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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 20 FEBRUARY 2021

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnn5v0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3cszcp9)
Who should pay for the news?

Google this week signed multi-million dollar deals with a number of major news providers in Australia, agreeing to pay for the journalism it features on its new ‘News Showcase’ pages. It comes as Australia’s parliament debates a proposed new law that would force tech giants to negotiate with news outlets big and small. Facebook, which like Google opposes the draft law, responded by blocking access to news content on the platform nationwide. But critics argue the proposed laws don’t go far enough and that the traditional business model of funding journalism through advertising revenue is broken. The pandemic has meant reduced income for many small newsrooms, despite an apparent rise in appetite for local information surrounding Covid-19. If access to reliable news is crucial to the smooth running of democracy, who should step in to pay for the journalism voters need? When it comes to paying the bills, what is the future of news? Join Paul Henley and a panel of expert guests.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnn9l4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x197vl0fjp1)
G7 agree to increase vaccine sharing funds

The G7, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States have agreed to increase funds for Covax - the vaccine sharing iniative - to $7.5 billion.We hear what Dr Mohga Kamal-Yanni of the People’s Vaccine Alliance, makes of this pledge. Plus, the UK Supreme Court has ruled that the ride-hailing app Uber must classify its drivers as workers and not as self-employed. We hear from an Uber driver, a union representative and an employment lawyer. And as President Biden takes the US back into the Paris Climate Agreement process, the BBC's Mike Johnson looks at the future of the US energy sector.

All this and more discussed with our guest throughout the show. Peter Ryan, the ABC's Senior Business Correspondent in Sydney.

(Picture: the coronavirus vaccine in a syringe. Credit: Getty Images.)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnnfb8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qw)
Questions of Loyalty

Kosovo declared its independence 13 years ago, but how viable is it as an independent state? After a landslide victory for the opposition Self-Determination party last week, the firebrand politician, former KLA member and prisoner Albin Kurti is back as Prime Minister. Yet as Guy Delauney remembers, Kurti has often seemed keener on the symbols of Albania than Kosovo itself. What does Mr Kurti really want for Kosovo - and what do Kosovans want from their government?

Pascale Harter introduces this and other stories from reporters and writers around the world.

The war in Yemen has been disastrous for the country's civilians, as the number of people killed by airstrikes, bombings and famine has climbed ever higher. It's a conflict so intractable that it's embroiled every level and sector of Yemen's society, and international allies and backers on all sides from across the region. There are so many layers of loyalty, and so many factions at work, that few outsiders have managed to understand it - much less resolve it. Recently Leila Molana Allen visited the south of the country and met some of the region's traditional, tribal leaders to hear how and why they have been forced to step in to try and save some lives and livelihoods. In a special dispatch, she explores the many complexities of political life in Yemen, and their effect on families, homes and clans.

And in Havana, Will Grant joins the people scouring the streets of Havana for food - and joining some of its lengthening queues. As the Covid pandemic hits the country's hard-currency income, and government economic reforms try to iron out problems in supply and demand, it's getting harder and harder to find some basic necessities. So finding a special treat for his wife's birthday becomes something of a challenge...


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8bsln)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhkk)
Heather Knight: Covid's exposed support for women's teams

On this week’s podcast, Alison Mitchell is joined by Jim Maxwell and Charu Sharma to discuss the fallout from India’s victory over England in the second Test in Chennai. The team discuss the state of the surface - was it a poor pitch, or just poor batting by England? And what should we expect from the day-night third Test in Ahmedabad? We’ll also hear from England Women captain Heather Knight, as her world champions prepare to take on New Zealand in a three-match ODI series - their first 50-over cricket in 14 months - and discuss why India Women haven't played for nearly a year. And we hear about how cricket is being played on ice in the Netherlands.

Photo: Heather Knight participates in a drill during an England touring side training session in Queenstown, New Zealand. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnnk2d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjf)
Six years on: the murder of Avijit Roy

It’s six years since the secular blogger Avijit Roy was murdered outside the Dhaka book fair, where he'd been a speaker. This week, five men were sentenced to be hanged for their part in the killing. BBC Bangla journalist Akbar Hossain has been covering the story since 2015 and reflects on the story.

The "Switzerland of Africa"
Photos posted on social media this week show alpine vistas and snow covered houses in Morocco. It's not a surprise to BBC Africa's Nora Fakim, who visited the French-built ski resort of Ifrane several years ago. She shares her memories of the Switzerland of Africa.

Where gender can be a matter of life or death
‘Leila’ is a 64-year-old teacher, dancer and actor, and the only openly intersex person in Afghanistan. Living in such a conservative society, she has faced many verbal and physical attacks. She told her story to Mahjooba Nowrouzi of BBC Afghan.

First African to head the WTO
Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala takes over as Director General of the World Trade Organisation this week. She's the first woman and first African to hold the role, and she's making Nigerians everywhere proud, including BBC Africa's Peter Okwoche.

Colombia's love affair with cycling
Cycling is the national sport of Colombia, but it went into decline during decades of armed conflict. Now Colombians are rediscovering their love of cycling and, at the same time, their own country. The BBC’s Daniel Pardo is one of them.


Image: Respects are paid to Avijit Roy in Dhaka, 2015
Credit: MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP via Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmw9)
Mary Wilson

The Motown group The Supremes had a string of number one hits in 1964. They would become the most popular girl group of the 1960s. One of the three original singers, Mary Wilson, spoke to Vincent Dowd about growing up in Detroit, commercial success, and civil rights.

Photo: The Supremes, (left to right) Florence Ballard, Mary Wilson, Diana Ross, on a visit to London in 1964. Credit: PA Wire.


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnnntj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcp9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnnskn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19z9)
Coronavirus: Living in a refugee camp

Tasneem recently graduated from university. Like everyone else, her future is on hold because of coronavirus. But for Tasneem it’s a particularly uncertain time, as she’s been living in Jordan at one of the world’s largest refugee camps, since leaving Syria with her family in 2013. Host Nuala McGovern has a conversation with her and her father about life in a refugee camp during the pandemic.

We also hear why Tanzania is denying its people are dying from Covid-19; and how sniffer dogs in Finland can be trained to detect the virus among passengers arriving at Helsinki airport - with unprecedented success.

(Photo: Khedywi Al-Nablsi and Tasneem Khedywi Al-Nablsi Credit: Tasneem Khedywi Al-Nablsi/AP)


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8c4v1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxm)
On 11 November 2019 James Le Mesurier was found dead in a street in Istanbul. He was the latest casualty in a very unusual war – one fought not on the battlefield, but online.

Le Mesurier was a mysterious figure with a taste for the finer things who served in the British Army in several of the world’s hotspots before focusing his energies on war-ravaged Syria from 2014. He co-founded the White Helmets, a Syrian civil defence force who filmed themselves pulling survivors and bodies from the rubble of bombed out buildings.

Soon, the White Helmets - and Le Mesurier - found themselves at the centre of a global race to control the narrative in the Syrian War. In this investigative series Mayday, presenter Chloe Hadjimatheou talks to the people who knew James, including his widow Emma, his ex-wife and former army colleagues, as well as those on the ground in Syria still working as White Helmets today in an effort to piece together James’ story and that of the White Helmets. She speaks to some of the White Helmet’s detractors and follows up accusations about the organisation to try and understand the truth surrounding them.

Chloe Hadjimatheou says: “Making this series has been an extraordinary experience, as listeners will discover. It started out being an investigation into the story of a man with an astonishing life and a mysterious death but it ended up taking me on a bizarre journey down rabbit holes of misinformation. Ultimately this is a story about how truth functions in modern warfare.”


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct24jg)
The cost of keeping schools closed during a pandemic

With thousands of schools still closed around the world, there are increasingly urgent warnings about the impact this pandemic is having on millions of children. Ros Atkins looks at risks of reopening classrooms and the consequences of not doing so.

(Photo: A boy studies in a koranic school classroom in Man, Ivory Coast. Photo: Eric Lafforgue/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnnx9s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d9sz0m8lh)
When will poorer countries get vaccines?

Leaders of the world's major economies have pledged billions of dollars to provide coronavirus vaccines for poorer countries, but the incoming head of the World Trade Organisation says they're acting too late.

Also, a busy for Italy's new prime minister, Mario Draghi and his government of national unity.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Dr. Felia Allum, senior lecturer in Italian and Politics at the University of Bath here in the UK and an expert on Mafia and organised crime; and Alan Posener, a columnist from the German newspaper die Welt.

(Picture: Vials of COVID-19 vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and AstraZeneca. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnp11x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d9sz0mdbm)
Texas prepares for thaw

Temperatures are expected to rise in Texas in the coming days, but there's a new risk.

Also, President Biden has told European leaders the Transatlantic alliance is back, following years of strained relations under Donald Trump.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Dr. Felia Allum, senior lecturer in Italian and Politics at the University of Bath here in the UK and an expert on Mafia and organised crime; and Alan Posener, a columnist from the German newspaper die Welt.

(Picture: Drivers continue to deal with treacherous conditions on streets of Fort Worth, Texas, USA. Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnp4t1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d9sz0mj2r)
World leaders pledge billions for coronavirus

Leaders of the world's major economies have pledged billions of dollars to provide coronavirus vaccines for poorer countries, but the incoming head of the World Trade Organisation says they're acting too late.

Also, as Alexei Navalny appeals against his prison sentence, is Europe on the verge of introducing tough new sanctions against Russia?

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Dr. Felia Allum, senior lecturer in Italian and Politics at the University of Bath here in the UK and an expert on Mafia and organised crime; and Alan Posener, a columnist from the German newspaper die Welt.

(Picture: Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga attends a video conference with other G-7 leaders. Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8cj2f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21lz)
Veterans

America has been involved in plenty of wars in recent decades and is proud of its military and veterans. But are veterans getting the support they need?


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnp8k5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19z9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 today]


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8cmtk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6b)
I'm Not a Monster

1. I love you, I miss you

A suicide bombing in Iraq and a home video from inside the ISIS caliphate begin the search for a family trapped in Syria. A desperate plea arrives from an American woman who says she wants to escape the Islamic State group with her young children. This episode includes descriptions of violence and some upsetting scenes involving children.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf5p)
Reporting the Navalny protests

Listeners question BBC correspondent Steve Rosenberg in Moscow about the challenges of reporting the protests over the jailing of Kremlin-critic Alexei Navalny. And we ask why the BBC has been banned in China - and what are the implications for those listening both inside and outside the country?

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnpd99)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3c8rqb6630)
'You eventually come out and the next day the sun rises'

We hear from the first Wallabies player to come out as gay, Dan Palmer. Last year he wrote a powerful column in the Sydney Herald saying that his ‘own death felt preferable to anyone finding out that I was gay’. Since this he has had hundreds of people messaging from around the world to say they have encountered similar problems with their sexuality. A few months on he speaks to Caroline about his decision to come out, his battle with his own sexuality and being a gay sportsman.

We also speak to the first woman to officiate at the Super Bowl. Sarah Thomas made history as a down judge when the Tampa Bay Bucaneers beat the Kansas City Chiefs and began her officiating career in 1996. Sarah will tell us what it is like to be a history maker, how it feels to be at the pinnacle of her career and how she is blazing a trail for many more women to come.

Sportshour's Katie Smith tells us the story of two Ironman trailblazers. Alistair Brownlee is trying to become the first man to complete an Ironman in under seven hours and Lucy Charles-Barclay is trying to become the first woman to accomplish this feat in below eight hours. We find out more about why they are trying to take on this mammoth task.

We are live at the Australian Open to see which female will win the Grand Slam.

Plus, can Southampton get their first win in the Premier League since 4 of January? They take on Chelsea in the lunchtime kick off and we will be live at the match.

(Photo: Dan Palmer poses during an Australian Wallabies portrait session at Crowne Plaza, Coogee on May 30, 2012 in Sydney, Australia. Credit: Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnpj1f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxht88gk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8cw9t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21mg)
Neeti Palta and Michael van Peel

International comedy stars join Jess Salomon and Eman El- Husseini to take on the headlines.

This week, Jess and Eman are joined by one of India’s most popular comics, Neeti Palta and Belgian comedy sensation Michael van Peel.

They’ll be finding out why Belgian government are so keen for their citizens to have a new haircut and asking what kind of jokes can land a comedian in prison…Join Comedians vs The News for the headlines as you’ve never heard them before.


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnpmsk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6v7)
Toys in the studio with Tunng’s Mike Lindsay and Hannah Peel

Mike Lindsay of the pioneering folktronica band Tunng is joined by Falle Nioke, Hannah Peel, and JFDR to discuss the power of a concept album, disappearing music, and how it feels getting new gear for your studio. Plus Falle gives us all a lesson in percussion.

Falle Nioke is a singer and percussionist from Guinea, West Africa. He was part of the DawoLos crew as a teenager, sings in eight languages, and is a master of the gongoma, a traditional instrument combining percussion and melody that you play with your thumbs.

JFDR is an Icelandic songwriter and multi-instrumentalist. She studied classical clarinet before releasing music as part of different groups including Pascal Pinon, Gangly and Samaris, catching the attention of Bjork along the way.

Hannah Peel is a composer, producer and broadcaster from Northern Ireland. She’s inspired by connections between science and music, and has scored music across television, film and theatre, including the Game of Thrones soundtrack, which earned her an Emmy nomination.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnprjp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z6d45cy58)
Iran plays down hopes of nuclear talks with US

Iran says that despite an EU offer to broker talks with the US aimed at reviving a nuclear deal, America "must act" first and lift sanctions.

Emergency medical workers in Myanmar say at least two people have been killed and several injured at a protest in the city of Mandalay against this month's coup. Witnesses said police used live ammunition as they tried to disperse the crowd. It's an escalation in the military's response to the daily demonstrations across Myanmar. Also in the programme; how memories of old Damascus inspired an award-winning composition.

