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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 30 JULY 2022

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m0019kf4)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:30 Pharaohs of the Sun by Guy de la Bédoyère (m0019kf6)
Episode 5

3,500 years ago, Egypt entered the 18th Dynasty with a succession of kings and queens who were obsessed with wealth and power. They spent Egypt’s money on grandiose temple building projects at Karnak and Luxor on the River Nile, and extravagant tombs designed to bear witness to their magnificence.

The wealth of the kings came at a huge cost to the people of Egypt whose needs were not uppermost in the rulers' concerns. Neighbouring countries were held to ransom by the power of the Egyptian army and the wealth gained in response was used solely for the kings’ purposes.

They were the most powerful, successful and richest of Egypt’s long line of Pharaohs. They were usually short in stature, all had a tendency to buck teeth, and most of them married their siblings. They include the female ruler, Hatshepsut, the religious reformer Akhenaten and his queen Nefertiti, and the most famous yet short lived of them all, the boy king Tutankhamun. Although his reign was insignificant the splendour of his tomb has been in the spotlight ever since it was discovered by Howard Carter.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Deborah Findlay
Produced by Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0019kf8)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0019kfb)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0019kfd)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m0019kfg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0019kfj)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Revd Dr Craig Gardiner

Good morning or ‘bore da’. This morning in Tregaron, West Wales, the dawn rises on the tents of the National Eisteddfod. This huge celebration of Welsh language, art and culture happens every year in the first week of August. But, while the date remains a constant, the location varies year on year. Annually it re-invents itself around the centre of hospitality in the field known as the Maes.

Here, over the next week, thousands of visitors will rush from musical concerts and poetry readings to dances and venues for food. But almost everyone’s itinerary gets interrupted, as they chance upon old friends, who decide that spending time with one another is more important that whatever else was on their list. And maybe that’s just as it should be, for the name ‘Eisteddfod’, literally means, sitting together.

Long before the winner of one of this year’s poetry competitions is seated on the Bard’s chair, there will be countless other opportunities for ordinary people to sit on benches, stools, or cross-legged on the grass, and simply be with one another.

As more of life returns to pre-covid busyness, we might practice sitting attentively with others. Like long ago when two sisters welcomed Jesus to their home. Martha was soon busy, rattling pots and preparing a meal. But Mary sat together with Jesus who says she made the better choice. Of course, Jesus wasn’t advocating indolence, but he does remind us, that everyone should have a time for simply sitting. And of course, in choosing as she did, Mary sat with God, which is really what any of us do, when we decide to pray.

God who pulls up a chair,
and invites us to linger,
bless those with whom we tarry today.
May every moment we preserve from busyness
become a place of knowing you
Amen


SAT 05:45 Four Thought (m0019k6c)
Asking the right questions about crime

Criminologist Dr Laura Bui wants us to ask the right questions when it comes to crime. The popular genre of ‘true crime’ may be popular but is it helping us better understand the origins of crime?

We turn to crime novels, film and documentaries to compare ourselves to both victims and perpetrators. How different are we?

This genre loves to tell us the ‘origin stories’ of infamous criminals to tell us of their childhoods and often past traumas - as if to explain their future actions. But this can have the effect of erasing the victims, diminishing their memory in some way.

But is the habit of asking ‘why’ a criminal committed a crime and not ‘how’ they got to the point of becoming a criminal flawed? We take one criminal out of the public only to have them replaced by another - Laura argues asking ‘how’ helps to finally break this cycle.

Presenter - Olly Mann
Producer- Jordan Dunbar
Editor - Tara McDermott
SM- Rod Farquhar


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m0019r8r)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (m0019kkc)
A new road for Kerrera

It's so close to the mainland that most people don't even realise it is there, but Kerrera in early summer is a jewel, and Antonia Quirke - who lives a couple of miles away - is curious about the impact of a new road. Early one summer morning she and producer Miles Warde take the ferry from Oban to find out what has changed.

Antonia Quirke is a broadcaster and author. She moved to the west coast of Scotland at the start of lockdown for love.

Produced for BBC audio in Bristol by Miles Warde


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m0019r8t)
30/07/22 Farming Today This Week: Global food crisis, sea eagles, dry weather

We hear about dry fields in both the UK and Italy, discuss calls for a cull of sea eagles in Scotland, and ponder which music is best for pigs.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


SAT 06:57 Weather (m0019r8w)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 07:00 Today (m0019r8y)
Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m0019r90)
Doon Mackichan

Doon Mackichan joins Nikki Bedi and Rev Richard Coles. The actor, writer and comedian – and double Emmy winner - talks about her latest comedy role set in a suburban street in Glasgow, how she did impressions to avoid the school bullies and her love of wild swimming.

Loree Draude is one of the first women to fly combat jets in the U.S. Navy. She switched to start-ups in Silicon Valley, rediscovered her love of theatre and now has a one-woman show.

Matt Rowland Hill grew up the son of a minister in an evangelical Christian church in South Wales, then lost his faith in his late teens and began his search for salvation elsewhere, turning to books and then to alcohol and drugs.

Carol Kirkwood shares her Inheritance Tracks – Surfin’ USA by The Beach Boys and Love Will Keep Us Alive by The Eagles.

Mike Gayle was the first man to win Romantic Fiction’s top award and was an Agony Uncle for girls’ teen magazine Bliss before becoming a novelist.

Two Doors Down is BBC Two on Tuesday nights at 10pm, and all five series are available to watch on the BBC iplayer.
Loree Draude’s show, I Feel the Need runs from 4th to 27th August at the Assembly Rooms - Powder Room in Edinburgh.
Matt Rowland Hill’s memoir, Original Sins is published by Chatto & Windus.
Mike Gayle’s book, The Museum of Ordinary People is published by Hodder & Stoughton. 

Producer: Annette Wells
Editor: Richard Hooper


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (m0019r92)
Series 37

Swansea

Jay Rayner and his panel are in Swansea. Jeremy Pang, Angela Gray, Sumayya Usmani and Dr Annie Gray answer questions from the audience.

With the seaside breeze streaming in to the auditorium, the panellists feel inspired to discuss smuggling food flavours into their cooking, the best recipes for the cockle, and the history of ice cream, with Dr Annie Gray whipping up an 18th Century recipe for the team to try.

Joining the panel this week are cockles expert, Carol Watts, and ice cream expert, Adrian Hughes.

Producer - Dominic Tyerman
Assistant Producer - Aniya Das

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 The Briefing Room (m0019kkq)
Adapting to a hotter Britain

Last week, temperatures in the UK reached a record-breaking 40.3 degrees centigrade. As Britons sweltered in their homes and offices, railway lines buckled, fires broke out in Greater London and the tarmac on Luton Airport runway began to lift. Climate Change scientists now describe this kind of heat as 'the new normal'.

How well is Britain set up to cope with extreme weather events? Do we need to start heat-proofing our houses and infrastructure? And does government need to focus more on adapting to climate change?

Joining David Aaronovitch are:

Mark Maslin, professor of Climatology at University College London

Glenn McGregor, professor of Climatology at Durham University

Richard Dawson, professor of Engineering at Newcastle University and member of the UK's Climate Change Committee

Kathryn Brown, former head of the Adaption at the UK's Climate Change Committee

Producers: Tim Mansel, Kirsteen Knight and Simon Watts.
Editor: Penny Murphy.
Studio manager: Graham Puddifoot.
Production co-ordinator: Helena Warwick-Cross.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m0019r94)
Farewell, Super Mario

We begin in Italy, where Mario Draghi has recently resigned as prime minister after only 18 months in office. Initially a popular choice as PM, after the former central banker guided Italy and the eurozone through numerous crises. But having failed to win support for a new economic package among his broad-based unity government, he called a vote of confidence – and lost. Mark Lowen reflects on a very Italian situation.

In Ukraine, Dan Johnson visits some of the Soviet-era institutions where children and young people living with disabilities are confined. He found that many of these residential homes are ill-equipped to provide proper care and cope with their complex needs. Human rights investigators say the neglect disabled people face in Ukraine reflects the failings of a system that has been deficient long before the war started.

Amid the political and economic crisis in Sri Lanka, Aanya Wipulasena reveals how locals like herself are learning to grow their own fruit and vegetables to cope with the soaring costs of food, and how the peace of the kitchen garden helps take her mind off the instability that has gripped the country.

In Peru, we meet the farmer behind a David and Goliath-style lawsuit, who has taken on Germany energy companies over the impact of emissions on the local environment. The case centres on determining the link between climate change and the melting of a nearby glacier, which campaigners fear will flood local villages. Olivia Acland has followed the story.

Roger Harrabin reflects on his 35 years covering the natural world, in which he has focussed on the threat posed by human-induced climate change. He recalls his reluctance to pitch his first report on global warming, and charts the rise of climate change in becoming the number one story of our time.

Presenter: Kate Adie
Producer: Serena Tarling
Production Coordinator: Gemma Ashman
Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m0019rbr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Surviving the Cost of Living (m0019r4q)
Barry and Amy

The cost of living is dominating the headlines. Inflation has risen to a 40 year-high, with energy and food prices soaring.

According to recent data by the National Union of Students (NUS), a third of students are living on less than £50 a month after paying their rent and bills.

Barry, who studies at St Andrews University, is one of many young people struggling with the cost of living. He has been working full time in-between his studies to make enough money, meaning less time for his uni work.

He’s meeting Amy who got her degree at Bangor university during the 2008 recession. She shares her experiences to help Barry get through his last year of studying.

Presenter: Rachel Stonehouse
Producer: Georgia Coan
Editor: Clare Fordham


SAT 12:30 Party's Over (m0019kdn)
Series 2

Going for Gold

What happens when the prime minister suddenly stops being prime minister? One day you're the most powerful person in the country, the next you're irrelevant, forced into retirement 30 years ahead of schedule and find yourself asking 'What do I do now?'

'I can't just disappear like Gordon Brown. They say he barely gets out of bed now. Just sits there doing word-searches and eating Kit Kat Chunkies. Miserable. I hate the chunky ones.' Former British Prime Minister Henry Tobin

After some unsuccessful attempts last summer to get back to the top, Henry returns with some new ideas on how to delay his impending descent into national irrelevance. In this first episode of the new series, Henry and team travel to Birmingham for the opening ceremony of the Commonwealth Games and immediately spy an opportunity for a comeback.

Starring Miles Jupp, Ingrid Oliver, Emma Sidi, Justin Edwards and David Momeni.

Recorded at The Crescent Theatre in Birmingham

Written by Paul Doolan and Jon Hunter
Producer: Richard Morris
Production co-ordinator: Caroline Barlow
Sound recordist and designer: Chris Maclean

A BBC Studios Production


SAT 12:57 Weather (m0019r98)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News and Weather (m0019r9b)
The latest national and international news and weather reports from BBC Radio 4


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m0019kdw)
Thangam Debbonaire MP, Jackie Doyle-Price MP, David Gauke, Ash Sarkar

Ben Wright presents political debate and discussion from The Junction Youth Centre in High Wycombe with Labour MP and Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Thangam Debbonaire MP, Conservative MP Jackie Doyle-Price, former cabinet minister and political commentator David Gauke and Contributing Editor at Novara Media Ash Sarkar.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: Michael Smith


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m0019r9d)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:45 28ish Days Later (m0019r9g)
Day Twenty-Seven: The Lessons We Learn

India travels back to the Victorian Age to probe at the use of the vaginal speculum and considers its link to menstrual shame and embarrassment, particularly in education. India then meets Chella Quint, founder of the Period Positive Movement, and also Professor Chris Bobel, who are the women at the forefront of revolutionising menstrual education both within school and the home.

Credits:
Presented by India Rakusen.
Producer: Ellie Sans.
Assistant Producer: Jorja McAndrew.
Executive Producer: Suzy Grant.
Original music composed and performed by Rebekah Reid.
Sound Design by Charlie Brandon-King.

Special thanks to all contributors and audio diarists.

A Listen production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.


SAT 15:00 DH Lawrence: Tainted Love (m000xskd)
Women in Love

Women in Love by DH Lawrence. Dramatised by Ian Kershaw.

Gerald is reeling from the death of his sister Diana. Rupert and Gudrun try to comfort him but Gerald finds it hard to express his emotions. As Ursula and Rupert grow closer can Gerald untangle his feelings for Rupert?

Gudrun ..... Katie Redford
Ursula ..... Cassie Bradley
Rupert ..... Alexander Arnold
Gerald ..... James Cooney
Diana ..... Verity Henry
Hermione ..... Emily Pithon
Loerke ..... Ashley Margolis

Director/Producer Gary Brown.

‘DH Lawrence: Tainted Love’ dynamically puts centre stage Lawrence's daring writing on the complexity of human love. Sexual awakenings, transgressive same sex love and internalised repression are explored as his characters try to find happiness and fulfilment in uncertain times. Set in a mining town in Nottinghamshire, this drama is a celebration of Lawrence at his most bold, pushing the boundaries of sexuality in the dawning of the Twentieth Century.

In ‘Women in Love’ Ursula Brangwen’s younger sister Gudrun comes into equal focus as the two sisters embark on love affairs. Gudrun is an artist who pursues a destructive relationship with Gerald Crich, a rich industrialist who is haunted by family tragedy. Lawrence contrasts this pair with the love that develops between Ursula and Rupert Birkin, an alienated intellectual who articulates many fashionable nihilistic opinions. The emotional relationships are given further depth and tension by an intense psychological and physical attraction between Gerald and Rupert.

With thanks to the Estate of Frieda Lawrence Ravagli.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m0019r9j)
Actor Samantha Womack, The Lionesses win, Dame Carolyn Fairbairn, Dear Daughter podcast, Jane Roe's daughter, The Home Edit

The actor Samantha Womack on her new role as the White Witch in The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe.

As the Lionesses reach the final of the Euros on Sunday let's not forget that the FA, the Football Assocation, banned the women's game for fifty years. Jacqui Oatley, the first female Match of the Day commentator, reflects on the women's game.

Women with learning disabilities die on average 26 years younger than the general population. In her first interview since taking up the role of chair of trustees at the learning disability charity Mencap, Dame Carolyn Fairbairn tells Emma about why the life, and death, of her sister Diana Fairbairn, who had learning disabilities and cerebral palsy, has inspired her new campaigning role to improve support for people with learning disabilities.

Namulanta Kombo on her award winning podcast 'Dear Daughter', which started with her idea of writing letters to her young daughter with advice for life.

Norma McCorvey is the real person behind the Roe vs Wade court case of 1972. Her eldest daughter Melissa Mills discusses what her mum would have made of the court case she was so central to being overturned.

Friends and business partners Clea Shearer and Joanna Teplin have become stars of pandemic feel-good TV with their Netflix show Get Organised with The Home Edit. They go into someone’s home and transform a cluttered space into something beautiful and functional.

Presenter: Anita Rani
Producer: Dianne McGregor


SAT 17:00 PM (m0019r9l)
Full coverage of the day's news


SAT 17:30 Boris (m0019r9n)
4. The Early MP Years: Riding Two Horses

Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson. A bit of a mouthful. To most people - and there are those that hate it - he’s simply Boris

This series tells the story of Boris Johnson - from boy to man to Prime Minister. In each episode, Adam Fleming talks to a range of people who’ve known, watched, worked or dealt with him.

In the fourth episode, we hear about the early politics years.

Guests:

Sir Iain Duncan Smith, who served as Leader of the Conservative Party and Leader of the Opposition from 2001 to 2003.

Lord Michael Howard, who served as Leader of the Conservative Party and Leader of the Opposition from November 2003 to December 2005.

Andrew Gimson, political journalist and author of Boris - The Making of the Prime Minister.

Producers: Ben Carter, Natasha Fernandes and Lucinda Borrell
Series Editor: Emma Rippon
Production co-ordinator: Brenda Brown
Studio Engineer: Neil Churchill


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0019r9q)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m0019r9s)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0019r9v)
Three former health secretaries have urged the government to compensate the victims of the infected blood scandal as soon as possible.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m0019r83)
Emer Reynolds, Travis Alabanza, Mark Borkowski, George Fouracres, St Paul & the Broken Bones, Comorian, Athena Kugblenu

Anneka Rice and Athena Kugblenu are joined by Emer Reynolds, Travis Alabanza, Mark Borkowski and George Fouracres for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from St Paul & the Broken Bones and Comorian.


SAT 19:00 Profile (m0019r7k)
Liz Truss

Despite finishing second in the vote amongst her Conservative parliamentary colleagues, Liz Truss is seen by many as the favourite to win the leadership contest when party members have their say. But who is the woman bidding to become the UK’s third female Prime Minister? Timandra Harkness follows her unconventional journey in British politics - from child of CND campaigners to preferred candidate of the political right.

Presenter: Timandra Harkness
Producers: Bob Howard and Ben Cooper


SAT 19:15 The Infinite Monkey Cage (m0019r9y)
Series 24

Brains

Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined by comedian Alan Davies and neuroscientists Prof Uta Frith and Prof Sophie Scott. They discover the secret to why humans are such social creatures and why two brains are definitely better than one. Our brains are wired to learn from and mimic other brains we come into contact with, even though most of the time we don't even realise that is what they/we are doing. The subtle cues we get from other people and the information in their brains, affects our own wiring and experience of the world. With this incredible complexity, might we ever be able to create an artificial brain that mimics our own and the human experience?

Executive Producer: Alexandra Feachem


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m0019rb0)
Generation Games

Can video games change lives? And, if so, how? 50 years after the arrival of Pong, gamer and writer Keza MacDonald considers what gaming has done for us. Using the rich BBC Archives, she explores how video games grew from a niche pursuit to a cultural phenomenon which stokes the imagination of, and offers agency to, those who fall for its charms.

Games now influence who we are, what we think and how we act. Keza speaks to collectors, competitive gamers, psychologists, games designers and, mostly importantly, gamers young and old to find out what impact games have had on us. We hear about the deep relationships that millions cherish with Pac-Man, Space Invaders and Donkey Kong, and illustrate the entanglement of life and gaming that is increasingly impossible to sever.

Presenter: Keza MacDonald
Producer: Gary Milne


SAT 21:00 Tumanbay (m000kw4l)
Series 4

The Fires

The city prepares for a spectacular celestial event – fires falling from the sky. While self-proclaimed Mother of the Empire, Fatima, sees it as an opportunity to glorify her new reign, for the Balarac it is the signal to enact a dreadful plan. Meanwhile Frog must save Matilla, the girl he loves, from the gallows and a prophesy that she will die at the hands of "the blind man".

Anton Lesser, Aiysha Hart, Rufus Wright and Kirsty Bushell lead an impressive ensemble cast in this gripping extended finale to this epic series from creators John Scott Dryden and Mike Walker.

Cast:
Gregor................ Rufus Wright
Heaven................Olivia Popica
Cadali................ Matthew Marsh
Fatima................ Kirsty Bushell
Grand Master................ Anton Lesser
Manel................ Aiysha Hart
Angel................ Steffan Donnelly
Sarp................Joplin Sibtain
Mehmed................ Nadim Sawalha
Frog................Misha Butler
Dumpy............... Ali Khan
Matilla................Albane Courtois
Bello................Albert Welling
Piero................Pano Masti
the Hafiz................Antony Bunsee
Sarah................Nina Yndis
Qulan................Christopher Fulford
Alkin............... Nathalie Armin
Landlady.............. Arita Sadiku

Original Music by Sacha Puttnam

Sound Design by Eloise Whitmore
Sound Recording by Laurence Farr

Produced by Emma Hearn, Nadir Khan and John Scott Dryden
Written and Directed by John Scott Dryden
A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:45 Rabbit at Rest (m0002cgs)
Episode 9

John Updike’s fourth novel about Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom.

It's the end of the 1980s and Harry has acquired a Florida condo, a second grandchild, and a troubled, overworked heart - not to mention a troubled underworking son. As Reagan’s debt-ridden, AIDS-panicked America yields to that of the first George Bush, Rabbit explores the bleak terrain of late middle age - looking for reasons to live and opportunities to make peace with a remorselessly accumulating past.

The novel won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1991, the second "Rabbit" novel to garner that award.

Reader: Toby Jones
Abridger: Eileen Horne
Producer: Clive Brill

A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:00 News (m0019rb3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (m0019k7d)
The Morality of Snobbery

People like us... you know what I mean. Snobbery? It's everywhere, and most of us would admit to it, at least occasionally. But beyond the caricatures of snooty and disdainful types who enjoy looking down on the tastes, habits and backgrounds of others, there's the serious matter of how it affects people's life chances. The British Psychological Society has launched a campaign to make social class a legally protected characteristic, like sex, race and disability. It would force employers and others to tackle discrimination on the basis of class. The idea is to reduce the damaging effects of class-based prejudice across education, work and health, and create a fairer society.

People from working class backgrounds are less likely to get into a top university or land a highly paid job, but how much of that is down to the snobbery of others? Is a change in the law really going to shift prejudices that have been embedded over generations? Is it right to use the law in this way? More broadly, what’s wrong with expressing a preference about how other people present themselves? Isn't some behaviour that gets labelled as snobbery just an attempt to defend high standards, whether in speech, writing, taste or manners? Is there a moral case for snobbery? With Bridgette Rickett, D.J. Taylor, David Skelton and Alex Bilmes.

Producers: Jonathan Hallewell and Peter Everett
Presenter: Michael Buerk


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (m0019k3h)
Series 12

Lancaster University

A funny, lively and dynamic quiz presented by Steve Punt and recorded on location at a different university each week, pitting three undergraduates against three of their professors.

This week the show comes from Lancaster University, the specialist subjects are English Literature, Marketing and French, and the questions range from Les Immortels and Roland Barthes to shopping trolleys and Philip K Dick.

The rounds vary between specialist subjects and general knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students’ knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors’ awareness of television, sport, and pop. And the Head-to-Head rounds, in which students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offer plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

The other universities in this series are University College London, Warwick, Bangor, Leeds Beckett and Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 23:30 Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets (m0019jvp)
Portsmouth

Poet Maggie Sawkins, winner of the Ted Hughes Award for New Work in Poetry, explores the language, dialect and poetry of her native Portsmouth in Hampshire.

