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, is due in court today for his corruption trial.

And the risks of hearing loss for musicians is highlighted in an Oscar nominated film.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lj3nj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5h)
Barbara Amiel: What do the super-rich owe the rest of the world?

The proportion of wealth owned by a super-rich elite continues to grow in societies around the world. The glaring disparity between the 'have-mosts' and the 'have-nothings' has fuelled a wave of political anger. Stephen Sackur speaks to the former newspaper columnist, editor, and one-time high society hostess Barbara Amiel, whose recent memoir, wittingly or not, paints an extraordinary, even grotesque, picture of the lives of the wealthy.


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy66gxx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j4h)
What happens to whistleblowers

How exposing the truth at work can cost you your career. Theo Leggett speaks to whistleblowers Ian Foxley and Bianca Goodson, both of whom found it impossible to get a new job after exposing wrongdoing at their respective employers. Psychotherapist David Morgan describes the emotional toll on those who choose to expose wrongdoing, and why the majority stay silent. And whistleblower lawyer Mary Inman, partner at the law firm Constantine Cannon, argues that companies need to start seeing whistleblowing as a help rather than a threat.

(Picture credit: Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0l)
The women who reclaimed the night

How women in the North of England took to the streets in the late 1970s to protest against a serial killer dubbed the Yorkshire Ripper. Police advised them to stay indoors to avoid being attacked but the feminist protestors wanted greater protection for women and girls. Rebecca Kesby has been hearing from Al Garthwaite one of the organisers of Britain's first "Reclaim the Night" march.

Photo: women taking part in a Reclaim the Night march. Credit: BBC


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lj7dn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dq8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy66lp1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pq5)
If a tree falls in a forest… does it make a sound?

If a tree falls in a forest, and no-one is there to hear it, does it make a sound? This is an age-old debate that listener Richard and his family have been arguing about for years. Can CrowdScience settle it once and for all?

Caroline Steel speaks to experts in hearing, biology, philosophy, physics and sound design, which takes her to some unexpected places.

Professor Stefan Bleek is an expert in psychoacoustics who says that sounds only exist in our heads.
Dr Eleanor Knox and Dr Bryan Roberts are philosophers that make her question if anything exists outside our own perception. Professor Lilach Hadany wonders if it’s limited to humans and animals - could other plants hear the falling tree too?
And Mat Eric Hart is a sound designer who says that sound is subjective – it’s always tangled up with our own interpretations.

Things get truly weird as we delve into the strange implications of quantum physics. If there is such a thing as reality, doesn’t it change when we’re there to observe it? Does the tree even fall if we aren’t there?

Presented by Caroline Steel
Produced by Anand Jagatia for the BBC World Service

Image: Fallen Tree. Credit: Getty Images


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ljc4s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pdr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy66qf5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct2dmd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2djr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ljgwx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqm2w5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy66v59)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ljln1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jst)
Secrets & Lies: Messages hidden in music

In this episode of our Secrets and Lies series we've delved into the archive to bring you incredible stories of secrets hidden in music.

Advertising executive Juan Carlos Ortiz grew up in Colombia, a country which has suffered decades of armed conflict and has long been among the major producers of illegal drugs. Juan Carlos ran an award-winning campaign against the addictive qualities of cocaine, and made powerful enemies of FARC guerillas who relied on the drugs trade. A few years later, Juan Carlos was asked to get a secret message to hostages being held by FARC rebels in the middle of a jungle. And he chose music as his disguise.

Ata Kak's musical career would never have got off the ground had it not been for the help of a little white lie. But when the Ghanaian musician released his first record in 1994, things stalled again - he sold only a handful of copies. The story would have ended there had it not been for an American student who made a chance discovery at a market stall in Ghana several years later.

Salim Gauwloos became famous dancing with Madonna on her iconic Blond Ambition tour. Madonna used the tour to promote freedom of sexuality and sexual health. All of this made a young Salim feel extremely uncomfortable. The reason he was so anxious was that he was harbouring a secret.

Do you have a story about how a secret or lie changed a life? It could be something that happened to you or someone close to you, or it could just be an amazing story you heard. If so, we'd love to hear about it. Record a short voice memo or write an e-mail and send it to us at outlook@bbc.com. If your story is about someone you know, just make sure they're ok with you telling us about it.


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ljqd5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqmbcf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy672nk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pq5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ljv49)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv50zmv0tfx)
India reports record high daily Covid cases

The Indian state of Maharashtra has applied tighter restrictions following a sharp spike in daily Coronavirus infections, including a night time curfew and weekend lockdown. The head of the state’s COVID-19 task force, Dr Sanjay Oak, tells us the situation is worse than ever.

Also in the programme: the Jordanian prince accused of plotting to destabilise the Kingdom has said he will defy orders to stop communicating with the public; and Myanmar’s beauty queen speaks out against the military coup.

(Photo: Indian commuters use face masks in a street. Credit: EPA/PIYAL ADHIKARY)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ljywf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy67b4t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y47vpyk3608)
England’s new testing regime

As the UK moves towards the end of a series of lockdowns, the government will offer residents in England two rapid coronavirus tests each week. We hear from Health Minister Edward Argar about what to expect and Lord Bilimoria of the Confederation of British Industry discusses the importance of frequent mass testing to get the economy going again. Also in the programme, the BBC's Theo Leggett has been speaking to whistleblowers. We start with retired British Army officer Ian Foxley who tells us about his personal experience. Plus, South Korean electronics giant LG was once a major force in the world of mobile phones. However, the company has said it will end production and sales of its mobile phone business due to its "continued slump amid stiffer competition". We hear from Chris Hall, the editor of technology website Pocket Lint about the LG’s mobile phone heyday.

(Picture: A member of the British Royal Air Force holds a lateral flow antigen covis-19 test swab sample / Credit: Reuters)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lk2mk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfhjq02l0)
Jordanian prince speaks out

Prince Hamza, accused of plotting to destabilise Jordan, says he will defy orders to stop communicating with the outside world. On Sunday the government said the Prince had been involved in a plot that included foreigners. He has dismissed such allegations, but bitterly criticised what he says is corruption and misrule in the kingdom. Our colleague from BBC Arabic brings us the latest developments.

And after the BBC’s Beijing correspondent John Sudworth was forced to leave China following pressure from the authorities, we discuss what’s it like working in China with two other foreign journalists who also have. We ask: how you operate as a correspondent and cover China from another country?

Also in Southern Africa, the Mozambican military says it has taken the town of Palma that was attacked by Islamist militants last month. We speak to our Africa experts about the people who were caught up with the fighting and about the threat of Islamic insurgency in the region.

(Photo: Jordan Prince Hamza bin Hussein, June 9, 2009. Credit: Reuters/Majed Jaber)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lk6cp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfhjq06b4)
Maharashtra goes back into partial lockdown

India recorded 103,558 new Covid cases on Monday, its biggest ever one-day figure, data from the health ministry showed – taking the national total to 12.59 million cases. India’s wealthiest state, Maharashtra, home to the financial capital, Mumbai, says it will impose a weekend lockdown and night curfew on its 110 million people in response to the rise in cases. We hear from people in the state as well as getting the latest developments from our correspondent.

And after the BBC’s Beijing correspondent John Sudworth was forced to leave China following pressure from the authorities, we discuss what’s it like working in China with two other foreign journalists who also have. We ask: how you operate as a correspondent and cover China from another country?

Also in Southern Africa, the Mozambican military says it has taken the town of Palma that was attacked by Islamist militants last month. We speak to our Africa experts about the people who were caught up with the fighting and about the threat of Islamic insurgency in the region.

(Photo: People stands in queue for COVID-19 vaccine in Mumbai, India, 05 April 2021. Credit: EPA/DIVYAKANT SOLANKI)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lkb3t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jst)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lkfvy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqn1v6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy67t4b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n7gskn9p9)
2021/04/05 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lkkm2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dq8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy67xwg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct1m7j)
Lithium: Chile’s white gold

The Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 2019 was awarded to John Goodenough, Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino "for the development of lithium-ion batteries." These rechargeable batteries are in our phones, and in our laptops. And they will be the batteries powering electric vehicles which we are being urged to use in place of ones fuelled by gasoline and diesel. Jane Chambers finds out how the element lithium has become so important in the world today. She lives in Chile, where lithium is called the country’s white gold, as it is the source of much of the world’s supply. Jane travels to the Atacama Desert and visits the SQM mine where lithium is evaporated out of huge brine lakes.

She talks to Professor Clare Grey of Cambridge University about her research into improving the efficiency of lithium ion batteries. And Dr Paul Anderson of Birmingham University explains what needs to be done for more lithium to be recycled.