(Picture: The US and European powers have called on Iran to return to compliance with the 2015 nuclear deal. Credit: EPA)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnpw8t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lnr8rddy4)
Live Sporting Action

Photo: West Bromwich Albion goalkeeper Sam Johnstone saves a shot from Burnley striker Ashley Barnes. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnqc8b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxht93pg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8dqjq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21lz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnqh0g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The History Hour (w3cszkq8)
Black History: The Black Panthers

As part of our Black History coverage we look back at the Black Panthers and ask Professor Clayborne Carson of Stanford University "How radical was the US black rights group?" Also, we bring you an archive interview with Mary Wilson of the Supremes, we delve into the question of compensation after the abolition of slavery - and no, not compensation for the people who had been enslaved, but for the former slave owners. Also, how one descendent of slaves, James Dawkins, discovered his ancestors' connection with the British writer Richard Dawkins. And, looking back at the story of Henrietta Lacks the African-American whose cells revolutionised medical science.

Photo: Schoolchildren at a Black Panthers breakfast club. Credit: Shutterstock


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnqlrl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk46)
Sundance Film Festival Special

This week Nikki Bedi speaks to some of the most exciting emerging filmmakers from around the world, at the 2021 Sundance Film Festival.

Triple award-winning Kosovan filmmaker Blerta Basholli, whose film Hive won this year’s World Cinema Grand Jury Dramatic Prize, Dramatic World Cinema Audience Award and a Directing Award, on the true life story that inspired it.

Husband and wife team Rintu Thomas and Sushmit Ghosh discuss their moving documentary Writing with Fire about India's only newspaper run by Dalit women, which scooped the World Cinema Documentary Audience Award and a Special Jury Award.

American director and screenwriter Carey Williams explains the concept behind R#J, his Romeo and Juliet for Generation Z.

Danish filmmaker Camilla Nielsson reveals the challenges of making President, her documentary about the 2018 elections in Zimbabwe, which won a Sundance Special Jury Award for Vérité Filmmaking.

Ajitpal Singh tells us about his debut feature Fire in The Mountains, a family drama about tradition versus modernity, set in the Himalayas.

Ethiopian-Mexican filmmaker Jessica Beshir explains the roots of her black and white docu-drama Faya Dayi, a meditation on life in Harar and the growth of the industry surrounding the stimulant khat.

And American director Karen Cinnore on her debut movie Mayday, a feminist fantasy war movie starring Mia Goth and Grace Van Patten.


(Photo: Sundance Film Festival. Credit: Sundance Film Festival)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnqqhq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z6d45dx49)
Myanmar: Two protesters have been killed in the city of Mandalay

Witnesses said police used live ammunition as they tried to disperse the crowd, following clashes with shipyard workers who are on strike. Footage shot at the protest shows people on the street scattering on foot and on motorbikes as gunfire rings out.

Also on the programme, the head of the United Nations nuclear watchdog, the IAEA, has arrived in Tehran amid redoubled efforts to try to revive the Iran nuclear deal and President Biden has declared a major disaster in the US state of Texas, due to the power outages caused by extreme winter weather.

(Picture: Protesters in Myanmar Credit: Reuters/Holm)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnqv7v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79vgs6m97p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fr2x49l6j)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8f6j7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct17xj)
The living water

Elizabeth Alker loves to feel the cold water as she slides into it from the river bank or steps nervously from the lake side. She is a Christian, used to the euphoric feeling that worship also brings her, and swimming in the open gives her a similar, immersive sensation - as soon as she leaves the water she immediately craves it again.

She sets outs to find out why so many people have that same craving, discovering tranquility and spirituality in the icy water. From there she moves on to consider the spiritual nature of water itself.

Right across the world’s faiths water represents life, fertility, healing and purity. It has been used in rituals for thousands of years, rivers are sacred, baptisms with water symbolises the introduction of children to their faith

Elizabeth explores why water is so important in the lives of believers, wild swimmers and the millions around the world whose spiritual thirst is quenched by its power.

She goes swimming with Helen Pidd of The Guardian newspaper who first introduced her to swimming outdoors, and Scottish singer Julie Fowlis who explains how the stories and myths surrounding water make their way into Gaelic music.

Professor Bron Taylor, author of ‘Dark Green Religion’ discusses the place of water in organised religion - as well as his own connection with the ocean having speak years as a coast guard.

Izumi Hasegawa describes the place of water in Shinto, and Ruth Fitzmaurice, author of ‘I Found My Tribe’, describes how swimming in the ocean helped her profoundly through the illness and death of her beloved husband Simon.

Why is water so important in the lives of believers, wild swimmers and the millions around the world whose spiritual thirst is quenched by its power.

Producer: Geoff Bird
Presenter: Elizabeth Alker

(Photo: Two people watch someone swimming in the water. Credit: Richard Lautens/Toronto Star/Getty Images)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnqyzz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0spy)
The great semiconductor squeeze

They’re the technical bits of genius businesses cannot do without. On this edition of Business Weekly, we look at the world of semiconductors and why a shortage of them is holding up industries the world over. From consumer electronics to cars, the squeeze on semiconductors affects the supply of everything with a computer chip. Also, Ngozi Okonjo-Iwela becomes the first African and first female director general of the World Trade Organisation. We hear from the woman herself about the task ahead. Plus, should children be learning about bonds, shares and savings accounts as well as algebra and geometry? We speak to pupils around the world keen to learn about finance and money.

(Photo: A man walks past a company logo at the headquarters of the world's largest semiconductor maker TSMC in Taiwan, Credit: Getty Images)



SUNDAY 21 FEBRUARY 2021

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnr2r3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9n)
Animation: Art, activism and anime

American and Japanese animation is known around the world, but how are other countries telling their own stories through animation? The animation industry is growing in India and Ghana, allowing for new perspectives and styles to reach a global audience. We speak to Sharad Devarajan, producer for the Indian animated TV series The Legend of Hanuman, and Cycil Jones Abban, the director of Ghanaian animated film 28th the Crossroads, about representation and upcoming trends and challenges.

When Latvian director Ilze Burkovska-Jacobsen was seven, she discovered what she thought were the bones of a World War II soldier in her sandbox. In her animated documentary My Favourite War, Ilze remembers a childhood living under the Soviet regime of the 1970s, where she was forbidden to discuss difficult aspects of the past. She tells us about the lasting trauma of living through that time and the healing power of animation.

Can animation be a tool for activism? Over recent months in Poland, demonstrators have taken to the streets protesting against a new ruling which makes nearly all forms of abortion illegal in the country. Students from Łódź Film School decided to create a piece of protest animation against the ban. We hear from artist Weronika Szyma, who co-organised the short film Polish Women’s Resistance.

All aboard the Mugen Train! French-Japanese animator Ken Arto describes the art of Japanese animation - anime, and his recent work on a scene in Demon Slayer: Kimetsu no Yaiba the Movie: Mugen Train, the record-breaking anime that’s become Japan’s highest-grossing movie ever.

Presented by Sophia Smith Galer

(Photo: Still from Ilze Burkovska-Jacobsen's My Favourite War. Credit: Bivrost Films)


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8fg0h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3cszf5p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnr6h7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3cszky1)
Weird weather

A paper in the BMJ shows that deaths from Covid 9 are being massively overlooked in Zambia. The new data come from post-mortem tests at the University Hospital mortuary in Lusaka, showing that at least 1 in 6 deaths there are due to the coronavirus; many of the victims had also been suffering from tuberculosis. Chris Gill of Boston University’s Department of Global Health, and Lawrence Mwananyanda, chief scientific officer of Right to Care, Zambia, discuss their findings with Roland Pease.

New variants of concern continue to be reported, such as the one labelled B 1 1 7 in the UK, or B 1 351 identified in South Africa. Geneticist Emma Hodcroft, of the University of Bern, talks about seven variants that have been found in the US. Although all these variants are evolving from different starting points, certain individual mutations keep recurring – which suggests they have specific advantages for the virus.
Her co-author Jeremy Kamil, of Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, explains how he can watch the viruses replicating inside cells.

Much of the United States, as far south as Texas, and Eurasia, has been gripped by an extraordinary blast of Arctic weather. Roland hears from climatalogist Jennifer Francis, of the Woodwell Climate Research Center, about the Arctic’s role in this weird weather.

Life, in the form of sponges, has been discovered hundreds of metres under the thick ice surrounding Antarctica, where it’s dark, subzero and barren. The British Antarctic Survey’s Huw Griffiths reveals how it was spotted unexpectedly in pictures colleagues took with a sub-glacial camera.


It’s the stuff of fairy tales – a beautiful cottage, with windows, chimney and floorboards … and supported by a living growing tree. CrowdScience listener Jack wants to know why living houses aren’t a common sight when they could contribute to leafier cities with cleaner air. The UK has an impressive collection of treehouses, but they remain in the realm of novelty, for good reasons. Architects are used to materials like concrete and steel changing over time, but a house built around a living tree needs another level of flexibility in its design. That doesn’t mean it’s impossible and CrowdScience hears about a project in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, where architect Ahadu Abaineh made a three-storey, supported by 4 living Eucalyptus trees as a natural foundation.

Host Marnie Chesterton meets some of the global treehouse building fraternity, including builder of over 200 structures, Takashi Kobayashi, who adapts his houses to the Japanese weather. In Oregon, USA, Michael Garnier has built an entire village of treehouses for his “Treesort”. He’s developed better ways of building , including the Tree Attachment Bolt, which holds the weight of the house while minimising damage to the tree.

Professor Mitchell Joachim from Terreform One explains the wild potential of living architecture, a movement which looks at organic ways of building. He’s currently building a prototype living house, by shaping willow saplings onto a scaffold that will become a home, built of live trees.




(Image: A man walks to his friend's home in a neighbourhood without electricity as snow covers the BlackHawk neighborhood in Pflugerville, Texas, U.S. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnrb7c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c1l)
How can sports be a gamechanger for women?

Many top sports events, disrupted by Covid, are finally back. And so is the BBC’s Indian sportswoman of the year award. Public voting is now underway to pick a winner from the five nominees: shooter Manu Baker, sprinter Dutee Chand, chess player Koneru Humpy, wrestler Vinesh Phogat and hockey player Rani. (You can read more about them on the BBC India website.) Each one of them has inspiring stories of grit and perseverance.

Sports changed their lives, but is the going now easier for the next generation of potential stars, or are issues like sexism and the gender pay gap holding them back? Can young women athletes follow genuine career pathways in professional sports?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we talk to three aspiring stars to discuss how sports can be a gamechanger for women.

Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Anjum Moudgil, shooter; Aveka Singh, footballer; Palak Kohli, para badminton player


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8fphr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyq)
Covid 19 death count: Which countries are faring worst?

Are different countries counting deaths from Covid-19 in the same way? Tim Harford finds out if we can trust international comparisons with the data available.

We discover Peru currently has the most excess deaths per capita over the course of the pandemic, while Belgium has the highest Covid death count per capita.

Tim speaks to Hannah Ritchie from Our World in Data and John Burn Murdoch, senior data visualisation journalist at the Financial Times.

(Photo: Medical staff wait for Covid-19 patients brought from remote communities to an Amazon River port in Iquitos, Peru, for transfer to the city hospital. Credit: Cesar Von Bancels/Getty Images)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnrfzh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0spy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnrkqm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct1mz5)
How the Irish shaped Britain

With migration, integration and assimilation dominating much public debate, Fergal Keane explores the profound influence, over many centuries, of the Irish in Britain.

Whether it is 19th century theatre or verse, or today’s pop culture, Irish migrants and their descendants have deeply influenced and steered the UK’s literature and arts. Their impact on Britain has translated into ideas of what Britishness is across the world. Think of Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw or, more recently, the Beatles, the Sex Pistols and Oasis, the Irish and their descendants have had a profound influence on British identity. The Irish have also been highly influential in the world of business, politics and sport.

Fergal Keane examines the impact of the longest and biggest immigrant story in the history of the United Kingdom.

(Photo: Irish neighbours in Aston, Birmingham, West Midlands, 15 August 1969. Credit: Mirrorpix/Getty Images)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnrpgr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8g1r4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnrt6w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d9sz0q5hl)
World condemnation of Myanmar's military

There's been international condemnation of the military authorities in Myanmar after reports that soldiers shot dead two protesters in Mandalay.

Also, Israel is easing lockdown restrictions after almost half the population received their first dose of coronavirus vaccine.

Plus, in Texas the big freeze is ending, but we hear how significant challenges remain because of thousands of burst water pipes.

And we take a hike with a group of black outdoorswomen in Massachusetts.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Kat Arney, British science writer and broadcaster; and Jeffrey Kofman, Canadian broadcaster and journalist, and CEO and Co-Founder of the Trint tech company.

(Picture: Protesters against the military coup outside the Chinese Embassy in Yangon, Myanmar. Credit: EPA)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnrxz0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d9sz0q97q)
Being black and the outdoors in the US

We take a hike with a group of black outdoorswomen in Massachusetts.

Also, there's been international condemnation of the military authorities in Myanmar after reports that soldiers shot dead two protesters in Mandalay.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Kat Arney, British science writer and broadcaster; and Jeffrey Kofman, Canadian broadcaster and journalist, and CEO and Co-Founder of the Trint tech company.

(Picture: Hiking boots and backpack with sleeping bag and water bottle. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlns1q4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d9sz0qdzv)
Are you confident at chitchat and small-talk?

How confident are you in the art of chitchat and small-talk? We have a crash course for you.

Also, low temperatures give way to thawing in Texas.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Kat Arney, British science writer and broadcaster; and Jeffrey Kofman, Canadian broadcaster and journalist, and CEO and Co-Founder of the Trint tech company.

(Picture: Her Majesty, the Queen in conversation with Sir David Attenborough in the gardens of Buckingham Palace. Credit: PA Wire)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8gdzj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 Outlook (w3cszf15)
The video that turned our lives upside down

Aboriginal Australian mum Yarraka Bayles was so exhausted by her young son's distress at being bullied, she did the only thing she could think of and streamed a video of him crying to show her community the devastating effect it was having. She was trying to help him, but had no idea it would land them at the centre of international news coverage, fierce debate, and online conspiracies. This is an extended version of a story broadcast first on 11th January 2021.