Maggie meets fellow poets Denise Bennett and Liz Neal at the city's Historic Dockyard, to ask whether the Pompey dialect has been relegated to the margins or is now moving into the modern mainstream. At Fratton Park, home of Portsmouth FC, she chats with George Marsh, former Poet in Residence, to find out how working with Pompey fans has inspired his poetry. From there, she heads to the roof of the iconic Square Tower in Old Portsmouth, the home of her own poetry and music club, Tongues & Grooves, to talk to Al Wright about his novel The Winch, set in a futuristic Portsmouth where people still use a version of the dialect.

Along the way, we hear from poet Jackson Davies about 'sailor speak', and Maggie investigates how dialect poetry can aid mental health. While graphic designer George Bodkin, from the art collective Pompey Banana Club, discusses how dialect has moved from street slang to being celebrated in various art forms around the city.

Other episodes in this series explore dialect and poetry in Hull, Liverpool and Cornwall.

A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4



SUNDAY 31 JULY 2022

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m0019rb5)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:15 Living with the Gods (b09dxz1d)
Replicating the Divine

Neil MacGregor continues his series on the expression of shared beliefs with a focus on the making of divine images.

For the painter of a Russian religious icon, the paramount purpose is the continuation of a tradition, in which the painter seeks only to take his proper place, creating an image which opens a gateway to the divine.

The Hindu goddess Durga is at the centre of the popular annual festival of Durga Puja, where communities create images of the goddess in everyday materials - clay, wood, straw and oil paint - which then are endowed with a transcendental character.

Producer Paul Kobrak

Produced in partnership with the British Museum
Photograph (c) The Trustees of the British Museum.


SUN 00:30 Commonwealth Stories (m0019kd8)
We Do Everything For You

To celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Commonwealth Short Story Prize, and mark this year’s Commonwealth Games celebrations, three recent prizewinners have written specially commissioned stories for Radio 4.

Today’s story is by Kevin Jared Hosein from Trinidad and Tobago. In We Do Everything For You, Lal's cruise ship vacation turns nightmarish as he begins facing the distress of being overlooked and disregarded because of his Caribbean background, as well as the pain of his wife’s disappointment in him.

Kevin Jared Hosein is an author and science teacher born and raised in Chaguanas, Trinidad and Tobago. He twice won the regional Commonwealth Short Story Prize for the Caribbean region, before winning the overall prize in 2018 with his story Passage. His novel Hungry Ghosts will be published by Bloomsbury in February 2023.

Reader Damian Lynch has recently been seen in lead roles in TV’s The Split and Giri/Haji, as well as in guest appearances in Casualty and Coronation Street.

The Commonwealth Short Story Prize attracts between 6,000 – 7,000 entries every year from nearly all the 54 Commonwealth countries, and taps into a rich, rewarding vein of storytelling from around the world. Five regional prizes are awarded, from which one writer is chosen as the overall winner.

Producer: Tolly Robinson
Sound Design: Lucinda Mason Brown
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0019rb7)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0019rb9)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0019rbc)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m0019rbf)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m0019r87)
The Cathedral Church of St Philip in Birmingham

Bells on Sunday comes from the Cathedral Church of St Philip in Birmingham, the host city of the 2022 Commonwealth Games that began last Thursday. Initially built between 1711 and 1715 in response to a growing population, it became the Cathedral Church for the new diocese of Birmingham in 1905. By 1937, the tower housed a ring of ten bells by Gillet and Johnston of Croydon who in 1949 augmented them to twelve with a tenor weighing thirty one hundredweight tuned to D. We hear the bells ringing Cambridge Surprise Maximus.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m0019r7k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Summary (m0019r69)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01np0zy)
This Is My Vigil

There are many different types of vigils; from waiting at the bedside of a loved one who is ill or dying, to peacefully praying for peace in a conflict. Sometimes we choose to keep vigils, but sometimes they are thrust upon us - like waiting for someone to return from being in danger. In this edition of Something Understood, Mark Tully asks why people hold and participate in vigils.

In 2012, Mark Tully met Dr Shelia Cassidy, who believes that vigil is part of the very fabric of life. Her own life has been full of vigil. We hear about her most important personal experience, when she was in jail in Chile and threatened with execution or life imprisonment. That night she stayed awake, arguing with God. She explains how, in this personal vigil, she tried to abandon herself to the will of God - like Jacob wrestling with the angel.

A pioneer of the hospice movement and of palliative medicine, Dr Sheila Cassidy has also helped many people to keep vigil as they die. She explains that she has learned we all have to keep vigils during our lives.

Sheila also sees prayer in general as a type of vigil; it's a time to leave one's mind open to whatever comes, and to wait for God.

With readings from Rabindranath Tagore on patience and Christopher Reid on the vigil he held at his dying wife's bedside, and music from John Tavener and Joan Baez, Mark Tully explores what role hopeful "watching and waiting" can play in our lives.

The readers are Gareth Armstrong, Emily Bevan and Simon Tcherniak.

The producer is Jo Coombs.
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (m0019r6c)
The Business of Farming

58,000 hectares of UK farmland is managed by just one company. Velcourt Ltd provides farm managers for over 120 holdings, working on the principle that land management and land ownership can be separated.

The company's management training scheme attracts people from agricultural college as well as those with no farming experience. Managing Director, Nick Shorter, says farm management can be a way into the industry for those without access to their own land.

Charlotte Smith visits two farms run by Velcourt - one an arable farm in Wiltshire and the other a large dairy operation in Somerset.

Presented by Charlotte Smith
Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Heather Simons


SUN 06:57 Weather (m0019r6f)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m0019r6h)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m0019r6k)
The UK is being pressured to explain why changes were made to an official statement on gender equality, including removing commitments to abortion and sexual health rights, following the International Ministerial Conference on Freedom of Religion or Belief, held in London earlier this month. Norway and Denmark have approached the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office to protest against the changes, and an open letter to Foreign Secretary Liz Truss from more than 20 human rights, pro-choice, and international aid groups has demanded the government reverse the deletions immediately and explain why they were made. Caroline Nokes MP, who chairs the women and equalities select committee, has also written to the foreign secretary. She tells us why she's concerned.

More than 650 Anglican Bishops from around the world have arrived in Canterbury for the first Lambeth conference since 2008. The conference offers an opportunity for worship, discussion and - once again, it seems - a falling out over sex. The Church is declining in the West and growing in the Global south. Harry Farley reports on what this means for the nature and leadership of the Anglican communion. The archive used in his report was supplied by Pathe News.

The Scottish Highlands and islands are criss-crossed with ‘coffin roads’, the paths along which bodies were carried for burial. Many are now popular walking and cycling routes. But their history reminds us of a time when death was a more public and ritualistic practice. Professor Ian Bradley, whose book on this has just been published, tells us what the distinctive West Highland and Hebridean approach to dying and mourning can offer us today.

Presented by Edward Stourton.
Produced by Julia Paul and Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m0019r6m)
Innovations for Learning

Television and radio presenter Angellica Bell makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Innovations for Learning.

To Give:
- UK Freephone 0800 404 8144
-You can donate online at bbc.co.uk/appeal/radio4
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Innovations for Learning’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘Innovations for Learning’.
Please note that Freephone and online donations for this charity close at 23.59 on the Saturday after the Appeal is first broadcast. However the Freepost option can be used at any time.

Registered charity number: 1179625


SUN 07:57 Weather (m0019r6p)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m0019r6r)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m0019r6t)
Grateful in all circumstances

For three weeks each summer thousands of Christians gather in the beautiful setting of the Lake District town of Keswick. The theme of the Keswick Convention this year is 'Grateful in all circumstances.' The service, recorded in the Convention's main tent, is led by Jodi Whitehouse & Martin Salter. The address is given by Matt Searles, a faculty member for Crosslands Training, who preaches on Psalm 32 with music from Ben Slee and the band of Christ Church Mayfair. Keswick Ministries exists to inspire and equip Christians to love and live for Christ in his world.
Readings: Luke 7:36-50; Psalm 32. Music: Praise, my soul, the King of Heaven (Praise, my soul); The Power of the Cross (Stuart Townend & Keith Getty); Yet not I but through Christ in me (Jonny Robinson | Michael Farren | Rich Thompson); Confession Song (Matt Searles & Ben Slee); Jesus Paid It All (Elvina M. Hall - Kim Walker Smith); Producer: Philip Billson


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m0019kdy)
Dance Cocky

From boyhood, through young adulthood, to the present day, Howard Jacobson ponders his relationship with dancing.

As summer festivals get underway across the UK, Howard tries to understand the attraction.

'I didn’t dance to Paul McCartney in the 60s, and I’m not going to start now... dancing isn’t what I do,' he says.

Producer: Adele Armstrong
Sound: Peter Bosher
Production coordinator: Gemma Ashman
Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0v50)
Scarlet Macaw

Michael Palin presents the scarlet macaw from Costa Rica. The Scarlet Macaw is a carnival of a bird, eye-catching, noisy and vibrant, with a colour-scheme verging on bad taste. Its brilliant red feathers clash magnificently with the bright yellow patches on its wings, and contrast with its brilliant blue back and very long red tail. It has a white face and a massive hooked bill and it produces ear-splitting squawks. Subtlety is not in its vocabulary.

Scarlet macaws breed in forests from Mexico south through Central America to Bolivia, Peru and Brazil. They use their formidable beaks not only to break into nuts and fruit, but also as pick-axes.

Colourful and charismatic birds usually attract attention and in some areas where the Scarlet Macaws have been collected for the bird trade, numbers have declined. In south-east Mexico where they are very rare, a reintroduction programme is underway to restore these gaudy giants to their ancestral forests.

Producer Andrew Dawes.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m0019r6w)
Paddy speaks to Andy Cook, who coached two of England's star footballers. We preview this weekend's Prom featuring the Ukrainian Freedom Orchestra and launch our summer book stories with a focus this week on characters that stay with us. And we hear calls to ban disposable barbeques as the prospect of a second summer heatwave arises. On the news review - Frances O'Grady - General Secretary of the TUC, Caroline Wheeler - Political Editor of The Sunday Times and Jo Tanner - Political Strategist.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m0019r6y)
Writer, Tim Stimpson
Director, Gwenda Hughes
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Brad Horrobin ….. Taylor Uttley
Brian Aldridge ….. Charles Collingwood
Chelsea Horrobin ….. Madeleine Leslay
Chris Carter ….. Wilf Scolding
Clarrie Grundy ….. Heather Bell
Eddie Grundy ….. Trevor Harrison
Freddie Pargetter ….. Toby Laurence
George Grundy …… Angus Stobie
Kirsty Miller ….. Annabelle Dowler
Lily Pargetter ….. Katie Redford
Natasha Archer ….. Mali Harries
Oliver Sterling ….. Michael Cochrane
Russ Jones ….. Andonis James Anthony
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Toby Fairbrother ….. Rhys Bevan
Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Tony Archer ….. David Troughton
Caitlin Thomas ….. Di Botcher


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (m0019r70)
Clare Smyth, chef

Clare Smyth is a highly acclaimed chef and is the first British woman to win the coveted three Michelin stars for her work. She opened her London restaurant, Core, in 2017, and before that she ran Restaurant Gordon Ramsay, which also held three Michelin stars.

Clare was born in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, and grew up on a farm, where her love of simple ingredients was nurtured. The youngest of three children, she discovered a passion for cooking and decided to make it her career from an early age.

She left home at 16, moving to England to take a catering course at a college in Portsmouth. Her ambition was to work with the finest chefs, and after completing her course and apprenticeship, she went on to cook in some of the most acclaimed kitchens in the world, including Le Louis XV under Alain Ducasse in Monaco. She returned to London to work in Restaurant Gordon Ramsay, at the invitation of the proprietor, and became the first British woman to run a three Michelin-starred kitchen.

Her many awards include the title of the World's Best Female Chef in 2018, and she received an MBE for services to the hospitality industry in 2013. She also found herself in the spotlight in 2018 as the caterer for the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. She lives in London with her husband.

DISC ONE: Sweet Child O’ Mine by Guns N’ Roses
DISC TWO: Zombie by The Cranberries
DISC THREE: Don’t Look Back in Anger by Oasis
DISC FOUR: Common People by Pulp
DISC FIVE: Set Fire to the Rain by Adele
DISC SIX: Maria by Blondie
DISC SEVEN: Brass in Pocket by Pretenders
DISC EIGHT: Circle of Life by Carmen Twillie and Lebo M.

BOOK CHOICE: The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien
LUXURY ITEM: A chef’s knife
CASTAWAY'S FAVOURITE: Circle of Life by Carmen Twillie and Lebo M.

Presenter Lauren Laverne
Producer Sarah Taylor


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m0019r72)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (m0019k3s)
Series 77

Episode 3

The nation's favourite wireless entertainment pays a visit to Malvern’s Forum Theatre. Marcus Brigstocke and Rachel Parris compete against Rory Bremner and Graeme Garden with Jack Dee in the chair. Colin Sell provides piano accompaniment. Producer - Jon Naismith. It is a BBC Studios production.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m0019r0l)
Protein: power in powder?

Protein supplements have been around for a long time but recently it feels like they made the jump from a niche product for gym enthusiasts to something much more mainstream. We are seeing protein being added to all kinds of food products for example, from chocolate bars to cereal.

Jaega Wise wants to find out more about these products. Do we need them? What are they made of? How much protein should we be eating?

Jaega visits Balance festival in East London to observe how protein is taking over the wellness scene. She also talks to her partner Will who has been drinking protein shakes. She visits a factory where they make Form Protein – a more upmarket, vegan supplement.

We hear from Professor Stuart Phillips on the effectiveness of protein supplements and Dietitian Dr Linia Patel on the Refence Nutrient Intake – the amount of protein we are recommended to have every day.

Presenter: Jaega Wise
Produced in Bristol by Natalie Donovan and Sam Grist


SUN 12:57 Weather (m0019r75)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m0019r77)
Radio 4's look at the week's big stories from both home and around the world


SUN 13:30 Black Roots (m0017khq)
Episode One – Frank Johnson, Joe Thompson and the fiddle in North Carolina.

String bands, hoedowns, square dances, old-time fiddle and banjo styles, these sounds were a dominant strand in African American roots music from the 17th century onwards. Despite this, many people think that such music comes solely from dungaree-wearing, white rural folk. Country might appear to be the whitest of all music genres, but it has some surprising roots.

How have these black roots been whitewashed from the history of American folk and country music? How have folk and country been positioned as white genres? What does black Americana sound like today?

In this episode, acclaimed musician Rhiannon Giddens returns to her home state of North Carolina to explore the lives of two black fiddlers - Joe Thompson and Frank Johnson. Johnson was one of the first black celebrities in the Southern states of the USA. Born into slavery, he bought freedom for himself and his family on the back of his profits as a musician. More than 2,000 people processed through Wilmington, North Carolina for his funeral in 1871. Though he died before the start of the recording industry, his music was passed down through generations of black fiddlers in the region. The last of these fiddlers was Joe Thompson, who taught Rhiannon countless songs.

Featuring Iris Thompson Chapman, Phil Jamison, John Jeremiah Sullivan and Dr. Lewin Manly.

Presented by Rhiannon Giddens
Produced by Tom Woolfenden
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0019kd6)
Pembrokeshire

Kathy Clugston and the panel are in Pembrokeshire, Wales, for the horticultural programme. Pippa Greenwood, Chris Beardshaw and Anne Swithinbank field the questions.

This week, the panellists suggest plants that can withstand the coastal storms and salty rain typical of this part of Wales. They also explain why a young mulberry tree might not be doing so well, and puzzle over a flock of sparrows that appear to be vegetarian.

Away from the questions, Anne Swithinbank heads over to the glass house at the The National Botanic Garden of Wales. She meets with Russell Beeton who shows her some exquisitely exotic plants.

Producer: Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Aniya Das

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 28ish Days Later (m0019r79)
Day Twenty-Eight: New Power

Through this series we have demonstrated how inequalities in research and persistent myths about women's bodies have led to inequalities in healthcare. In this episode, India talks to someone who has the power to influence change. Dame Professor Lesley Regan has dedicated the last decade of her career to fighting for better health outcomes for women all over the world.

Credits:
Presented by India Rakusen.
Producer: Ellie Sans.
Assistant Producer: Jorja McAndrew.
Executive Producer: Suzy Grant.
Original music composed and performed by Rebekah Reid.
Sound Design by Charlie Brandon-King.

Special thanks to all contributors and audio diarists.

A Listen production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.


SUN 15:00 Drama (m0019r7c)
Separate Tables

Table Number Seven

Separate Tables is a vital portrait of postwar Britain in flux. Here, in a small, shabby hotel in Bournemouth, a brutal clash of generations is playing out. Beneath a veneer of respectability lies a modern world of desire, deception and violence.

Separate Tables comprises two linked one-act plays: Table By The Window and Table Number Seven. In this play, Table Number Seven, a newspaper reveals Major Pollock’s long-held secret. Will the other residents cast him out for good?

CAST
Major Pollock ..... Adrian Scarborough
Sibyl Railton-Bell ..... Chloe Pirrie
Mrs Railton-Bell ..... Susan Brown
Miss Cooper ..... Nathalie Armin
Lady Matheson ..... Ruth Everett
Mabel ..... Alexandra Hannant
Charles ..... Matthew Durkan
Jean ..... Marilyn Nnadebe
Miss Meacham ..... Rebecca Crankshaw
Mr Fowler ..... Neil McCaul

Written by Terence Rattigan
Directed by Anne Isger
Sound by Keith Graham, Mike Etherden, Ali Craig, Anne Bunting
Production Co-ordination by Gaelan Connolly and Clare Ewing
A BBC Audio Production for BBC Radio 4

A note on the play: This drama uses the ‘alternative version’ of Rattigan's text, which was only discovered after Rattigan’s death, and never performed during his lifetime. In this version, the Major’s ‘crime’ is one of homosexuality, whereas in the originally performed version, the Major was accused of assaulting women. It’s generally accepted that the avoidance of reference to homosexuality was as a result of censorship of theatres imposed by the Lord Chamberlain at the time. Rattigan himself said ‘I had in fact appealed over the head of the Lord Chamberlain to the sensibilities and particular awareness of an English audience. I was in fact saying to them “Look, Ladies and Gentlemen, the Lord Chamberlain has forced me into an evasion, but you and I will foil him. Everybody in the play is going to behave as if there were no evasion at all and as if the more important and serious theme were still the issue.”’


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m0019r7f)
The Ethics of Writing Crime

Chris Power is joined by writers Margie Orford, Lavie Tidhar, and Andrew Harding to discuss the ethical questions authors confront as they research and write about crime and the faint lines between fact and fiction. Margie Orford is a crime writer and journalist, her latest novel The Eye of the Beholder follows two women as they try to bury their abusive pasts. Lavie Tidhar's novel Maror spans 50 years of turbulent Israeli history by pulling together true stories of crime and corruption to reveal truths hidden from view for over forty years. And the BBC's foreign correspondent, Andrew Harding, is the author of the true-crime thriller These Are Not Gentle People, a work of narrative non-fiction about the horrific and traumatic events that took place in a small South African town in 2016.

Also on the programme, bestselling crime writer Denise Mina shares her love of The Heart of a Dog by Mikhail Bulgakov as The Book I'd Never Lend.

Book List – Sunday 31 July and Thursday 4 August

The Eye of the Beholder by Margie Orford
Like Clockwork by Margie Orford
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Maror by Lavie Tidhar
These Are Not Gentle People by Andrew Harding
The Mayor of Mogadishu by Andrew Harding
The Promise by Damon Galgut
Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor
The Steam Pig by James McClure
The Caterpillar Cop by James McClure
The Story of a Crime by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö
In Cold Blood by Truman Capote
Heart of a Dog by Mikhail Bulgakov: Translated by Misha Glenny
Confidence by Denise Mina


SUN 16:30 Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets (m0019r7h)
Liverpool

Actor and writer Catherine Harvey explores the poetry and language of Liverpool to find out what it means to be a Dicky Sam, a Whacker, a Liverpudlian or a Scouser.

In the remains of the world’s first commercial wet dock (now deep beneath a shopping centre) Catherine discovers how a cluster of streets next to a muddy pool became a vibrant cultural melting pot, and asks linguist Tony Crowley about the impact of the Port on what Thomas De Quincey once called ‘the many-languaged town of Liverpool’.

From the burial pits of St Patrick’s Church, the resting place of thousands who died in past epidemics, to the Everyman Theatre where live poetry events continue the legacy of The Mersey Sound, we hear from some of Liverpool’s contemporary poets, including Amina Atiq, Jennifer Lee Tsai, Greg Quiery and Levi Tafari. But are the myths about Liverpool’s linguistic history true? And what makes the dialect and identity of this diverse community so unique?

The other areas visited in this series of Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets are Hull, Portsmouth and Cornwall.

A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 17:00 Today (m0019t4g)
The Today Debate: Turning the Economy Around

Mishal Husain is joined by an expert panel to look at the challenges facing the UK economy.

Joining the Today Debate are BBC's Political Editor Chris Mason; Torsten Bell, Chief Executive of the Resolution Foundation; Rain Newton-Smith, Chief Economist at the CBI and Dame Clare Moriarty, Chief Executive of Citizens Advice.

The Today Debate will explore the combination of inflation and stagnation. Turning the economy around is a key thread in the battle to be the next Prime Minister and matters to living standards and wellbeing across the country.

How can it be done?


SUN 17:40 Profile (m0019r7k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0019r7m)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m0019r7p)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0019r7r)
The tournament has seen interest in women's football increase, with hopes it'll have a wider impact beyond the competition.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m0019r7t)
Ian McMillan

Poet and broadcaster Ian McMillan chooses highlights of the past week on BBC radio and BBC Sounds.

This week, Ian is gazing at the ancient pyramids of Egypt and trying to catch a bus in Leeds. He's with a fictional politician at the Commonwealth Games and glorying in the linguistic joy of online dating and the glottal stop. He's lifted up by music and poetry and brought down to earth by a policeman’s knock at the door.