Editor: Deborah Cohen

Picture: Lithium plant in Atacama Desert, Chile, Credit: SQM


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lkpc6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv50zmv1nnt)
Mozambique government regains control of key coastal town

The Mozambique military says it has regained full control of Palma, following last month's deadly attack by militant Islamists. Also on the programme: the corruption trial of Israel's Prime Minister resumes, and the end of a New York music and drag institution - drag queen Lady Bunny on the closing of the Pyramid Club.

(Photo: Adelino Alberto and his family who fled an attack on the town of Palma are seen at a temporary displacement centre in Pemba, Mozambique)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lkt3b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy685cq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lkxvg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywkm53z7df)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sbpfl3912)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6893v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48p4p4tgdl)
England’s new testing regime

As the UK moves towards the end of a series of lockdowns, the government will offer residents in England two rapid coronavirus tests each week. We hear from Health Minister Edward Argar about what to expect and Lord Bilimoria of the Confederation of British Industry discusses the importance of frequent mass testing to get the economy going again. Also in the programme, the BBC's Theo Leggett has been speaking to whistleblowers. We start with retired British Army officer Ian Foxley who tells us about his personal experience. Plus, South Korean electronics giant LG was once a major force in the world of mobile phones. However, the company has said it will end production and sales of its mobile phone business due to its "continued slump amid stiffer competition". We hear from Chris Hall, the editor of technology website Pocket Lint about the LG’s mobile phone heyday.

(Picture: A member of the British Royal Air Force holds a lateral flow antigen covis-19 test swab sample / Credit: Reuters)



TUESDAY 06 APRIL 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ll5bq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq88yhhjnf)
US calls for minimum global corporation tax

US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen has called for a minimum rate of corporation tax around the world; the BBC's Michelle Fleury explains what the Biden administration is hoping to achieve. Also in the programme, as Senate Minority leader Mitch McConnell hits out at companies protesting against Georgia's new election law, Professor of Law Ciara Torres-Spelliscy discusses what influence corporations can have. Plus, the BBC's Theo Leggett has been speaking to whistleblowers about their careers after exposing wrongdoing. And we hear about the controversy surrounding a new art gallery in Hong Kong.
Our guests throughout the hour are Professor Peter Morici, an economist at the University of Maryland and former Hong Kong government official Rachel Cartland of Cartland Consulting.

(Picture: U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen / Credit: Reuters)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ll92v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqnx23)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy68nc7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2d26)
Don't log off: My life, my world

Alan Dein follows Margaret in Uganda, who cares for nine children orphaned by Aids and who has HIV herself. Told through interviews and her own smartphone recordings, it’s an inspiring story of hope and resilience as Margaret deals with lockdown and the loss of loved ones.

(Photo: A teacher talks to HIV positive orphans during classes. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lldtz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jst)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lljl3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqp4kc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy68wvh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcr)
Fabergé: The iconic maker of bespoke jewellery

The internationally renowned jewellery company Fabergé is best known for its iconic jewelled eggs, which are synonymous with extreme wealth and luxury.

In the Studio has been allowed rare entry inside its doors, where the inner workings of the commissioning process, resulting in the acquisition of a bespoke Fabergé objet d’art, is revealed.

Felicity Finch follows the company’s unusual partnership with The Craft Irish Whiskey Co. who have commissioned the first Celtic jewelled egg, as part of a seven-piece set featuring the oldest triple distilled Irish whiskey in the world.

Felicity speaks with Fabergé’s Global Sales and Business Development Director Josina von dem Bussche-Kessell and Marcus Mohr, the Workmaster who oversees the craftspeople keeping alive the rare, traditional enamelling techniques in their German workshop.

She also meets the whiskey company founder and CEO Jay Bradley, who is hoping his deadline will be met despite the difficulties thrown up by the pandemic. Will the dream of holding his very own Fabergé egg in his hands be fulfilled?

Presented and Produced by Felicity Finch
Executive Produced by Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

Image courtesy of Fabergé


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6llnb7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2kng10qbz)
George Floyd trial: Police chief says Chauvin broke policy

Chief Medaria Arradondo said Mr Floyd's restraint was not in line with training and "certainly not part of our ethics and our values".

There are claims that China is filling the south china sea with its fishing boats to claim sovereignty. Its not clear how much fishing they're doing, but photographs show them tied up together in blocks.

And the story of the sailor stuck on a ship he can't leave


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lls2c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2kng10v33)
150 dead in East Timor after tropical cyclone

There are fears that dozens are missing after a tropical cyclone battered Indonesia and East Timor. We talk to a doctor on the ground.

Hunter Biden, the son of the US president, defends himself in a BBC interview after being accused of inappropriate ties to a company in Ukraine.

And we speak to the Egyptian woman wrongly accused of piloting the big cargo ship which blocked the Suez canal for a more than a week.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6llwth)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2kng10yv7)
More than 150 killed in floods and landslides in East Timor and Indonesia

Torrential rain and landslides have caused widespread destruction in Indonesia and East Timor. We have an update from the ground on the humanitarian situation.

US negotiators join talks in Vienna aimed at salvaging an international agreement on Iran's nuclear programme.

And President Joe Biden's son Hunter opens up in a BBC interview about his struggles with drug and alcohol addiction.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lm0km)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkm)
Helping animals cross the road and other obstacles

Irrigation pipes have been designed to double as mid-air walkways to help slow lorises cross open farmland in Indonesia; and a footbridge has been built for a rare breed of monkey in Brazil - the golden lion tamarin. These are just two examples of new infrastructure designed to help wild animals cope with human obstacles.

Picture credit: Little Fireface Project


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy69cv0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jfj)
Where art and cryptocurrency meet...

When the world of crypto currencies met with the world of art, they created what's called a non-fungible tokens or NFT. Some say NFTs could redefine what we think of as art while others think it’s just the latest crypto craze that may well end in financial losses and tears.
(Picture: Artwork by Jazmine Boykins/ Blacksneakers, courtesy of the artist)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x53)
Mexico's female serial killer

Former female wrestler Juana Barraza was found guilty in March 2008 of murdering at least eleven elderly women in Mexico city over a period of seven years. Barraza, who became known as the "little old lady killer", admitted to murdering three women, and told investigators that it was because of her lingering resentment for the abuse that she'd suffered as a child at the hands of her alcoholic mother. Mike Lanchin has been hearing from Mexican neuro-psychologist Dr Feggy Ostrosky, who spent days interviewing Barraza in jail, trying to understand what had turned her into a serial killer.

(Photo: Former female wrestler Juana Barraza. Credit: David Deolarte/AFP/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lm49r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy69hl4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct1m7j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lm81w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rsp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lmct0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqpzs8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy69r2d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lmhk4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw2)
Secrets & Lies: Fraudsters and forgers

In this episode we're reaching into the archive and retrieving stories of secrets and lies from the world of art.

Over many years Shaun Greenhalgh created art forgeries in his garden shed in the English town of Bolton. He fooled the art world into thinking his paintings and sculptures were lost masterpieces by the likes of Leonardo da Vinci, Gauguin and Degas. The scale and breadth of his work is unprecedented.

The personal story behind one of the most famous art frauds of recent times. Margaret Keane was the artist behind the popular 'Big Eyes' paintings of the 1960s, but her husband Walter Keane bullied her into letting him take the credit for them. He made millions of dollars from them, until Margaret took him to court to prove they were her own. Margaret's story was turned into a feature film by Hollywood director, Tim Burton.

And if all this sharing of secrets has got you thinking about a story in your own life we'd love to hear it. Write to us, or send a short voice memo to outlook@bbc.com. The secret could be about you or someone you know, or it could just be a fantastic tale you heard. If your story is about someone you know, just make sure they're ok with you telling us about it.


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x53)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lmm98)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqq78j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy69zkn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct1m7j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lmr1d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv50zmv3qc0)
Can the Iran nuclear deal be revived?

Attempts have begun to revive the Iran nuclear deal or JCPOA, which the Trump Administration withdrew from in 2018. In Vienna today the remaining signatories of the deal: Russia, China, France, Britain and Germany join Iran for consultations to pave way for Washington's return; a US delegation is set to take part indirectly.

Also in the programme: the World Peace Foundation attached to Tufts University in Boston accuses Ethiopia and its allies of "starvation crimes" in Tigray - we hear from an eyewitness. And after North Korea says it will not participate in the Tokyo Olympics, we assess the situation on the ground.