If you are looking for support for any of the issues discussed in this programme, you can find links to useful organisations here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/actionline


Presenter and producer: Saskia Edwards

Photo: Yarraka and Quaden Bayles
Credit: Courtesy of Yarraka Bayles


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlns5g8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8gjqn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Africa Life Clinic (w3ct21g5)
Sexual health, Covid-19 vaccines

We’re looking at a health issue that disproportionately affects black women - Uterine fibroids. These are non-cancerous growths that develop in or around the womb. There is little research on what causes fibroids or how to prevent them.
Azeezat Olaoluwa, BBC News Women’s Affairs journalist based in Lagos, has been investigating.

And the findings from a small study in South Africa on a leading Covid-19 vaccine have led to questions over its effectiveness. This one offers the most promise for Africa as it doesn’t need to be kept at super low temperatures. There are still plans to roll out this vaccine across Africa, though South Africa is now looking for alternatives. Rhoda Odhiambo has been looking into what it all means.
Presented by Priscilla Ngethe.

(Picture: A socially-distanced queue in Kenya. Credit: Getty Images).


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlns96d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c1l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8gngs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct17xj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnsdyj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxhtc5cn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8gs6x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct1gvb)
The New Arctic

The New Arctic: Tourism

Allan Little looks at the growing tourism industry above the Arctic circle which is raising complex social, economic and environmental consequences for remote communities.

On the one hand, there are sustainable, indigenous-operated businesses that benefit from increasing numbers of visitors in search of authentic reindeer experiences and the Northern Lights, but other regions are experiencing the problem of mass tourism. On the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard, we see how the Covid-19 pandemic has exposed the fragility of a seasonal tourism-based economy, as operators now fight for survival.

Paradoxically, tourists are often drawn north to witness the Arctic before it melts, while their carbon footprint is only adding to the problem. We meet several tourism businesses providing greener, more sustainable alternatives, including the world’s first hybrid-electric whale watching vessel.

Producer: Victoria Ferran

(Photo credit:: Victoria Ferran)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnsjpn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4t)
Can we solve our space junk problem?

The world is entering a new space race but every new satellite launched into Earth’s orbit runs the risk of colliding with one of the millions of pieces of space junk left behind by previous missions. So how can we solve our space junk problem? Featuring former NASA astrophysicist, Don Kessler; Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, Moriba Jah; space systems engineer, Richard Duke; and Victoria Samson of the Secure World Foundation


Presenter: Charmaine Cozier
Producer: Viv Jones


(A spent S-IVb rocket floats in Earth orbit. View from Skylab Space Station 1973. NASA photo via Getty Images)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8gwz1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3csz6mg)
Drug-free in Norway

Warning: Some listeners might find these stories disturbing.

Can Norwegians with psychosis benefit from radical, drug-free treatment? In a challenge to the foundations of western psychiatry, a handful of Norway’s mental health facilities are offering medication-free treatment to people with serious psychiatric conditions. But five years after the scheme began it is still being questioned by the health establishment. For Assignment, Lucy Proctor hears the testimony of Norwegian psychiatric patients, and the doctors who have aligned themselves on either side of the debate. Why is this happening in Norway? And how much power should people with debilitating psychosis have over their own lives?

Presenter: Lucy Proctor
Producer: Linda Pressly

(Image: Artwork depicting a young woman, with her head in her hands. Credit: Malin Rossi)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnsnfs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z6d45gv2c)
Funeral procession for 20-year-old Myanmar protester

The funeral has taken place in Myanmar of a young woman who became a symbol of resistance to military rule after she was shot during a protest. Mya Thwate Thwate Khaing was buried in the capital, Naypyidaw. We hear from the funeral and from a political activist.

Also on the programme, we head to Spain where protesters took to the streets of Barcelona for the fifth consecutive night on Saturday following the arrest of Catalan rapper Pablo Hasel. He was arrested on Tuesday for insulting police and Spanish royalty in his song lyrics igniting a debate over freedom of expression laws in Spain. Our reporter tells the story. And voting is taking place in Niger in the second round of a presidential election - which will see the first democratic transition of power since independence from France in 1960.

(Mya Thwe Thwe Khaing has become a rallying point for protesters in Myanmar. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnss5x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct1mz5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnswy1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjws)
The Kalevala: the Finnish epic that inspired a nation

When the Kalevala was published in 1835, Finland had a distinct cultural and linguistic identity but it had always been part of either the Swedish or the Russian empire. Neither did Finland have much of a literary tradition, but as the 19th-century progressed the Kalevala took on a symbolic role as the representation of a Finnish identity that fed into the movement for Finnish independence. Rooted in the folk culture of the Karelia region, a travelling doctor shaped the song texts into a story in a way which is still being debated today.

Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss how the Kalevala underscored the search for Finnish national identity are Dr Niina Hämäläinen, executive director of the Kalevala Society in Helsinki; Professor Tom DuBois from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the author of Finnish Folk Poetry and the Kalevala; and the award-winning British musician, playwright and storyteller, Nick Hennessey.


Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service.


[Image: The Defense of the Sampo, 1896. Artist: Akseli Gallen-Kallela. Credit: Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images]


SUN 15:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnt0p5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lnr8rhkbh)
Live Sporting Action

Photo: Arsenal manager Mikel Arteta and Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola stand on the touchline during the Premier League match between Manchester City and Arsenal. (Credit: Manchester City FC via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlntcxk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxhtd4bp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8hr5y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21mg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnthnp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6v7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlntmdt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z6d45ht1d)
Iran and the IAEA come to a temporary agreement regarding inspections

The IAEA will continue to have access to nuclear facilities for three months. President Biden wants the US to rejoin the 2015 nuclear accord abandoned by Donald Trump but wants Iran to come back into compliance with the deal before it lifts sanctions.

Also on the programme, the Myanmar military have been removed from Facebook for using it to incite violence. And Israel suffers its worst environmental disaster for years as its Mediterranean shoreline is drenched with tar.

(Picture Credit: EPA)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlntr4y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79vgs6q64s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fr2x4dh3m)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8j3fb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlntvx2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8j75g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3cszf15)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]



MONDAY 22 FEBRUARY 2021

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vyytxc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19z9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkn65r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Discovery (w3csz9fv)
The power of night

Lucy Cooke meets some of the animal kingdom’s nocturnal inhabitants to understand why it pays to stir once the sun goes down.

She examines some of the extraordinary nocturnal adaptations from the largest group of mammals, the bats, to the mysterious long fingered lemur, the Aye Aye, to hear why the dark has proved evolutionarily advantageous. In an increasingly crowded planet, could future survival for many diurnal animals depend on a nightlife?

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Picture: Honey Badger, Credit: Cindernatalie/Getty Images


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vyyynh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x58391yzb07)
Israel re-opens economy with vaccine passports

A number of facilities are now able to reopen including gyms, hotels and synagogues but they require a "green passport", a certificate that can only be obtained once you have been vaccinated. But it's not all been smooth sailing as the BBC's Middle East editor, Sebastian Usher explains. One country to the north of Israel is Lebanon whose struggling economy has taken a twin hits from Covid and last year's fertilizer explosion at the port in Beirut; the Lebanese government wants banks to increase their capital reserves to prevent a banking crisis and we ask James Swanston, Middle East Economist at Capital Economics, if it's working. The fallout continues following snow storms in Texas - we hear details from Texan resident, Diana Vela who's Associate Executive Director of the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame in Fort Worth. And despite lockdowns reducing traffic, air pollution was behind approximately 160,000 deaths in the world’s five most populous cities last year, according to a Greenpeace Southeast Asia report; we hear from Aidan Farrow, pollution scientist at Greenpeace. (Picure of the Israeli flag and a vaccine via Getty Images).


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkn9xw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21lz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vyz2dm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc37)
Timothy Snyder: Lessons from history

Stephen Sackur speaks to Timothy Snyder, renowned American historian of totalitarianism and the Holocaust, about the Trump presidency. Professor Snyder believes the former US president and his movement brought America face to face with early stage fascism. Historical parallels may be seductive, but are they useful?


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlknfp0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4n)
The women who protect nature

Kim Chakanetsa meets two environmental champions fighting to save South America's most precious ecosystems.

Kris Tompkins is the president and co-founder of Tompkins Conservation. Kris and her late husband, Doug Tompkins, have been instrumental in the creation of 13 national parks in Chile and Argentina, conserving over 14 million acres of land.

Dr Dolors Armenteras is one of the world’s leading scientists on forest fires. Originally from Spain, she now works with the National University of Colombia. She spent the last 20 years fighting to save the country’s Amazon forest, and against misogyny in science.

Produced by Alice Gioia.

IMAGE DETAILS
Left: Dolors Armenteras (credit Tania M. Gonzalez)
Right: Kris Tompkins (credit James Q. Martin)


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vyz64r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjws)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh68)
The first woman to play in the NHL

French Canadian Manon Rhéaume became the first, and only, woman to play in the National Hockey League. In 1992 she was signed by the Tampa Bay Lightning as a goaltender after a successful performance in training camp. Manon tells Rebecca Kesby how she started playing ice hockey at the age of 5 with her brothers, and why she loves playing in goal with pucks flying at her at well over 100km an hour. Manon Rhéaume played in the men professional league for 5 years and represented Canada in the Women's game.

(Photo: Manon Rhéaume for the Tampa Bay Lightning in 1992. Credit: Manon Rhéaume's private collection)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vyz9ww)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbf)
Have we planted too much faith in trees?

It seems we all love trees. Politicians, celebrities and big businesses love trees too. They’re seen as a natural climate fix because they eat carbon dioxide, one of the main gases that cause global warming.

The number of trees pledged in the coming years runs into the billions. Pakistan wants to plant more than three billion trees in the next couple of years. Ethiopia claims to have planted 350 million in one day! Neal Razzell and Graihagh Jackson try to see the wood from the trees amongst all these claims, and discover that a ‘forest’ planting campaign doesn't always end up creating the natural woodland we imagine it to be.

And to add to the urgency of the climate crisis, there's a new problem - a warming world may mean plants can’t suck up our carbon dioxide as effectively. Have we planted too much faith in trees?

Experts:
Dr Kate Hardwick, Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew
Prof Pedro Brancalion, professor of forest sciences at the University of São Paulo
Dr Ben Ben Poulter, NASA Goddard Space Centre
Rafael Bitante, SoS Mata Atlantica Project

Producer: Jordan Dunbar (London), Jessica Cruz (Sao Paulo)
Researcher: Soila Apparicio
Editor: Penny Murphy


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlknp58)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv72)
Can we build houses from living trees?

It’s the stuff of fairy tales – a beautiful cottage, with windows, chimney and floorboards … and supported by a living growing tree. CrowdScience listener Jack wants to know why living houses aren’t a common sight when they could contribute to leafier cities with cleaner air. The UK has an impressive collection of treehouses, but they remain in the realm of novelty, for good reasons. Architects are used to materials like concrete and steel changing over time, but a house built around a living tree needs another level of flexibility in its design. That doesn’t mean it’s impossible and CrowdScience hears about a project in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, where architect Ahadu Abaineh made a three-storey, supported by 4 living Eucalyptus trees as a natural foundation.

Host Marnie Chesterton meets some of the global treehouse building fraternity, including builder of over 200 structures, Takashi Kobayashi, who adapts his houses to the Japanese weather. In Oregon, USA, Michael Garnier has built an entire village of treehouses for his “Treesort”. He’s developed better ways of building , including the Tree Attachment Bolt, which holds the weight of the house while minimising damage to the tree.

Professor Mitchell Joachim from Terreform One explains the wild potential of living architecture, a movement which looks at organic ways of building. He’s currently building a prototype living house, by shaping willow saplings onto a scaffold that will become a home, built of live trees.

Photo Credit: Ahadu Abaineh


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vyzfn0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wrf6nlpzq)
Myanmar protesters call for general strike

We're live in Myanmar where the growing protest movement has been spreading out across the country’s cities after the military’s coup earlier this month.

EU foreign ministers are discussing sanctions against Russian officials behind the crackdown on Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny and his supporters.

And the Afghan president, Ashraf Ghani speaks to the BBC about the NATO troop presence in this country and the peace deal with the Taliban.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vyzkd4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wrf6nltqv)
Myanmar protests continue across the country

Thousands of people in Myanmar have once again taken to the streets, as the military warned anti-coup protesters they could die. We speak to a human right activist and former political prisoner in Myanmar.

Friends of Princess Latifa call for sanctions against the Emirate of Dubai for allegedly holding her hostage. Her best friend, with her at the time of the alleged abduction, joins us live.

And in the midst of the battle against Covid-19, Guinea declared last week another outbreak of Ebola. We report on how countries have been learning from past Ebola outbreaks to be better prepared this time.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vyzp48)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wrf6nlygz)
UK to outline its way out of lockdown

Boris Johnson, the British Prime Minister, is to announce today that all schools in England will reopen in two weeks, as part of his roadmap to slowly reopen society. We get the view of an epidemiologist.

Our Chief International correspondent speaks to the President of Afghanistan.

And the director of operations for the International Committee of the Red Cross says the needs of people affected by fighting in the Ethiopian region of Tigray are greater than previously thought.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vyzswd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc37)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkp54s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7kq)
Will hydrogen prove a life saver?

The "hydrogen economy" has received a lot of hype, but could this explosive gas fill some critical gaps in a future zero-carbon energy system?

Justin Rowlatt looks at Australia's plans to use its huge solar and wind resources to generate hydrogen from seawater. Miranda Taylor of the government-sponsored agency National Energy Resources Australia lists some of the many potential applications for the gas that the country is taking a punt on. But how many of them will actual prove commercially viable?

Clean energy consultant Michael Liebreich says that despite hydrogen's versatility, in most cases it's likely to prove far less efficient than other technologies. But there are a few key exceptions, some of which could be life saving. Plus, chemistry professor Andrea Sella blows up a balloon, zaps some water, and nearly gives Justin a hernia.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Hydrogen pipeline with blue sky background; Credit: Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszml9)
Acid rain

In the 1960s, Swedish scientists documented how acid rain was poisoning lakes, killing fish, damaging soils and forests. Crucially they said it was an international problem, because the acid rain was caused by industrial pollution being carried on the prevailing winds from countries thousands of miles away. Acid rain is primarily created by the burning of fossil fuels, particularly coal, which releases large amounts of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides into the air. These particles then mix with moisture in the atmosphere to create sulphuric and nitric acid, which then falls back to earth as acid rain. The phenomenon of acid rain was noticed in the 19th century but the threat was largely ignored. Alex Last spoke to Prof Henning Rodhe of Stockholm University about the research that alerted the world to the dangers of acid rain.