Image of Ian McMillan © Adrian Mealing


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m0019r0g)
Alice and Shula walk the cross country course and chat about the Grey Gables launch event tomorrow – it’s now at the Village Hall. Shula’s touched when Alice asks her if she’ll lead Martha’s naming ceremony, explaining that it was Shula who helped her get back to rehab and so back to being Martha’s mum again. As they walk the course it becomes clear that the design has been altered – even novices would struggle with it. Initially dismissive, Justin finally concedes that he and an old business friend thought the first section was a bit tame, so they tinkered with it. Alice says it needs putting right. Chris knows someone who could help, but he won’t be cheap. Shula says that’s fine; Justin will be footing the bill.
Peggy and Tony are with Nova and Seren while exhausted Tom and Natasha are sleeping. Peggy loves getting to know the babies. When Tony gets Seren off to sleep with his special rock, Peggy says he obviously makes her feel safe. It’s no surprise, he does that with everyone. As Peggy holds Nova she comments that all babies are special, but twins have a special connection. She’d like Nova and Seren to have a stained glass-window in St Stephens, like Jack’s which has been such a comfort to her over the years. Tony thinks it’s a wonderful idea and agrees to ask Tom and Natasha about it. Peggy hopes it would give the babies joy and strength whenever they’d need it.


SUN 19:15 Alexei Sayle's Strangers on a Train (m0019r7w)
Series 1

Manchester to Bournemouth

Author, actor and comedy icon, Alexei Sayle continues his travels across the country by rail.

Alexei’s mission is to break the golden rule of travelling by train and actually talk to his fellow passengers in a quest for conversations that reveal their lives, hopes, dreams and destinations. There’s humour, sadness and surprise as people talk about what is going on in their lives and, as Alexei passes through familiar towns and cities, he also tells stories and memories from his career and childhood.

Alexei has a lifelong "ticket to ride" in his DNA. His father was a railway guard and the Sayle family benefitted from free travel in the UK and across Europe. As a boy, Alexei and his family roamed far and wide from the family home in Anfield, Liverpool. At a time when most people thought an exciting trip by train was to Brighton or Blackpool, Alexei travelled thousands of miles to mysterious towns with unpronounceable names in far flung corners of the continent.

In each programme in the series, Alexei embarks on a rail journey, taking a chance on who he might meet and inviting them to have a conversation with him. In this episode, he travels from Manchester to Bournemouth and meets Moira who, as a dedicated Manchester City fan, has sky blue hair, sky blue clothes and even a sky blue house. He also talks to Jean who has been to visit a lifelong friend who worked alongside her as a psychiatric nurse, Steven and Simon who are both accountants but spend their leisure time travelling the world together to go to top music gigs, and rail enthusiast and veteran record producer Pete Waterman on one of his thousands of trips on the west coast line.

Producers Peter Lowe and Nick Symons
A Ride production for Radio 4


SUN 19:45 Three Fires (m0019r7y)
Episode 3: Girolamo Resplendent

This five-part serial from award-winning crime writer Denise Mina takes a dark, contemporary look at Renaissance-era Florence. In a corrupt city riven by factionalism, wealth inequality and suffering from a rampant outbreak of plague, the pressure is building.

As the citizens of Florence chafe against gross inequality, puritanical preacher Girolamo Savonarola starts to build up a following.

Written by Denise Mina
Read by Kieran Hodgson
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


SUN 20:00 Feedback (m0019kdd)
Do the Culture wars have to be fought to the death? Can either side be persuaded to listen calmly to the other’s point of view? That's what Radio 4 is trying to achieve through its new series AntiSocial. The Editor Emma Rippon explains why, and how.

Is lunchtime an appropriate time to discuss menstruation on Radio 4? The Presenter of 28ish Days Later, India Rakusen, tells Roger Bolton why she thinks it is.

And is there anything to laugh at in community social media? Two listeners give their views on Radio 4’s Welcome to the Neighbourhood.

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Kate Dixon
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m0019kdb)
Lord David Trimble (pictured), Susie Steiner, Uwe Seeler

John Wilson on

Lord David Trimble, Northern Irish politician who was an architect of the Good Friday Agreement and won a Nobel Peace Prize.

Susie Steiner, a British crime author who shared her experience of living with a brain tumour.

Uwe Seeler, captain of the West German football team in 1966 and a hero for his home team of Hamburg.

Producer: Sofie Vilcins

Interviewed guest: Lord Dean Godson
Interviewed guest: Val McDermid
Interviewed guest: Alan Mullery MBE
Interviewed guest: Derek Rae

Archive clips used: British Pathé, 1966 World Cup Final: England vs Germany (Part 1) 1966; BBC Radio 4, Meeting Myself Coming Back - David Trimble 05/03/2017; BBC News Online, Good Friday agreement 10/04/1998; BBC Radio 4, Today - Tony Blair on David Trimble 26/07/2022; ITV.com, Michelle O'Neill on David Trimble's legacy of leadership 26/07/2022; BBC Radio Ulster, Doug Beattie and Sir Jefferey Donaldson on David Trimble 26/07/2022; BBC Radio 4, Great Lives - Elvis Presley 14/08/2007; Peter James TV / YouTube Channel, Susie Steiner interview 02/01/2018; BBC Radio 4, In Touch, Susie Steiner interview 12/04/2016; BBC Radio 4, Open Book - Susie Steiner interview 24/09/2020; BBC Archive, 1966 World Cup Final 30/07/1966; YouTube, Uwe Seeler scores against England - World Cup 1970; HSV / Hamburger SV YouTube Channel, The Life of Uwe Seeler 22/07/2022; YouTube, HSV Team Tribute in memory of Uwe Seeler.


SUN 21:00 Surviving the Cost of Living (m0019r4q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m0019r6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (m0019k3x)
Addiction in the age of the metaverse

Are we past the point of no return when it comes to our obsession with online technology? Elaine Moore considers her own tech use and explores our future in the metaverse.

According to a YouGov poll, the majority of Brits can’t get through dinner without checking their phone. Children and young adults can now be treated on the NHS for ‘gaming and internet addiction’. So, with the arrival of the metaverse, which promises to seamlessly blend our real and virtual worlds, are we facing a future which could potentially turbocharge this issue?

Elaine asks if addiction to technology is real, and as it becomes more entwined in our everyday lives, what’s being done about it? Speaking to addiction specialists, tech experts, and others, she finds out how we can live more harmoniously with technology and develop healthier relationships with our screens.

With contributions from:

James Ball, author of 'The System: Who Owns the Internet, and How it Owns Us'.

Anna Lembke, Professor of Psychiatry at Stanford University School of Medicine and author of 'Dopamine Nation'.

Dr Rebecca Lockwood from the National Center for Gaming Disorder.

Catherine Price, science journalist and founder of ScreenLifeBalance.com.

Professor of AI and Spatial Computing, David Reid.

Producer: Craig Templeton Smith


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m0019r81)
Carolyn Quinn discusses the Conservative party leadership race and the challenges facing the new prime minister, with Tory backbencher and chair of the centrist One Nation group, Damian Green; the Labour Party Chair, Anneliese Dodds; and Baroness Cathy Ashton - former EU High Commissioner for Foreign Affairs. The deputy political editor of the Daily Mail - John Stevens - brings additional insight and analysis.


SUN 23:00 Loose Ends (m0019r83)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01np0zy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 01 AUGUST 2022

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m0019r85)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Sideways (m0019k67)
27. A Blip on the Radar

Angie Zelter is on her way to Loch Goil in Scotland. It’s a beautiful summer’s day, and her friends have packed a picnic. But that’s not the real reason they’re there. Angie has an urgent message to deliver to the world about nuclear weapons. And she’s going to deliver it through an act of destruction.

In this episode, Matthew Syed looks at the danger that nuclear weapons pose, even if nations never use them in a deliberate act of war. He hears about the moments we came within a hair’s breadth of disaster through misunderstanding, negligence, accident and even a blackbrown bear.

It’s simple - the more weapons there are in the world, the more risk increases. But how to deal with this problem throws up complex solutions and viewpoints.

Some would like the total eradication of nuclear weapons, arguing that disarmament across the world is the only way to avoid catastrophic risk. But others worry about disrupting the delicate balance of nuclear deterrence. As Matthew hears, history shows us that scaling back the numbers is possible - even at the height of the Cold War. He asks whether the possibilities for non-proliferation and scaling back through treaties and verification could be a way forward today.

Contributors:
Angie Zelter - Founder of the Trident Ploughshares movement in the UK, anti-nuclear weapons activist and Peace and Environmental Campaigner
Eryn MacDonald - Global Security Analyst at the Union of Concerned Scientists
Patricia Lewis - Research Director for Conflict, Science and Transformation and Director, International Security Programme
Mariana Bujeryn - Global Fellow with the Wilson Center's Nuclear Proliferation International History Project and Research Fellow at the Project on Managing the Atom and International Security Project at the Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center

Presenter: Matthew Syed
Producer: Nadia Mehdi
Series Editor: Katherine Godfrey
Sound Design and Mix: Rob Speight
Theme tune by Ioana Selaru
A Novel production for BBC Radio 4


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m0019r87)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0019r89)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0019r8c)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0019r8f)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m0019r8h)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0019r8k)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Revd Dr Craig Gardiner

Good morning.

A few years ago, the Cardiff born author Layla Saad searchingly asked the world of Twitter, ‘how might we become good ancestors?’ That question of how we’ll be remembered is one many of us ask, in our own way, during moments of introspection. ‘What have we done to make the world a better place?’

This week in Wales, much of the attention is focused upon the National Eisteddfod, gathering in the town of Tregaron. It’s a festival not just of performances and competitions, but one where the rituals of history interweave with the future possibilities of science and technology, politics, education, minority rights and more. So, no doubt generations to come will ask who has made significant contributions to the country and what has been their legacy?

The folk of Tregaron have their own guide to help with this: a statue which dominates the town square, remembers one of their own ancestors, Henry Richard. In the 19th century Richard was ordained as a congregational minister and later became an MP who vigorously represented local and wider Welsh interests. At a time when slavery was still legal, he was an ardent abolitionist, he was a pioneer in further education and his work on the international stages of diplomacy gained him the impressive reputation as the ‘apostle of peace.’

That is surely a worthy epitaph.

Richard’s legacy is to pass on to us the tradition of the psalms to ‘seek peace and pursue it.’ He continues the practice of Jesus who breathes peace upon his disciples, and he rises to St David’s appeal to his followers, ‘Keep your faith, and do the little things that you have seen and heard with me.’

Dear God
May we learn today
To keep the faith
and become ancestors of peace
of justice and joy,
an inheritance gifted to all who come after us.
Amen


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m0019r8m)
01/08/22 - Robots on farms, Tenant farmers

A review looking into robots on farms has been published, it calls for more cooperation between academia, business and farmers. It also recommends a longer-term seasonal workers scheme so that agriculture has enough staff while the automation industry becomes more mainstream. We hear from a farm in Cornwall where robots are already being used to plant crops.

All this week Farming Today will be looking at tenant farmers. They manage 35% of the UK's farmed land area, and are a vital part of the food growing network. But they face some challenges - from increasingly shorter tenancies to a lack of available land. Council owned farms have also been sold off as the money is needed elsewhere. Charlotte Smith finds out about the difficulties facing tenants.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced in Bristol by Sally Challoner.


MON 05:56 Weather (m0019r8p)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0qpk)
Trumpeter Swan

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the sonorous trumpeter swan of North America. Across an Alaskan wilderness powerful sounds and calls emanate from the largest and heaviest of all wildfowl, the pure white trumpeter swan. With a wingspan of up to 250 cm, the biggest male trumpeter swan on record weighed over 17 kilogrammes, heavier than mute swans. They breed on shallow ponds and lakes in the wilder parts of north west and central North America. Hunted for feathers and skins, they were once one of the most threatened birds on the continent, with only 69 birds known in the United States, although populations hung on in Alaska and Canada. Since then trumpeters have been protected by law and populations have recovered in many areas. Alaska and Canada remain strongholds and today reintroductions are returning this musical bird to their former range in the USA.


MON 06:00 Today (m0019qzw)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 This Cultural Life (m0014wng)
Akram Khan

Dancer and choreographer Akram Khan is one of the world’s most acclaimed and influential figures working in contemporary dance today. Born in London to Bangladeshi parents, Akram is renowned for his radical productions in which classical Asian music and movement is fused with modern styles. He’s won many awards, was made an MBE in 2005, and choreographed and performed in the 2012 London Olympics opening ceremony.

He tells John Wilson about his teenage role in Peter Brook's epic production of The Mahabharata, which toured the world; the importance of collaborating with with leading creative figures from outside the world of dance including Anish Kapoor and Juliette Binoche; and reveals how an extraordinary chance encounter changed his artistic outlook.

Producer: Edwina Pitman


MON 09:45 Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui (m0019qzy)
The Counter

Angela Hui grew up behind the counter of her parents’ Chinese takeaway, Lucky Star, in the former mining village of Beddau, Wales.

It opened on the luckiest day of the century, 8 August 1988, an auspicious date with the number eight signifying good wealth, fortune and prosperity in Chinese culture – three key factors needed for a young, growing immigrant family.

On one side of the counter Angela interacts with the takeaway’s loyal staff, Cecilia, Dewi and Lowri. They serve and deliver food lovingly prepped and cooked by Angela’s parents. Regular customers pester Angela at the counter as she tries to do her homework.

Running a Chinese takeaway is hard work and there is tension in the overlapping spaces of home and work, playground and business. Angela and her two brothers, Keen and Jacky, also have to act as go-betweens for their parents when there are language barriers.

But there is also beauty in the rhythm and joy from living in the takeaway and being surrounded by the food of Angela’s home culture.

On the other side of the counter, Angela enjoys family dinners before service, dishes a world away from the simplified, watered-down Western version ordered by the locals - whole steamed sea bass, Cantonese soup, steamed egg, Chinese broccoli with oyster sauce. To them, food is love and food symbolises family.

A blending of her Welsh and Chinese heritage, the takeaway was a place that embodied the dual identities that Angela herself was experiencing.

In this episode, Angela recalls sitting at the takeaway counter from a young age. She can’t remember a time when she and her two brothers didn’t have to be rushing home to be ready to work by 5pm.

Read by Priya Hall
Abridged by Anna Magnusson
Produced by Alexandra Quinn
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0019r01)
Women's Euro 2022

In today's Woman's Hour we dedicate the programme to Women's Football after the Lionesses won the Euro 2022 Championship last night.

Rebecca Myers is a journalist for The Times and a prominent voice in Women's Sport, she joined Andrea to give a match report and described some of her favourite moments.

What will the legacy of last night’s Women’s Euro 2022 be? The former lioness and second highest goal scorer for England Kelly Smith joins Andrea Catherwood alongside Dame Heather Rabbatts, Dame Heather was the first female board member of the Football Association when she joined in 2012.

We will also discuss the grass roots of the game and what more oppurtunities could be given to girls who want to play at school and beyond, Andrea speaks to Baroness Sue Campbell the Director of Women’s Football at the FA.

David Kogan negotiated the sale of the TV rights for the Women’s Super League and is a long time advisor to the FA, he joins Andrea to discuss what next for the business side of the sport.

Neither the Wales nor Scotland women’s football teams qualified for the Euro 2022 tournament, but will England’s victory, and Northern Ireland’s involvement in the group stages, be a boost for all the nations of the UK? The Scottish crime writer and football fan Val McDermid joined us alongside Laura McAllister, former Wales international team captain and currently deputy chair of UEFA's Women's Football committee and Caragh Hamilton, a midfielder for the Northern Ireland team.

And Evelyn, a seven-year-old goalie from Leeds, has written a poem in honour of her favourite Lioness.

Presenter: Andrea Catherwood
Producer: Emma Pearce


MON 11:00 My Name Is... (m000ffzx)
My Name Is Hayley: Asking for Rejection

No one likes rejection, but is it possible to inoculate yourself against it?

Hayley is a young woman who wants to get better at dealing with rejection and asking for what she wants without fear of No. So, she goes in search of rejections from strangers to explore whether getting rejected a lot makes it easier to deal with.

She speaks with facilitator Linda Cockburn about the notion of "rejection therapy," as well as social psychologist Vanessa Bohns, whose research illuminates how we underestimate the difficulty of saying no. She also talks with her friend Max and comedian Alice Fraser about how to transcend rejection and perhaps even learn to embrace it.

Presented by Hayley Griffin
Produced by Meara Sharma
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


MON 11:30 The Bottom Line (m0019kks)
Little Boxes?

The government target for building houses in the UK is 300,000 a year, but over the past few years only around 60 per cent of that number have been constructed. The sector faces many challenges; labour and skills shortages and rapidly rising prices for raw materials, not to mention uneven planning laws and green building commitments.

Are they building the homes the country needs and where it needs them? Evan Davis and guests discuss.

GUESTS

Ben Dimson, Partner, Property Sector, McKinsey

Peter Truscott, CEO, Crest Nicholson

Rico Wojtulewicz, Head of Housing and Planning, National Federation of Builders

Presenter: Evan Davis
Producers: Julie Ball and Lucinda Borrell
Editors: Hugh Levinson and Jon Bithrey
Sound: James Beard, Rod Farquhar
Production Co-ordinators: Siobhan Reed and Helena Warwick-Cross


MON 12:00 News Summary (m0019r03)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 You and Yours (m0019r05)
Holiday Home Spoofing, Consumer Panel and Indy Coffee Shops

The low paid are struggling with rising prices but what about the middle classes, are they silently thriving? And the indy coffee shops eating into the high st chains market.


MON 12:57 Weather (m0019r07)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m0019r09)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Jonny Dymond.


MON 13:45 The Last Request (m0019r0c)
Episode 1

BBC reporter Laura McDaid held Martin Barry's hand as he died. 17 years later, she begins a search to fulfil his last request: to find his birth mother and pass on a message.


MON 14:00 The Archers (m0019r0g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Trust (m0010090)
A Social Distance

Second series of Jonathan Hall's comedy drama about an inner city academy school in Salford and how it coped with the pandemic in 2020. Starring Julie Hesmondhalgh.

Episode one - A Social Distance
It is mid March 2020 and the schools have closed due to Covid 19. East Salford Academy tries to cope with all the conflicting information from the government whilst dealing with confused parents. There are so many questions - Who is meant to be in school? What exactly is a key worker? How are school meal vouchers going to be distributed? The school principle Yvette Miller grapples with all these issues whilst keeping the Academy Trust and the nervous staff informed and happy.

Yvette ..... .Julie Hesmondhalgh
Sir Ken ..... Jonathan Keeble
Tim ..... Ashley Margolis
Marigold/Candice ..... Verity Henry
Joy/Carol ..... Susan Twist
Moey/Mr Ayhan ..... Abdullah Afzal

Director/ Producer Gary Brown.
A BBC Audio Drama North Production.

With grateful thanks to those who helped with the research -

Tom Barradas Lingard
John Winkley
Isobel Ashmead
Pippa Davies
Pat Thomson


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (m0019r0j)
Heat 1, 2022

The first four contestants of the 2022 series join Russell Davies for the classic general knowledge tournament to decide who takes the title Brain of Britain. The field is as strong as ever for the 69th season of the quiz, with competitors from all over the UK, including some who have narrowly missed the title before, alongside others who are throwing their hat into the ring for the very first time.

Sport, medicine, classic literature, art, languages, history, music and physics are just some of the fields from which questions are drawn in this opening edition of the series.

Taking part today are:
Azeez Feshitan from London
Angela Hawke from Bognor Regis
Emma Laslett from Milton Keynes
Ray Walters from Cheltenham.

As always, a listener will also get the chance to win a prize if they can Beat the Brains with questions he or she has devised.

Assistant Producer: Stephen Garner
Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m0019r0l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Sketches: Stories of Art and People (m0019r0n)
City Streets

Anna Freeman presents three stories of people whose work relates strongly to the streets of different cities. Ben Wilson aka Chewing Gum Man likes to make art in public spaces until it got him into trouble. He was taken to court over painting on advertising billboards. But he feels strongly about preserving public space for people and art and one day became inspired by the tiny blobs of spat out chewing gum he noticed dotted around the streets. He had the idea of creating paintings out of them. Tiny as they are they are incredibly intricate and some are moving tributes to the local people and places around Muswell Hill Ben has got to know while he works on the pavement.

As a child in Baghdad Dhamyaa Abbass loved to sew and make dresses out of her mother's old clothes. But her parents wanted her to concentrate on her studies and she grew up to become a head teacher. Dress making had to be put aside. Years later she came to England as a refugee and began building a life in Oxford with her children. She got involved with the Multaka Project. Multaka – which means meeting point in Arabic – uses two University museums - The History of Science and Pitt Rivers - and their collections as a meeting point to bring communities together through the mutual sharing of art, stories, culture, and science. It pairs Arabic speakers with English speaking guides. The project also encouraged Dhamyaa to take up dress making again and she began designing and sewing dresses that reflect her culture and love of her home country. It's her way of coping with homesickness for the country she was forced to leave.
Darryl Carrington has performed in touring circuses, international arena shows and festivals around the world as a juggler, trapeze artist and cabaret act. But in recent years, he's found a renewed love for using clowning and his own experiences of neuro-diversity to connect with audiences through street performances.


MON 16:30 Don't Log Off (m0017k71)
Series 13

A Different Way

An ecological retreat on the edge of Amazonian rainforest which has the area's indigenous people as its nearest neighbours. A self declared independent artist's republic in the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius with its own flag, currency and constitution. A peace loving village community in New Zealand where everyone shares their money and children can safely roam free. Then there's the Argentinian family which travelled the world by vintage car on a journey that lasted for more than 22 years. Alan Dein connects with people across the world who are reaching further, dreaming deeper and seeking a different path in life.

Producer: Conor Garrett


MON 17:00 PM (m0019r0q)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0019r0s)
The victorious England women's football team have lifted the European Championship trophy in front of thousands of fans at a huge celebration in Trafalgar Square.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (m0019r0v)
Series 77

Episode 4

The antidote to panel games pays a return visit to the Forum Theatre in Malvern. Marcus Brigstocke and Rachel Parris take on Rory Bremner and Graeme Garden with Jack Dee in the chair. Colin Sell attempts piano accompaniment. Producer - Jon Naismith. It is a BBC Studios production.