(Picture: Meeting of JCPOA Joint Commission in Vienna / Credit: Reuters Wires)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lmvsj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6b71x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bb14c8067)
Credit Suisse axes top executives and bonuses amid huge losses

Credit Suisse replaced two key executives and cut bonuses amid the fallout from two major business relationships. Greensill Capital and hedge fund Archegos Capital Management, which were linked to the Swiss banking giant, imploded in recent weeks with major losses. Perter Hody from Finnews.com in Zurich gives his insight on Credit Suisse and its involvement. Also in the programme, we hear how the European Union has approved almost $5 billion in French government aid for Air France which, like many airlines, is struggling with the impact of the pandemic. Plus, could non-fungible tokens or NFT redefine what we think of as art or is it just the latest crypto fad? The BBC’s Manuela Saragosa tells us what happens when the world of crypto currencies and art world collide.

(Photo: A sign of Swiss banking Credit Suisse on their Zurich headquarters / Credit: Fabrice COFFRINI / AFP / Getty Images)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lmzjn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfhjq2zh3)
Coronavirus: Tanzania

We hear from our reporter in Dar es Salaam about major changes in the country's approach to the Covid-19 pandemic. The new Tanzanian President Samia Suluhu Hassan is to set up a taskforce of experts to advise the government in a significant departure to the approach of late President Magufuli.

Dr Isaac Bogoch is an infectious diseases physician and scientist from the University of Toronto. He joins us to discuss the latest lines on the global pandemic and answers questions from the audience.

And we learn about the BBC’s audience event Crossing Divides that this year has brought together people in Lebanon to exchange views on issues they feel passionately about. Participants explain why they wanted to have conversations about whether young people can make a greater contribution to the future of Lebanon by staying in the country. They were trying out a “deep listening” method and explain how it helped them to understand someone else’s point of view.

Picture: Tanzania"s new President Samia Suluhu Hassan takes oath of office following the death of her predecessor John Pombe Magufuli at State House in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania (March 19, 2021). Credit: REUTERS/Stringer/File Photo


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ln38s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfhjq3377)
UK investigates 'Covid passports'

The British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has announced an easing of coronavirus restrictions in England from next week. The big conversation since is the idea of proving your Covid status to access certain events or foreign travel through Covid certificates or passports. But for some the idea is controversial. More than 70 MPs, including 40 from the Prime Minister's own Conservative party, have signed a pledge to oppose the idea, calling it '“divisive and discriminatory'. We hear the differing views from across the UK.

And we hear from our reporter in Dar es Salaam about major changes in the country's approach to the Covid-19 pandemic. The new Tanzanian President Samia Suluhu Hassan is to set up a taskforce of experts to advise the government in a significant departure to the approach of late President Magufuli.

Also we learn about the BBC’s audience event Crossing Divides that this year has brought together people in Lebanon to exchange views on issues they feel passionately about. Participants explain why they wanted to have conversations about whether young people can make a greater contribution to the future of Lebanon by staying in the country. They were trying out a “deep listening” method and explain how it helped them to understand someone else’s point of view.

(Photo: Prime Minister Boris Johnson during a coronavirus media briefing in Downing Street, London, April 5, 2021. Credit: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ln70x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x53)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lnbs1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqqyr9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6bq1f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n7gskr6ld)
2021/04/06 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lngj5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6btsk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lrt)
Phones sending data every 4.5 minutes

Our smartphones are sharing data every four and a half minutes according to research from Trinity College Dublin. Telemetry, automated recording and transmission of data, from Apple and Android devices back to these company’s servers is going on even if the phone is only used to make calls. Professor Douglas Leith is on the programme and explains that even when a user has logged out of sending telemetry or they are not logged on, data is still being transmitted.

R.U.R. versus Q.U.R.
The 1921 play Rossum’s Universal Robots (R.U.R.) by Karel C̆apek gave rise to the term “robot,” but the 1941 short story Quinby’s Usuform Robots (Q.U.R.) by Anthony Boucher more accurately reflects today’s robots says Professor Robin Murphy from Texas A&M University. Robin, herself a disaster robotics specialist, is on the show to discuss how these two different ideas developed in very different social and political climates and what we can learn from both these Sci-fi stories.

Virtual Stadium Noise
If you've been watching sport in the last few months you may have noticed that stadiums are almost empty. But when you watch the game, it's very likely that you will hear a crowd cheering the players on. So what's going on? It looks like broadcasters are turning to video games, for the sound of the crowd. Our reporter Chris Berrow has been finding out.



(Image credit: Getty Images)



The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Angelica Mari.

Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lnl89)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv50zmv4kkx)
US and Iran begin indirect talks

The talks in Vienna aim to revive the international deal on Iran's nuclear programme. Also on the programme: concerns for the health of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, mineral mining in Greenland, and an interview with President Biden's son, Hunter.

(Photo: Iranian flag flies in front of the IAEA headquarters in Vienna. Credit: Reuters/Lisi Niesne)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lnq0f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6c28t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lntrk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywkm54249j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sbpfl65y5)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6c60y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48p4p4xc9p)
Credit Suisse axes top executives and bonuses amid huge losses

Credit Suisse replaced two key executives and cut bonuses amid the fallout from two major business relationships. Greensill Capital and hedge fund Archegos Capital Management, which were linked to the Swiss banking giant, imploded in recent weeks with major losses. Peter Hody from Finnews.com in Zurich gives his insight on Credit Suisse and its involvement. Also in the programme, we hear how the European Union has approved almost $5 billion in French government aid for Air France which, like many airlines, is struggling with the impact of the pandemic. Plus, could non-fungible tokens or NFT redefine what we think of as art or is it just the latest crypto fad? The BBC’s Manuela Saragosa tells us what happens when the world of crypto currencies and art world collide. And the rich are getting richer according to Forbes latest 'billionaires list' - we hear from Kerry Dolan, Assistant Managing Editor of Wealth at Forbes.

(Photo: A sign of Swiss banking Credit Suisse on their Zurich headquarters / Credit: Fabrice COFFRINI / AFP / Getty Images)



WEDNESDAY 07 APRIL 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lp27t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq88yhlfkj)
IMF: Rich world recovering faster than expected

The IMF says that the rich world is recovering faster than expected from the downturn resulting from the pandemic. But what about the developing world? Jubilee USA campaigns for debt relief for developing countries - we speak to its executive director, Eric Le Compte. And in a world struggling to pull itself out of a pandemic, lockdowns and recession, why are there quite so many billionaires? We hear from Kerry Dolan, Assistant Managing Editor of Wealth at Forbes about their latest rich list. Credit Suisse replaced two key executives and cut bonuses amid the fallout from two major business relationships; Peter Hody from Finnews.com in Zurich analyses what went wrong. And we're joined throughout the programme by Mehmal Sarfraz, journalist and co-founder The Current in Lahore, Pakistan; we're also joined by Tony Nash, chief economist at Complete Intelligence in Houston Texas. (Picture of IMF sign by Saul Loeb via Getty Images).


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lp5zy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqrsz6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6ck8b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct29bz)
Water: Too Much And Not Enough

Ecological crises

Journalist Alok Jha argues that if humans are to survive and thrive for the rest of the 21st Century we must urgently transform our relationship with water.

Many of the serious geopolitical tensions over water as a resource that we looked at in the previous episode of this series are rooted in worsening ecological crises. In this episode, Alok shows how the global water crisis is inextricably linked to the climate crisis – and how neither can be dealt with alone.

In Bangalore, we hear how incredible pollution levels led to a lake catching fire, before revealing how local water management decisions play into the global groundwater emergency. Then former Nasa scientist Jay Famiglietti provides a satellite perspective on the problem, showing how water disasters are both a result of the climate crisis and help fuel it.

Back on earth, we hear what this means for Hindou Ibrahim’s pastoralist cattle herder community living on the edge of the rapidly shrinking Lake Chad, and Alok puts water lobbyist Maggie White on the spot to ask why water is not the urgent global priority it should be for leading politicians and policymakers.

(Photo: Aerial photo of the Lake Chad, in the Bol region, 200km from Chad capital city N'Djamena. Credit: Sia Kambou/AFP/Getty Images)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lp9r2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x53)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lpfh6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqs1gg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6csrl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8c)
The UN Deputy Secretary General

In 2015 the United Nations announced a radical plan to change the world.

Global leaders drew up a list of 17 "sustainable development goals" to create a blueprint for a better future. Governments agreed to support the goals which cover gender equality, health provision, a good education and much more. We asked 17-year-olds from 17 different countries tell us what they think needs to change if the world is to meet those goals by 2030.

This week, to coincide with the UN's Youth Forum, the Deputy Secretary General of the United Nations, Amina Mohammed, has answered questions from four of Project 17's teenagers. Yolanda Nazo, Hereiti File, Sahar Beg and Lanre Adeleye have all made programmes with the BBC about different goals. Now they get to hear from a world leader about what's being done to make change happen - and they are asked by Amina Mohammed what they are doing to make a difference.