Photo: Forest decline caused by acid rain in the Giant Mountains in Poland - 1998 (Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vyzxmj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkp8wx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz01cn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 on Sunday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkpdn1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz053s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s3kxjx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkpjd5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv72)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz08vx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd4g)
We discovered we were stolen as babies

In 1975, when Maria Diemar was two months old, she was flown more than 8000 miles from Chile to Sweden to meet her adoptive parents. They couldn't have children of their own, and thought they could offer a home to a child from a poorer country. Two years later, they brought over another baby from Chile, just a few weeks old, and called him Daniel. The adoption agency didn't have much information about the children's biological parents, but were clear that - to their knowledge - their birth mothers had given them up willingly. Growing up, it wasn't easy for Maria or Daniel to live with the knowledge that they'd been given away. Both experienced discrimination in Sweden as a result of their skin colour. Daniel struggled with depression. Desperate to know more about where they came from, Maria set out to find the truth about their backgrounds, only to discover that they were part of a national scandal in Chile.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Picture: Maria Diemar and Daniel Olsson
Credit: Maria Diemar


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszml9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz0dm1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s3l515)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkprwf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz0jc5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z6rdgppzr)
Italy's ambassador to DR Congo killed in ambush on UN convoy

Luca Attanasio was travelling with the UN's World Food Programme when he died alongside two others in the Virunga National Park area. The attack is believed to have been an attempted kidnapping, though it's not clear who carried it out.

Also in the programme: Hundreds of thousands joined a general strike in Myanmar in some of the largest protests since a military coup three weeks ago; President Joe Biden holds a vigil as the United States' Covid-19 death toll reaches half a million; and Norway's National Museum of Art concludes that a mysterious inscription on Edvard Munch's painting The Scream was written by the artist himself.

(Photo: Italy's foreign minister has confirmed the death of Luca Attanasio. Credit: Italian foreign ministry/AFP/Getty Images)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz0n39)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc37)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkq0cp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvbnn6phj0)
Israel's coast disfigured after oil spill

Authorities in Israel hope to identify the source of an oil spill that has hit its coast. Zafrir Rinat of Israel's Haaretz newspaper explains the background, and Dr Corina Ciocan, senior lecturer at the Centre for Aquatic Environments at the University of Brighton, assesses the scale of the clean up operation that will be required. Also in the programme, while many industries have struggled over the past year, the video gaming sector has had a bumper 12 months. The BBC's Adrian Bradley reports on how gaming has helped many of those stuck in lockdown stay connected, and develop new skills. Plus, insurers are warning that the increasing amount of space junk around planet Earth could endanger satellites crucial to some business operations, such as weather forecasting, banking and communications. Pascal Lecointe is a specialist in space insurance for insurers Hiscox, and talks us through the risks.

(Picture: A clump of tar on an Israeli beach. Picture credit: Reuters.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz0rvf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t930vl3x8)
England unveils lockdown exit plan

With data from Britain's coronavirus vaccination programme suggesting it is having a major effect on preventing serious illness, the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson announces a four-stage relaxation of coronavirus lockdown restrictions in England. Our reporter brings us the latest developments as the plan is announced.

And our health expert Dr Eleanor Murray, assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health answers listener's questions about the coronavirus. Send in your questions to OS as a voice message via WhatsApp on +447730 751925.

Also, protests have continued in Barcelona and across Spain following the arrest of Catalan rapper Pablo Hasel last week. Hasel was arrested on Tuesday for insulting police and Spanish royalty in his song lyrics and tweets, igniting a debate over freedom of expression laws in Spain. He is facing a nine-month jail term for glorifying terrorism. We speak to a local journalist to get the latest.

(Photo: Prime minister Boris Johnson, February 17, 2021. Credit: Alastair Grant/PA Wire)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz0wlk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t930vl7nd)
Coronavirus conversations: The impact on aid workers

As part of our coronavirus coverage, we continue to bring together people around the world with shared experiences. Today we are joined by aid workers in Botswana, India and Ecuador to hear how the pandemic has not only affected the lives of the people they support, but also their ability to provide that support.

Also the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson announces a four-stage relaxation of coronavirus lockdown restrictions in England. Our reporter brings us the latest developments.

And we continue to hear voices from Myanmar, where hundreds of thousands of people have filled the streets in a peaceful display of protest against the three-week old military regime.

(Photo: Action Aid volunteers in India. Credit: Action Aid)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz10bp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd4g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszml9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz142t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s3lwhy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkqhc6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k172vc3jv)
2021/02/22 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz17ty)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkqm3b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2cb0)
The Life Scientific: Giles Yeo

Professor Jim Al-Khalili talks to leading scientists about their life and work.


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz1cl2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z6rdgqk6n)
England's lockdown exit plan

Boris Johnson has revealed his "roadmap" to end the lockdown in England - as data from the UK's vaccination drive shows a spectacular drop in serious illness and deaths. We examine the Prime Minister's plan. Also on the programme: The latest on protests in Myanmar; and as the US Supreme Court clears the way for New York prosecutors to obtain Donald Trump's tax returns, we ask if the former president is facing fresh legal trouble. (Image: Prime Minister Boris Johnson during a media briefing in Downing Street, London, on coronavirus (Covid-19). Monday February 22, 2021. Leon Neal/PA Wire)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz1hb6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79vv1hxyb1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172x3frg5fm78w)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkqvll)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172xm9s30jh7tg)
Israel coast disfigured after oil spill

Authorities in Israel hope to identify the source of an oil spill that has hit its coast. Zafrir Rinat of Israel's Haaretz newspaper explains the background, and Dr Corina Ciocan, lecturer in marine biology at the University of Brighton, assesses the potential impact on marine life in the Mediterranean Sea. Also in the programme, while many industries have struggled over the past year, the video gaming sector has had a bumper 12 months. The BBC's Adrian Bradley reports on how gaming has helped many of those stuck in lockdown stay connected, and develop new skills. Plus, insurers are warning that the increasing amount of space junk around planet Earth could endanger satellites crucial to some business operations, such as weather forecasting, banking and communications. Pascal Lecointe is a specialist in space insurance for insurers Hiscox, and talks us through the risks.

(Picture: A clump of tar on an Israeli beach. Picture credit: Reuters.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz1m2b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc37)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkqzbq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



TUESDAY 23 FEBRUARY 2021

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz1qtg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3cszkq8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz1vkl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x1986v9v2nh)
UK unveils timeline to ease lockdown

Shops, hairdressers, gyms and outdoor hospitality could reopen on 12 April in England under plans set out by Prime Minister Boris Johnson. It requires four tests on vaccines, infection rates and new coronavirus variants to be met at each stage. We discuss the slow global progression towards a post-Covid world with economist and Emeritus Professor at the University of Maryland, Peter Morici, and financial expert Jessica Khine. Meanwhile, in Myanmar, hundreds of thousands of people gathered in towns and cities across the country as part of a general strike against military rule. And, we explore how 2020 may have been the video games industry's best year ever. (Picture credit: Reuters)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz1z9q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2j)
Tackling sport’s concussion problem

Head injuries in sport can have a devastating effect on the brain, which is often only noticed later in life. So lots of people are investigating ways of making it safer to play sports such as American football, boxing and soccer. We look at new technology including smart mouth guards and innovative helmets, and we find out about the latest medical developments that are helping people to combat the risk of brain disease.

Produced and presented by Ben Wyatt

Image: Two footballers contest a header (Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkrbl3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcm)
Ben Okri

In the Studio enters the creative mind of the celebrated Nigerian poet and author Ben Okri.

Ben takes us on the journey of a new poem as it forms in his mind and makes its way to the page. Coinciding with a newly published anthology of his poems, A Fire in My Head, he reflects on the poetry writing process and the role of the poet in the 21st century.

Through a mixture of audio diary recorded in London during lockdown and in conversation with the BBC’s Bola Mosuro, Ben offers an unique insight into his way of bringing one of the most ancient literary forms to life.

Presented by Bola Mosuro
Produced by Neil McCarthy for the BBC World Service
Image by Mat Bray


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz231v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd4g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszml9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz26sz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct20d1)
I am Robert Chelsea

The first African-American to have a face transplant tells his own story - in a documentary about faith, identity and character. Robert Chelsea suffered horrific burns after his stationary car was hit by a truck with a drunk driver at the wheel, in Los Angeles in 2013. He survived and went ahead with a series of demanding surgical operations at a Boston hospital in an attempt to restore his appearance. A shortage of black donors meant it was a long wait for his doctors to find even a partial match for his skin colour. The operation was a success. Although he still has difficulty speaking, he can now eat and drink without difficulty. In a moving narrative, Robert, his friends, family and doctors reflect on his remarkable journey. They pay tribute to a man whose first thoughts are always of others, and who has borne his afflictions with remarkable fortitude and good humour.

(Photo: Robert Chelsea. Credit: BBC)


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkrl2c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct2cb0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz2bk3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wrf6nplwt)
US records over 500,000 Covid-19 deaths

President Joe Biden has addressed the nation as the US marks 500,000 deaths from Covid-19, the highest toll of any country in the world. We speak to someone who had the virus last year.

El Chapo's wife Emma Coronel Aispuro has been arrested in the US over drug trafficking charges. We have the latest.

And we take a look at South Africa's economic prospects during the pandemic.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz2g97)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wrf6npqmy)
Australia and Facebook resolve dispute

We go live to Australia as Facebook and the government resolve a dispute over a proposed law that would make it and Google pay news publishers for content.

There have now been over 500,000 deaths from Covid-19 in the US. An infectious diseases expert gives their assessment.

And we discuss the decision by the insurance market Lloyds of London is seeking an archivist to investigate what it calls its 'shameful' role in the Atlantic slave trade.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz2l1c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wrf6npvd2)
Dispute between Australia and Facebook is resolved

Facebook and Australia have been at loggerheads for weeks now over proposed Australian laws to make big technology giants, like Facebook and Google, pay for news stories. Today they have come to an agreement. We have the latest.

The British government has set out its plan to ease lockdown, with schools returning in early March. We get the reaction of a teacher.

And we report on a survey in Nigeria which suggests that rates of infection from Covid-19 in the country are much higher than previously reported.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz2psh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlks21w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8cd)
The plastic pandemic

The pandemic has brought with it a massive rise in plastic waste. Tamasin Ford looks at how the demand for hygiene along with plummeting oil prices boosted our use of single use plastics. In some countries, it has increased by 50 percent. In other countries, the increase has been even six or seven fold. She speaks to Gary Stokes, the Founder of Oceans Asia in Hong Kong, a marine conservation organisation. And to Amy Slack, head of campaigns and policy at Surfers Against Sewage, an ocean conservation group in St Agnes in Cornwall in the South West of England. Plus Jacob Duer, the CEO of the Alliance to End Plastic waste, based in Singapore - an organisation supported by the private sector. And Elsie Mbugua, an energy trader and founder of Elcy Investments.


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmqt)
Ireland's bank bailout

In the wake of the 2008 global financial crisis Ireland had to borrow billions to stop its banks from going under and to keep its economy afloat. The IMF, the EU and the European Central Bank provided the money. Matt Murphy has been speaking to Patrick Honahan, who was Ireland's central banker at the time of the bailout.

Photo: Protesters take to the streets of Dublin in November 2010 to oppose savage public spending cutbacks needed to secure an international bailout. Credit:Ben Stansall/AFP via Getty Images


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz2tjm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct20d1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlks5t0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz2y8r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk46)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz320w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s3ntg0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlksf98)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 Discovery (w3ct2cb0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz35s0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdl0)
The man who didn't remember and the woman who never forgets

What happens to a marriage when one partner loses their memory and has no recollection of ever having been in love with the other person? It happened to an American couple Adam and Raquel Gonzales in 2016, about four years into their relationship. They met in Phoenix, Arizona after Adam had moved there from Texas with his children. This story was first broadcast in April 2018; it contains a disturbing reference to a violent attack.

Australian Rebecca Sharrock can remember everything she's ever said, done or felt. She’s one of just 80 or so people in the world who’ve been diagnosed with Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory, or HSAM. Her condition’s been verified by researchers at the University of California Irvine. Not only can Rebecca recall what she was doing on any particular day, the memory is so strong that it’s like she’s there in that moment all over again. So does she think of her memory as a blessing or a curse? This story was first broadcast in August 2018.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Image and credit: Adam and Raquel Gonzales/Rebecca Sharrock


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmqt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz39j4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s3p1y8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlksnsj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz3f88)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z6rdgslwv)
Facebook reverses ban on news pages in Australia

Facebook restores news feeds in Australia after the government agreed to amend legislation forcing social media companies to pay for news content.

Also in the programme: Aid agencies are again warning that Yemen stands on the brink of famine with hunger now a problem all over Yemen, not just the north. And a study of Covid-19 infection rates in Nigeria suggests they're much higher than previously reported.

(Photo: Facebook and newspapers. Credit: EPA)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz3k0d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlksx8s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwzk3f508p)
Sheikh Yamani dies at age 90

The long-serving Saudi oil minister Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Yamani has died in London at age 90. Mr Yamani was the public face of the 1970s oil embargo, and Julian Lee of Bloomberg, who worked with Mr Yamani at the Centre for Global Energy Studies in London, considers his legacy. Also in the programme, as the latest government figures indicate young people have disproportionately lost jobs as a result of the pandemic in the UK, the BBC's Sarah Corker has been to Blackpool in northwest England to hear about youth employment prospects there. There is concern that many millions of discarded face masks as a result of Covid-19 are eventually ending up as plastic waste in our oceans, and the BBC's Tamasin Ford investigates what can be done to help tackle the problem. Plus, a range of apps now promise to make tracking or calculating our personal carbon footprint easier, with a view to helping minimise our environmental impact. Christian Arno from Pawprint explains how his firm's app works.