MON 19:00 The Archers (m0019r0x)
It’s the Grey Gables launch event at the Village Hall. When Oliver, Adil and Roy arrive to set up, they find the hall’s been double-booked with the Borsetshire Scottish Dance Society and they’re not budging. When they discover Audrey Fisher and Hilary Noakes are involved Roy thinks they need to get in the big guns, and he contacts Lynda. Meanwhile Adil goes in to talk them. When Lynda arrives, Adil still hasn’t reappeared, and they realise he’s joined in with the dancing. When he emerges he says it’s all sorted. Oliver and Roy agree that Adil’s brilliant in a crisis.

Tony’s at the launch with Helen – he admits that one of the reasons he’s there is to get away from Pat and Caitlin reminiscing about all things Welsh. There’s a large turnout and Tony points out that anyone who’s anyone in their area is there, including Ambridge residents. Adil makes a speech outlining their plans, from sourcing food from Grey Gables land and nearby farms to bringing finance and prosperity to the local economy via guests. Oliver chips in saying they’ll be staffing the hotel as much as possible from Ambridge. Afterwards Helen, Tony and Lynda are all impressed. Roy says it was a fantastic presentation and the audience really got the point of what they’re trying to do. However he’s less impressed when he finds that he, Adil and Oliver will have to take part in the Highland fling – the only way Adil could get the dance society to budge was by agreeing to make up the numbers!


MON 19:15 Front Row (m0019r0z)
Beyoncé's album Renaissance, poet Don Paterson, the New Diorama Theatre, Free-for-All exhibition, Nichelle Nichols remembered

Beyoncé's Renaissance: we discuss Beyoncé's house and disco inspired new album – her first solo material in six years - and her huge significance as an artist and cultural icon. Nick is joined by Jacqueline Springer – curator, music journalist and lecturer- and by the writer and editor Tara Joshi.

The Arctic is Don Paterson’s new collection of poems. The title refers not to the polar region but the third worst bar in Dundee, the resort of survivors of various apocalypses. Other poets are a presence, too, in Paterson’s poems ‘after’ Gabriela Mistral, Montale and Cavafy. Nick Ahad interviews Don Paterson about this poetic cornucopia.

David Byrne is the artistic director and chief executive of London’s New Diorama, the Stage newspaper’s Fringe Theatre of the Year. He joins Nick to explain his decision to present no public programme for the rest of the year.

Free-for-All is a programme that does what it says on the tin – all artworks on the walls of the Touchstones Gallery have been made by people from Rochdale. Artist Harry Meadley joins Nick to explain the concept.

And we remember American actor Nichelle Nichols, best known for her role in Star Trek as Lieutenant Uhura, who has died aged 89.

Presenter: Nick Ahad
Producer: Ekene Akalawu

Image: Beyoncé


MON 20:00 The Silent Mind (m0019r11)
‘Today I found out that not everyone has an interior monologue, and it’s ruined my day.’

A little while ago this blog post went viral, triggering an intense online debate.

Why do some people have loud, intrusive voices running in their head seemingly all the time, and others a totally ‘silent mind’? Psychologist and author Professor Charles Fernyhough finds out what it’s like to have no inner speech, and asks - why are we often totally wrong about what’s going on inside our own heads?

'Silent Mind' clip by Alan Watts courtesy of alanwatts.org

Produced by Olivia Humphreys
Sound Mixing: Mike Woolley
An Overcoat Media production for BBC Radio 4


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (m0019kjw)
The Return of the Tigers

Tigers are making a remarkable comeback in Nepal. The small Himalayan nation is on track to become the first country to double its wild tiger population in the last decade. A new census will be released on International Tiger Day (29th of July). The recovery is the result of tough anti-poaching measures that have involved the military and the local community. Other iconic species including rhinos and elephant populations have also increased. But this has come at a cost, there has been an increase in tiger attacks on humans. Rebecca Henschke travels to Bardia national park, to find out what’s behind the conservation success and what it means for the community living with the Tigers.

(Photo Credit: Deepak Rajbanshi)

Presented by Rebecca Henschke
Produced by Kevin Kim and Rajan Parajuli, with the BBC Nepali team
Studio mix by Neil Churchill
Production coordinators Gemma Ashman and Iona Hammond
Editor Penny Murphy


MON 21:00 China's Stolen Treasures (m0015lsg)
Buyers and Sellers

It’s late February 2009 inside the Grand Palais in Paris, and the Christie’s auction of the estate of designer Yves Saint Laurent is in full swing. The room is packed. A bank of telephones stands to one side, as bidders call in or raise their paddles. A hush comes over the crowd as a digital projector displays the bronze heads of a rat and a rabbit.

Bidding surged beyond the estimate. This pair of bronze animal heads were two of the twelve that decorated the Zodiac Fountain at the imperial Old Summer Palace in Beijing until they were looted by British and French troops in 1860. They sell for £15 million each.

Normally, that would mark the end of an auction story. But in this case, it was only the beginning. Because the buyer, a wealthy Chinese businessman and adviser to China’s National Treasures Fund, Cai Mingchoa, never intended to pay. He bid and won in protest because he felt that China should not have to buy back their cultural heritage from the west.

In this episode of China’s Stolen Treasures, Noah Charney explores the market in Chinese antiquities, from auction houses to collectors, trailing the famous Zodiac heads that once decorated a great water clock and fountain in the Chinese emperor’s Old Summer Palace.

With artist Ai Weiwei, art dealer William Chak, Christie’s specialist Kate Hunt, collector Christopher Bruckner, art investigators Dick Ellis and Arthur Brand and police superintendent Kenneth Didriksen.

Writer and Presenter - Dr Noah Charney
Producer - Caroline Finnigan
Executive Producer - Rosie Collyer
Researcher - Nadia Mehdi
China Producer - Coco Zhao
Sound Designers - David Smith and Tom Berry for Wardour Studios
Music Composer - Nicholas Alexander
Voice Over Artists - Bernard O'Sullivan and Oliver Zheng

A Novel production for BBC Radio 4


MON 21:30 The Smugglers' Trail (m0015vl7)
Smugglers Profit as War Rages

The war in Ukraine has generated new opportunities for smugglers to make money and they have been quick to react. Some of those fleeing their homes have been prepared to pay for safe passage out of the country. And as BBC reporter, Sue Mitchell, and former soldier turned aid worker, Rob Lawrie, discover, the gangs involved are even offering false paperwork to help with visa applications and discounted places for those wanting to cross by dinghy from France to the UK

For vulnerable children in Ukraine the dangers posed by those involved in trafficking are huge and charities are reporting growing concerns about the number of orphans who have disappeared from the system. Rob Lawrie joins a team of US military special operations veterans from Aerial Recovery who are working with the Government to rescue vulnerable children from combat zones. From the orphanages they can then be taken to safe areas where they can be properly processed.

According to Martin Kvernbekk, from the Norwegian branch of the refugee charity, Salam, this wasn't happening at the start of the war, when children dropped at the Poland-Ukraine border by well-meaning organisations were in danger of being targeted by smugglers: “They're very easy prey - they're looking for assistance, so if you're an adult with some candy, food or refuge, they will come with you, they don't know any better.”

He describes how people smugglers wearing reflective vests pretended to belong to organisations helping the relief effort: “The gangs are very advanced - it's big, well-financed networks that do this for a living. They're good at this in peace time,” he says, “Now it's a war, it's chaos, and they're exploiting the fact that there is disorder to be able to snatch more kids and women.”


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m0019r13)
US House Speaker Pelosi to visit Taiwan tomorrow

In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


MON 22:45 Mrs Bridge by Evan S Connell (m0019r15)
Episode 6

Evan S. Connell's Mrs Bridge is an extraordinary tragicomic portrayal of suburban life and one of the classic American novels of the 20th century.

Mrs Bridge, a conservative housewife in Missouri, has three children and a kindly lawyer husband. Her married life begins in the early 1930s – and soon after she and her young family move to a wealthy country club suburb of Kansas City. She spends her time shopping, going to bridge parties and bringing up her children to be pleasant, clean and have nice manners. The qualities that she values above all else. And yet she finds modern life increasingly baffling, her children aren't growing up into the people she expected, and sometimes she has the vague disquieting sensation that all is not well in her life.

In a series of comic, telling vignettes, Evan S. Connell illuminates the narrow morality, confusion, futility and even terror at the heart of a life of plenty.

First published in 1959 it was perhaps overshadowed by the critical attention paid to contemporaries like Philip Roth and John Updike - although Mrs Bridge was a finalist for the National Book Award in that year. Ten years later Connell published Mr Bridge which follows that same events largely from the point of view of Walter Bridge. In 1990, James Ivory directed the film Mr and Mrs Bridge based on both novels and starring Paul Newman and his wife Joanne Woodward. Fans of the book today include the novelist David Nicholls and Tracey Thorne, author and singer.

Read by Fenella Woolgar
Written by Evan S Connell
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (m0019jyf)
Ghosting Caking and Breadcrumbing

Michael Rosen talks to cyber-pyschologist Dr Nicola Fox Hamilton about the new language that has emerged now that so many relationships begin online. She has studied the way people use words and expressions to describe themselves in their dating profiles as well as their experiences of internet romance. She reveals how many of the creative new terms to describe relationships forged this way spring from African American speech and language.
If you want to avoid being ghosted, catfished or bread-crumbed then this is for you.

Producer for BBC Audio Wales and West of England: Maggie Ayre


MON 23:30 You're Dead To Me (p0853185)
Neanderthals

Greg Jenner is joined by the brilliant comedian Tim Minchin and Palaeolithic archaeologist Dr Becky Wragg Sykes as they take us way back in time to visit the mysterious world of Neanderthals. Just who were the Neanderthals? Were they the squat caveman archetypes we’ve come to know in pop culture? Did they really shout “Ug” at the moon? Or have we misunderstood them entirely? Join the team as we discover there is so much more to those handsome, hench beings that walked the Earth before us.



TUESDAY 02 AUGUST 2022

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m0019r17)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 00:30 Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui (m0019qzy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0019r19)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0019r1c)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0019r1f)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m0019r1h)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0019r1k)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Dr Craig Gardiner.

Good morning.

On this day, in 1922 Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone passed away in Nova Scotia, Canada. There’s some debate over who actually invented the device, but Bell is credited with the design patent for a machine capable of transmitting vocal or other sounds telegraphically. US patent number 174, 465 is arguably the most valuable single invention ever registered.

Of course, our phones have come a long way since then: what was in my childhood a heavy piece of equipment hardwired to the wall, has become the smart phone in my pocket.

But while we’ve been quick to develop technology, we’ve not always been so responsible with the quality and reliability of what we actually say. If the rhetoric of political campaigns and celebrity court cases regularly sets dubious standards of veracity and vitriol, so too can how we talk to one another in our more private conversations. It’s not just sticks and stones, it’s words as well that hurt us.

The apostle James once warned his fellow Christians that it was hard to tame a venomous tongue, but more positively the writer of the Bible’s book of Proverbs reminds us that ‘Gracious words are like a honeycomb, they bring sweetness to the soul and health to the body.’

Whether it was on the phone or face to face, hopefully we can all remember a time when someone spoke to us in such a way, a compliment, an affirmation that lifted our spirits and left a good taste in our soul. Such goodness can linger with us for the day, and soon that human longing to communicate will give us the chance to pass the honey on to someone else.

God of all words
Guard what we say
and how we say it,
soften our tongues
that we might bring sweetness to others
and healing to our wounded world
Amen


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m0019r1m)
A new study published today investigates how agri-environment schemes affect crop yields. Do farmers have to choose between producing food and looking after wildlife - or is it possible to successfully do both at once? Caz Graham speaks to the lead author of the report from the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology.

Continuing a week-long look at tenant farming, we hear from farmers in Northumberland who fear for their future as landowners look to other land uses such as tree-planting and rewilding.

A major supermarket is launching an own-brand egg today, which it claims is carbon-neutral. We find out how the hens are farmed, and why their diet is key to their environmental impact.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced in Bristol by Emma Campbell.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0vqb)
Chowchilla

Michael Palin presents the secretive chowchilla from Queensland, Australia. The chowchilla gets its name from its song, which is one of the most distinctive sounds of the coastal rainforest of north-east Queensland. You're not likely to see the bird though because it spends its time skulking on the forest floor. Chowchillas belong to the family known as logrunners because they feed and nest on or near ground-level. They're stout thrush-like birds; the males are dark brown with a white chest and throat, whilst the female's throat is rusty-orange.

Chowchillas have been found to sing with different dialects in different areas. Within say, 50 hectares, all the family groups of pairs and non-breeding younger birds may share the same dialect. But in an adjacent area, the families may assemble some of their song components slightly differently. Over time, their song culture could change and a new dialect would be born.

Producer : Andrew Dawes


TUE 06:00 Today (m0019rj0)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Long History of Argument (m0019rj2)
From Socrates to Social Media

Synthesis

Rory Stewart explores the strange human phenomenon of arguing and why it matters so deeply to our lives in a new series on BBC Radio 4.

Argument became the way in which we answered the deepest questions of philosophy, established scientific rules, and made legal decisions. It was the foundation of our democracies and the way in which we chose the policies for our state.

Rory grew up believing that the way to reach the truth was through argument. He was trained to argue in school, briefly taught classical rhetoric and he became a member of parliament. But the experience of being a politician also showed him how dangerous arguments can be, and how bad arguments can threaten our democracies, provoke division and hide the truth.

In this episode, Rory explores why our democracy and humanity may depend on rediscovering how to argue well.

Producer: Dan Tierney.


TUE 09:30 New Storytellers (m0019rj4)
Sara's Spirit

On the evening of 3rd June 2017, three extremists drove a hired van over London Bridge, mounting the crowded pavement repeatedly before going on a rampage through Borough Market. This attack took eight innocent people's lives, including 21 year old Sara Zelenak.

Sara's Spirit tells the story of a young woman from Brisbane, Australia, who got caught up in the tragedy. Five years on, her parents Julie and Mark are keeping her memory alive, as they navigate the grief of losing their child.

This series of New Storytellers is presenting the winners of the Charles Parker Prize for the Best Student Radio Feature 2022. However, for editorial reasons, the fourth prize winning feature will be broadcast at a later date. So, although Goldsmiths’ College student Anna Budd's feature, Sara's Spirit, was not one of the five winners it was very highly commended by the judging panel and so earns a place in this series. The judges said it was a "very accomplished, professional piece" for its "harrowing and emotionally immersive" exploration of grief and loss. "It ‘didn’t sugar-coat the impact of the tragedy."

Producer: Anna Budd
A Soundscape production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 09:45 Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui (m0019rj6)
The Happy Gathering

Angela Hui grew up behind the counter of her parents’ Chinese takeaway, Lucky Star, in the former mining village of Beddau, Wales.

It opened on the luckiest day of the century, 8 August 1988, an auspicious date with the number eight signifying good wealth, fortune and prosperity in Chinese culture – three key factors needed for a young, growing immigrant family.

On one side of the counter Angela interacts with the takeaway’s loyal staff, Cecilia, Dewi and Lowri. They serve and deliver food lovingly prepped and cooked by Angela’s parents. Regular customers pester Angela at the counter as she tries to do her homework.

Running a Chinese takeaway is hard work and there is tension in the overlapping spaces of home and work, playground and business. Angela and her two brothers, Keen and Jacky, also have to act as go-betweens for their parents when there are language barriers.

But there is also beauty in the rhythm and joy from living in the takeaway and being surrounded by the food of Angela’s home culture.

On the other side of the counter, Angela enjoys family dinners before service, dishes a world away from the simplified, watered-down Western version ordered by the locals - whole steamed sea bass, Cantonese soup, steamed egg, Chinese broccoli with oyster sauce. To them, food is love and food symbolises family.

A blending of her Welsh and Chinese heritage, the takeaway was a place that embodied the dual identities that Angela herself was experiencing.

In this episode, Angela struggles to communicate naturally with her Cantonese speaking parents at home. And when the Hui family go on their weekly trip to Cardiff to meet friends and restock with supplies, Angela’s aunties tease her for not mastering their ancestral tongue.

Read by Priya Hall
Abridged by Anna Magnusson
Produced by Alexandra Quinn
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0019rj8)
Commonwealth Games, Body image and mental health report, Lizzo and Beyonce lyrics, Personality disorders

The Commonwealth Games in Birmingham are underway and for the first time in a major multi-sport event, more medals will be awarded to women than men, with the medal programme confirming a total of 136 events for women compared to 134 for men. Jessica speaks to BBC Sports presenter Clare Balding as well as the first ever female Chef de Mission for Team Scotland, who for the first time have more women competing in their team than men.

Six weeks after pop star Lizzo changed the lyrics of her song because it contained an ableist slur, Beyonce has been criticised for using the same term. In her new song ‘Heated’, which is co-written by hiphop star Drake, the slur is used twice. In a statement, Beyonce said the term wasn't used intentionally in a harmful way, and will be replaced. Hannah Diviney is a writer and Disability Activist from Sydney, who went viral for calling out both Lizzo and Beyonce.

The impact of body image on mental and physical health is "wide-reaching" according to a new wide-ranging report out today by the Health and Social Care Committee which calls for e.g. for the Government to introduce a law so "commercial images" which feature bodies which have been doctored in any way - including changing body proportions or skin tone - are legally required to carry a logo to let viewers know they have been digitally altered. And the Government to speed up the introduction of a promised licensing regime for non-surgical cosmetic procedures to prevent vulnerable people being exploited. Jessica hears from Jeremy Hunt is Chair of the Committee, and Dawn Steele, a patient trustee to the board of the Joint Council For Cosmetic Practitioners.

Penelope Campling is a psychiatrist and psychotherapist. Over the course of her 40-year career, she has seen many changes in the way we treat serious mental illness. She spent twenty years running the NHS personality disorder unit in Leicester. She has now retired from the NHS, still practising as a psychotherapist, and has just published her second book, Don’t Turn Away: Stories of Troubled Minds in Fractured Times.

Presenter: Jessica Creighton
Producer: Dianne McGregor


TUE 11:00 Science Stories (b087p0cy)
Series 4

Jumping Genes

Barbara McClintock's work on the genetics of corn won her a Nobel prize in 1983. Her research on jumping genes challenged the over-simplified picture of chromosomes and DNA that Watson and Crick's discovery has all too often been used to support. During the half century that she worked at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory she became something of a living legend, a pioneer in a time when women weren't expected to take much interest in science. In that story, she made a profound discovery that her male colleagues dismissed for years, leaving her out in the cold until they finally realized that it was true and granted her a belated Nobel Prize.

Philip Ball tells the story of Barbara McLintock's life and work, from her early preference for sports, for solitude, and for intellectual life, that disturbed her parents, to her meticulous research on corn. In conversation with her recent biographer, Dr Nathaniel Comfort of Johns Hopkins University, he explores the facts and the fictions that grew up around her. Philip Ball talks about the legacy of her discovery of jumping genes with Professor Greg Hannon of the Cancer Research UK Institute at Cambridge University, who spent 25 years working in the McLintock Laboratory at Cold Spring Harbor.


TUE 11:30 Techno: A Social History (m0019rjb)
The World

In the final part of this social history, DJ Ash Lauryn explores the disparate contexts where the radical potential of Techno lives on, right now.

The Ukrainian DJ Nastia speaks of the resilience of Kyiv’s cherished club scene – which was born out of the turmoil of the 2013 revolution but for now lies dormant. In the capital of Georgia, Giorgi Kikonishvili speaks of Bassiani, the club that became a headquarters for progressive politics and community organising – until armed police raids threatened the scene’s existence.

Meanwhile in Beirut, long held to be the Middle East’s capital for electronic music, Tala Mordata and other promoters attempt to rebuild after the 2020 explosion destroyed its storied nightclubs. And in Ramallah, fans of Techno go to extreme lengths to commune with like-minded people at parties, and the godmother of Palestinian techno, Sama' Abdulhadi, is jailed for hosting a showcase of local artists at a site of worship.

Produced by Frank Palmer
Sound design by Granny Eats Wolf

A Cup & Nuzzle production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m0019rjd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 You and Yours (m0019rjg)
Call You and Yours - What do you have to do to help your child follow their sporting dream?

What do you have to do to help your child follow their sporting dream?

Sunday's win for England is being described as a breakthrough moment for women in sport - and plenty of other youngsters are being inspired by performances in the Commonwealth Games.

But what are the stresses and strains of helping a son or daughter play their sport? How much do you have to invest in money and time?

What do you have to do to help your child follow their sporting dream?

Email us - youandyours@bbc.co.uk - and add a phone number so we can call you back - or from 11am on Tuesday call us on 03700 100 444.

PRESENTER: WINIFRED ROBINSON

PRODUCER: MIRIAM WILLIAMSON


TUE 12:57 Weather (m0019rjj)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m0019rjl)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Jonny Dymond.


TUE 13:45 The Last Request (m0019rjn)
Episode 2

Laura McDaid is searching for the birth mother of a close friend who died 20 years ago.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m0019r0x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Trust (m001020r)
A New Normal

Second series of Jonathan Hall's comedy drama about an inner city academy school in Salford and how it coped with the pandemic in 2020. Starring Julie Hesmondhalgh.

Episode two - A New Normal.
September 2020. After the chaos of the A Level results, East Salford Academy welcomes back the students. There is going to be a new normal. Rigorous Covid protocols have to be followed. How will they cope with social distancing, classroom bubbles and bottles of cheap hand sanitiser? And that's just the staff.

Yvette ..... Julie Hesmondhalgh
Sir Ken ..... Jonathan Keeble
Tim ..... Ashley Margolis
Joy/Carol ..... Susan Twist
Dhruti ..... Mina Anwar
Chris ..... Jake Ferretti
Candice/Wendy ..... Verity Henry

Producer/Director Gary Brown
A BBC Audio Drama North Production.