Presenter: Sana Safi
Producer: Joe Kent

Project 17 is produced in partnership with The Open University


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lpk7b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2kng13m82)
Record virus deaths in Brazil

Brazil has recorded more than 4,000 deaths in 24 hours for the first time. Hospitals are overwhelmed. We're joined by a doctor on the medical frontline.

One of Myanmar's best known comedians, the 60 year old satirist Zarganar, is among those reportedly arrested in the latest crackdown by the military authorities.

And the man accused of wanting to destroy humanity - just by standing up for Covid science. We hear from an American evangelical Christian who says some of his brethren have been politicised against masks and vaccines.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lpnzg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2kng13r06)
Covid deaths in Brazil reach a record high

There have been more than four thousand deaths in Brazil from Covid in a single day. The public health system is overwhelmed as the virus spirals out of control.

The jailed Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny is moved to an infirmary as his health declines further. His doctor is arrested while protesting.

And our correspondent visits The Czech town of Terezin, best known as the site of a Nazi concentration camp. Many of its buildings are now falling into disrepair and that's a concern for some Holocaust survivors.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lpsql)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2kng13vrb)
Brazil Covid deaths reach 4,000 in one day

Brazil's hospitals are overwhelmed as new variants fuel the pandemic. We speak to a doctor on the frontline.

The European Medical Agency is expected to publish its latest advice on the AstraZeneca vaccine - will it make a link to blood clots?

And after decades of a strict one child policy, our correspondent in China finds convincing parents to have more kids is not so easy.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lpxgq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb0)
Ken Rogoff: Does Bidenomics make sense?

The Covid pandemic looks like a watershed moment in global economics. Big Government is back as the failsafe engine of economic growth, as the usual fears such as soaring debt and rising inflation have been pushed aside. Stephen Sackur interviews acclaimed US economist Ken Rogoff, once dubbed ‘the godfather of austerity’. Is he a convert to Bidenomics?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6d8r3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jn9)
Tracing cotton’s DNA

Can technology help eradicate forced labour from global cotton supplies? A confrontation continues to rise between Western powers, global brands, and the Chinese authorities over the use of forced labour and human rights abuse in cotton production in the western region of Xinjiang. Sophie Richardson, China director at Human Rights Watch, explains why transparency from the Chinese authorities over the whole cotton supply chain is unlikely to be forthcoming. With that in mind, some technology companies are volunteering their services to mark or trace the DNA of cotton, so apparel companies can be sure that it's not from a region with suspected forced labour. Jim Hayward, CEO of Applied DNA Sciences, explains how their particular cotton tagging technology works. But John Gapper, business columnist at the Financial Times, cautions that without larger industry willingness to uproot their business models, at considerable cost, the tech can only go so far to solve the problem.

Presenter: Tamasin Ford
Producer: Frey Lindsay

(Picture: Cotton from fields in Xinjiang, China is displayed in the palm of a cotton-picker's hand. Picture credit: FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7c)
David Attenborough's first expedition

In 1954, the BBC broadcast a new television programme in Britain. It was called Zoo Quest and it launched the career of a man who has since brought the natural world into millions of homes around the world, the broadcaster Sir David Attenborough. Louise Hidalgo has been listening back through the BBC archives to Sir David telling the story of the first natural history expedition for Zoo Quest, to Sierra Leone in West Africa.

Picture: David Attenborough, producer of the BBC wildlife documentary series Zoo Quest, and Jack Lester (right), curator of London Zoo's reptile house, planning their next expedition with the help of Gregory the parrot, March 1955 (Credit: William Vanderson/Fox Photos/Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lq16v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct29bz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6ddh7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lrt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lq4yz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lq8q3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqswpc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6dmzh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lqdg7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyb)
Secrets & Lies: Imposters

This episode of our Secrets and Lies series is all about imposters. From the Outlook archive, we have two stories of lies so audacious that, when exposed, they caused shockwaves globally.

Fab Morvan became world famous with the 80s pop band Milli Vanilli. He and his bandmate Rob Pilatus notched up number one hits in Europe and America, and sold millions of albums. But they had a secret - and when that secret came out, it had a devastating effect.

Rachel DeLoache Williams ended up in the midst of a high-profile court case in the United States. It all centred on Anna Sorokin - someone she had considered to be a close friend but who she says conned her out of tens of thousands of dollars. Anna had tricked New York city’s elite into thinking she was a wealthy German heiress, when in fact she was a fraudster with no trust fund at all. Anna was found guilty on a number of charges including grand larceny and served nearly four years in prison.

Do you have a fantastic story involving a secret or a lie? We'd love to hear about it. Record a short voice memo or write an e-mail and send it to us at outlook@bbc.com. If your story is about someone you know, just make sure they're ok with you telling us about it.


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lqj6c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqt45m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6dwgr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lrt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lqmyh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv50zmv6m83)
Brazil breaks daily Covid deaths record

Brazil registered 4,195 deaths associated with Covid-19 in the last 24 hours, a new daily maximum, and accumulated 336,947 deaths since the start of the pandemic just over a year ago.

Also in the programme: Amnesty International's new boss on the lessons of 2020; and a return to Terezin the former Nazi concentration camp.

(Picture: A cross is seen in the Sao Francisco Xavier cemetery, where victims of COVID-19 are buried in Rio de Janeiro. credit: EPA/Antonio Lacerda)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lqrpm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6f3z0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4ck678cvr8)
Amazon boss Jeff Bezos backs corporate tax hikes

There is a growing consensus between western governments that corporations should pay more tax on their profits following years of cuts to business taxes. The debate was revived this week by US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen. Amazon’s Jeff Bezos – singled out by President Biden for not paying enough - has said he supports raising taxes on US companies. Alex Cobham, the Chief Executive of the Tax Justice Network, which campaigns for global tax reform discusses the proposed changes to the current tax regime. Also in the programme, as Brazil becomes the global epicentre of the coronavirus pandemic, recording more than 4,000 Covid-related deaths in 24 hours, the government is planning an infrastructure sale. The BBC’s Thais Carranca explains why the state is selling-off the operating rights to 22 of the country's airports, five ports and a railway line and how the US $1.75 billion they hope to raise will be used. Plus, Greenland's opposition party has won an election, which could have major consequences for international mining interests in the Arctic. Birger Poppel, a researcher at the University of Greenland tells us what this could mean for the country’s large deposits of rare earth metals.

(Photo: Jeff Bezos at an Amazon news conference in Seattle / Credit: Reuters / Jason Redmond)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lqwfr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfhjq5wd6)
Coronavirus: Benefits of AstraZeneca jab 'outweigh risks'

We start with an update on the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, following an investigation by the the UK medicines regulator into whether it is directly causing rare brain clots. The EU has also been outlining its findings of a review of the jab's safety, saying "unusual blood clots with low blood platelets should be listed as very rare side effects". Our health correspondent brings us more, and today's medical expert, Dr Maria Sundaram, takes us through some of the other coronavirus lines of the day.

Also, we go to Brazil, where there have been more than 4,000 Covid-related deaths in 24 hours for the first time. We speak to our teams on the ground and Brazilians being impacted by the surge in infections.

And doctors in Nigeria have started an indefinite strike, asking for better pay and insurance. We connect to two doctors who tell us what it's been like working during the pandemic.

(Photo: Vial labelled "AstraZeneca coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine" placed on displayed EU flag. Credit: Reuters/Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File Photo)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lr05w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfhjq604b)
Coronavirus: Brazil records more than 4,000 daily deaths for the first time

Brazil, one of the countries worst-hit by coronavirus, has recorded more than 4,000 Covid-related deaths in 24 hours for the first time. We speak to Brazilians impacted by the surge in infections and a doctor in the country.

Also, we bring you the latest on the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, following an investigation by the the UK medicines regulator into whether the vaccine is directly causing rare brain clots. The EU has also been outlining its findings of a review of the jab's safety, saying "unusual blood clots with low blood platelets should be listed as very rare side effects".

And doctors in Nigeria have started an indefinite strike, asking for better pay and insurance. We connect to two doctors who tell us what it's been like working during the pandemic.

(Photo: A nurse holds balloons during a protest asking for COVID-19 vaccines and in favour of SUS (Unique Health System) during World Health Day in Brasilia, Brazil. Credit: Reuters/Adriano Machad)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lr3y0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lr7p4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqtvnd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6flyj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n7gskv3hh)
2021/04/07 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lrcf8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct29bz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6fqpn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv1)
Mental Health and the long term implications of Covid

Mental Health and Covid; Claudia examines a large new Lancet Psychiatry study showing that one in three people develop anxiety, depression or a neurological problem in the six months after they were ill with the virus.