(Picture: Sheikh Yamani in 2000. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz3nrj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t930vp0tc)
Coronavirus: 500,000 lives lost in the US

The US has passed the figure of 500,000 Covid-related deaths. We speak to Americans about their experiences of grief and look at the pandemic response by the Biden presidency. We also have a conversation with a psychologist about the “numbness” many are feeling as they struggle to process these huge coronavirus statistics.

Dr Isaac Bogoch from Toronto will help us answer audience questions about the virus.

And we hear about the new Ebola outbreak in Guinea where vaccinations are starting with those who have come into contact with Ebola patients as well as with frontline workers.

(Photo: President Joseph Biden, First Lady Jill Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris and Second Gentleman Doug Emhoff hold a moment of silence and candle lighting ceremony on the South Portico of the White House for the 500,000 Americans who have died from the Covid pandemic in Washington, DC, USA, 22 February 2021. Credit: JIM LO SCALZO/EPA)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz3shn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t930vp4kh)
Coronavirus conversations: America reflects on 500,000 death toll

The US has passed the figure of 500,000 Covid-related deaths. President Joe Biden addressed the nation, saying: "We can't accept such a cruel fate. We have to resist becoming numb to the sorrow." We speak to people in Elmhurst in New York, which back in March 2020 was one of the worst hit parts of the country. At the time doctors at Elmhurst hospital described the situation as "apocalyptic". We learn how the community is doing now.

Also, one of three men accused of assassinating investigative journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia in Malta in 2017 has been sentenced to 15 years in prison after pleading guilty. Our reporter on the ground brings us the latest developments.

And we hear about the new Ebola outbreak in Guinea where vaccinations are starting with those who have come into contact with Ebola patients as well as with frontline workers.

(Photo: Ieda delos Reyes, Deacon at Elmhurst Baptist Church in New York. Credit: Ieda delos Reyes)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz3x7s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdl0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmqt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz40zx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s3psf1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlktd89)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k172vg0fy)
2021/02/23 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz44r1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct20d1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlktj0f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99c)
Facebook reverses ban on news in Australia

Tech giant Facebook blocked news content across its Australian platform last Thursday on account of a proposed law which would enforce some firms to pay news publishers for use and distribution of their information. Nearly a week later the government has agreed to amend the law and negotiate the value of this content. Tech reporter Angharad Yeo in Australia returns to the show to discuss the new law and how it could be seen as a test case for online regulation across the globe.

Can AI be a playwright?
To celebrate the 100th anniversary of Czech playwright Karel Čapek’s production R.U.R. in which the word ‘robot was first used, Prague's Švanda Theatre, working alongside theaitre.com, are set to present a play written entirely by AI, exploring the everyday life of a robot. Reporter Hannah Fisher speaks to Tomáš Studeník, Czech radical innovator, computational linguist Rudolf Rosa and drama expert David Košťák about their upcoming project set to air on 26th February.

Robo Squid and Jellyfish
Engineers have developed a robotic squid that propels itself with pulses of water at the natural resonance of the robot. By using the resonance frequency that the robot naturally has they increased its speed without increasing energy consumption – a trick used by a number of animals in nature. Dr. Nicole Xu, who is researching and creating robotic jellyfish, is on the programme to explain how this technique could allow for much better exploration and monitoring of our oceans.

(Image credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.

Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz48h5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z6rdgtg3r)
Yemen's silent hunger crisis

Ten years since the outbreak of war in Yemen, the United Nations is warning the country is at risk of the worst famine the world has seen in decades. We hear from the centre of the crisis and speak to the most senior UN official in charge of relief operations.

Also on the programme: Sir David Attenborough warns climate change threatens global security; and could the street drug ecstasy cure alcoholism?

(Image: A Yemeni child looks on as she waits for her malnourished brother at a hospital in Sanaa, Yemen, 13 January 2021. EPA/YAHYA ARHAB)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz4d79)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79vv1j0v74)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172x3frg5fq45z)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlktrhp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmdh1tj7vjt)
Ethics of Vaccine Passports

The UK Prime Minister has confirmed a review into whether the country should develop a vaccine passport. We hear from Professor Melinda Mills on the ethics and challenges of Vaccine Passports. Also in the programme, As facebook comes to an agreement with the Australian government over links to news articles, we ask who blinked first. There is concern that many millions of discarded face masks as a result of Covid-19 are eventually ending up as plastic waste in our oceans, and the BBC's Tamasin Ford investigates what can be done to help tackle the problem. Plus, a range of apps now promise to make tracking or calculating our personal carbon footprint easier, with a view to helping minimise our environmental impact. Christian Arno from Pawprint explains how his firm's app works.

(Picture: Nurse administering a Covid-19 Vaccine. Picture credit: Press Association.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz4hzf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlktw7t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 24 FEBRUARY 2021

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz4mqk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk46)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz4rgp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x1986v9xzkl)
Ethics of Vaccine Passports

The UK Prime Minister has confirmed a review into whether the country should develop a vaccine passport. We hear from Professor Melinda Mills on the ethics and challenges of Vaccine Passports. Also in the programme, As facebook comes to an agreement with the Australian government over links to news articles, we ask who blinked first. Plus, we hear the latest from parliament as the music streaming companies face UK MPs over how much consumers pay for music. We speak to Bloomberg's Nisha Gopalan in Hong Kong and Marketplace's Mitchell Hartman in the US.

(IMAGE: A Nurse administers a Covid-19 Vaccine. Picture Credit: Press Association)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz4w6t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7r)
Elizabeth Neumann: The battle for the soul of the US Republican Party

How far does the Republican party need to go to reinvent itself following Donald Trumps defeat in the November Presidential election? Elizabeth Neumann, a former counter terror official in the Trump Administration says she saw America’s far right, white-supremacists as a growing security threat and she felt Donald Trump was fanning the flames of their extremism. In April 2020 she resigned. Now she says she is fighting for what she calls accountability in the Republican party - but has her stand come too late?


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkv7h6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x85)
Goal 6: Clean water

In 2015 the United Nations announced a radical plan to change the world.

Global leaders drew up a list of 17 "sustainable development goals" to create a blueprint for a better future. Governments agreed to support the goals which cover gender equality, health provision, a good education and much more. Now 17-year-olds from 17 different countries tell us what they think needs to change if the world is to meet those goals by 2030.

Joyce lives in rural Rwanda and has to walk to a communal tap to collect water for her family every day. But she is lucky, she doesn't have to walk too far and the water is clean. Some of her friends face much longer journeys and have to collect water from ponds used by cattle or for laundry. She talks to activists, a government spokeswoman and other schoolchildren about Rwanda's water and sanitation situation.

Presenter: Sana Safi
Producer: Kate Lamble

Project 17 is made in partnership with The Open University


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz4zyy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdl0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmqt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz53q2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Compass (w3ct1gvc)
The New Arctic

The New Arctic: Power

Contrary to popular opinion, the Arctic is not a pristine, empty white desert. It is home to four million people distributed across eight distinct nation states: The USA, Canada, Kingdom of Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Russian Federation.

Allan Little looks at how the region is fast becoming fraught with geopolitical tensions. Despite all sides stressing this is still an area of low tension, Russia is building up its military presence and capabilities, with Nato countries responding with large-scale Arctic training exercises. China’s interest in the region is also creating new security concerns. But at a local level, we discover a very different story - Norwegian and Russian border communities maintain long-standing friendships.

Many argue that a new cold war is unlikely and geopolitics are overshadowing more urgent security issues facing the region. Future disputes are predicted over resource management and lucrative new shipping routes but not all-out war. And how important is the Arctic Council as the primary forum for dialogue and inclusion of indigenous voices, who must play a key role in the future of the region.

(Photo: A family in the Tundra. Credit: Stine Barlindhaug)


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkvgzg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz57g6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wrf6nshsx)
Clean energy push from 15 world leaders

Former British Prime Minister David Cameron is among a group of political heavyweights calling for a big push on clean energy for countries affected by conflict.

The golf legend Tiger Woods has been involved in a major car crash and is in surgery, having suffered multiple leg injuries.

And we'll talk to the Texas man who took his monster truck through the ice to rescue people stuck in their cars - hundreds of them.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz5c6b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wrf6nsmk1)
Tiger Woods car crash in Los Angeles

Former World Number one golfer Tiger Woods is just out of surgery after he was involved in a serious road accident, we'll get the latest from the US on his condition.

A landmark case in Germany as a court decides if a Syrian man who fled his country's civil war was an accomplice to crimes against humanity, He was working as a government intelligence officer at the time.

Ninety per cent of goods around the world are transported by sea, now a new report suggests trade barriers have increased during the pandemic so what does that mean for global prosperity?


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz5gyg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wrf6nsr95)
Tiger Woods car crash: 'awake and responsive' after surgery

The former British Prime Minister David Cameron is among a group of political heavyweights calling for a big push on clean energy for countries affected by conflict.

Malaysia says it has deported 1200 refugees from Myanmar despite a court order to halt the process. We get an update on how and where they are from Amnesty International

and we have the story of one man and his pick up truck... Ryan Sivley tells us how he rescued hundreds of people stuck in their cars in the icy conditions hitting Texas last week.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz5lpl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkvyyz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8p1)
Love in the time of coronavirus

Covid-19 has ruined millions of wedding plans. Will 2021 spark a race to the altar for those unable to tie the knot? California couple Lauren and Patrick Delgado tell their story. We also hear from Jordie Shepherd, host of the Corona Brides podcast, and the bride tear-gassed on her wedding day. Also, has Covid-19 put an end to the Big Fat Indian Wedding? We ask Lalita Raghav at the wedding planners Ferns N Petals.

Picture: Bride and groom figurines are pictured wearing face masks (Credit: Getty)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmt2)
The fall of Kwame Nkrumah

The Ghanaian president, Kwame Nkrumah, was one of Africa's most famous independence leaders. But in 1966, while he was out of the country, the Ghanaian military and police seized power in a coup. The legendary Ghanaian film maker Chris Hesse worked closely with Nkrumah and was with him at the time. He spoke to Alex Last about his memories of the coup and his friendship with the man who'd led Ghana to independence.

Photo: Kwame Nkrumah c 1955 (Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz5qfq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct1gvc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkw2q3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x85)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz5v5v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct1mz5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz5yxz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s3rqc3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkwb6c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz62p3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdss)
Jail Time Records: Songs from a Cameroon prison

Vidou H was a music producer and DJ with an enviable life in Cameroon, but everything changed when he and his brothers were falsely accused of murder. He was sent to a tough overcrowded prison to await trial, a process that took two years. For much of that time he had no access to music, until a recording studio was set up inside, the idea of an Italian artist called Dione Roach. Dione hoped music could help with rehabilitation and Vidou H was quickly put in charge of the production side. He started making an album with the talent he found in prison. The result is the soon to be released Jail Time Records Vol.1.

Yara Shalaby is Egypt's first female rally driver. She's mastered the sport in some of the country's toughest desert terrain, while also putting up with a lot of detractors - people telling her that women can't drive. In spite of that, she's risen up the sport and has beaten many of her male competitors in the process.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Music producer Vidou H. Credit: Dione Roach)


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmt2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz66f7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s3ryvc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkwkpm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x85)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz6b5c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z6rdgwhsy)
Syrian ex-intelligence officer convicted in landmark Germany case

In a landmark case, a court in Germany has convicted a former Syrian intelligence officer for human rights abuses committed against opponents of President Assad.
Also in the programme: Ghana has become the first country to receive a coronavirus vaccine shipment from Covax, the global initiative to help poorer countries tackle the pandemic. And will the Olympics be held in Tokyo this year ?

(Photo: The trial of alleged Syrian intelligence officer Eyad al-Gharib began in April 2020. Credit: AFP)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz6fxh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkwt5w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxszv0y6m2)
South Africa budgets for Covid vaccines

Coronavirus-hit South Africa has unveiled its national budget for the coming year. The BBC's Lerato Mbele in Johannesburg talks us through how tight the country's finances are, as it plans spending to help roll out Covid-19 vaccines. Also in the programme, women now occupy more than a third of the top jobs at the UK's 350 largest firms. We find out more from Denise Wilson, chief executive of the government-backed Hampton-Alexander Review, which released the latest figures, and was launched to encourage UK-listed companies to appoint more women. India is forging ahead with plans to tax digital services, and Suranjali Tandon, assistant professor at the government-backed National Institute of Public Finance and Policy explains the motivation behind the move. Plus the BBC's Ed Butler reports on how coronavirus has impacted couples looking to tie the knot, as well as the global wedding industry.

(Picture: A healthcare worker is vaccinated against Covid-19 in South Africa. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz6knm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t930vrxqg)
Coronavirus: First vaccines delivered through Covax

Ghana has become the first country to acquire Covid vaccines through the global “Covax” programme aimed at sharing access to vaccine more fairly. We speak to our health reporter about the roll-out plan in the continent and hear from Ghanaians about their experiences of the pandemic.

We also hear from two doctors in Venezuela who have reminded of the shocking reality they are facing while tackling the pandemic; many of the biggest hospitals in the country don’t even have running water.

Our Chinese media analyst explains the heated debate a divorce ruling has sparked in China and around the world. A court in Beijing ruled that a man must compensate his wife for the housework she did during the marriage.

(Photo: A worker checks boxes of AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccines as the country receives its first batch of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccines under COVAX scheme, at the international airport of Accra, Ghana February 24, 2021. Credit: Francis Kokoroko/Reuters)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz6pdr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t930vs1gl)
Coronavirus conversations: Venezuelan doctors

We hear from two doctors in Venezuela who have reminded of the shocking reality they are facing while tackling the pandemic; many of the biggest hospitals in the country don’t even have running water.

We also go to France where the number of patients treated in intensive care units for Covid-19 has reached a 12-week peak. France has switched from lockdown to a national curfew but the number of infections has remained high. We speak to a doctor about the challenges health care workers are facing.

We also hear about the debate a divorce ruling has sparked in China and around the world . A court in Beijing ruled that a man must compensate his wife for the housework she did during the marriage.