With grateful thanks to those who helped with the research-

Tom Barradas Lingard
John Winkley
Isobel Ashmead
Pippa Davies
Pat Thomson


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (m0019r92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Made of Stronger Stuff (p0bjy2pj)
Hair

Psychologist Kimberley Wilson and Dr Xand van Tulleken take a journey around the human body, asking what it can tell us about ourselves and the world around us. In this episode, Kimberley and Xand get to the root of our hair problems.

From the race to grow hair in a dish, to the vast inequalities that have resulted in permanent hair loss, Xand and Kimberley explore the enormous significance we impart on a string of dead cells on our heads.

Producer: Georgia Mills
Researcher: Leonie Thomas
Executive Producer: Robert Nicholson
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (m0019b5l)
The Art of Apologies

Michael Rosen talks to sociolinguist Louise Mullany about all the ways in which we say sorry. From the sympathetic sorry in the face of bad news, to the polite sorry we say to strangers in the street. Via workplace hierarchies, gender differences, and the nitty-gritty of political apologies.

Louise is a Professor of Sociolinguistics at the University of Nottingham and author of 'The Science of Politeness', due out next year.

Produced for BBC Audio Bristol by Becky Ripley


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (m0019rjr)
Pat Nevin on Johan Cruyff

Pat Nevin chooses Johan Cruyff who was part of the Dutch revolution of the 1970s. He burst onto the international stage at the 1974 World Cup with an incredible piece of skill against Sweden later dubbed the 'Cruyff turn'. Cruyff went on to play for Barcelona before retiring young only to be forced to return after some poor business investments wiped out his fortune. He played in the States before returning to coach at his beloved Ajax and Barcelona where he amassed more trophies, steadfastly sticking to his brand of 'total football' and changing how the game was played.

Pat Nevin remembers the gasp of the crowd who witnessed the 'Cruyff turn', and still admires how this thin, intelligent footballer used speed and guile to outwit opponents. But the former Chelsea and Everton great says that it's Cruyff's imprint on the way that football is now played that impresses him most, an influence, Pat says, that can be seen at the top of the Premier League table today with Pep Guardiola's Manchester City playing a version of Dutch 'total football'.

As Pep himself said about his former Barcelona coach, "Johan Cruyff painted the chapel, and Barcelona coaches since merely restore or improve it."

The Dutch journalist and author of 'Johan Cruyff: Always on the Attack' Auke Kok, sheds light on Johan's childhood, his early years as an Ajax player, and how Cruyff's stubborn attitude was both a strength and a weakness throughout his life.

Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Toby Field

Other guests in the new series include the UK government vaccine taskforce head, Kate Bingham; chef Romy Gill; and BAFTA winner Holly Walsh who has picked the cult sixties writer, BS Johnson.


TUE 17:00 PM (m0019rjt)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0019rjw)
Liz Truss backtracks on her public sector pay plan after a Tory backlash


TUE 18:30 Andrew Maxwell Values (m0019rjy)
Series 1

Episode 3

Since the COVID-19 pandemic, we have started to reflect more on our working lives and increasingly question the relative value of different occupations around the UK. Andrew Maxwell investigates why until now we have traditionally valued some jobs above others and what a new understanding of “work” might mean for how we approach our changing world.

This week Andrew considers the status of different jobs and his guest is the political economist, Mark Blyth.

Producer: Richard Morris
Production co-ordinator: Ryan Walker-Edwards

A BBC Studios Production


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m0019r4n)
At Bridge Farm Tony and Helen tell everyone that people were bowled over by the Grey Gables launch event. They’re interrupted by a customer complaining about food missing from the veg boxes – it’s the third complaint today. Tom insists he’d checked the boxes twice, but everyone blames it on his sleep deprivation. When Caitlin brings up the subject of Peggy’s church window, it’s clear no-one’s told Helen about it. Later Tom admits to Helen that he and Natasha were so amazed by the idea they didn’t think about anyone else. Helen feels that Peggy’s implying her children don’t deserve something unique, but that Tom’s do. Tom thinks it’s simply because he’s had twins. He asks Helen not to spoil it for Natasha, who thinks it’s an incredible gift.
Later Tom’s cross with Caitlin when she admits she’s been taking things from the veg boxes – she thought she could help herself. She’s apologetic when Tom asks her to steer clear of farm stuff.
When Pat tells Helen that Tom should’ve told her about the church window, Helen’s more cross with Peggy as it’s so unfair on Henry and Jack. When Pat points out it also affects Peggy’s other grandchildren, Helen admits she’s discovered they’re all really happy for Tom and Natasha and that makes her feel selfish. Pat says she doesn’t always understand Peggy’s actions, but not to let it come between Helen and Tom. Later Pat talks to Tony saying Peggy’s so clumsy in the way she does things. Tony says it’s unintentional and it was a heartfelt gesture. Pat agrees; Peggy will always remain a mystery to her, but no-one could question her love for their family.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m0019rk0)
Disabled-access ticket booking, Writer Will Ashon, Artists Jane Darke and Andrew Tebbs

Disabled-access ticket booking – for concerts, comedy clubs, theatre, festivals, and more. Carolyn Atkinson reports on problems with new initiatives to make access to the arts much easier for disabled people: the big delays to the National Arts Access Card, and inconsistencies in purchasing ‘companion’ tickets.

Will Ashon is a novelist and non-fiction writer whose latest book, The Passengers, is a compilation of voices he recorded with 180 people he came across through chance and random methods – voices who share their hopes, fears and experiences that shaped their lives. Will tells Tom Sutcliffe what the combination of thoughts and tales say about Britain today.

Artists Jane Darke and Andrew Tebbs were inspired by the Marianne North Gallery at Kew - in which the walls are covered with North’s natural history paintings made on her travels around the world. They created something similar, looking at the plants insects and animals of a single small parish in Cornwall, St Eval, where Jane lives. The 100 paintings have been exhibited since June at Kresen Kernow, Cornwall’s new state-of-the-art archive centre in Redruth, and today the artists begin a residency there - with workshops, walks, talks, and films. Jane Darke, Andrew Tebbs and Chloe Phillips, of Kresen Kernow, explain this ambitious project.

Presenter: Tom Sutcliffe
Producer: Harry Parker


TUE 20:00 The Cost of Economic War (m00181ln)
As the fight on NATO’s border has intensified, the West’s response has been to make war with Russia - economic war. Sanctions, not bombs, have been the weapon chosen to take on the Putin regime and Western leaders have devised ever more elaborate tortures for the Rouble.

In light of diminishing appetite for war and financial inducements over the past century, trade and financial sanctions have increasingly become the preferred tool of statecraft employed by countries around the world. But how effective are they?

Author and columnist for The Economist, Duncan Weldon, explores the strengths and weaknesses of economic sanctions. Looking at historical uses over the past 100 years, Duncan examines to what extent and in what scenarios they achieve foreign policy aims. He also reflects on the unintended consequences and the impact on economies. And he considers what the sanctions against Russia, in response to the invasion of Ukraine, mean for the global economy and the future geopolitical landscape.

With Daniel Dresner, Professor of international politics at the Fletcher school of law and diplomacy at Tufts University; Dr Erica Moret, Senior Researcher at the Centre for Global Governance and Humanitarian Studies at the Graduate Institute, Geneva; Nathanael Tilahun, a lawyer and Professor of International Law at University of Coventry specialising in sanctions, security and financial crime; Macroeconomist Rachel Ziemba, founder of Ziemba Insights and adjunct senior fellow at The Center for A New American Security in Washington; and Taban Osman, a Kurdish Iraqi, actor and singer from Sulemani in northern Iraq.

Presenter: Duncan Weldon
Producer: Jac Phillimore
Sound Design and Mix: Rob Speight
Executive Producer: Katherine Godfrey
A Novel production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m0019rk2)
Diabetic macular oedema treatment, The Commonwealth Games

Diabetic macular oedema is a condition that can develop when having type one or type two diabetes. It can impact sight progressively in the form of retinopathy or maculopathy. We hear about a new treatment for the condition, which The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has estimated to benefit around 22,000 people. Bernie Warren has the condition and she tells us about the benefits this drug could have to her life. We also get more information about the condition and the new treatment from Robin Hamilton, who is an Ophthalmic Surgeon at Moorfield’s Eye Hospital.

The Commonwealth Games are underway in Birmingham. They are an integrated games, with both para and able-bodied athletes competing alongside each other. Some visually impaired athletes are included in the mix and so we get a round-up of the medal winners from BBC Sports reporter, Delyth Lloyd. We speak to visually impaired Para-Triathlon gold medallist, Dave Ellis about his win and to Jonny Riall, who is the leader of Team England and also Head of Sport at the British Paralympic Association on the integration of athletes at the Commonwealth Games.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Beth Hemmings
Production Coordinator: William Wolstenholme

Website image description: pictured is a Team England swimmer diving into a pool at the Commonwealth Games. The image is taken using an underwater camera. The swimmer is wearing a red swimsuit and red swimming cap. Yellow and pink bunting hangs in the air over the pool.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (m0019r4t)
Covid waves, Gene therapy for haemophilia B, New uses for old drugs

Smitha Mundasad asks whether we will see waves of Covid – with infections going up and down and then up and down again - forever more. We speak to Elliot whose life has been transformed after a single shot of gene therapy to treat the inherited blood disorder haemophilia B. And Dr Margaret McCartney discusses the accidental discovery of Viagra and how sometimes researchers find new, surprising uses for old medicines.

Produced by Geraldine Fitzgerald.


TUE 21:30 The Long History of Argument (m0019rj2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m0019rk4)
Nancy Pelosi visits Taiwan

In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 Mrs Bridge by Evan S Connell (m0019rk6)
Episode 7

Evan S. Connell's Mrs Bridge is an extraordinary tragicomic portrayal of suburban life and one of the classic American novels of the twentieth century. Mrs Bridge, a conservative housewife in Missouri, has three children and a kindly lawyer husband. Her married life begins in the early 1930s – and soon after she and her young family move to a wealthy country club suburb of Kansas City. she spends her time shopping, going to bridge parties and bringing up her children to be pleasant, clean and have nice manners. The qualities that she values above all else. And yet she finds modern life increasingly baffling, her children aren't growing up into the people she expected, and sometimes she has the vague disquieting sensation that all is not well in her life. In a series of comic, telling vignettes, Evan S. Connell illuminates the narrow morality, confusion, futility and even terror at the heart of a life of plenty.

First published in 1959 it was perhaps overshadowed by the critical attention paid to contemporaries like Philip Roth and John Updike. Although Mrs Bridge was a finalist for the National Book Award in that year. Ten years later Connell published Mr Bridge which follows that same events largely from the point of view of Walter Bridge. In 1990 James Ivory directed the film Mr and Mrs Bridge based on both novels and starring Paul Newman and his wife Joanne Woodward. Fans of the book today include the novelist David Nicholls and Tracey Thorne, author and singer.

Mrs Bridge by Evan S. Connell
Read by Fenella Woolgar
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
The Waters Company for BBC Radio 4


TUE 23:00 Daliso Chaponda: Citizen of Nowhere (m0010gkc)
Series 3

Blame

Episode 1 ‘Blame’

Malawian comedian Daliso Chaponda is back with a third series of his Rose D’Or nominated show where he examines divisive global issues.

Over the course the two previous series Daliso has covered colonialism, slavery, political corruption, charity, immigration, cultural relativism, dictators, and how different countries deal with the sins of their past.

In this first episode of the new series, through comedy routines and guest interviews, Daliso will be tackling the subject of ‘Blame’.

Performer… Daliso Chaponda
Writer… Daliso Chaponda
Guest… Tony Vino
Additional Material… Scott Bennett

Production Coordinator... Mabel Wright
Producer… Carl Cooper

Theme tune - 'Timalira' by Lawi

This is a BBC Studios Production.


TUE 23:30 Bridget Christie: Mortal (m000v7q9)
Life

Episode 2 - Life

Following on from her hugely successful, award-winning previous series – ‘Minds The Gap’ and ‘Utopia’, Bridget now turns her attention to Mortality, covering ‘Birth’, ‘Life’, ‘Death’ and ‘The Afterlife’.

Like many of us forced to work from home during lockdown, Bridget has recorded this series herself in her house, and in her local park, on a pre-sanitised recording device sent to her in the post. Batteries weren’t included. She had to buy them all herself.

In a collection of informative, personal and absurd recordings, she confronts the difficult questions most of us spend our lives avoiding - all whilst being interrupted by cats, bad WiFi, life admin and her own dead self from beyond the grave.

"Does life have meaning?", "How do you live in the moment?", "Why is life like a washing machine cycle?" and "What's that dog barking at?"

If you are mortal, then this is the show for you.

Written and performed by Bridget Christie
With guest appearances from her sister Eileen and her friend Ash.
Producer... Carl Cooper
Sound Mixer... Olga M. Reed

Bridget Christie: Mortal is a BBC Studios Production



WEDNESDAY 03 AUGUST 2022

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m0019rkb)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


WED 00:30 Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui (m0019rj6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0019rkd)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0019rkg)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0019rkj)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m0019rkl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0019rkn)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Dr Craig Gardiner.

Good morning.

Today at Wales’ National Eisteddfod, judges will reveal the winner of the ‘Welsh Learner of the Year’ competition. This year’s contest was launched back on St David’s Day, and since then contestants have been gradually whittled down to just four finalists. They come from different parts of Britain and Ireland, with varying experiences of life, but they each share a passion for learning something new.

Whoever gets the prize, every competitor is already a winner. Fluency, and the opportunity it offers to engage with others will be its own reward. But to reach that goal, each learner will have struggled day by day with vocabulary and grammar. They will have practised linguistic mutations and idiomatic expressions, over and over by themselves. And even as they’ve persevered in private, eventually there comes the day of daring it all in public, speaking beyond the classroom, having conversations with a stranger. With that comes the risk of getting it wrong.

My father used to say, ‘whoever never made a mistake never made much in life’. And that’s just as true for language learning as it is for playing an instrument, hitting a ball, putting up shelves or baking a cake. But it’s also true in our daily struggle to be kinder, more patient, more generous and forgiving people. Of course, we will not always get it right, but as St Paul told the churches of Galatia ‘we should not become weary in doing good, for at the proper time we will reap a harvest if we do not give up.’

Whoever wins the accolade of ‘Welsh Learner of the Year’, congratulations to you for reaping the harvest of your hard work and perseverance. And for the rest of us, whatever our new challenges and opportunities:

Dear God grant us a sustaining passion
when the times are tough,
may we not grow weary
but keep on doing good
and maybe, God, today
will bring its own reward
for never giving up.
Amen


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m0019rkq)
As the world’s leading soil scientists gather in Glasgow, we hear calls for a total re-think of how we measure soil health. According to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation, a third of agricultural soil is “moderately” to “highly” degraded, threatening global food supplies, increasing carbon emissions and reducing its capacity to hold water. But how do scientists evaluate the health of soil - and is the way they’ve been using the best one?

As the Environment Agency declares July to have been the driest in England on record since 1935, two farmers in Suffolk tell us how their farms are affected. Is planting into dry ground worthwhile, and should they invest in new irrigation systems?

And all this week we are talking about the issues faced by tenant farmers. Today we're in Gloucestershire with pig farmer Helen Wade, who would like to share her tenanted land with a new farmer.

Presented by Caz Graham
Produced in Bristol by Natalie Donovan


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0m9x)
Laughing Kookaburra

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Sir David Attenborough presents Australia's laughing kookaburra. At 45cm the laughing kookaburra is one of the world's largest kingfishers. Native to south and eastern Australia, they have now been introduced to Western Australia and parts of New Zealand. Although they do catch fish, they hunt mainly on land where they eat reptiles, small mammals and invertebrates. The cacophony of loud hooting laughs from which they get their Aboriginal name, is often produced by several birds in chorus. The cackling call is one of the few exotic bird sounds that is recognised around the world: a captive kookaburra named Jacko became a radio celebrity in Australia through his ability to break into that laughing call on demand. By the time of his death in 1939 he was one of the best known birds in the world.

Producer : Andrew Dawes


WED 06:00 Today (m0019r3x)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Sideways (m0019r3z)
28. Exiting the Bunker

A pigeon sparks a spy hunt. The clock is ticking and the bunker is calling.

In this final episode of our four part nuclear series, Matthew Syed examines the current nuclear landscape. In this complex, multiplayer context how do we create a safer world?

We begin in Kashmir, the disputed territory between India and Pakistan, where mutual suspicion has led to nuclear expansion and a delicate balance of power. With our sights understandably on the Ukraine crisis, Matthew argues that while our current nuclear ecosystem persists, there could be other flashpoints that we’re not paying enough attention to.

Matthew enters the worrying world of nuclear modelling and hears about research that suggests the threshold for catastrophic nuclear damage is lower than we might think. And we’re taken down into the bunker to understand why some people believe safety really lies in their own hands.

But is bunkering down the solution? And is planning for the worst actually a hopeful act - you are planning for there to be a world to re-join in the end?

As our series ends, Matthew asks whether we can reconcile different ideas about how to contain nuclear weapons, wake up and regain agency, to chart a path to a safer future.


Guest list:
SJ Beard, Academic Programme Manager at the Cambridge Centre for Existential Risk
Dr Annie Waqar, Academic Consultant, UK & South Asia and nuclear arms control researcher
Bradley Garrett, author of Bunker: Building for the End Times and Assistant Professor of Geography at University College Dublin
Professor Brian Toon, University of Colorado.
Paul Ingram, Academic Programme Manager at the Cambridge Centre for Existential Risk
Beatrice Fihn, Executive Director of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons
Sir Lawrence Freedman, Emeritus professor of War Studies at King’s College London and nuclear strategy expert.

Presenter: Matthew Syed
Producer: Pippa Smith
Researcher: Nadia Mehdi
Series editor: Katherine Godfrey
Sound design and mix: Rob Speight
Theme tune by Ioana Selaru
A Novel production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 09:30 Four Thought (m0019r41)
Meeting Up

Laura Simpson argues that online meetings have good for individuals and companies, and that we should be wary of returning to the status quo.

The meeting, says Laura, is the fundamental unit of white collar working life. And in the last couple of years it's undergone a revolution - out have gone the suits, glass tables and rigid hierarchy; in have come moments of vulnerability, the hand raise function, and unannounced visits from children. It's happened in plain sight, but its consequences have been little discussed. Laura is a Global Director at advertising and marketing company, McCann Worldgroup. As she shares stories from some of the meetings she has been in, she explains why she believes this change has created a re-imagining of what meetings could be, and a rebalancing of power within them - with more people, and in particular more junior people and those who previously felt marginalised, empowered to contribute.

Producer: Giles Edwards


WED 09:45 Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui (m0019r5v)
Hong Kong

Angela Hui grew up behind the counter of her parents’ Chinese takeaway, Lucky Star, in the former mining village of Beddau, Wales.

It opened on the luckiest day of the century, 8 August 1988, an auspicious date with the number eight signifying good wealth, fortune and prosperity in Chinese culture – three key factors needed for a young, growing immigrant family.

On one side of the counter Angela interacts with the takeaway’s loyal staff, Cecilia, Dewi and Lowri. They serve and deliver food lovingly prepped and cooked by Angela’s parents. Regular customers pester Angela at the counter as she tries to do her homework.

Running a Chinese takeaway is hard work and there is tension in the overlapping spaces of home and work, playground and business. Angela and her two brothers, Keen and Jacky, also have to act as go-betweens for their parents when there are language barriers.

But there is also beauty in the rhythm and joy from living in the takeaway and being surrounded by the food of Angela’s home culture.

On the other side of the counter, Angela enjoys family dinners before service, dishes a world away from the simplified, watered-down Western version ordered by the locals - whole steamed sea bass, Cantonese soup, steamed egg, Chinese broccoli with oyster sauce. To them, food is love and food symbolises family.

A blending of her Welsh and Chinese heritage, the takeaway was a place that embodied the dual identities that Angela herself was experiencing.

In this episode, the Hui family take a summer holiday to Hong Kong to visit family and stock up on restaurant supplies. It’s unusual for Angela to spend time with her family outside the takeaway and the change in pace means she sees her parents in different ways.

Read by Priya Hall
Abridged by Anna Magnusson
Produced by Alexandra Quinn
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0019r45)
Euros 22 legacy, Kansas and abortion rights, Dance music and women, Sam Smith, Juliette Pochin

Kansas is the first state in the US to decide in a referendum to protect abortion rights in a major victory for pro-choice groups. What impact could this have across the rest of America after the overturning of Roe vs Wade? Professor Fiona De Londras, Chair of Global Legal Studies at Birmingham Law School updates us.

The Lionesses win is still being celebrated, with thousands gathering in Trafalgar Square on Monday to celebrate. The women’s game, however, has a history of being dramatically underfunded compared to the men’s and currently 37% of schools don’t offer girls’ football in PE. To change this, the government has announced a £230 million investment into improving grassroots football… but will it work? Former English international footballer Rachel Yankey and Francesca Brown, the founder and chief executive of Goals4Girls discuss their hopes for women’s football and the lasting legacy of the Euro win.

We’re looking at dance music on the programme today. A new report has found that just 5% of dance music in the UK charts has a female as the lead artist. The report also looks at gender equality issues at festivals, and how ‘The Male Gaze’ places pressure on women in the industry. The Radio 1 DJ Jaguar joins Jessica, alongside Nicola Davies, the report’s lead author.

Sam Smith was the first, and youngest woman to ever run a stockbroking company in the UK, and she often found herself the only woman in a room or trading floor. She's one of just nine female CEOs of companies in the FTSE 100 index, and has decided to step down from her role at the firm she founded FinnCap Group PLC. So what are her reflections on how things have changed for women in the 24 years since she joined the world of finance?

Last year she turned 50 - at the same time her daughter left home for university. Thrown by how much it affected her, Juliette Pochin, a record producer working with artists ranging from Alfie Boe through to Harry Styles and the London Symphony Orchestra, has come out from behind the studio and written a cabaret show Music, Mayhem and a Mezzo. She is making her debut at the Edinburgh Fringe from the 5th to the 13th August.