Ten years on from the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster in Japan. Professor Jun Shigemura discusses whether the unseen threat of exposure to radiation can teach us anything about dealing with the hidden threat of the current Covid-19 virus.

A report from Nigeria on how some people with fractures may turn to the traditional bonesetter to get their bones mended. Charles Mgbolu reports from Lagos.

And diagnosing concussion: how a team at the University of Birmingham in the UK has developed a saliva test which can detect whether someone with a bang on the head during sport can safely return to the game. Professor Tony Belli explains the science behind the test.

Plus Claudia’s studio guest is Graham Easton, Professor of Clinical Communication Skills at Barts and the London Medical School.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: A traditional Japanese kite, bearing messages of hope by children living in Fukushima prefecture, is flown over the Great East Japan Earthquake and Nuclear Disaster Memorial Museum in Futaba town on the eve of the 10th anniversary of the disaster. Photo credit: Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lrh5d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv50zmv7gh0)
EU regulator says blood clotting is a 'very rare AstraZeneca side effect'

The European Medicines Agency says unusual blood clots should be listed as a very rare side effect of the AstraZeneca vaccine for Covid-19. The UK's vaccine advisory body in its own press conference said under-30s would be offered an alternative jab to AstraZeneca. Also in the programme: we'll hear from Hungary's government spokesman about the country's decision to ease Covid-19 restrictions despite some doctors saying it's too early; and not even kryptonite could stop Superman's first appearance in a comic book from breaking records.

(Photo: A medical worker prepares an injection with a dose of AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine, at a vaccination centre in Zagreb, Croatia, April 7, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Antonio Bronic).


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lrlxj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6fz5x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lrqnn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywkm54516m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sbpfl92v8)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6g2y1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48p4p5086s)
Amazon boss Jeff Bezos backs corporate tax hikes

There is a growing consensus between western governments that corporations should pay more tax on their profits following years of cuts to business taxes. The debate was revived this week by US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen. Amazon’s Jeff Bezos – singled out by President Biden for not paying enough - has said he supports raising taxes on US companies. Alex Cobham, the Chief Executive of the Tax Justice Network, which campaigns for global tax reform discusses the proposed changes to the current tax regime. Also in the programme, as Brazil becomes the global epicentre of the coronavirus pandemic, recording more than 4,000 Covid-related deaths in 24 hours, the government is planning an infrastructure sale. The BBC’s Thais Carranca explains why the state is selling-off the operating rights to 22 of the country's airports, five ports and a railway line and how the US $1.75 billion they hope to raise will be used. Plus, Greenland's opposition party has won an election, which could have major consequences for international mining interests in the Arctic. Birger Poppel, a researcher at the University of Greenland tells us what this could mean for the country’s large deposits of rare earth metals.

(Photo: Jeff Bezos at an Amazon news conference in Seattle / Credit: Reuters / Jason Redmond)



THURSDAY 08 APRIL 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lrz4x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq88yhpbgm)
Covid cases rise in India and Brazil

We analyse how a rise in Covid cases is affecting two of the world 's largest economies; India and Brazil. There's a growing consensus between western governments that corporations should pay more tax on their profits following years of cuts to business taxes; we hear from Alex Cobham, the Chief Executive of the Tax Justice Network, which campaigns for global tax reform. Plus, Greenland's opposition party has won an election which could have major consequences for international mining interests in the Arctic. Birger Poppel, a researcher at the University of Greenland tells us what this could mean for the country’s large deposits of rare earth metals. The founder of the dating app Bumble Whitney Wolfe Herd has joined Forbes list of the super rich, which shows how popular dating apps have become; we speak to relationship coach Jo Barnett. And we're joined throughout the programme by Jeanette Rodriguez from Bloomberg in Mumbai and communications analyst Ralph Silver in Toronto. (Picture of coronavirus via Getty Images).


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ls2x1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqvpw9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6gg5f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gx3)
Denmark: Goodbye to mink

Can Denmark's mink industry rise again? Denmark was the world's top producer of mink for the luxury market. Last year a coronavirus variant was found in the animals, and transmitted to people. There was a fear the variant - Cluster 5 - might interfere with the efficacy of any vaccine developed for humans. So in November, the Danish government ordered a cull of all 17 million farmed mink. But questions have continued to be asked about the decision to effectively end production. Was it driven by an anti-fur, political agenda? Was the science reliable? For Assignment Linda Pressly and Danish journalist, Rikke Bolander, meet some of those with skin in the game. What are the chances of a revival of Denmark's mink business?

Producers/presenters: Linda Pressly and Rikke Bolander
Editor, Bridget Harney

(Image: A mink in a cage on a Danish fur farm. Credit: Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ls6n5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lsbd9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqvyck)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6gpnp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rff)
Portion distortion

Serving sizes have increased dramatically in recent decades. It’s happened so subtly that many of us simply don't realise, but it’s having a serious impact on our health and our planet. So, how can we reverse it?

Emily Thomas learns how food manufacturers and clever marketers have nudged us into buying ever larger portions, leveraging ultra cheap ingredients and our own psychology. We hear that the phenomenon is so pervasive it’s also crept into the home, where many of us have lost any concept of what an appropriate portion is.

Given the increasing awareness of the poor health and environmental outcomes linked to overconsumption, we find out what regulators and companies are doing to shrink portions back to a more sustainable size, and ask whether the real answer might lie in a fundamental shift in the way we all value food.

Producer: Simon Tulett

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: A woman drinking from a giant coffee cup. Credit: Getty/BBC)

Contributors:

Pierre Chandon, professor of marketing and director of the INSEAD Sorbonne University Behavioural Lab, Paris;
Theresa Marteau, director of the behaviour and health research unit at Cambridge University;
Denise Chen, chief sustainability officer at Melco Resorts & Entertainment, Hong Kong.


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lsg4f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2kng16j55)
Top Myanmar celebrity arrested

The 24 year old actor and model Paing Takhon has been arrested by the military after speaking out against the coup.

Questions have been raised about the Oxford-Astrazeneca vaccine's very rare side effects. A world expert urges us to retain our perspective.

And we’ll hear how China is trying to persuade its citizens to get vaccinated.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lskwk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2kng16mx9)
Famous Myanmar actor and model arrested

Paing Takhon is a model and actor and one of Myanmar's most popular celebrities. He was detained in a dawn raid after protesting against the military, and his fans have mounted a massive campaign for his release.

European nations fail to agree over how to deal with the AstraZeneca jab. There's growing evidence of a link between the vaccine and a very small risk of blood clots. But experts and the statistics do agree the benefits of mass vaccination outweigh the risks.

And we walk around a London park to find out how climate change is affecting local trees and hear about the key role of oaks.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lspmp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2kng16rnf)
One of Myanmar's biggest celebrities arrested

The popular actor and model Paing Takhon has been arrested. He had been pushing for a return to democracy. We'll hear why he was targeted by the military rulers.

Hardly a day goes by without questions being asked about the safety of the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine. Now the UK recommends an alternative for the under 30s. We'll have reaction from Germany, one of the first countries to raise doubts.

Across France, theatres have been occupied by protestors calling for more government help for the arts during the pandemic. Gregory Montel star of Netflix series Call My Agent has lent his support.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lstct)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1r)
Why has Peru had such a bad pandemic?

Peru has suffered one of the highest excess death levels in the world. The government failed to take account of the structure of society and the needs of its people in its response to the pandemic. A culture of corruption and political turmoil are persistent themes that have led to an underfunded health system and a lack of focus how Peruvian people would be able to cope during the dark months of a deadly pandemic. Instead vast numbers of casual workers lost their jobs and started to trek home, taking the virus with them. Also remote communities were cut off by the freeze on transport and unable to get access to vital medical supplies, amid a dwindling supply of oxygen to treat them. We take a look at what lies beneath Peru’s terrible experience during the pandemic.

Presenter: Tanya Beckett
Producer: Nathan Gower

(Peruvians protest at a political rally, March 25, 2021. Credit: Ernesto Benavides/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6h5n6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j90)
Mining the ocean

How rocks on the ocean floor could be key to the transition to electric cars. Justin Rowlatt speaks to Gerard Barron, boss of DeepGreen, a company that wants to gather rocks from the ocean floors rich in the metals essential for making electric car batteries. He tells us why this kind of mining is crucial to transitioning away from fossil fuels. Louisa Casson, senior campaigner with Greenpeace, warns of the environmental devastation this could cause. And zoologist Adrian Glover tells us how mining could take place alongside conservation of the deep seabed.