(Photo: A Venezuelan health worker vaccinates a colleague with Russia"s Sputnik V vaccine against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at a hospital, in Caracas, Venezuela February 22, 2021. Credit: Leonardo Fernandez Viloria/Reuters)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz6t4w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdss)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmt2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz6xx0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s3spb4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkx95d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k172vjxc1)
2021/02/24 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz71n4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct1gvc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkxdxj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcd8)
Long Covid: solving the mysteries

Health Check discusses Long Covid with Nishi Chaturvedi, professor clinical epidemiology at University College London, and Dr Shamil Haroon, family doctor and public health researcher at the University of Birmingham. They’ve both begun big research projects on what Long Covid is, what causes it and how best to treat patients. We also hear from two people whose lives have transformed for the worse by the syndrome.

Claudia talks to Professor Gagandeep Kang who has delivered a keynote talk at this week’s Commonwealth Science Conference. Her theme was how the world’s scientists were able to develop multiple coronavirus vaccines so quickly. She says the global health community were determined to learn the lessons from the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014 to 2016. Professor Kang is one of India’s leading vaccinologists, based at the Wellcome Trust Research Laboratory at the Christian Medical College in Vellore. Claudia also asks her about the latest coronavirus infection rate in India and why the mortality rate has been much lower there than in many other countries.

Dr Ann Robinson is Claudia’s guest of the week, talking about the Ebola outbreak in Guinea, how research on Long Covid may benefit many more than those who have it, and a ketamine nasal spray for the treatment of severe depression.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

(Picture: Ill woman with purple face mask coughing, lying down and resting. Photo credit: Ruslan Dashinsky/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz75d8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z6rdgxc0v)
Former Syrian officer sentenced in landmark case

In Germany, a Syrian intelligence officer is convicted for complicity in crimes against humanity. We hear from one of those who testified at the trial.

Also on the programme, Ghana is the first African country to receive a delivery from the global Covid vaccine scheme, Covax; And after a century in private hands, a painting by van Gogh goes public.

(Photo: Staff removes handcuffs of Syrian defendant Eyad A. as he arrives to hear his verdict in the courtroom in Koblenz, Germany; Credit: Thomas Frey/Pool via REUTERS)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz794d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79vv1j3r47)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172x3frg5ft132)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkxnds)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmf9hk411w6)
Biden takes semiconductor action

The global semiconductor shortage continues to affect industries from computers through to automobiles. As President Biden signs an executive order to help look into the shortage, we hear just why there's a shortage and what can be done about them. Also in the programme, coronavirus-hit South Africa has unveiled its national budget for the coming year. The BBC's Lerato Mbele in Johannesburg talks us through how tight the country's finances are, as it plans spending to help roll out Covid-19 vaccines. Plus we hear fromSenagalese engineer Marie Ndieguene, whose new way to help farmers prevent post-harvest loss has been nominated for the Africa Engineering Prize. And the BBC's Ed Butler reports on how coronavirus has impacted couples looking to tie the knot, as well as the global wedding industry.

(Picture: President Biden holds up a semiconductor chip. Picture credit: Reuters.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz7dwj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkxs4x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x85)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



THURSDAY 25 FEBRUARY 2021

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz7jmn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct1mz5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz7ncs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x1986vb0wgp)
Biden pledge to tackle semiconductor shortage

US President Joe Biden has ordered officials to find ways to bolster supply chains as a shortage of computer chips hits carmakers around the world.
It comes after the pandemic has strained many producers and forced the US to scramble for medical gear.
The initial review is focused on computer chips, pharmaceuticals, rare earth minerals and large batteries, such as those used in electric cars.
Also on the programme; will the Olympics go ahead? And at what cost? The plight of weddings in the pandemic, and what next for live music.
The BBC's Fergus Nicoll is joined from Lahore, Pakistan by Mehmal Sarfraz and from Toronto, Canada by Ralph Silva.


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz7s3x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4v)
What is the future for Myanmar?

As protests continue in Myanmar against the generals who staged a military coup, and with Aung San Su Kyi under house arrest and facing criminal charges, has the country lost all prospects for a democratic future? With Tanya Beckett.


(A little girl shouts slogans with protestors waving flags of Myanmar, 22 February 2021. Credit: Peerapon Boonyakiat /Getty Images)


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlky4d9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr9)
Alice Waters: My life in five dishes

Alice Waters is one of America’s most influential chefs and food writers. In the 1970s she led a food revolution that sparked a movement towards local, sustainable, organic food. Alice tells Emily Thomas about her life, from a suburban childhood in New Jersey to the radical politics of the University of California, Berkeley. She explains how she was inspired to set up a small French restaurant called Chez Panisse, after a trip to France as a student, and how it became a mecca for writers, chefs, musicians and artists.

After almost half a century of food activism, Alice tells us that she still has plenty of work to do. She talks about her mission to educate children through her Edible School Yard project, how lockdown has focused her mind on climate change, and what it has felt like to see her beloved restaurant forced to close its doors over the past year.

(Photo: Alice Waters. Credit: Amanda Marsalis/ BBC).


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz7ww1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdss)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmt2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz80m5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 Assignment (w3csz6mh)
Kenya’s unhappy doctors and nurses

All over the world, frontline health workers have paid the ultimate price during the coronavirus pandemic. But in Kenya the story of one young doctor’s heroism has made headlines for all the wrong reasons. Twenty eight year-old Stephen Mogusu died from Covid 19 in December 2020, after working on an isolation ward and complaining that he lacked adequate protective clothing. Despite his vital service, he hadn’t been paid a salary for five months. Stephen’s tragedy also exposes a wider malaise in Kenya’s health provision: A corruption scandal involving overpriced masks, aprons and other protective clothing. Meanwhile, across the country, a series of on-off strikes have disrupted care, as doctors, nurses and clinicians have made sporadic protests against alleged mismanagement and a devolved power structure they say is dysfunctional. For Assignment, Lucy Ash finds out what’s ailing Kenya’s healthcare system.

Producer: Michael Gallagher
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Healthcare workers light candles next to a photograph of Doctor Stephen Mogusu. Credit: Dennis Sigwe/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkycwk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszcd8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz84c9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wrf6nwdq0)
China says 100m raised out of poverty

China has been celebrating an economic and social landmark - raising 100 million people out of poverty in just eight years.

In Lebanon there is a growing political scandal after a series of senior government officials are accused of jumping the queue to gain access to coronavirus vaccinations

And inter-generational tension in Oregon as the US state prioritises teachers over the elderly in its vaccine rollout.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz883f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wrf6nwjg4)
China claims a monumental social and economic transformation

The Chinese government has been congratulating individuals - and itself - on ending extreme poverty in the country.

A billionaire diamond trader Nirav Modi will appear in a London court today and face possible extradition to India to face charges relating to a $2bn bank fraud.

And we find out about the Iraqi Falcons - a secret intelligence group that battled the Islamic State, foiling suicide bomb attacks and bringing its leaders to justice.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz8cvk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wrf6nwn68)
China celebrates ending rural poverty

China's president Xi-JinPing has handed "poverty alleviation awards" in an event designed to mark the end of extreme poverty in China.

We hear more from Princess Latifa - the Dubai Royal who claims she is being held against her will in the Gulf Kingdom - as allegations emerge that her sister too attempted to flee the country 20 years ago but was recaptured in Britain and returned to Dubai.

And a year into the Covid-19 pandemic, many people are sure that our lives will never be the same ... and apparently neither will our language: we hear how the crisis has forced its way into German vocabulary.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz8hlp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkyvw2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7yj)
China's vaccine diplomacy

Poorer countries in search of Covid-19 vaccines are looking east. Agathe Demarais, global forecasting director at the Economist Intelligence Unit, describes how China and Russia are stepping in to provide vaccines where Europe and the US aren't. Yanzhong Huang, senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations, explains how this feeds into China's soft power aspirations. Yuan Ding, dean of the China Europe International Business School, and David Haigh, CEO of Brand Finance, discusses China's efforts at soft power so far.

(Photo: A nurse in Brazil holds a sample of a Chinese Covid-19 vaccine)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmnk)
The WW2 airman from Sierra Leone

Johnny Smythe was one of very few West Africans to fly with Britain's air force during WW2. Recruited in Sierra Leone in 1941 he was trained as a navigator and flew 26 missions on RAF bombers before being shot down over Germany and taken prisoner in 1943. His son Eddy Smythe spoke to Tim Stokes about his father’s story.

Photo: Johnny Smythe in his RAF uniform. Copyright: Eddy Smythe.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz8mbt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6mh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkyzm6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz8r2y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjwt)
Abraham Maslow’s psychology of human needs

Many students of psychology, business, nursing and other disciplines are taught about "Maslow's pyramid of human needs", a diagram that shows a progression from our basic needs, such as food and shelter, to higher, social needs and, eventually, to striving for often intangible life goals and fulfilment. The pyramid is an iconic image, yet Abraham Maslow, a leading humanistic psychologist of the 20th century, didn't actually create it. Moreover, his writings are much more sophisticated and perceptive than the diagram suggests. So where did this confusion come from and why didn't Maslow disown the pyramid? How should we understand Maslow's hierarchy of human needs? Why has it proved so useful in so many different disciplines? And in what way is it relevant to how we live today?

These are some of the questions that Bridget Kendall explores with Jessica Grogan from University of Texas at Austin, author of Encountering America, a history of humanistic psychology; David Baker, emeritus professor of psychology and former director of the Cummings Center for the History of Psychology at the University of Akron; and Scott Barry Kaufman, former director of the Imagination Institute at the University of Pennsylvania and author of Transcend which updates Maslow for the 21st century.


[Photo: Abraham Maslow, undated photograph. Credit: Bettmann/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh69)
The Gay Games

In 1982, the first ever Gay Games were held in San Francisco. Attracting a large crowd and featuring more than 1000 athletes from more than 100 countries, the event was organised by a group of LGBT activists, including former Olympians, to raise awareness about homophobia in sport. The Gay Games are now held every four years at venues around the world. Ashley Byrne speaks to organiser Sara Waddell Lewinstein and athlete Rick Tomin. This programme was first broadcast in 2010.

PHOTO: An athlete at the Gay Games (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz8vv2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s3vm86)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkz73g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 Health Check (w3cszcd8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz8zl6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdc7)
The child labourer who became a star of Mexico's food scene

The celebrated chef, nicknamed ‘Fast Eddie’, began picking fruit as an undocumented child in the US. He was deported having served time in prison for selling drugs - after turning himself in. Eduardo Garcia tells Saskia Edwards how he went on to become one of the most successful Mexican restauranteurs.

Scotsman Hugh Milne was the bodyguard of a notorious Indian guru who amassed thousands of followers and 100 Rolls Royces. He tells Jo Fidgen what was really going on behind the scenes. Originally broadcast in 2018.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture and credit: Eduardo Garcia


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmnk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz93bb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s3vvrg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkzglq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz972g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z6rdgzdq1)
Myanmar coup: Supporters of military Junta clash with pro-democracy rivals

About 1,000 supporters of the military turned up for a rally in central Yangon on Thursday. Some were photographed with clubs and knives. Students, doctors and other members of the public joined pro-democracy demonstrations.

Also in the programme: China says it has eradicated poverty in the country; and Armenia’s, Nikol Pashinyan, denounces what he called a coup attempt.

(Photo: A demonstrator kneels as he protests against the military coup while riot police advance on a street as tensions rise in Yangon. Credit: EPA).


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz9btl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qlkzq2z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlw53ctnhnl)
China's Xi claims an end to extreme poverty

China's president Xi Jinping has claimed his country has eradicated extreme poverty. Shuli Ren is a columnist for Bloomberg Opinion, and tells us what life is like for those living in China's rural heartlands. Also in the programme, mining giant Anglo American has announced its best half-year performance since 2011. Its chief executive, Mark Cutifani discusses how much of the success is down to rising commodity prices. We hear about concerns the six nation East African Community political and trade bloc is being undermined by governments blocking imports of certain products from neighbouring nations. Plus, the eight part drama series Industry, by HBO, Bad Wolf and the BBC, aims to portray life for graduate bankers working in London's financial district. The BBC's Nina Nanji has been talking to some of those just starting out in the sector to find out whether fiction mirrors reality.

(Picture: Farmers in rural China. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz9gkq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t930vvtmk)
Coronavirus conversations: The role of robots during the pandemic and beyond

We continue to bring people together to share their experiences of the coronavirus pandemic and reflect on one of the many ways our lives have been affected. Increasingly robots have been helping with the effort to beat Covid, from disinfecting hospitals to delivering groceries. We talk to robot engineers and discuss the possible legacy of this.

Also, one of our regular health experts, Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland, answers your questions about the coronavirus. You can send your question into OS via WhatsApp to +447730 751925.

And will music festivals in Europe being going ahead in 2021? We speak to a Dutch researcher being paid to see whether it might be possible to hold COVID-safe festivals and other large live music events.

(Photo: Andie Zhang, robotics engineer. Credit: BBC)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz9l9v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t930vvycp)
Coronavirus vaccines: EU meets to speed up rollout

European Union leaders are holding a virtual meeting to address speeding up the distribution of coronavirus vaccines. The European Commission has been heavily criticised over its strategy, as the rollout of vaccines lags behind Israel, Britain and the United States. We take a bounce around Europe to get the latest.

Also, we continue to bring people together to share their experiences of the coronavirus pandemic and reflect on one of the many ways our lives have been affected. Increasingly robots have been helping with the effort to beat Covid, from disinfecting hospitals to delivering groceries. We talk to robot engineers and discuss the possible legacy of this.

And we get your coronavirus questions answered by today's expert Dr Swapneil Parikh, who is an infectious disease researcher at the Kasturba Hospital of infectious diseases in Mumbai, India. You can send your questions to us via WhatsApp, our number is: +447730 751925.

(Photo: European Council President Charles Michel and European Parliament President David Sassoli with other EU leaders on a screen at the start of a EU Council two-days video conference on the COVID-19 pandemic. Credit: EPA/Olivier Hoslet)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz9q1z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdc7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmnk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz9tt3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s3wl77)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll062h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k172vmt84)
2021/02/25 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vz9yk7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6mh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll09tm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1s)
Waste not, want not

Although vaccines will go a long way to reducing the number of cases of Covid, there’s still a need for other approaches. One of these could be an engineered biomolecule, designed by virologists Anne Moscona and Matteo Porotto, that blocks SARS-CoV-2 precisely at the moment it tries to enter cells in the nose and upper airways. Roland Pease talks to Anne Moscona about this “molecular mask”.