Presenter: Jessica Creighton
Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Interviewed Guest: Professor Fiona de Londras
Interviewed Guest: Rachel Yankey
Interviewed Guest: Francesca Brown
Interviewed Guest: Jaguar
Interviewed Guest: Nicola Davies
Interviewed Guest: Sam Smith
Interviewed Guest: Juliette Pochin


WED 11:00 The Silent Mind (m0019r11)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Princess (p0cj3qch)
Kit De Waal on Sarah Forbes Bonetta

Author Kit De Waal and TV presenter and journalist Zeinab Badawi explore the extraordinary story of Sarah Forbes Bonetta. The 6 year old West African girl, orphaned by King Dahomey and taken to his court, where a British Naval Captain bargained to take her back to England. There she was presented as a gift to Queen Victoria and entered high society, where she was called "the African princess".

Produced by Audio Always
Producer: Ailsa Rochester
Editor: Jo Meek
Sound: Tom Rowbotham


WED 12:00 News Summary (m0019rhf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 You and Yours (m0019r4d)
Pawnbrokers, Teeth whitening at home, Grain

More people are using pawnbrokers as a quick source of emergency cash. The country's largest pawnbrokers say lending is up 40 percent on pre-pandemic levels. It's been estimated that around 350,000 people a year use pawnbrokers services. We hear from one couple who have pawned their television set in order to get food and pay their electricity meter.

Are you considering paying hundreds - if not thousands - of pounds for that perfect 'Love Island' smile? You might want to tread carefully. More than two thirds of 18-34 years are willing to pay thousands of pounds every year to have their teeth aligned, and across social media you see celebrities and influencers promoting procedures like teeth whitening, veneers or Invisalign. We hear from the clients of one company who are still not smiling after the service they received.

We also look at the effect of the war in Ukraine on UK goods supplies. As the first shipment of grain arrives in Turkey from Ukraine, we assess which companies and products are suffering in the UK as a result of grain being blockaded since February. We hear from a gin distiller who is struggling with the cost of ethanol, which is made from wheat and a key component in the making of gin.

And many customers of energy firms will no doubt have had an issue with their energy company at some time...but how would you feel if it went on for FOUR YEARS? We hear from the son of a woman in her 90s who was wrongly declared dead by her bank, causing all her payments to be frozen. Four years on, the son is still trying to get direct debits re-activated as her energy bills stack up to thousands of pounds.

PRESENTER: Peter White
PRODUCER: Craig Henderson


WED 12:57 Weather (m0019r4g)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m0019r4j)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Jonny Dymond.


WED 13:45 The Last Request (m0019r4l)
Episode 3

Laura McDaid is searching for the birth mother of a close friend who died 20 years ago.


WED 14:00 The Archers (m0019r4n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (m000lf9s)
Graveyards in My Closet

By Daf James

When Daf was 11 he made a momentous discovery about his grandparents. The true story of a dark family secret.

in 1931 Daf’s Nan was five years old; her father took her to her grandparents’ house in the mountains of North Wales and told her that her mother was dead. He then left her there and never came back. This event sparked a lifetime of secrets that reverberated across the last century. Today, Daf wrestles with the story; but he’s not sure whose story it is, where it truly starts or what any of it means. Armed with a cast of actors, and the help of his dad, Daf sets out to explore the skeletons in his family’s closet.

Daf James is an award-winning playwright, screenwriter, composer and performer working in both English and Welsh. As a screenwriter he is part of the 2019 BBC TV Drama Writers’ Programme. Graveyards in My Closet is a follow-up to his Radio 4 drama My Mother Taught Me How to Sing.

Narrator …. Daf James
Little Daf …. Fflyn Edwards
Mam Aberteifi …. Siw Hughes
Hanna …. Carys Eleri
Grandad …. Ifan Huw Dafydd
Douglas …. Himself
Nigel Owens.... Himself

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


WED 15:00 Surviving the Cost of Living (m0019r4q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


WED 15:30 Inside Health (m0019r4t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Sideways (m0019r3z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m0019r4w)
It's... another true crime show!

Crime and true crime has always been big business in films and books. But when Serial exploded onto the scene almost eight years ago it launched a whole new genre; the true crime podcast. Now with the major broadcasters and streaming services involved, it seems like we just can’t get enough of solved and unsolved crimes.

And it’s not just criminal cases - this week we’ve seen the insatiable interest surrounding the Wagatha Christie verdict, the TV rights are already sold.

TV cameras are also now allowed into criminal courts for sentencing right across the UK.

So today we take a look at how the public appetite for true crime has led to one of the biggest production booms in years, and ask where it might lead.

Mark Williams-Thomas is an investigative reporter, former detective and new global head of investigations for the regional publisher Newsquest.
Suruthi Bala is co-host of the Redhanded podcast which tells the stories of an incredible range of criminal cases and unusual mysteries from around the world.
Will Hanrahan is co-founder of First Look TV, a production company that specializes in True Crime.
Persephone Bridgman Baker is a partner with the legal firm Carter-Ruck.
Abi Clarke is the host of the 'It's... Wagatha Christie' podcast and also a huge True Crime fan.

Presenter: Datshiane Navanayagam
Producer: Helen Fitzhenry


WED 17:00 PM (m0019r4y)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0019r52)
China warplanes enter Taiwan airspace, after Nancy Pelosi ends her visit to the island


WED 18:30 Anneka Has Issues (m0019r54)
Series 1

Death

Anneka Rice has led a fascinating and adventure-filled life. In this new stand-up series, she examines four tricky issues that are of particular importance to her. Bringing insight and a refreshingly eccentric but practical mindset to these sometimes taboo subjects she'll explain how her life has been shaped by her background and experiences.

Anneka needs to decide what's best to do with her parents' ashes and this prompts a deep dive into one of our most difficult and unexplored areas of life. Something that we will all, without doubt, experience but are so reluctant to talk about.

Producer: Alison Vernon-Smith
Production Coordinator: Katie Baum, Beverly Tagg
A BBC Studios Production


WED 19:00 The Archers (m0019r56)
When Tracy asks if there’s been any more gossip about the post box fire, Susan quickly changes the subject. Susan thinks Tracy looks tired and says what made the work bearable for Emma at the chicken factory was the mates; they never stopped laughing. It’s Tracy’s turn to change the subject. Oliver appears and broaches the subject of Brad’s Maths summer school. There’s another one at Christmas – he’d like to pay Brad’s expenses. When Tracy declares she not a charity case, Oliver says it was his fault Brad lost the harvest work. He doesn’t blame Tracy for losing trust in him, but Brad has so much potential, and nothing should get in the way of that. Tracy’s taken aback and agrees to think about it. When Oliver asks how her job’s going she says it’s fine.
At Ambridge Hall, Adil comments it’s a shame Justin missed the Grey Gables launch event. Justin tries to engage Adil in possible partnership options between Grey Gables and The Stables. But Adil’s only half listening, noticing that Ruby doesn’t look right. He suggests that Justin ring the vets. When Justin tells Alistair that Ruby’s really not well, Alistair agrees to see Ruby before he closes up. Adil drives Justin there. It’s bad news – there’s a tumour on Ruby’s spleen, which can’t be removed until tomorrow because Ruby needs a blood transfusion first. When Adil asks if Justin’s ok, Justin covers saying he’s fine, it’s Lilian who’ll be upset. Supportive Adil suggests getting back to Ambridge Hall for dinner, but Justin’s lost his appetite.


WED 19:15 Front Row (m0019r58)
The National Eisteddfod of Wales, Ted Gioia on Duke Ellington, musician Carolina Eyck performs

Huw Stephens reports from the National Eisteddfod of Wales in Tregaron, Ceredigion, talking to Archdruid Myrddin ap Dafydd, winner of this year’s Novel Prize Meinir Pierce Jones, and folk singer Owen Shiers.

In 1965 the jury recommended that the Pulitzer Prize for Music should be awarded to the jazz composer and band-leader Duke Ellington. But he did not receive the honour. The music historian Ted Gioia has started a petition calling for him to receive it posthumously now.

Carolina Eyck brings the eight seasons of Lapland’s Sami people to the Proms, courtesy of a concerto written for her and her instrument - the theremin. She talks to Shahidha about the joy of playing a musical instrument that has fascinated audiences since its creation just over a century ago and that she plays with just the movement of her hands in the air.

Presenter: Shahidha Bari
Producer: Julian May

Image: The National Eisteddfod of Wales Photographer credit: Alun Gaffey


WED 20:00 Behind the Crime (m0019r5b)
Behind the Crime: Chris

As a society, we send close to 100,000 people to prison each year. Criminal behaviour costs the country around £60 billion every year, according to Home Office research.

Is it possible to prevent crime by understanding the root causes of offending behaviour?

Sally Tilt and Dr Kerensa Hocken are forensic psychologists who work in prisons.

Their role is to help people in prison to look at the harm they’ve caused to other people, understand why it happened and work out how to make changes to prevent further harm after they’ve been released.

In Behind the Crime, they take the time to understand the life of someone whose crimes have led to harm and, in some cases, imprisonment.

In this opening episode they talk to Chris, who received a prison sentence for a reckless arson. He was released in 2017.

On the face of it, Chris was a drug abuser with a track record of violent offences and robberies. In this remarkable interview, he describes himself as a ‘one-man crime wave’.

The job of the forensic psychologists is to dig deep into Chris’s story, to understand the sequence of external influences that got Chris to the point where he was causing harm to himself, to others and to society as a whole.

Today, Chris has built a career for himself as a printer and a poet. He works for The Archer Project, a charity that supports homeless people in Sheffield.

For details of organisations that can provide help and support, visit bbc.co.uk/actionline


WED 20:45 Four Thought (m0019r41)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 Made of Stronger Stuff (p0bjy2pj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 The Media Show (m0019r4w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m0019r5j)
Chinese warplanes enter Taiwan air defence zone

In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


WED 22:45 Mrs Bridge by Evan S Connell (m0019r5l)
Episode 8

Evan S. Connell's Mrs Bridge is an extraordinary tragicomic portrayal of suburban life and one of the classic American novels of the twentieth century. Mrs Bridge, a conservative housewife in Missouri, has three children and a kindly lawyer husband. Her married life begins in the early 1930s – and soon after she and her young family move to a wealthy country club suburb of Kansas City. she spends her time shopping, going to bridge parties and bringing up her children to be pleasant, clean and have nice manners. The qualities that she values above all else. And yet she finds modern life increasingly baffling, her children aren't growing up into the people she expected, and sometimes she has the vague disquieting sensation that all is not well in her life. In a series of comic, telling vignettes, Evan S. Connell illuminates the narrow morality, confusion, futility and even terror at the heart of a life of plenty.

First published in 1959 it was perhaps overshadowed by the critical attention paid to contemporaries like Philip Roth and John Updike. Although Mrs Bridge was a finalist for the National Book Award in that year. Ten years later Connell published Mr Bridge which follows that same events largely from the point of view of Walter Bridge. In 1990 James Ivory directed the film Mr and Mrs Bridge based on both novels and starring Paul Newman and his wife Joanne Woodward. Fans of the book today include the novelist David Nicholls and Tracey Thorne, author and singer.

Mrs Bridge by Evan S. Connell
Read by Fenella Woolgar
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
The Waters Company for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:00 Tom Mayhew Is Benefit Scum (m0019r5n)
Series 2

These Boots Are Made For Working

Comedian Tom Mayhew and his tiny Mum explore jobs, life and ambition. What does it mean to have a successful life and is it even possible when there’s a cost of living crisis?

Tom Mayhew Is Benefit Scum is an autobiographical stand-up series where the comedian shares stories about his life growing up working class and his time on benefits. The show takes a wry, sideways look at the prejudices that people have towards benefits claimants and turns those assumptions on their head.

Written and Performed by Tom Mayhew
Featuring Chris Cantrill
Additional Material – Olivia Phipps
Production Coordinator – Katie Baum
Producer – Benjamin Sutton
A BBC Studios Production.


WED 23:15 Welcome to the Neighbourhood (m0019r5q)
Ep. 6: James Acaster

Jayde Adams and guest James Acaster dive into the feisty world of community apps and messageboards, sifting through the angry neighbourhood bins to find disgruntled comedy gold.

From biggest beefs to weirdest news, Jayde discovers a hotbed of (largely unintentional) hilarity with graffiti-daubed wheelie bins, stray cats, e-scooters and more.

Jayde and the production team would like to hear about what's riling up the neighbours around Britain. Are your groups kicking off? Listeners can submit screenshots of the funniest and freakiest posts and threads to welcometotheneighbourhood@bbc.co.uk.

Presenter: Jayde Adams
Producer: Cornelius Mendez

An unusual production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:30 Alex Edelman's Peer Group (m000w4t0)
Series 4

America As It Is Now

When Alex Edelman first heard about the Coronavirus he was on tour in the UK. Coming back to the US and enduring lockdowns, the complete destruction of his livelihood and the tail-end of the Trump presidency, he talks about the ways he has changed, how America has changed with him and how he got caught up in a little election of his own.

Written by Alex Edelman and Max Davis.

With special thanks to
Adam Brace
Tasha Dhanraj
Rajiv Karia
Alfie Brown
Mike Birbiglia
and
Danny Jolles

Produced by Sam Michell

It is a BBC Studios Production



THURSDAY 04 AUGUST 2022

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m0019r5s)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


THU 00:30 Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui (m0019r5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0019r5x)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0019r5z)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0019r61)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m0019r63)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0019r65)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Dr Craig Gardiner.

Good morning.

‘If anyone would strike you on the right cheek, turn the other to them too’. So said Jesus long ago. But Christians have often struggled with his challenge for nonviolence. Tregaron town, home to this year’s Welsh National Eisteddfod is a sympathetic location for conceiving patterns of life beyond violence. Not only was it home to Henry Richard, Wales’ own ‘apostle of peace’, but down the road at Llangeitho, is the birthplace of Annie Jane Hughes-Griffiths.

Annie’s story is inspiring, but it lay hidden and almost forgotten until just a few years ago, when her diary was re-discovered. It records her journey to the United States in the aftermath of World War 1 where she and some friends encouraged America to join the League of Nations and bring about what they called a ‘heritage of a warless world.’

Annie brought with her a staggering petition from almost 400,000 Welsh women of peace. But despite 9 million Americans standing in solidarity with their purpose, the plan did not succeed.

But none of that invalidates Annie’s peaceful purpose. Indeed, some of her hopes found their way into the new United Nations. The ongoing conflicts between countries, just like clashes with neighbours and even wrestlings with our conscience, makes it even more important that her story and other hidden stories of peace-making are recovered, celebrated and re-enacted.

Such hidden histories stretch back into the days of Jesus. His exhortation to turn the other cheek wasn’t advocating passivity in the face of conflict, but like Annie and those women from Wales, he was offering people creative and peaceable ways to overcome what is wrong in the world.

Imaginative God,
Reveal to us now
Your hidden ways of peace
And forgotten histories of grace
So that we may live beyond
the shadows of our anger
and the verdicts of the sword
Amen


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m0019r67)
Farm Payment extension, Short farm tenancies, Seasonal worker folk song

Farmers who currently get the highest level of government support for looking after the environment have been told they will be able to carry those schemes over for a further five years. We ask if that's good news, or if it could mean more delays for farmers transferring to the new Environmental Land Management schemes.

We continue our look into Tenant Farming - today we hear concerns that farmers signed up for short tenancies could find applying for those new environmental protection schemes more difficult. Fiona Clampin meets Lewis Steer in Dartmoor.

And we hear a new folk song that's been written to pay tribute to migrant seasonal workers. It was commissioned by researchers from the University of Leeds and Oxford who are running a project called 'Feeding the Nation' to track the experiences of workers throughout the 2020 and 2021 harvests.

Presented by Caz Graham
Produced in Bristol by Natalie Donovan


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04sxv25)
Red-necked Nightjar

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the nocturnal red-necked nightjar of the Spanish countryside. Like others in the family, red-necked nightjars are nocturnal birds which feed on large insects, snapping them up with huge bristle-lined mouths. A summer migrant, the red-necked nightjar breeds mainly in Spain, Portugal and North Africa. It is closely related to the common European nightjar, but it sounds very different. By day they hide on the ground among scrub where their cryptic patterns provide excellent camouflage. They're the colour of mottled bark and as you'd expect from their name, have a rusty-red collar. As the sun sets, they emerge from their hiding places to glide and turn on slender wings through scrub and pinewoods, occasionally warning rivals by clapping their wings together over their backs with a sound like a pistol-shot. Between bouts of moth-chasing, they settle on a pine branch and pour forth their repetitive, but atmospheric song.

Producer : Andrew Dawes


THU 06:00 Today (m0019rbt)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 Positive Thinking (m0019rbw)
A solution to climate change inaction?

Sangita Myska continues her search for the world’s brightest ideas that might make Britain better. Each week, we hear from a different innovator, trying to solve a different problem – and then stress test their idea with a panel of leading experts.

Britons are facing political upheaval, economic shock and a cost of living crisis. Some environmentalists fear this has pushed a bigger, existential threat off the agenda - climate change.

In this episode of Positive Thinking, could our innovator have a solution to help reinvigorate the climate debate?

Sangita meets Anab Jain from Superflux, a creative studio that makes art installations and films that tackle big policy problems, especially climate change. Her aim is to give decision-makers and the public a visceral experience of what the future could be like if they don’t act now – or the positive future we could have if they do.

Can ‘feeling’ the future create meaningful action to solve the climate crisis?

Our expert panel:
Tom Burke, the chairman and founding director of the think tank E3G – Third Generation Environmentalism.
Olivia Laing, writer, critic, former environmental activist and author of Funny Weather: Art in an Emergency.
Per Espen Stoknes, psychologist, former Green Party MP in Norway, and author of What We Think About When We Try Not To Think About Global Warming.

Producer: Eve Streeter
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


THU 09:30 The Climate Tipping Points (m001812w)
4. Antarctica

Justin Rowlatt discusses how close we are to triggering an irreversible collapse of the West Antarctic ice sheet, which could cause floods in every coastal city, from London to Tokyo, in the next two to three centuries. In this series, he discovers how global warming may trigger irreversible changes to our planet.
Producer: Laurence Knight


THU 09:45 Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui (m0019rdc)
The Customers

Angela Hui grew up behind the counter of her parents’ Chinese takeaway, Lucky Star, in the former mining village of Beddau, Wales.

It opened on the luckiest day of the century, 8 August 1988, an auspicious date with the number eight signifying good wealth, fortune and prosperity in Chinese culture – three key factors needed for a young, growing immigrant family.

On one side of the counter Angela interacts with the takeaway’s loyal staff, Cecilia, Dewi and Lowri. They serve and deliver food lovingly prepped and cooked by Angela’s parents. Regular customers pester Angela at the counter as she tries to do her homework.

Running a Chinese takeaway is hard work and there is tension in the overlapping spaces of home and work, playground and business. Angela and her two brothers, Keen and Jacky, also have to act as go-betweens for their parents when there are language barriers.

But there is also beauty in the rhythm and joy from living in the takeaway and being surrounded by the food of Angela’s home culture.

On the other side of the counter, Angela enjoys family dinners before service, dishes a world away from the simplified, watered-down Western version ordered by the locals - whole steamed sea bass, Cantonese soup, steamed egg, Chinese broccoli with oyster sauce. To them, food is love and food symbolises family.

A blending of her Welsh and Chinese heritage, the takeaway was a place that embodied the dual identities that Angela herself was experiencing.

In this episode, the Hui family enjoy interacting with their favourite customers but others are intent on singling the family out; life growing up in a takeaway is far from peaceful.

Read by Priya Hall
Abridged by Anna Magnusson
Produced by Alexandra Quinn
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0019rc0)
Manipulating body images in ads. National Poet of Wales Hanan Issa . Abortion stories. Nancy Pelosi Taipei visit.

Last week we talked about the Spanish equality ministry’s summer campaign promoting body positivity on the beach featuring diverse women of different shapes and sizes. But the campaign has received a lot of criticism since as it used multiple women’s images without their permission. We hear from one, Juliet Fitzpatrick who had a double mastectomy, who believes her face was manipulated and put onto the body of another woman - who had only one of her breasts removed.

US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's controversial visit to Taipei in the face of warnings from Beijing. Pelosi has hinted she’d attracted China’s annoyance not for becoming the highest ranking US official to visit Taiwan in a quarter century, but because she’s a woman. Nancy Soderberg is an American foreign policy strategist and former US ambassador to the UN. And we are also joined by Isabel Hilton, the founder of China Dialogue. Good morning

Poetry is the space where I go to make sense of the world' - the the words of Hanan Issa an Iraqi-Welsh poet from Cardiff who was recently appointed as the next National Poet of Wales. She joins Jessica to explore some of the themes which influence her work and talk about what the new role means to her.

Since Roe v Wade was overturned in the US more women are telling their stories but secrecy and shame still surrounds abortion. In 2019 we asked you ‘have you had an abortion? How did you feel about it then and how do you feel about it now? Over the past few week's we've given you the opportunity to hear some of the stories again. Today in the fourth episode of the series we hear from a woman in her 60's we are calling "Alison".

And Chrysta Bilton talks to us about her new book Book - A Normal Family: The Surprising Truth About My Crazy Childhood (And How I Discovered 35 New Siblings)

Presenter Jessica Creighton
Producer Beverley Purcell
PHOTO CREDIT; Sue Lacey


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (m0019rc2)
Ukraine: Collaboration and Resistance

Ukrainian forces have launched a counteroffensive to retake Kherson, the largest city captured by Russia in this year's invasion. But the occupiers are redoubling their efforts to integrate the city and surrounding region into Russia - and they need the help of local collaborators. A few Ukrainians are eagerly serving the invaders. But many key workers - teachers, doctors and other state employees - are forced into a cruel choice. They must agree to work according to Russian rules, betraying their country - or else lose their jobs. Tim Whewell reports on life behind Russian lines in Kherson - and talks to some of those who've thrown in their lot with the occupiers, including the eccentric former journalist and fish inspector who's now deputy head of the region's Russian-backed administration.


THU 11:30 Cover Story (m0019rc4)
A deep dive into a song and its place in the story of two artists.

'A Foggy Day' was written by Gershwin for a 1937 film and has been recorded by some of the greatest singers of our times - but it's through Judy Garland that Rufus Wainwright got to know the song and decided to create his own version of it.