(Photo: A sunset over an ocean, Credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2v)
From Leningrad to St Petersburg

As the communist system in the former Soviet Union was collapsing in 1991, the people of Leningrad voted to drop Vladimir Lenin's name abandoning the city's revolutionary heritage and returning to its historic name of St Petersburg. Dina Newman spoke to Ludmilla Narusova, wife of the first St Petersburg mayor, Anatoli Sobchak, who campaigned for the hugely symbolic change.

This programme is a rebroadcast - it was first aired in 2018.

Photo: Communist campaigners demonstrate against the name change in Leningrad in 1991. Credit: Sobchak Foundation.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lsy3y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gx3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6h9db)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lt1w2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rky)
Rabindranath Tagore: The Bard of Bengal

So prodigious was the polymath Rabindranath Tagore, there’s a saying in Bengal that one lifetime is not enough to consume all of his work. Poet, playwright, thinker, activist, educator, social reformer, composer, artist… the list of his talents is long. Today his name is known all over India and Bangladesh; children recite his poetry at school and his legacy lives on in many different ways.

When he became the first non-European to win the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913, Tagore was feted for a time by American and European literary figures who saw in him someone who embodied Western preconceptions of a mystic Oriental sage. As a result of his newfound fame outside India, Tagore travelled widely and exchanged ideas with many celebrated world leaders and thinkers from Einstein to Gandhi. Today Tagore’s thoughts on education and his stance vis-à-vis the natural world and our relationship to the environment are seen as remarkably forward-looking.

Rajan Datar is joined by Kathleen O’Connell, retired lecturer in South Asian Studies from the University of Toronto and the author of Rabindranath Tagore: the Poet as Educator; the writer Aseem Shrivastava who lectures on Tagore and his ecological thought at Ashoka University in Delhi; and Chandrika Kaul, Reader in Modern History at the University of St Andrews, who’s published widely on imperial and modern India.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service.

[Photo: Rabindranath Tagore. Credit: Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l7z)
Kuwait at the football World Cup

In 1982, Kuwait made their first and only appearance at the football World Cup, with their amateur side putting up respectable performances against France and England. But press attention focused on the Kuwaitis’ team mascot – a camel called Haydoo, who became such a fan favourite that he even inspired a hit song. Sumaya Bakhsh talks to Kuwait captain, Saad al-Houty, about how Haydoo came to represent national pride for a team that had been dismissed by the foreign media as a bunch of camel-herders.

PHOTO: Saad al-Houty (Personal Collection)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lt5m6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqwslg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6hjwl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rff)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lt9cb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2v)
Secrets & Lies: Family secrets

In episode nine of Outlook's Secrets and Lies series we bring you two extraordinary stories of family secrets unravelled.

Growing up in California, Rachel Mason and her brother Josh didn't know exactly what was sold in their unassuming and straight-laced parents' bookstore. They had no idea the shop was actually one of the biggest distributors of adult material, specifically gay porn, in the US. The bookshop became a haven for the queer community as Karen and Barry supported gay employees throughout the HIV and Aids crisis in the 1980s, all the while hiding the business from family and friends. Rachel has made a documentary about their story called Circus of Books.

Scottish actor Alan Cumming is the star of Hollywood films like X-Men and the hit TV series The Good Wife, but for him the real drama is in the family secrets that have shaped his life and career.

And if all this sharing of secrets has got you thinking about a story in your own life we'd love to hear it. Write to us, or send a short voice memo to outlook@bbc.com. The secret could be about you or someone you know, or it could just be a fantastic tale you heard. If your story is about someone you know, just make sure they're ok with you telling us about it.


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ltf3g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqx12q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6hscv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ltjvl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv50zmv9j56)
India coronavirus: Can its vaccine producers meet demand?

As India tries to vaccinate its population, we hear from a doctor in Maharashtra state. It has a very high Covid-19 infection rate.

Also in the programme: We speak to the Director of the Oxford Vaccine programme about public trust in the AstraZeneca vaccine; and petrol bombs are thrown in another night of violence in Northern Ireland.

(Photo: India has been exporting AstraZeneca vaccines around the world. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ltnlq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6j0w3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y492w1gdvch)
World’s biggest vaccine-maker faces supply issues

The Serum Institute of India, the world’s biggest maker of vaccines, has accused Europe and the US of holding back vital raw materials needed for production. Procurement specialist, Simon Geale, tells us why India is facing supply chain challenges.
Also in the programme, we hear the latest on The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam - Africa's largest hydroelectric project. Earlier this week, talks broke down between Egypt and Sudan – countries that fiercely oppose the project - and Ethiopia. A journalist based in Ethiopia’s capital Addis Ababa, Samuel Getachew, tells us why discussions to find a compromise between the countries has collapsed.
Plus, the BBC’s Vincent Dowd reports on Broadway, the commercial theatre district in New York City. The neighbourhood's 41 theatres closed just over a year ago, but some are hoping to reopen in September. We hear from top theatre producers who say they will only return with every seat sold.

(Picture: Covid-19 vaccines. Credit: Reuters)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ltsbv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfhjq8s99)
Coronavirus symptoms: Loss of smell and taste

We connect people in Costa Rica, the UK and the United States who have all experienced a loss or change in their sense of taste or smell for months after having Covid-19. We also talk about their experiences with a medical professor who specialises in taste and smell.

Australia has become the latest country to limit the use of the Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid vaccine because of a possible link with rare cases of blood clotting. Our medical expert answers audience questions about Covid vaccines and other coronavirus stories.

And we explain the reasons behind violence on the streets of Northern Ireland in the past few days, with links to the politics of Brexit and the policing of coronavirus restrictions part of the discussion.

(Photo: Lisa Fox. Credit: Lisa Fox)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ltx2z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfhjq8x1f)
Coronavirus: Brazil's deepening crisis

We continue to speak to people in Brazil about the serious situation with the coronavirus outbreak. Yesterday we heard from Sao Paolo and Salvador and today we hear from two journalists, one in the state of Minas Gerais and another in Santa Catarina. They describe the situation as "disastrous" with people dying while waiting for a hospital bed.

We connect people in Costa Rica, the UK and the United States who have all experienced a loss or change in their sense of taste or smell for months after having Covid-19. We also talk about their experiences with a medical professor who specialises in taste and smell.

We'll also discuss the Biden administration's announcements on guns in the United States. The president is due to sign an executive order to try to reduce the number of so-called "ghost guns" - homemade weapons with no serial number, which are difficult to trace.

(Photo: Gravediggers wearing protective suits handle bags of bones during exhumations to open space on cement graves as new burials are suspended, except private deposits and children, at Vila Nova Cachoeirinha cemetery amid the outbreak of the coronavirus disease in Sao Paulo, Brazil on April 1, 2021. Credit: Amanda Perobelli/File Photo/Reuters)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lv0v3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lv4l7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqxrkh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6jhvm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n7gsky0dl)
2021/04/08 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lv8bc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gx3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6jmlr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3g)
On the trail of rare blood clots

On Wednesday the EU’s EMA and UK’s JCVI announced a suspected correlation between vaccination and an extremely rare type of blood clot. Prof Sabine Eichinger is a co-author of a new paper suggesting a link with vaccination or the immune response to Covid vaccination and suggests the name VIPIT for the condition. One of her patients died at the end of February having presented with a rare combination of symptoms – blood clots and a low blood platelet count. Sabine tells Roland the dots they have managed to join in the story so far.

Scientists at Fermilab in the USA posted four papers and announced an exciting development in particle physics that might lift the curtain on science beyond the Standard Model. Their measurement of something known as g-2 (“gee minus two”, just fyi), by measuring with phenomenal accuracy the magnetic properties of muons flying round in circles confirms a 20-year old attempt at a similar value by colleagues at Brookhaven. At the time, it was breathtaking but suspicious. Muons, rather like heavy electrons, don’t quite behave as the Standard Model might have us believe, hinting at fields and possibly particles or forces hitherto unknown. Dr. Harry Cliffe – a member of the LHCb team who found something similarly weird two weeks ago - describes the finding and the level of excitement amongst theorists worldwide.

Superfans around the world have learned to speak fluent Klingon, a fictional language originating from Star Trek. In a quest to understand the science behind these languages often dismissed as gobbledygook, Gaia Vince has been speaking to some of the linguists responsible for creating these languages. It’s time for her to relax the tongue, loosen those jaw muscles and wrap her head around the scientific building blocks embedded in language and what languages like Klingon tell us about prehistoric forms of communication.

Meanwhile, primatologist Edward Wright of the Max Plank Institute has been hanging out with mountain gorillas in Rwanda and recording the sound of their “chest clapping”. As he describes in the journal Scientific Reports his work confirms what scientists have long suspected - that the famous gesture - often portrayed in films - is a measure of size and strength - allowing communication in the dense, tropical forests in which the animals live.