We’re already beginning to see really encouraging analyses showing that Covid vaccines are performing as well in the real world as was promised by last year’s trials. Shane Crotty of the La Jolla Institute for Immunology discusses progress so far and the question of one dose or two with Roland.

Lives can be saved if there’s an early warning system for earthquakes and tsunamis. Seismologist Zhongwen Zhan at CalTech has been experimenting with a newly installed 10,000 km cable laid along the Pacific coasts of north and south America by Google, all the way from Los Angeles to Santiago. What he was looking for were subtle changes in a property of light that’s important to IT engineers, and can detect subsea earthquakes.

We are still sending too much waste to landfill sites. At the Commonwealth Science Conference this week Veena Sahajwalla of the University of New South Wales explained how she is creating small scale factories that can use discarded objects such as ceramics and textiles to make new products.


(Image: Getty Images)


Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Deborah Cohen


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzb29c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z6rdh07xy)
Armenian PM accuses army of coup attempt

Nikol Pashinyan says the army "must obey the people and elected authorities" after the country's armed forces called for him and his cabinet to resign. Mr Pashinyan has been under pressure since Armenia lost a war with neighbouring Azerbaijan last year.

Also in the programme: European Union leaders hold a virtual conference to try to speed up coronavirus vaccinations; and doctors join anti-coup protests in Myanmar.

Photo: Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pahinyan. Credit: EPA


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzb61h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79vv1j6n1b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172x3frg5fwy05)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll0k9w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmcnm2xrbxq)
China's Xi claims an end to extreme poverty

China's president Xi Jinping has claimed his country has eradicated extreme poverty. Shuli Ren is a columnist for Bloomberg Opinion, and tells us what life is like for those living in China's rural heartlands.Also in the programme, Etsy publishes a strong set of results, we hear from Etsy seller Ellie Chalkley about why she uses the platform. Mining giant Anglo American has announced its best half-year performance since 2011. Its chief executive, Mark Cutifani discusses how much of the success is down to rising commodity prices.Plus, the eight part drama series Industry, by HBO, Bad Wolf and the BBC, aims to portray life for graduate bankers working in London's financial district. The BBC's Nina Nanji has been talking to some of those just starting out in the sector to find out whether fiction mirrors reality.

(Picture: Farmers in rural China. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzb9sm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll0p20)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



FRIDAY 26 FEBRUARY 2021

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzbfjr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3cszjwt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh69)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzbk8w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x1986vb3scs)
Pressure mounts on California Governor Newsom, as recall petition gains momentum

The Governor of California, Gavin Newsom, is under mounting pressure from a petition which could see him recalled from his role. According to petition organisers, more than a million people have signed the petition, angry at his handling of the pandemic. Nathaniel Rakich, elections analyst at FiveThirtyEight.com breaks it all down for us.
Also on the programme; the boss of one of the world's biggest mining firms, Anglo-American's chief executive Mark Cutifani, speaks to us about a commodities boom as countries look to build their way out of the pandemic recession. We also hear from Adar Poonawalla, CEO of the Serum Institute of India one of the world's largest producers of vaccines, check in on young workers in London's financial district on whether their real working lives match the TV adaptations of life in finance, and hear about the rise and rise of online seller Etsy.
Throughout the programme Fergus Nicoll will be joined from Los Angeles by NPR contributing editor Paddy Hirsch and from Mumbai by Bloomberg's bureau chief there, Jeanette Rodrigues.

Picture Credit: Reuters.


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzbp10)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyq)
Dr Seth Berkley: How to ensure the whole world gets a Covid vaccine

Maybe we shouldn't be surprised that a vast gulf is opening up between Covid vaccination rates in the richest countries and the poorest. But still the numbers are shocking. While the UK has given 27% of its population a first dose, many nations have yet to inject a single arm. Hardtalk speaks to Dr Seth Berkley, head of Gavi, the Global Vaccine Alliance and key driver of the effort to ensure the whole world gets Covid protection. It is a great ambition; is it achievable?


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll119d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3cszthg)
Yohan Cabaye, 'Super Agents' and İstanbul Başakşehir

Former France international Yohan Cabaye discusses his decision to retire from football. Players' agent Mino Raiola talks about his motivation. And we find out what's gone wrong for the Turkish champions İstanbul Başakşehir.

Picture: Yohan Cabaye with his hands on hips during a Premier League match between Burnley and Crystal Palace (Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images).


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzbss4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdc7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmnk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzbxj8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq3)
Who blinked - Facebook or Australia?

Facebook and the Australian government reach a compromise over a new law requiring tech giants to pay publishers for news content. Is it a model for other countries to follow? Plus, how water-soluble circuit boards might help reduce e-waste. And have internet influencers been saviours of many businesses during lockdown? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill.


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll18sn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzc18d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wrf6nz9m3)
US raises human rights with Saudi Arabia

We look into US Saudi relations as President Joe Biden and King Salman talk for the first time. We speak to a dissident who was friends with the murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

A BBC investigation has revealed large chunks of the Amazon rain forest are being sold off via social media. Lands supposedly under legal protection have been offered for sale.

And the rights group Amnesty International has issued a report alleging a massacre in the Tigray region of Ethiopia, with extrajudicial executions, indiscriminate shelling and widespread looting.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzc50j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wrf6nzfc7)
What next for US Saudi relations?

President Joe Biden has spoken with the Saudi leader King Salman. The two nations are long standing allies but there is always the issue of human rights. The two men talked on the phone ahead of the release of a US report of an investigation into the gruesome murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi. We discuss where the relationship will go from here.

The pandemic has taken much from us, and in the Amazon region it has now sounded the death blow to an entire ethnic group , as the last male member of the Juma people dies from the disease.

And if you thought moving house was difficult, wait to hear about moving an actual house in San Francisco - that's the entire structure rolling down the street.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzc8rn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wrf6nzk3c)
Will human rights become key in new US Saudi relations?

Saudi Arabia and America strengthen their relationship, or will human rights get in their way? President Joe Biden has spoken with Saudi King Salman, ahead of a US report into the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Peace may be about to break along one of the world's most fractious borders, as India and Pakistan vow to end their sporadic military confrontations in Kashmir.

And a report from Amnesty International alleges that multiple war crimes took place last November in the sacred city of Aksum in the Tigray region of Ethiopia.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzcdhs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll1rs5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz79q)
Why does Bitcoin consume so much energy?

As Bitcoin's price hits a new all-time high, it's now estimated to use as much electricity as the whole of Argentina But is this remotely sustainable?

Justin Rowlatt speaks to cryptocurrency expert and University of Chicago economics professor Gina Pieters about why such heavy energy consumption is an intrinsic feature of Bitcoin, and why the higher it's value rises, the more its energy footprint expands.

But what about it's carbon footprint? That's a debate we get to hear both sides of, with crypto evangelist Ethan Pierse saying that Bitcoin miners are helping to finance the expansion of renewable energy sources, while the more sceptical data analyst Alex de Vries says they are burning plenty of fossil fuels to compete in an expensive and pointless lottery.

Plus Kenneth Rogoff, the former chief economist of the International Monetary Fund, compares Bitcoin to a work of modern art, and wonders whether its future may be as a curiosity at a Star Trek convention in the year 2100.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Blue Neon light, Bitcoin shape; Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmwb)
Banning landmines

In March 1999, the Ottawa Treaty banning anti-personnel landmines became part of international law. Over 80% of countries have signed the treaty, which was the culmination of a five-year campaign and which has saved hundreds of thousands of lives around the world. Louise Hidalgo has been talking to Jody Williams, who co-ordinated the campaign and was later awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her work.

Picture: Jody Williams at the signing of the Ottawa Treaty, alongside dignitaries including then United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan. (Credit: Dave Chan/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzcj7x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll1wj9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 World Football (w3cszthg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzcn01)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcpb)
Has Covid rolled back democratic rights?

Countries around the world are using the coronavirus pandemic to 'crush dissent and silence independent reporting' according to the UN chief Antonio Guterres. He says some nations are using restrictions meant to halt the spread of Covid-19 to weaken political opposition. Governments say a tighter grip over freedom of expression is essential to curb disinformation and confusion at a time when societies are under lockdown. Countries with authoritarian tendencies aren't the only ones under fire - the criticisms are being leveled at governments with well-established democracies too. So what are governments trying to get away with under the cover of Covid? How have the changes taken away democratic rights, and can the trends be reversed? Ritula Shah and a panel of guests discuss dissent in the time of Covid.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzcrr5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s3yj59)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll240k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzcwh9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjg)
Somalia's election impasse

Somalia currently has a president in name only. President Mohamed Abdulahi Mohamed, who’s also known by his nickname Farmajo, should have ended his term of office on 8 February. But the parliamentary elections to begin the process of choosing a new president are yet to take place. It's a tense situation, and opposition protests last week in Mogadishu saw gunfire, with more protests planned. BBC Africa's Bella Sheegow in Mogadishu and BBC Monitoring's Ibrahim Aydid in Nairobi explain what's been happening.

Sri Lanka’s star of ‘Who Wants To Be a Millionaire’
A Muslim teenager in Sri Lanka has become a household name after her star performance in the local version of the tv show ‘Who Wants To Be a Millionaire’. Shukra Munawwar won the hearts of the audience, at a time of strong anti-Muslim rhetoric from some parts of society. Shirly Upul Kumara of BBC Sinhala went to meet her at her home in southern Sri Lanka.

Iranian kohl
BBC’s Nassim Hatam explores the history of kohl, or sormeh in Farsi, the black eye make-up that's been worn by Iranian women for millennia.

My Friend from a Care Home
Russia’s care homes house thousands of people behind high fences and closed doors. But the Covid-19 pandemic has provided a unique chance for a few residents to leave their institutions and start learning to live independently. In her BBC Russian documentary, Zlata Onufrieva follows Nina’s progress, as she adjusts to life outside with the help of her friend Arina.

Floods in southern Thailand
BBC Thai's Issariya Praithongyaem shares the story of the fruit farmers in Thailand’s Muslim south who lost thousands of dollars’ worth of crops due to floods caused by water released from a hydroelectric dam.


Image: Supporters of different opposition presidential candidates demonstrate in Mogadishu in February 2021
Credit: Photo by AFP via Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmwb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzd07f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s3yrnk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll2cht)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct20d2)
The Right Thing: Saving the man who shot me

Mike Wooldridge tells the story of Rais Bhuiyan, who In his 20s, traded a job in the Bangladeshi Air Force for a life in the US. He was working at a petrol station. A man with baseball cap walked in and pointed a double-barrelled shotgun at him. Rais offered all the money in the till to him, but the attacker asked him where he was from. Rais was confused, and said ‘Excuse me?’, but as he spoke, he was shot. He said it felt like a million bees stinging his face. He fell to the floor and started reciting from the Koran, begging God not to take him that day.

White supremacist Mark Stroman’s attack left Bhuiyan partially blind, and two other men died during Stroman’s killing spree. In court Stroman said he had intended to target Muslims in revenge for the 9/11 attacks. Stroman was found guilty and received the death penalty, but Bhuiyan forgave his attacker and campaigned against the execution, saying that his faith told him that saving one life was like saving the whole of mankind.

As well as Rais, we hear from his friends, those who worked alongside him to save Mark Stroman, and the brother-in-law of one of the other victims, Waqar Hussein.

(Photo: Rais Bhuiyan. Credit: WFFA ABC Channel 8, Dallas)


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzd3zk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z6rdh29m4)
Biden orders attack on Iran-backed militias in his first military action

First military action undertaken by the Biden administration also takes place ahead of publication of a U.S. intelligence report expected to single out Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman for approving and probably ordering the 2018 killing of former royal insider Jamal Khashoggi.

Also in the programme: We mark ten years since the uprising that deposed Muammar Gaddafi in Libya; and the UK Supreme Court rules Shamima Begum, who left the UK for Syria to join the Islamic State group as a teenager, will not be allowed to return and fight her citizenship case .

(Photo: U.S. President Joe Biden displays his face mask as he speaks during an event to commemorate the 50 millionth coronavirus disease. Credit: Reuters.)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzd7qp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll2m02)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltj6xmcsq3)
India's economy bounces back

The Indian economy grew 0.4% in a year, after significant coronavirus-related declines. The BBC's Nikhil Inamdar in Mumbai talks us through how different sectors have performed. And we hear from Adar Poonawalla, chief executive of the world's largest vaccine maker, Serum Institute of India, about the role the company is playing in getting coronavirus jabs shipped around the world. Also in the programme, IAG, the parent of British Airways, Iberia and several other airlines, has posted a loss of just over $9bn in 2020. We consider the future of the aviation industry with the environmental campaigner, George Monbiot. Plus, three decades after the cult classic Eddie Murphy film Coming to America was released, a sequel will be screened on Amazon Prime from next week. We ask South African actor Nomzamo Mbatha, who stars in the new production, how the west's portrayal of Africa has changed since the 80s.

(Picture: Workers in an Indian factory. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzdcgt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t930vyqjn)
Nigeria: Over 300 schoolgirls kidnapped

More than 300 schoolgirls have been kidnapped by unidentified gunmen from a school in Nigeria's north-western Zamfara state. This is the latest mass abduction targeting schools in northern Nigeria in recent weeks. We'll bring you the latest on the story and speak to two parents in the north who are concerned about their children's safety.

Also, we continue to bring together people from across the world to share their experiences of how the coronavirus pandemic has affected their lives. Today we speak to three oncologists - doctors who specialise in cancer care - to hear how cancer treatment and patients have been impacted by the pandemic.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer your questions. Today our guest is Dr Megan Murray - Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard University.

(Photo: A collection of student footwears left behind after gunmen abducted students at the Government Science school in Kankara, in northwestern Katsina state, Nigeria December 13, 2020. Credit: Reuters/Afolabi Sotunde)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzdh6y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t930vyv8s)
Coronavirus conversations: Cancer care

We continue to bring together people from across the world to share their experiences of how the coronavirus pandemic has affected their lives. Today we speak to three oncologists - doctors who specialise in cancer care - to hear how cancer treatment and patients have been impacted by the pandemic.