For Radio 4 Rufus takes the song apart, exploring how it works, and reveals how he approaches his own performance of it.

Contributors include pianist Jacob Mann, and Judy Garland biographer John Fricke, who tells the story of Judy Garland's version, and explores the significance of 'A Foggy Day' in the setlist for her lauded Carnegie Hall concert in 1961 and of the concert as a turning point in her life.

Also featuring Dr Karen McNally, Reader in American Film, Television and Cultural History at London Metropolitan University, and jazz singer, composer and conductor Emma Smith.

Produced by Megan Jones for BBC Audio Wales and West


THU 12:00 News Summary (m0019rm4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 You and Yours (m0019rc8)
Gap Finders - Kate Griggs

Today's gap finder is Kate Griggs. She is an author, a campaigner and the founder and Chief Executive of the charity Made By Dyslexia.
Kate believes that Dyslexic Thinking should be harnessed as a superpower for the way it can be creative and disruptive in the workplace.
She has backing from Microsoft. Sir Richard Branson, Orlando Bloom and Keira Knightley are fans.

Kate Griggs has been shifting the narrative on dyslexia and educating people on its strengths since 2004. Dyslexic herself and having been surrounded by family members who also are dyslexic, she's been surrounded by 'Dyslexic Thinking’ her whole life.

Kate is also the author of two Amazon #1 best-selling books published by Penguin Random House, a children’s book Xtraordinary People and her new book for adults, THIS is Dyslexia.

Her campaign work has helped lead the charge to disrupt the world’s thinking around dyslexia, which she believes is vital for the workplace of the future and what employers are looking for. Her and the charity's main objective is to transform the way workplaces, schools, and society sees dyslexia.

PRESENTER: WINIFRED ROBINSON

PRODUCER: JAY UNGER


THU 12:32 Sliced Bread (m0019rcb)
Paint

We watch paint dry for you to find out if pricey paint is worth it.

Domestic interior wall paint comes in many different pots, colours, types and price points. However some claim the extra pennies mean they’re not only better quality and offer a better finish, but that they’re better for the environment too.

Listener Emily got in touch on WhatsApp after she bought a house that needs redecorating. She has six children, two dogs, two tortoises, two ducks and five chickens, so is very much in need of a paint that will offer good coverage, but be wipeable, and durable too, and wants to know if she needs to pay more to get that?

She also wanted to know about VOCs – Volatile Organic Compounds – that the expensive paints say they don’t contain, and if she buys a cheaper paint will any of these VOCs harm her kids and the environment?

Greg Foot finds this out by speaking to a paint inspector, and testing out differently priced paints with a painter and decorator to find out which ones meet the promises they’re making.

This series, we’re testing your suggested wonder-products. If you’ve seen an ad, trend or fad and wonder if there’s any evidence to back up a claim, drop us an email to sliced.bread@bbc.co.uk or you can send us a voice note to our new WhatsApp number: 07543 306807

PRESENTER: Greg Foot
PRODUCER: Kate Holdsworth


THU 12:57 Weather (m0019rcd)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m0019rcg)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Jonny Dymond.


THU 13:45 The Last Request (m0019rcj)
Episode 4

Laura McDaid is searching for the birth mother of a close friend who died 20 years ago.


THU 14:00 The Archers (m0019r56)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (m000m56z)
Agatha Christie’s Absent in the Spring

Famous for her ingenious crime books and plays, Agatha Christie also wrote about crimes of the heart under the name of Mary Westmacott. Absent In The Spring, written under that name, is the book that Christie cites in her autobiography as the most complete of all her works.

Set in 1934, it is the story of a woman, Joan Scudamore, who unexpectedly becomes stranded in a Mesopotamian way station when returning from a visit to her daughter in Baghdad. The sudden solitude compels her to look back over her married life in rural England. The barren heat of the desert is contrasted against the lush greenery of her West Country home as she digs deeper into her emotional memories and uncovers incidents that have lain buried in her psyche for many years.

She begins to put together a picture of her life that both frightens and appalls her in equal measure. She returns to England, determined to change her attitude to love and married life. The conclusion to the story is as unexpected as it is truthful.

Cast:
Joan Scudamore ... Harriet Walter
Barbara Wray/ Myrna Randolph ... Amy Morgan
Ali/ William Wray ... Nabil Elouahabi
Blanche Haggard ... Geraldine Alexander
Rodney Scudamore/Col. Sherston ... James Fleet
Lesley Sherston/ Miss Gilbey ... Hilary Maclean

Written by Agatha Christie as Mary Westmacott
Adapted by Malcolm McKay

Composer: Nick Bicât
Sound Designer: Leon Chambers

Directed by Catherine Bailey
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4


THU 15:00 Open Country (m0019rcl)
Radical Essex

Emily Knight uncovers an unexpectedly radical story, hidden in the Essex countryside. In the 1940s, men and women horrified by the violence of war, disconnected, disillusioned and despondent, began to turn to the land - and each other - for healing. A new way of life was needed, and a new movement sprang up. Part pacifist philosophy, part radical Christianity, part utopian idealism, the Back-to-the-Land movement of the '40s and '50s saw groups of people coming together to take over pockets of farmland, working collectively, sharing the hardships and the joys of communal living.

But this isn't just a farming movement. It's a story in which pacifist philosophy overlaps with new forms of Christianity, where the literature of DH Lawrence and George Orwell meets a working-class intellectualism, fired up by the possibility of real social change. It's a world of big dreams, hard graft, close communities, and a flowering of music, poetry and theatre, all under the arched roof of a crumbling Essex barn.

In a world ravaged by climate change and Covid-19, could we see a similar movement springing up today?

Producer for BBC Audio in Bristol : Emily Knight


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m0019r6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m0019r7f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (m0019r9y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:15 on Saturday]


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m0019rcp)
Shaun The Sheep Jumps Over The Moon, Bronze Age Kissing and PPE Rubbish

ESA announce that Shaun The Sheep will fly around the moon this month aboard Artemis-1 mission. Philippe Deloo tells Gaia Vince what's in store for the woolly astronaut this month. Philippe is the team lead on the European Service Module, the part of NASA's Orion spacecraft which will be the workhorse of the new moon missions, ferrying four astronauts at a time to the moon and perhaps even beyond one day. This first Artemis mission, slated for launch 29th August, will check all the engineering bravado of the new launch and orbital systems ready for subsequent human passengers in a couple of years.

Christiana Scheib, of the Universities of Cambridge and Tartu, is part of a team who seem to have pinpointed in time the moment the Herpes virus that causes cold sores first spread across human populations. By obtaining genomes of HSV1 from four individuals who died between the iron age and medieval times, their analysis suggests an initial emergence sometime in the Bronze age. The intriguing hypothesis that accompanies the discovery is that the variant's emergence was facilitated by a new trend among bronze age folk of romantic kissing. But as she describes, it's hard to be certain for "there is no gene for kissing".

One way of restricting the spread of many viruses is of course various forms of PPE. The last few years have seen billions more items of PPE used on our planet, often without a clear plan for their disposal, and they get accidentally dropped and even deliberately dumped all over the world. Alex Bond of the Natural History Museum at Tring observes and catalogues rubbish affecting wildlife. He took the BBC's Victoria Gill on a walk down a canal in Salford to discuss the issues with the tissues.

Presented by Gaia Vince
Produced by Alex Mansfield


THU 17:00 PM (m0019rcr)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0019rcw)
The Bank of England forecasts a lengthy recession for the UK as it raises interest rates


THU 18:30 The Brig Society (m0019thn)
The CoBrig Society

A one-off special edition of the show where Marcus Brigstocke is put in charge of things – and this time, it's Covid. How has society changed, how should we prepare for the future, and are there any of those baked potatoes left?

Helping him tear the mask off the whole subject and then realising that's probably a bad expression under the circumstances are Margaret Cabourn-Smith (“John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme”), William Andrews (“Sorry I’ve Got No Head”) and Rufus Jones (“Paddington”, "Home")

Written by Marcus Brigstocke, Jeremy Salsby, Toby Davies, Nick Doody, Katie Storey, Dan Tetsell and Zoë Tomalin

Produced by David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for the BBC

www.pozzitive.co.uk

The Brig Society began the first of its four series to date in 2013, following on from Marcus's long stint as the backpacking idiot Giles Wemmbley Hogg. Each week, Marcus would be put in charge of something – Housing, Farming, Diplomacy, Exams, the NHS – and each week he'd start out by thinking “Well, it can’t be that difficult, surely?” and end up with “Oh - it’s utterly difficult and I’ve made a complete fist of it...”

The show won the 2014 Writers' Guild Award and a Silver at the New York International Programme awards


THU 19:00 The Archers (m0019rcy)
Alistair and Denise make a great team as Alistair operates on Ruby. Adil comforts Justin whilst they await news. When Alistair rings, it’s good news and Adil and Justin can’t contain their joy. Justin again tries to discuss a possible link-up between the Stables and Grey Gables. Adil interrupts him saying Justin should take the day off – it would be understandable if he did, as he obviously cares deeply about Ruby. Embarrassed Justin bats him away saying Ruby’s more Lilian’s than his. Can Adil please not say anything to Lilian about how ‘concerned’ he was about Ruby? Alistair buys Denise lunch as a thank you for helping Ruby pull through. They comment on how attached Justin is to Ruby – Denise thinks he may’ve shed a few tears. Alistair makes Denise blush when he says that Denise was robbed of the Vet Nurse of the Year award; she’s the best one he’s ever worked with.
Helen enjoys a bit of baby therapy holding Seren. She tells Tom that he and Natasha are doing an incredible job. He responds it doesn’t feel like it. Helen apologises for adding to Tom’s worries by overreacting to the church window, but Tom says he and Natasha were wrong to agree to it. They’re going to thank Peggy, but refuse the offer. Helen insists Tom should accept, as Henry and Jack don’t mind, but Tom says Natasha’s dead-set on refusing now. Helen says she’ll try to convince Natasha to change her mind, then they all can enjoy the beautiful window when it’s done.


THU 19:15 Front Row (m0019rd0)
Bullet Train & Mohsin Hamid's The Last White Man reviewed, conductor Semyon Bychkov

Tom Sutcliffe and guest reviewers Bidisha and Amon Warmann discuss Bullet Train, starring Brad Pitt. It's a vivid mixture of comedy and violence from director David Leitch, and is based on a thriller by Japanese author, Kōtarō Isaka. We also discuss Mohsin Hamid's latest novel, The Last White Man - a fable about what happens when white people's skin begins to turn brown.

Conductor Semyon Bychkov conducts the BBC Symphony Orchestra at the Proms in a programme of a programme of Czech and Russian music. He left the USSR for the USA in 1975 and is currently Chief Conductor and Music Director of the Czech Philharmonic. He talks music and politics too - he's spoken out and taken part in protests against Russia's invasion of Ukraine, but has also criticised the dropping of Russian works from concerts around the world.

Presenter: Tom Sutcliffe
Producer: Paul Waters


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (m0019rd2)
Scotland's drugs problem

Scotland has the worst figures for drug-related deaths anywhere in Europe. According to National Records for Scotland, 1,330 drug users died in 2021 - a slight improvement, but a death rate per capita which is still 4.8 times higher than England's.

Why do so many Scots die from drugs? And what more can be done to prevent it?

Joining David Aaronovitch in The Briefing Room are:
James Cook, BBC Scotland Editor
Kirsten Horsburgh, Director of Operations at the Scottish Drugs Forum
Andrew McAuley, Glasgow Caledonian University
Professor Catriona Matheson, University of Stirling
Professor Alex Stevens, University of Kent

PHOTO: Campaigning group Faces and Voices of Recovery protesting outside the Scottish Parliament in July 2022. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images


THU 20:30 The Digital Human (m0010gg4)
Series 24

Tilt

We all cheat at least a little bit, some of us in family games of monopoly, others on their taxes. Aleks asks if the digital era has made that easier; with less apparent consequence and therefore more tempting? If that's the case where does that lead us.

Why, for example, would people hack the language learning app Duolingo to achieve an entirely meaningless high score, just to beat those of their fellow learners? And if you use the fitness app Strava to compete with others who cycle the same route, what possesses you to use an electric bike next time, or even do it in your car? One of the key factors that encourage us to cheat is psychological distance - we can't see the impact of our cheating so it becomes more tempting. That's the digital world.

More charitably, another influence on our cheating is if we're already exhausted physically, psychologically or emotionally. Is that what might explain the rise in academic cheating that experts have detected during the course of the pandemic, when so much education and assessment has moved online?

Aleks explores all these examples along with the justifications people engage not own up to their behaviour.

Producer: Peter McManus


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m0019rcp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 Positive Thinking (m0019rbw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m0019rd4)
UK heading for "long and deep" recession

In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 Mrs Bridge by Evan S Connell (m0019rd6)
Episode 9

Evan S. Connell's Mrs Bridge is an extraordinary tragicomic portrayal of suburban life and one of the classic American novels of the twentieth century. Mrs Bridge, a conservative housewife in Missouri, has three children and a kindly lawyer husband. Her married life begins in the early 1930s – and soon after she and her young family move to a wealthy country club suburb of Kansas City. she spends her time shopping, going to bridge parties and bringing up her children to be pleasant, clean and have nice manners. The qualities that she values above all else. And yet she finds modern life increasingly baffling, her children aren't growing up into the people she expected, and sometimes she has the vague disquieting sensation that all is not well in her life. In a series of comic, telling vignettes, Evan S. Connell illuminates the narrow morality, confusion, futility and even terror at the heart of a life of plenty.

First published in 1959 it was perhaps overshadowed by the critical attention paid to contemporaries like Philip Roth and John Updike. Although Mrs Bridge was a finalist for the National Book Award in that year. Ten years later Connell published Mr Bridge which follows that same events largely from the point of view of Walter Bridge. In 1990 James Ivory directed the film Mr and Mrs Bridge based on both novels and starring Paul Newman and his wife Joanne Woodward. Fans of the book today include the novelist David Nicholls and Tracey Thorne, author and singer.

Mrs Bridge by Evan S. Connell
Read by Fenella Woolgar
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
The Waters Company for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:00 Your Place or Mine with Shaun Keaveny (p0c2nmg0)
Daliso Chaponda: Lilongwe, Malawi

Your Place Or Mine is the travel podcast that isn’t going anywhere - not until guests can convince Shaun Keaveny it’s worth getting off the sofa for. Each week a familiar face will try to persuade Shaun and resident geographer, historian and comedian Iszi Lawrence that jetting off to their favourite destination is worth the hassle.

Across the series listeners will be able to figuratively globe-trot to a new destination, as guests share a personal guide to their favourite place on the planet. Iszi will be on hand to check out the facts during the podcast’s metaphorical tour of its visitors’ much-loved locations.

In this episode, comedian Daliso Chaponda pitches a trip to his favourite ‘beautiful, backward place’: Lilongwe in Malawi. Safaris, stillness and starry skies beckon Shaun - but what about the Black Mambas?

With all the missed travel these past two years, Your Place Or Mine will explore whether getting back on a plane is too much for our wallets and limited carbon budgets, or if seeing the world and experiencing global cultures is something we can’t afford to miss.

Your Place or Mine is a BBC Audio production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.

Producers: Proinsias O’Coinn and Jen Whyntie


THU 23:30 Dr Phil's Bedside Manner (m000z6xl)
Series 1

Dr Phil visits Birmingham City Hospital

An innovative mix of comedy performance and documentary in a new series presented by Dr Phil Hammond.

As a doctor and a comedian, Phil knows that humour and laughter are vital coping mechanisms in the NHS, as he travels the UK on a mission to listen to the beating heart of a national institution.

The programmes are an adventurous, hilarious, thought provoking mix of humour and happiness, tragedy and reflection as the personal thoughts, opinions, experiences and hopes of people who work for and use the NHS are revealed.

In each programme, Phil visits one NHS hospital somewhere in the UK and speaks to porters and patients, cleaners and cardiologists, visitors and volunteers, the managers and the medics.

And at each location Dr Phil performs a free stand-up comedy show for the staff based on his listening experiences at that location and the stories of the people he has met.

A Ride production for BBC Radio 4



FRIDAY 05 AUGUST 2022

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m0019rd9)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 00:30 Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui (m0019rdc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0019rdf)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0019rdh)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0019rdk)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m0019rdm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0019rdp)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Dr Craig Gardiner.

Good morning.

On the penultimate day of Wales’ National Eisteddfod, comes a highlight of the week: the chairing of the Bard.

Every year a bardic chair is specially crafted for the winning poet who has mastered the notorious challenges of the ‘awdl’ poetry competition. In a moment of drama, the winner is proclaimed using their nom de plume, and so, for a second, with the lights out in the pavilion, only the successful poet knows who has won. Then, they stand and are revealed in the glare of spotlight.

But there is another act before the winner is confirmed as a partially unsheathed sword is raised above their head and the crowd are asked a question: ‘truth against the world, is there peace?’ Then another, ‘heart to heart, is there peace? And finally, ‘shout above responding shout, is there peace?’

This is not an enquiry into conflict in the world, much less a sifting of potential animosity in our souls. It is simply seeking to confirm the decision for the bard.

But perhaps there is a moment when the words of the ancient prophet Jeremiah echo through the ages and hang like that sword above us all. Back in his day, the leaders of Israel proclaimed ‘peace, peace,’ but their lives were riddled with duplicity and deceit and Jeremiah knew things had to change.

Sometimes it takes the searching questions of a good friend or a therapist, a pastor or a priest to get us to admit that our peace is broken, the peace between us and others, between us and nature and indeed within ourselves is gone. Wherever we are today, maybe in the spotlight of this morning, we know we need to be healed, restored or forgiven.

Dear God if that is us
Crying ‘peace’ despite our conflicts,
Crying ‘health’ despite our brokenness,
Crying ‘love’ in our abandonment,
Come now and restore to us the joy of life,
Bring healing, bring loving, bring peace
Amen


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m0019rdr)
The British Growers’ Association, which represents the horticulture and fresh produce industries, is warning of a potential crisis in the sector, as input costs spiral and the price they are paid is kept stubbornly low. They’ve just carried out research into carrot and broccoli production and say unless farmers get paid more for their veg, they’ll be forced to stop growing it.
As the drought continues in parts of the UK, some farmers are keeping a close eye on their valuable irrigation systems. They’re fast becoming a target for thieves - joining other farm essentials like quad bikes, diesel, GPS systems and machinery parts. This year’s report by the rural insurer NFU Mutual, published this week, says the cost of rural crime is now back up to pre-pandemic levels. We join one farmer in Cambridgeshire who regularly patrols his fields.
All week we've been looking at the issues facing tenant farmers. Today we meet a couple who - despite multiple applications - have had no luck finding a new tenancy. They currently rent a farm but the landlord has decided to sell.
Gooseberries are often seen as a rather old-fashioned fruit, but they do make good pies! And if you want to find the best gooseberries, Egton Bridge near Whitby is the place to be this week. It's the home to the UK’s oldest gooseberry show which has taken place in the first week in August for 222 years. It attracts gooseberry fans from across the UK.
The presenter is Caz Graham.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkyr5)
Greater Honeyguide

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the greater honeyguide of sub-Saharan Africa. A loud repetitive "it's - here" – "it's -here" is a sound the greater honeyguide only makes to humans in an extraordinary co-operative act between humans and bird. Relatives of woodpeckers they are one of the few birds which can digest wax and also feed on the eggs, grubs and pupae of bees. A greater honeyguide knows the location of the bee colonies in its territory and is able to lead honey-hunters to them. Once it has successfully guided its helpers to a nest, it waits while the honey-hunters remove the comb. Then it moves in to snap up the grubs and wax from the opened nest. So reliable are honeyguides that the Boran people of East Africa save up to two thirds of their honey-searching time by using the bird's services and use a special loud whistle (called a fuulido) to summon their guide before a hunt.

Producer : Andrew Dawes


FRI 06:00 Today (m0019rr3)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m0019r70)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui (m0019rst)
Opening/Closing

Angela Hui grew up behind the counter of her parents’ Chinese takeaway, Lucky Star, in the former mining village of Beddau, Wales.

It opened on the luckiest day of the century, 8 August 1988, an auspicious date with the number eight signifying good wealth, fortune and prosperity in Chinese culture – three key factors needed for a young, growing immigrant family.

On one side of the counter Angela interacts with the takeaway’s loyal staff, Cecilia, Dewi and Lowri. They serve and deliver food lovingly prepped and cooked by Angela’s parents. Regular customers pester Angela at the counter as she tries to do her homework.

Running a Chinese takeaway is hard work and there is tension in the overlapping spaces of home and work, playground and business. Angela and her two brothers, Keen and Jacky, also have to act as go-betweens for their parents when there are language barriers.

But there is also beauty in the rhythm and joy from living in the takeaway and being surrounded by the food of Angela’s home culture.

On the other side of the counter, Angela enjoys family dinners before service, dishes a world away from the simplified, watered-down Western version ordered by the locals - whole steamed sea bass, Cantonese soup, steamed egg, Chinese broccoli with oyster sauce. To them, food is love and food symbolises family.

A blending of her Welsh and Chinese heritage, the takeaway was a place that embodied the dual identities that Angela herself was experiencing.

In this episode, Angela is away at university in Cardiff but she still travels home at weekends to help at Lucky Star. Things are changing in everyone’s lives and the family consider the future of the takeaway.

Read by Priya Hall
Abridged by Anna Magnusson
Produced by Alexandra Quinn
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0019rr7)
England's netballers - the Roses, School exclusions, South Asian women in WWII, Rape survivors and therapy, Women artists

This time last week we were looking forward to the big match: The Lionesses at the European Championship Final at Wembley. We hoped, but we just couldn't predict what would happen, but what a great moment when they won against Germany! But don't let the success of women's football overshadow the sport that's been with us all along: netball. At the Commonwealth Games, the English team - known as the Roses - are in the semi-final tomorrow, up against Australia. If they win, they'll be in the final on Sunday. And don't forget: the Roses WON at the Commonwealth Games last time around, four years ago. We speak to ex-Roses captain, Ama Agbeze.