Image: Platelets, computer illustration. Credit: Sebastian Kaulitzki /Science Photo Library via Getty Images

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lvd2h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv50zmvbcd3)
AstraZeneca vaccine: Will the risks associated with it dent confidence in Africa?

The advice from the Africa Vaccine Delivery Alliance for COVID-19 is to get inoculated as the risks associated with the vaccine are far less than the health risks associated with contracting the coronavirus.

Also on the programme: President Biden sets out measures to tackle what he says is an epidemic of gun violence in the United States; and the UN calls for an end to forced sterilisation which has been reported in nearly 40 countries.

(Photo: Amref Health Africa Group Chief Executive Officer Dr. Githinji Gitahi receives the AstraZeneca vaccine under the COVAX scheme Credit: Reuters/Monicah Mwangi)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lvhtm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6jw30)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rff)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lvmkr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywkm547y3q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sbpflczrc)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6jzv4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48p4p5353w)
World’s biggest vaccine-maker facing supply chain woes

The Serum Institute of India, the world’s biggest maker of vaccines, has accused Europe and the United States of holding back vital raw materials needed for production. We hear from Adar Poornawalla, the chief executive of the vaccine manufacturer, who says India’s requirements will be made a priority. In addition, procurement specialist, Simon Geale tells us why India is facing supply chain challenges. Plus, we look ahead to this year's Black British Business Awards with the event's organiser, Melanie Eusebe. And the BBC’s Vincent Dowd reports on Broadway, the commercial theatre district in New York City. The neighbourhood's 41 theatres closed just over a year ago, however some are hopeful that these venues could reopen in September. We hear from top theatre producers who say they will only return with every seat sold.

(Picture: Line of vials of COVID-19 Coronavirus Vaccine are placed on dry ice / Credit: Reuters/Dado Ruvic)



FRIDAY 09 APRIL 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lvw20)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq88yhs7cq)
Vaccine equality and economic recovery

Today - three of the most important people in global finance get together to thrash out ideas about ways of averting vaccine inequality and the economic inequality that will be made worse as a result. Saudi Arabia has begun operating its first renewable energy project - a solar power plant; we hear from Professor Karen Young, a Resident Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington DC. We look ahead to this year's Black British Business Awards with the event's organiser, Melanie Eusebe. A new hashtag is cropping up in Myanmar - #MilkTeaAlliance. So what's going on? We hear more from Iain Marlow of Bloomberg. Plus, the BBC’s Vincent Dowd reports on Broadway, the commercial theatre district in New York City, whose 41 theatres closed just over a year ago. And we're joined throughout the programme by David Kuo in Singapore; he's co-founder of the Smart Investor, and in Los Angeles we're joined by Emmy-award winning journalist Leyna Nguyen. (Picture of world map and vaccine via Getty Images).


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lvzt4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqylsd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6kc2j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tyt)
D.C. United, El Clásico and an inspirational Puerto Rican

D.C. United coach Hernán Losada discusses the influx of young talent from South America into Major League Soccer. And the former Puerto Rico goalkeeper Anita Rabell tells us how she overcame a culture of machismo to establish women's football on the island.

Picture: Hernán Losada coaches Beerchot in a Belgian Pro League match (Photo by KRISTOF VAN ACCOM/BELGA MAG/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lw3k8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lw79d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqyv8n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6klks)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2d2b)
Modern Midrash

For thousands of years Jews have sought to understand the Bible, with all its inconsistencies and contradictions, through “midrash”. Midrash is a combination of interpretation and teaching based on the written texts of the Old Testament that tell the story of the ancient Hebrews, from the creation of the world, through God making his covenant with Abraham, the Exodus from Egypt, the destruction of Jerusalem, the Temple and the exile to Babylon.

As what it means to be Jewish has changed over the millennia, Jews have used midrash to re-interpret their identity in the world. In this edition of “Heart and Soul,” Michael Goldfarb searches through the ancient texts for clues to what it is to be Jewish in the 21st Century. He looks for modern midrash in conversations with a rabbi, an archaeologist, a Jewish Studies professor, a psychoanalyst, and a composer who is writing musical midrash for each part of the Torah, the five books of Moses. They talk about the historical truth of the Bible, and can midrashic interpretation help find meaning in the Holocaust, and even these days of the pandemic.


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lwc1j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2kng19f28)
President Biden lays out new gun control plans

We get a reaction from someone who started campaigning against guns after the tragic shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2014.

Hundreds have been protesting in Kyrgyzstan against the practice of kidnapping women for marriage.

And we'll hear from young people in Kenya who received help from mentors to steer them away from crime and from joining the Islamist militants Al Shabab.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lwgsn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2kng19jtd)
Sister of blood clot victim says 'take the vaccine'

Medical experts reassure the public that the risk of blood clot from Astra Zeneca vaccine is incredibly low.

Argentina begins a three-week curfew to curb the rise in Covid cases. They reached a record 23,000 in one day. So what's behind this spike?

And on the other side of the world, a student in India will be sharing her experience of life under curfew and lockdown as the country experiences its own steep increase in coronavirus numbers


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lwljs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2kng19nkj)
Why is President Biden taking on 'ghost guns'?

The president said gun violence was an epidemic and an international embarrassment.

The woman who says people should keep on getting vaccines - despite her brother dying from rare side effects.

And the British filmmaker tackling the issue of why "Blacks can't swim" - with black people only accounting for 2% of regular swimmers.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lwq8x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n0z)
Amrullah Saleh: Is the Afghan peace process running out of road?

If Afghanistan is to find a way out of seemingly never-ending war the next few weeks will be critically important. The Biden Administration is pressing the Afghan Government and the Taliban to accept a transition plan based on a ceasefire and power-sharing. It’s a tough sell, given the taliban has intensified its military campaign in recent months. But what’s the alternative? Stephen Sackur speaks to Afghanistan’s First Vice President Amrullah Saleh. Is the Afghan peace process running out of road?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6l2k9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1hzz)
Mega ships

After the Ever Given blocked the Suez Canal last month, we ask: are container ships too big? How much bigger can they get? To answer those questions we speak to Aslak Ross, head of marine standards at the world’s largest container shipping line, Maersk. Jan Hoffman, head of trade and logistics at the UN's Conference on Trade and Development, explains that economies of scale have led to the ships getting bigger and bigger. And Evert Lataire, head of maritime technology at Ghent University, describes how he assesses whether a mega ship can fit into a port, or through a canal.

Picture: the Ever Given container ship lodged sideways in the Panama Canal. Credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyb)
Discovering the Jet Stream

The Jet Stream is formed by powerful high-altitude rivers of air which circle the globe and help determine our climate. The existence of these winds was first documented in Japan in the 1920s, but only became more widely known during World War Two, when American airmen encounter high-speed winds on bombing missions over Japan. At the same time, the Japanese military also began to use these powerful transcontinental winds to carry innovative balloon bombs all the way to the West Coast of America. Using archive recordings we tell the story of the discovery and speak to Professor Tim Woollings from Oxford University, the author of Jet Stream: A Journey Through Our Changing Climate.
Photo: B-29 bombers passing Mount Fuji on their way to Tokyo, April 1945 (Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lwv11)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1ngq)
Ad cookies facing the crunch

How Apple and Google’s privacy clampdown will bring upheaval to online advertising. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter David Molloy. Produced by Jat Gill.


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6l69f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lwys5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hs6)
Why is Russia massing troops near Ukraine?

The security situation in eastern Ukraine is flaring up again, seven years into a simmering conflict between Moscow and Kyiv that started with Russia's annexation of Crimea in 2014. Increased numbers of Russian armed forces have been moved to the region, Ukraine says two of its servicemen were killed earlier this week, and Moscow is blaming Ukraine for the death of a five-year-old in a reported explosion in a region controlled by Russian-backed separatists. The European Union is ‘severely concerned’ about the situation and the United States has put its troops in Europe on high alert. So why is Russia massing forces near Ukraine now? Is it a test for new US President Joe Biden and – if so – could it exacerbate tensions between the old Cold War rivals? What do events tell us about the intentions of Russia’s President Putin and Ukraine’s President Zelensky? Join Ritula Shah and guests as they discuss the latest escalating tensions between Ukraine, Russia and the West.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lx2j9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqzphk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6lfsp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tyt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lx68f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dq)
Chile's Covid-19 paradox

Chile has become a global example of how a high vaccine rollout may not mean the end of the Covid-19 pandemic. Numbers of infections and deaths are higher than ever, and a strict new lockdown has been imposed. BBC Mundo contributor Paula Molina explains how this situation arose.