Also, more than 300 schoolgirls have been kidnapped by unidentified gunmen from a school in Nigeria's north-western Zamfara state. This is the latest mass abduction targeting schools in northern Nigeria in recent weeks. We'll bring you the latest on the story and speak to two parents in the north who are concerned about their children's safety.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer your questions. Today our guest is Marc Mendelson - Professor of Infectious Diseases at the University of Cape Town in South Africa.

(Photo: Staff in the oncology department at the Rebagliati Hospital in Lima, Peru. Credit: Dr Miguel Ticona)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzdlz2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmwb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzdqq6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s3zh4b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll32zl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k172vqq57)
2021/02/26 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzdvgb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll36qq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv73)
Why do men rule the world?

Listener Paula from Kenya is a computer scientist, she can’t help but notice the inequality in her workplace.

With only 1 in 10 countries having female heads of state, there is no doubt that men are in charge.

Paula wants to know if there is any scientific underpinning to this inequality? Perhaps it can be explained by our brains and bodies? Or does evolution weigh in?

Or maybe it is all down to society and the way we raise our boys and girls. The toys and ideals we give our children must surely have an impact.

And most importantly, if we want a world run by men and women equally, how can we get there? We hear how Iceland became the most gender equal country in the world.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton. Produced by Caroline Steel for the BBC World Service

[Image: Men in board room. Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzdz6g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z6rdh34v1)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzf2yl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79vv1j9jyf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172x3frg5fztx8)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll3g6z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmbv5cb4ydj)
India's economy bounces back

The Indian economy grew 0.4% in a year, after significant coronavirus-related declines. The BBC's Nikhil Inamdar in Mumbai talks us through how different sectors have performed. And we hear from Adar Poonawalla, chief executive of the world's largest vaccine maker, Serum Institute of India, about the role the company is playing in getting coronavirus jabs shipped around the world. Also in the programme, IAG, the parent of British Airways, Iberia and several other airlines, has posted a loss of just over $9bn in 2020. We consider the future of the aviation industry with the environmental campaigner, George Monbiot. Plus, three decades after the cult classic Eddie Murphy film Coming to America was released, a sequel will be screened on Amazon Prime from next week. We ask South African actor Nomzamo Mbatha, who stars in the new production, how the west's portrayal of Africa has changed since the 80s.

(Picture: Workers in an Indian factory. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzf6pq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll3kz3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3cszthg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Africa Life Clinic 09:32 SUN (w3ct21g5)

Assignment 12:32 SUN (w3csz6mg)

Assignment 04:06 THU (w3csz6mh)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6mh)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6mh)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5q4cb8bsln)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5q4cb8c4v1)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5q4cb8cj2f)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5q4cb8cmtk)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5q4cb8cw9t)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5q4cb8dqjq)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5q4cb8f6j7)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172x5q4cb8fg0h)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5q4cb8fphr)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5q4cb8g1r4)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5q4cb8gdzj)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5q4cb8gjqn)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5q4cb8gngs)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5q4cb8gs6x)

BBC News Summary 12:30 SUN (w172x5q4cb8gwz1)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5q4cb8hr5y)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5q4cb8j3fb)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5q4cb8j75g)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172x5q4qlkn65r)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5q4qlkn9xw)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5q4qlknfp0)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5q4qlknp58)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5q4qlkp54s)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172x5q4qlkp8wx)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172x5q4qlkpdn1)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172x5q4qlkpjd5)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172x5q4qlkprwf)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172x5q4qlkq0cp)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172x5q4qlkqhc6)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172x5q4qlkqm3b)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5q4qlkqvll)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5q4qlkqzbq)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5q4qlkrbl3)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5q4qlkrl2c)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5q4qlks21w)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5q4qlks5t0)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5q4qlksf98)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5q4qlksnsj)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5q4qlksx8s)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5q4qlktd89)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172x5q4qlktj0f)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5q4qlktrhp)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5q4qlktw7t)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5q4qlkv7h6)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5q4qlkvgzg)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5q4qlkvyyz)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172x5q4qlkw2q3)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172x5q4qlkwb6c)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172x5q4qlkwkpm)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172x5q4qlkwt5w)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172x5q4qlkx95d)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172x5q4qlkxdxj)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172x5q4qlkxnds)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5q4qlkxs4x)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5q4qlky4d9)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5q4qlkycwk)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5q4qlkyvw2)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172x5q4qlkyzm6)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5q4qlkz73g)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172x5q4qlkzglq)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172x5q4qlkzq2z)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172x5q4qll062h)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172x5q4qll09tm)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172x5q4qll0k9w)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5q4qll0p20)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5q4qll119d)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172x5q4qll18sn)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172x5q4qll1rs5)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172x5q4qll1wj9)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172x5q4qll240k)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172x5q4qll2cht)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172x5q4qll2m02)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172x5q4qll32zl)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172x5q4qll36qq)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172x5q4qll3g6z)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172x5q4qll3kz3)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172x5p9xlnn5v0)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5p9xlnn9l4)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172x5p9xlnnfb8)

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BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172x5p9xlnnntj)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172x5p9xlnnskn)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172x5p9xlnnx9s)

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BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172x5p9xlnp4t1)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172x5p9xlnp8k5)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172x5p9xlnpd99)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172x5p9xlnpj1f)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172x5p9xlnpmsk)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172x5p9xlnprjp)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172x5p9xlnpw8t)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172x5p9xlnqc8b)

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BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172x5p9xlnqqhq)

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BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5p9xlnqyzz)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlnr2r3)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlnr6h7)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlnrb7c)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlnrfzh)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlnrkqm)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlnrpgr)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlnrt6w)

BBC News 07:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlnrxz0)

BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlns1q4)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlns5g8)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlns96d)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlnsdyj)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlnsjpn)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlnsnfs)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlnss5x)

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BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlnt0p5)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlntcxk)

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BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlntmdt)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlntr4y)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5p9xlntvx2)

BBC News 00:00 MON (w172x5pb8vyytxc)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172x5pb8vyyynh)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172x5pb8vyz2dm)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172x5pb8vyz64r)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172x5pb8vyz9ww)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172x5pb8vyzfn0)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172x5pb8vyzkd4)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172x5pb8vyzp48)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172x5pb8vyzswd)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172x5pb8vyzxmj)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172x5pb8vz01cn)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172x5pb8vz053s)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172x5pb8vz08vx)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172x5pb8vz0dm1)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172x5pb8vz0jc5)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172x5pb8vz0n39)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172x5pb8vz0rvf)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172x5pb8vz0wlk)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172x5pb8vz10bp)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172x5pb8vz142t)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172x5pb8vz17ty)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172x5pb8vz1cl2)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172x5pb8vz1hb6)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172x5pb8vz1m2b)

BBC News 00:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz1qtg)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz1vkl)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz1z9q)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz231v)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz26sz)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz2bk3)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz2g97)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz2l1c)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz2psh)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz2tjm)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz2y8r)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz320w)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz35s0)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz39j4)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz3f88)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz3k0d)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz3nrj)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz3shn)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz3x7s)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz40zx)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz44r1)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz48h5)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz4d79)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172x5pb8vz4hzf)

BBC News 00:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz4mqk)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz4rgp)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz4w6t)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz4zyy)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz53q2)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz57g6)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz5c6b)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz5gyg)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz5lpl)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz5qfq)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz5v5v)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz5yxz)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz62p3)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz66f7)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz6b5c)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz6fxh)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz6knm)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz6pdr)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz6t4w)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz6xx0)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz71n4)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz75d8)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz794d)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172x5pb8vz7dwj)

BBC News 00:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz7jmn)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz7ncs)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz7s3x)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz7ww1)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz80m5)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz84c9)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz883f)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz8cvk)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz8hlp)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz8mbt)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz8r2y)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz8vv2)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz8zl6)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz93bb)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz972g)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz9btl)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz9gkq)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz9l9v)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz9q1z)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz9tt3)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172x5pb8vz9yk7)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172x5pb8vzb29c)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172x5pb8vzb61h)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172x5pb8vzb9sm)

BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzbfjr)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzbk8w)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzbp10)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzbss4)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzbxj8)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzc18d)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzc50j)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzc8rn)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzcdhs)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzcj7x)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzcn01)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzcrr5)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzcwh9)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzd07f)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzd3zk)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzd7qp)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzdcgt)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzdh6y)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzdlz2)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzdqq6)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzdvgb)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzdz6g)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzf2yl)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172x5pb8vzf6pq)

BBC OS Conversations 05:06 SAT (w3ct19z9)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct19z9)

BBC OS Conversations 00:06 MON (w3ct19z9)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172x2t930vl3x8)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172x2t930vl7nd)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172x2t930vp0tc)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172x2t930vp4kh)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172x2t930vrxqg)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172x2t930vs1gl)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172x2t930vvtmk)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172x2t930vvycp)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172x2t930vyqjn)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172x2t930vyv8s)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7kq)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3csz8cd)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8p1)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3csz7yj)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3csz79q)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x197vl0fjp1)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172x1986v9v2nh)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172x1986v9xzkl)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x1986vb0wgp)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172x1986vb3scs)

Business Weekly 23:06 SAT (w3ct0spy)

Business Weekly 03:06 SUN (w3ct0spy)

Comedians Vs. The News 11:32 SAT (w3ct21mg)

Comedians Vs. The News 19:32 SUN (w3ct21mg)

CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3cszv72)

CrowdScience 11:32 MON (w3cszv72)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3cszv73)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz99c)

Digital Planet 04:32 WED (w3csz99c)

Digital Planet 11:32 WED (w3csz99c)

Discovery 00:32 MON (w3csz9fv)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2cb0)

Discovery 04:32 TUE (w3ct2cb0)

Discovery 11:32 TUE (w3ct2cb0)

From Our Own Correspondent 02:06 SAT (w3csz9qw)

From Our Own Correspondent 05:06 SUN (w3csz9qw)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3csz9qw)

From Our Own Correspondent 23:06 SUN (w3csz9qw)

HARDtalk 02:06 MON (w3cszc37)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc37)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3cszc37)

HARDtalk 23:06 MON (w3cszc37)

HARDtalk 02:06 WED (w3cszc7r)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3cszc7r)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3cszc7r)

HARDtalk 23:06 WED (w3cszc7r)

HARDtalk 02:06 FRI (w3cszbyq)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3cszbyq)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3cszbyq)

HARDtalk 23:06 FRI (w3cszbyq)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszcd8)

Health Check 04:32 THU (w3cszcd8)

Health Check 11:32 THU (w3cszcd8)

Heart and Soul 22:32 SAT (w3ct17xj)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct17xj)

Heart and Soul 13:32 FRI (w3ct20d2)

I'm Not A Monster 09:32 SAT (w3ct1z6b)

I'm Not A Monster 02:32 SUN (w3ct1z6b)

I'm Not A Monster 22:32 SUN (w3ct1z6b)

In the Studio 02:32 TUE (w3cszvcm)

In the Studio 09:32 TUE (w3cszvcm)

In the Studio 13:32 TUE (w3cszvcm)

In the Studio 23:32 TUE (w3cszvcm)

Mayday 05:32 SAT (w3ct1cxm)

Mayday 00:32 SUN (w3ct1cxm)

Mayday 10:32 MON (w3ct1cxm)

More or Less 02:50 SUN (w3ct0pyq)

More or Less 15:50 SUN (w3ct0pyq)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct0pyq)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct0pyq)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6v7)

Music Life 20:06 SUN (w3csz6v7)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2wrf6nlpzq)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172x2wrf6nltqv)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172x2wrf6nlygz)

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Newsday 07:06 WED (w172x2wrf6nsr95)

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Newsday 06:06 THU (w172x2wrf6nwjg4)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172x2wrf6nwn68)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172x2wrf6nz9m3)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172x2wrf6nzfc7)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172x2wrf6nzk3c)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172x2z6d45cy58)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172x2z6d45dx49)

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Newshour 21:06 THU (w172x2z6rdh07xy)

Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172x2z6rdh29m4)

Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172x2z6rdh34v1)

Outlook 08:32 SUN (w3cszf15)

Outlook 23:32 SUN (w3cszf15)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3cszd4g)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3cszd4g)

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Outlook 12:06 TUE (w3cszdl0)

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Outlook 03:06 WED (w3cszdl0)

Outlook 12:06 WED (w3cszdss)

Outlook 18:06 WED (w3cszdss)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3cszdc7)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf5p)

Over to You 00:50 SUN (w3cszf5p)

People Fixing the World 02:06 TUE (w3cszv2j)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3cszv2j)

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Project 17 02:32 WED (w3ct0x85)

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Project 17 13:32 WED (w3ct0x85)

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Ros Atkins on ... 05:50 SAT (w3ct24jg)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3cszh1s)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3k172vc3jv)

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Sporting Witness 03:50 MON (w3cszh68)

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Sports News 22:20 SAT (w172x3fr2x49l6j)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172x3c8rqb6630)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172x3lnr8rddy4)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172x3lnr8rhkbh)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhkk)

Tech Tent 04:06 FRI (w3cszhq3)

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The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3cszk46)

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The Climate Question 04:06 MON (w3ct0xbf)

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The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct1gvb)

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The Conversation 02:32 MON (w3cszj4n)

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The Conversation 13:32 MON (w3cszj4n)

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The Cultural Frontline 00:06 SUN (w3cszj9n)

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The Documentary 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mz5)

The Documentary 14:06 SUN (w3ct1mz5)

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The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3cszjjf)

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The Food Chain 02:32 THU (w3cszjr9)

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The Forum 15:06 SUN (w3cszjws)

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The Real Story 00:06 SAT (w3cszcp9)

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The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3cszky1)

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When Katty Met Carlos 08:32 SAT (w3ct21lz)

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When Katty Met Carlos 01:32 MON (w3ct21lz)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3cszmw9)

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WorklifeIndia 02:06 SUN (w3ct1c1l)

WorklifeIndia 10:06 SUN (w3ct1c1l)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172x58391yzb07)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172xlvbnn6phj0)

World Business Report 22:32 MON (w172xm9s30jh7tg)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3cszthg)

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