Egypt's new Coptic speakers
Coptic can be traced back to the language spoken in Ancient Egypt, but only survives today in the liturgy of the Coptic Orthodox Church. Apart, that is, from a growing number of Egyptians who want to reconnect with their history. Rana Taha of BBC Arabic explains how they're bringing the language back to life.

South Korea's Olympic diplomacy
North Korea's announcement that it will not take part in the Tokyo Olympics, in order to protect its athletes from Covid-19, has disappointed South Korea. Julie Yoonnyung Lee of BBC Korean explains why the Games are seen as such an important opportunity for South Korea to engage with the North.

Meeting the female 'kolbars'
The 'kolbars' or porters, who illegally carry heavy loads across the Iran-Iraq border, are mostly Kurdish people, who turn to this dangerous work because it's impossible to find other employment. It is thought of as a man's job, but Parham Ghobadi of BBC Persian tells us there are also women taking part.

Bosnia's forgotten king
Tvrtko I, the first King of Bosnia, ruled over Serbs, Croats and Bosnians in the 14th century, and expanded Bosnian territory to the greatest it's been before or since. Today, he's largely forgotten. BBC Serbian's Nataša Anđelković tells us why she wanted to remind her audience about him.

Image: A Chilean woman shows an identification card during the vaccination against Covid-19
Credit: Claudio Santana / Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lxb0k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wqzxzt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6lp8y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lxfrp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv50zmvdf29)
Prince Philip has died aged 99, Buckingham Palace announces

Prince Philip, Queen Elizabeth II's husband, has died aged 99, Buckingham Palace has announced.

In a statement shortly after midday, the palace said: "His Royal Highness passed away peacefully this morning at Windsor Castle."

Newshour looks back at his lifetime of service to the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth, at his contribution to environmental causes and at his role as consort to Queen Elizabeth.

(Photo: HRH Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip. Credit: EPA)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lxkht)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n0z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6lxs6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46mjvnftzq)
First broadcast 09/04/2021 14:32 GMT

The latest business and finance news from around the world, on the BBC.


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lxp7y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfhjqcp6d)
Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh has died aged 99

Prince Philip, Queen Elizabeth II's husband, has died aged 99, Buckingham Palace has announced. In a statement shortly after midday, the palace said: "His Royal Highness passed away peacefully this morning at Windsor Castle."

The Duke of Edinburgh, who was the longest-serving consort in British history, had returned to Windsor Castle on 16 March after a month in hospital.

We look back at his lifetime of service to the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth and at his role as consort to Queen Elisabeth. We also bring voices from around the world to reflect on Prince Philip's life and passions.

(Photo: HRH Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip. Credit: EPA)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lxt02)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfhjqcsyj)
Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh has died aged 99

Prince Philip, Queen Elizabeth II's husband, has died aged 99, Buckingham Palace has announced. In a statement shortly after midday, the palace said: "His Royal Highness passed away peacefully this morning at Windsor Castle."

The Duke of Edinburgh, who was the longest-serving consort in British history, had returned to Windsor Castle on 16 March after a month in hospital.

We look back at his lifetime of service to the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth and at his role as consort to Queen Elisabeth. We also bring voices from around the world to reflect on Prince Philip's life and passions.

(Photo: HRH Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip. Credit: EPA)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lxxr6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fn1)
The life of Prince Philip

Buckingham Palace has announced the death of Prince Philip, the husband of Queen Elizabeth II. He was 99 years old. Edward Stourton tells the story of his life.


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ly1hb)
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FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wr0ngl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ly57g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Newshour (w172xv50zmvf4k2)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6ly8zl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv50zmvf896)
Prince Philip has died aged 99, Buckingham Palace announces

Prince Philip, Queen Elizabeth II's husband, has died aged 99, Buckingham Palace has announced.

In a statement shortly after midday, the palace said: "His Royal Highness passed away peacefully this morning at Windsor Castle."

Newshour looks back at his lifetime of service to the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth, at his contribution to environmental causes and at his role as consort to Queen Elizabeth.

(Photo: HRH Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip. Credit: EPA)


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lydqq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fn1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lyjgv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wr14g3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Africa Life Clinic 09:32 SUN (w3ct21gc)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gx3)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gx3)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gx3)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzk8hnww3cs)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzk8hnwwgm5)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzk8hnwwtvk)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzk8hnwwylp)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzk8hnwx62y)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzk8hnwy19v)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SAT (w172xzk8hnwy51z)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzk8hnwyn1h)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzk8hnwz08w)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzk8hnwz7s4)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzk8hnwzcj8)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzk8hnwzqrn)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzk8hnwzvhs)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzk8hnx0301)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzk8hnx11z2)

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BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzk8vy672nk)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzk8vy69r2d)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzk8vy69zkn)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172xzk8vy6b71x)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzk8vy6bq1f)

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BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzk8vy6ck8b)

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BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzk8vy6fz5x)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzk8vy6g2y1)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzk8vy6gg5f)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzk8vy6gpnp)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzk8vy6h5n6)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzk8vy6hjwl)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172xzk8vy6hscv)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172xzk8vy6j0w3)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzk8vy6jhvm)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172xzk8vy6jmlr)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172xzk8vy6jw30)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzk8vy6jzv4)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzk8vy6kc2j)

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BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172xzk8vy6l2k9)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzk8vy6lfsp)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172xzk8vy6lp8y)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172xzk8vy6lxs6)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjg1y95mc8)

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BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172xzjg1y98j8c)

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BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjgf6lh8fm)

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BBC News 11:00 MON (w172xzjgf6ljgwx)

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BBC News 14:00 MON (w172xzjgf6ljv49)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172xzjgf6ljywf)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172xzjgf6lk2mk)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172xzjgf6lk6cp)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172xzjgf6lkb3t)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172xzjgf6lkfvy)

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BBC News 23:00 MON (w172xzjgf6lkxvg)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjgf6ll5bq)

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BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjgf6lp27t)

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BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjgf6lq8q3)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172xzjgf6lqdg7)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172xzjgf6lqj6c)

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BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjgf6lrqnn)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjgf6lrz4x)

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BBC News 06:00 THU (w172xzjgf6lskwk)

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BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzjgf6lstct)

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BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzjgf6lt1w2)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjgf6lt5m6)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172xzjgf6lt9cb)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172xzjgf6ltf3g)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172xzjgf6ltjvl)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172xzjgf6ltnlq)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzjgf6ltsbv)

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BBC News 18:00 THU (w172xzjgf6lv0v3)

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BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172xzjgf6lvw20)

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BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172xzjgf6lxp7y)

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BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172xzjgf6lydqq)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172xzjgf6lyjgv)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d5g)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxfhjq02l0)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172xxxfhjq06b4)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j4h)

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Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jn9)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvq7xp62znz)

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Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvq88yhlfkj)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172xvq88yhpbgm)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvq88yhs7cq)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dgh)

Comedians Vs. The News 18:32 SAT (w3ct21mn)

Comedians Vs. The News 23:32 SUN (w3ct21mn)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pq5)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pq5)

Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct2cbk)

Deeply Human 22:06 SUN (w3ct2cbk)

Deeply Human 03:06 MON (w3ct2cbk)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lrt)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1lrt)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lrt)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct2cck)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct1m7j)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct1m7j)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct1m7j)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mtl)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mtl)

Global Questions 19:32 SAT (w3ct2f7k)

Global Questions 12:32 SUN (w3ct2f7k)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n5h)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n5h)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3ct1n5h)

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HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3ct1n0z)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3ct1n0z)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nv1)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nv1)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nv1)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2d31)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct2d2b)

I'm Not A Monster 09:32 SAT (w3ct1z6j)

I'm Not A Monster 22:32 SUN (w3ct1z6j)

I'm Not A Monster 03:32 MON (w3ct1z6j)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tcr)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tcr)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1tcr)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2djr)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2djr)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2djr)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hbm)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hbm)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2kng0xtfw)

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Newshour 14:06 THU (w172xv50zmv9j56)

Newshour 21:06 THU (w172xv50zmvbcd3)

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Outlook 18:06 MON (w3ct1jst)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3ct1jst)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct1k2v)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l15)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l15)

People Fixing the World 19:06 SAT (w3ct1pkl)

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People Fixing the World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pkm)

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Project 17 04:32 WED (w3ct0x8c)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0n7gskn9p9)

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Sports News 23:20 SAT (w172y0sbb58smyq)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172y0pvzzgp432)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0t4rwwftsr)

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Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lb6)

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When Katty Met Carlos 08:32 SAT (w3ct2cc6)

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World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzl39nsvwlw)

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