In the last normal academic year before the pandemic, 7,894 children were permanently excluded from English state schools. However, the data shows that certain groups of children are more likely to be excluded than others. Boys are three times more likely than girls, children on free school meals are four times more likely than other children, and Gypsy Roma, Travellers of Irish heritage, and black Caribbean children are all significantly more likely to face school exclusion than white British children. To explore why these disparities exist, Anita is joined by Dr Amelia Roberts, deputy director of UCL’s Centre for Inclusive Education; Jason Arthur, CEO of Mission 44, a charitable foundation which aims to support disadvantaged young people; and Lisa Smith, chair of the Advisory Council for the Education of Romany and Other Travellers.

When we think about the World War II war effort, Indian women in saris are not the first people that come to mind. Social historian Kiran Sahota has been researching the role of Indian women in the war, and has curated her research into a documentary and exhibition, which is currently on tour in the UK.

There’s been anger from counsellors and psychotherapists about new guidelines around access to rape victims therapy notes. The changes introduced by the CPS were first reported exclusively by Woman’s Hour back in May when solicitors raised concerns. Now five leading bodies representing psychiatrists, psychologists and counsellors have raised their own concerns. Newsnight reporter Anna Collinson has been looking into the story. We also hear from Dame Vera Baird, the Victims Commissioner for England and Wales.

According to the art market, men are 10 times better at painting than women, with men’s art valued ten times more than women’s. Now, a new Radio 4 documentary, 'Revaluating Art' explores why. Its creator, Mary-Ann Sieghart explains.

Presenter: Anita Rani
Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Interviewed Guest: Ama Agbeze
Interviewed Guest: Dr Amelia Roberts
Interviewed Guest: James Arthur
Interviewed Guest: Lisa Smith
Interviewed Guest: Kiran Sahota
Interviewed Guest: Vera Baird
Interviewed Guest: Anna Collinson
Interviewed Guest: Mary-Ann Sieghart


FRI 11:00 Moving Pictures (m000pm01)
The Detroit Industry Murals by Diego Rivera

Cathy FitzGerald invites you to discover new details in old masterpieces, using your phone, tablet or computer.

Each thirty-minute episode of Moving Pictures is devoted to a single artwork - and you're invited to look as well as listen, by following a link to a high-resolution image made by Google Arts & Culture. Zoom in and you can see the pores of the canvas, the sweep of individual brushstrokes, the shimmer of pointillist dots.

This episode takes a closer look at the 'Detroit Industry Murals' by the Mexican artist, Diego Rivera. The masterpiece covers four walls in the Detroit Institute of Arts and gives viewers a glimpse into Ford's massive industrial complex in Detroit, known as The Rouge. How did Rivera - communist activist - come to create an artwork for the Fords - one of the wealthiest families in the world?

To see the high-resolution image, visit www.bbc.co.uk/movingpictures and follow the link to explore Detroit Industry.

Interviewees: Benjamin Colman, Tyler Taylor, Mark Castro, Barbara Haskell

Producer and presenter: Cathy FitzGerald

Art consultant: Leah Kharibian
Exec producer: Sarah Cuddon
Mix engineer: Mike Woolley
With thanks to Renato González

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4

Diego M. Rivera, Detroit Industry Murals North Wall (detail), 1932-1933, frescoes. Detroit Institute of Arts, Gift of Edsel B. Ford, 33.10.


FRI 11:30 Mucking In (m0019rr9)
Series 1

Pest Control

Chris, a vegan eco-friendly vet student hunk, comes to help with lambing and Dangerfield Farm is thrown into turmoil.

Cicely finds him controlling and struggles to cater for vegans, so Chris takes over the cooking. He makes himself indispensable to Ben, until he disobeys the farm-rules and inadvertently lets Toby the terrier violate Floss the sheepdog who’s in season. And Beatrix takes a shine to him, which brings Archie rushing down from London, only to find that he needn’t have bothered, because Chris has blotted his own copybook by letting slip his true feelings for Jane Austen.

By Sue Limb and Betsy Vriend

Cast
Alison Steadman – Cicely
Nigel Planer – Ben
Morwenna Banks – Beatrix
Tony Gardner – Archie
Jolyon Coy - Chris

A Little Brother production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m0019rwd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 AntiSocial (m0019rrf)
Drag queens and libraries

The row over drag queens reading stories to children.

A spate of protests outside libraries has focused attention on the idea of drag queen story hours - drag queens reading stories to young children in libraries and other public spaces. For some, it’s the perfect way to build acceptance of LGBTQ+ identities, plus it’s fun and fabulous for the children. For others, it risks exposing young minds to adult entertainment and complex themes of sex and gender.

Presenter: Adam Fleming
Producers: Simon Maybin & Lucy Proctor
Researcher: Ellie House
Music: Oskar Jones
Editor: Hugh Levinson


FRI 12:57 Weather (m0019rrh)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m0019rrk)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Edward Stourton.


FRI 13:45 The Last Request (m0019rrm)
Episode 5

Laura McDaid is searching for the birth mother of a close friend who died 20 years ago.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m0019rcy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Limelight (p0clfh4t)
English Rose

English Rose - Episode 4: Life Support

By Helen Cross.

Gulliver is in the hospital and Rose wants to know why. There is danger everywhere and she must protect him.

Eighteen-year-old Rose has come from Whitby to Manhattan to work as nanny to a glittering but secretive family. She's not like the other girls. And Gulliver is no ordinary baby. This is a world not just of champagne, but shadows, where all is definitely not as it seems.

Stylish and surprising fantasy horror with a comic twist, starring Alexandra Mardell (Coronation Street) and Demetri Goritsas (Ten Percent). With music by Dana Margolin and Sam Yardley of Mercury-nominated band, Porridge Radio.

Helen Cross wrote ‘My Summer of Love’ which won a Betty Trask award and was made into a Bafta-winning film with Emily Blunt (recently rated her best film in The Guardian top ten Emily Blunt films). Mary Ward-Lowery won Best Director in 2020 Audio Drama Awards.

Rose ... Alexandra Mardell
Maya ... Miranda Braun
Austin ... Demetri Goritsas
Siobhan ... Deirdre Mullins
Delphine ... Yasemin Özdemir
Randy ... Michael Begley
Art Guy ... Mathew Durkan
Beatrice ... Alexandra Hannant
Newsreader ...Tayla Kovacevic-Ebong
Jason ... Joseph Tweedale
Mam ... Jane Thornton

Including the voices of Jo Makel, Paul Murphy, James Hoggarth, Freya Pollaidh, Augusta Chapman, Becky Ripley and Ben Casswell.
Original music written and performed by Dana Margolin and Sam Yardley of Porridge Radio, and produced, mixed and engineered by Sam Yardley.

Sound design by Ilse Lademann
Producer Mary Ward-Lowery


FRI 14:45 Living with the Gods (b09dyxxw)
The Making of Meaning

Neil MacGregor continues his series about the expression of shared beliefs with a focus on how we come to comprehend sacred images.

Our understanding of the rock art created by the San people of southern Africa over many centuries is helped by written accounts, so that what first appears to be an image of a hunting expedition becomes a record of a spiritual journey into another realm of experience. "For many years it was a matter of gaze and guess," says David Lewis Williams, an authority on rock art: "You gaze at it, and if you gaze long enough, your guess will take you close to what it's all about - and I'm afraid that's not the case, but we don't have to gaze and guess any more."

In the British Museum, a small 19th century Japanese shrine shows the spirits coming to visit a long-settled agricultural society. The curved doors of a small wooden box open to reveal, inside, a shimmering world of carved gilded wood, and a scene to which Japanese viewers would bring different interpretations.

Producer Paul Kobrak

Produced in partnership with the British Museum
Photograph (c) The Trustees of the British Museum.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0019rrq)
Eastbourne

Peter Gibbs and the panel are in Eastbourne for this week's horticultural programme. Matthew Pottage, Christine Walkden and Ashley Edwards answer the questions.

On his way, Peter stops by the chalky cliffs of Beachy Head. He speaks with Tim Squire, Ranger for the Eastern Downs of the National Park, who tells him all about the unique chalk grassland of the area.

In Eastbourne, the panellists suggest some low-growing plants for a windy, coastal terrace, as well as what we can plant now that the weather is warmer than ever before. They also discuss how to water the garden in drought conditions.

Away from the questions Matthew heads over to Sienna Hosta nursery to speak with Chris Potts, who explains how they keep their hostas slug and snail free.

Producer: Dominic Tyerman
Assistant Producer: Aniya Das

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 Commonwealth Stories (m0019rrs)
Agamemnon’s Earthen Ships

To celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Commonwealth Short Story Prize, and mark this year’s Commonwealth Games celebrations, three recent prizewinners have written specially commissioned stories for Radio 4.

Today’s story is by the 2018 prizewinning writer Constantia Soteriou from Cyprus, translated by Lina Protopapa. Agamemnon’s Earthen Ships tells the story of a character from ancient Greek mythology who refused to bow to the demands of a warlike king, and has unsettling resonances with the violent political upheavals of today’s Europe.

Constantia Soteriou was born in Nicosia. Her first novel Aishe Goes on Vacation (Patakis, 2015) received the Athens Prize for Literature. Her second book Voices Made of Soil (Patakis, 2017) was included in the short list for the Cyprus Literature Awards. She has written plays for independent stages and the Cyprus Theatre Organization.

Reader Mia Soteriou is an actor and musician who played Arina in the film Mamma Mia! and Mirri Mas Duur in Game of Thrones. She has also appeared regularly on television and radio.

The Commonwealth Short Story Prize attracts between 6,000 – 7,000 entries every year from nearly all the 54 Commonwealth countries, and taps into a rich, rewarding vein of storytelling from around the world. Five regional prizes are awarded, from which one writer is chosen as the overall winner.

Producer: Sara Davies
Sound Design: Lucinda Mason Brown
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m0019rrv)
Bernard Cribbins OBE (pictured), Diana Kennedy MBE, Sir Colin Blakemore, Nichelle Nichols

Matthew Bannister on

Bernard Cribbins OBE, the much-loved actor known for appearances in The Railway Children and Doctor Who as well as reading countless stories on Jackanory.

Diana Kennedy MBE, the British-born food writer who dedicated her life to promoting the diversity of Mexican cuisine.

Sir Colin Blakemore, the neuroscientist who received death threats after speaking out in defence of experiments on animals.

Nichelle Nichols, the trailblazing African American actor who played Lieutenant Uhura in Star Trek.

Producer: Sofie Vilcins

Interviewed guest: Jenny Agutter
Interviewed guest: Helen Lederer
Interviewed guest: Gabriela Cámara
Interviewed guest: Fiona Fox

Archive clips used: EMI Films, The Railway Children 1970; BBC One, Fawlty Towers - The Hotel Inspectors 10/10/1975; BBC, CBeebies - Storm in a Teacup 05/04/2015; Filmfair, The Wombles - One Pair of Feet 23/02/1973; BBC Radio 4, The Food Programme 30/06/2014; Greenwich Entertainment/Submarine Deluxe, Diana Kennedy - Nothing Fancy 2020; BBC Two, The Mind Machine 13/09/1988; BBC Radio 4, Today 08/11/2011; BBC Radio 4, The Life Scientific - Sir Colin Blakemore 08/11/2011; Desilu Productions/Norway Corporation, Star Trek S02E02 Who Mourns For Adonais 27/04/1970; BBC Radio 4, Archive on 4 - Star Trek, The Undiscovered Future 03/09/2016; BBC Radio 1, Nicky Campbell - Nichelle Nichols interview 31/01/1995; NASA, Recruitment Film 1977; Yap Films, Building Star Trek (TV Movie) 2016.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (m0019rrx)
Can you believe BBC weather forecasters when they link extreme temperatures with climate change?

BBC Meteorologist Tomasz Schafernaker discusses reporting of the recent heatwave and the linking of it to climate change, as well as answering comments from a listener comparing it to the summer of ‘76.

The BBC Scotland Editor James Cook explains how he manages to remain impartial, as the independence issue heats up again north of the border.

And Jeffrey Boakye tells us whether he has added to his own playlist as a result of co-presenting that eclectic show, Add To Playlist, with Cerys Matthews.

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Kate Dixon
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 17:00 PM (m0019rrz)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0019rs3)
Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak both insist their rival plans for the economy are best


FRI 18:30 Party's Over (m0019rs5)
Series 2

Cruise Control

What happens when the Prime Minister suddenly stops being Prime Minister? One day you're the most powerful person in the country, the next you're irrelevant, forced into retirement 30 years ahead of schedule and find yourself asking 'What do I do now?'

"I can't just disappear like Gordon Brown. They say he barely gets out of bed now. Just sits there doing word-searches and eating Kit Kat Chunkies. Miserable. I hate the chunky ones." Former British Prime Minister Henry Tobin.

Henry hopes that an invitation to make a speech will be the passport he needs to a regular slot on the international lecture circuit.

Starring Miles Jupp, Ingrid Oliver, Emma Sidi, Justin Edwards and David Mumeni.

Recorded at The Crescent Theatre in Birmingham.

Written by Paul Doolan and Jon Hunter
Producer: Richard Morris
Production co-ordinator: Caroline Barlow
Sound recordist and designer: Chris Maclean

A BBC Studios Production.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (m0019rs7)
Writer, Liz John
Director, Julie Beckett
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Helen Archer ….. Louiza Patikas
Natasha Archer ….. Mali Harries
Pat Archer ….. Patricia Gallimore
Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Tony Archer ….. David Troughton
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Justin Elliott ….. Simon Williams
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Tracy Horrobin ….. Susie Riddell
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Adil Shah ….. Ronny Jhutti
Lynda Snell ….. Carole Boyd
Oliver Sterling ….. Michael Cochrane
Caitlin Thomas ….. Di Botcher
Roy Tucker ….. Ian Pepperell
Peggy Woolley ….. June Spencer
Denise ….. Clare Perkins


FRI 19:15 Screenshot (m0019rs9)
The Harder They Come at 50

Ahead of Jamaican Independence Day, Ellen E Jones and Mark Kermode immerse themselves in one of the island’s greatest exports, The Harder They Come, marking the film’s 50th anniversary.

The Harder They Come was a sensation, but it took a while for its vibrations to be heard around the world. In 1972, the premiere in Kingston brought the area to a complete standstill. Outside of Jamaica, the film helped introduce reggae music to millions, thanks to its Jimmy Cliff-driven soundtrack.

Exploring the film’s continuing legacy, Ellen hears from one of its stars, Carl Bradshaw, and the film’s publicist Barbara Blake-Hannah, for whom the movie was so life-changing that she left the UK and moved to Jamaica where she later became a Member of Parliament. Mark speaks to DJ, broadcaster, musician and filmmaker Don Letts, whose film Dancehall Queen is a homage to The Harder They Come. Mark also talks to music supervisor Ed Bailie who worked closely with Steve McQueen on his Small Axe films, including Lovers Rock which also owes a great debt to this cult classic.

Ellen and Mark also look at what The Harder They Come did, or did not do, for the Jamaican film industry, and the films that followed it - including Rockers, Countryman, and Babylon.

Producer: Tom Whalley
A Prospect Street production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m0019rsc)
Lord Adebowale, Robert Jenrick MP, Catherine West MP, Charlotte Pickles

Ben Wright presents political debate and discussion from Wakefield Cathedral. The panel taking questions from our audience includes the chair of the NHS Confederation and cross bench peer Lord Adebowale, the Conservative MP and former cabinet minister Robert Jenrick, Director of the Reform think tank Charlotte Pickles, and the Labour MP and shadow Foreign Office minister Catherine West.

If you would like to be in the audience, tickets are available free in advance via the Wakefield Cathedral website.

Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton
Lead broadcast engineer: Tom Parnell
Editor: Chris Ledgard


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m0019rsf)
No Final Frontier

Sara Wheeler has just been appointed the authorised biographer of the travel writer, Jan Morris. But she faces a dilemma. She's concerned that she is 'effectively appropriating the story of a woman who appropriated hundreds of other stories'.

How, she wonders, can she navigate this tricky territory.

Producer: Adele Armstrong
Sound: Peter Bosher
Production coordinator: Iona Hammond
Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith


FRI 21:00 Archive on 4 (b08xxbt7)
The Real Summer of Love

1967 saw the so-called Summer of Love, when thousands descended on Haight Ashbury suburb in San Franciso with their flower power, wacky fashions, drugs and hippy anti-establishment message which soon spread around the world.

But what did it all mean to British people?

Historian and writer Dominic Sandbrook argues that, for the majority in Britain, the Summer of Love and even 1960s Swinging London was a party happening somewhere else.

With the economy running into trouble, Harold Wilson's government devalued the pound. All was not well in British industry, with unofficial wildcat strikes and the country's ports paralysed by a 10-week strike. Dockers like Colin Ross, his young wife and baby struggled to feed themselves. Divisions in society were evident whether, as Colin puts it, 'between the haves and have-nots' or in multi-racial communities like Brixton.

Yet the '60s brought a new sense of freedom, tolerance and colour to people's monochrome daily lives. Tourists flocked to London fashion haunts such as Carnaby Steet and, in 1967, The Beatles' Sgt Pepper was declared album of the decade while barefoot songstress Sandi Shaw won the Eurovision Song Contest.

As a pop columnist, Virginia Ironside seemed to have it all. But, as liberated as she appeared, she felt pressure from the permissive society. She had two abortions, one illegally in a Harley Street clinic.

In 1967, laws came in legalising abortion and homosexuality. The same year saw the new town Milton Keynes which, although not quite the countercultural utopia San Francisco hippies had hoped for, still represented a kind of idealism - a vision of a suburban good life in the heart of the countryside.

Producer: Sara Parker
Executive: Samir Shah

A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in July 2017.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m0019rsk)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 Mrs Bridge by Evan S Connell (m0019rsp)
Episode 10

Evan S. Connell's Mrs Bridge is an extraordinary tragicomic portrayal of suburban life and one of the classic American novels of the twentieth century. Mrs Bridge, a conservative housewife in Missouri, has three children and a kindly lawyer husband. Her married life begins in the early 1930s – and soon after she and her young family move to a wealthy country club suburb of Kansas City. she spends her time shopping, going to bridge parties and bringing up her children to be pleasant, clean and have nice manners. The qualities that she values above all else. And yet she finds modern life increasingly baffling, her children aren't growing up into the people she expected, and sometimes she has the vague disquieting sensation that all is not well in her life. In a series of comic, telling vignettes, Evan S. Connell illuminates the narrow morality, confusion, futility and even terror at the heart of a life of plenty.

First published in 1959 it was perhaps overshadowed by the critical attention paid to contemporaries like Philip Roth and John Updike. Although Mrs Bridge was a finalist for the National Book Award in that year. Ten years later Connell published Mr Bridge which follows that same events largely from the point of view of Walter Bridge. In 1990 James Ivory directed the film Mr and Mrs Bridge based on both novels and starring Paul Newman and his wife Joanne Woodward. Fans of the book today include the novelist David Nicholls and Tracey Thorne, author and singer.

Mrs Bridge by Evan S. Connell
Read by Fenella Woolgar
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
The Waters Company for BBC Radio 4


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (m0019rjr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Sarah Kendall: Talking Story (m000x0vb)
Chris Addison

Sarah Kendall started her career as a stand-up comedian in the late 90s in Australia. After 15 years performing stand-up comedy in comedy clubs and at festivals around the world, Sarah moved away from the more traditional joke telling aspect of the job and transitioned into storytelling.

Sarah wanted to create something on stage that felt like the sort of films she loved to watch, so she wrote an hour-long show that was one single story as opposed to a series of jokes and routines. She reimagined her teenage years as though they had been directed by John Hughes, giving her memories a full, cinematic makeover.

She found, in telling these personal stories, that she was connecting with her audience in a way that was more meaningful to her and in a way that she wasn’t able to with the jokes and routines in her previous shows.

What is it about stories that brings people together. How do we use stories to make sense of life?

In this series, Sarah will be talking to three different storytellers about what ‘story’ means to them and about how they developed their own style of storytelling in their respective mediums.

In this first episode Sarah talks to comedian, writer, actor, director Chris Addison about his journey from joke writing to screen writing and directing. Discussing his relationship with storytelling across his broad body of work.

Sarah’s live storytelling shows have been adapted for BBC Radio 4 and have formed two seasons of her series - ‘Sarah Kendall: Australian Trilogy’. The show went on to win numerous awards including the Writers’ Guild of Great Britain Award and the BBC Audio Drama Award. Since then, Sarah has gone on to write and star in the Royal Television Society award winning and BAFTA nominated sitcom ‘Frayed’.

Presenter - Sarah Kendall
Guest - Chris Addison
Producer - Carl Cooper

This is a BBC Studios production




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

28ish Days Later 14:45 SAT (m0019r9g)

28ish Days Later 14:45 SUN (m0019r79)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m0019kdy)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m0019rsf)

Alex Edelman's Peer Group 23:30 WED (m000w4t0)

Alexei Sayle's Strangers on a Train 19:15 SUN (m0019r7w)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (m0019k3x)

Andrew Maxwell Values 18:30 TUE (m0019rjy)

Anneka Has Issues 18:30 WED (m0019r54)

AntiSocial 12:04 FRI (m0019rrf)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m0019r9d)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m0019kdw)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m0019rsc)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m0019rb0)

Archive on 4 21:00 FRI (b08xxbt7)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m0019rcp)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m0019rcp)

Behind the Crime 20:00 WED (m0019r5b)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m0019r87)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m0019r87)

Black Roots 13:30 SUN (m0017khq)

Boris 17:30 SAT (m0019r9n)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (m0019r0j)

Bridget Christie: Mortal 23:30 TUE (m000v7q9)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m0019r6w)

China's Stolen Treasures 21:00 MON (m0015lsg)

Commonwealth Stories 00:30 SUN (m0019kd8)

Commonwealth Stories 15:45 FRI (m0019rrs)

Cover Story 11:30 THU (m0019rc4)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (m0019kjw)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (m0019rc2)

DH Lawrence: Tainted Love 15:00 SAT (m000xskd)

Daliso Chaponda: Citizen of Nowhere 23:00 TUE (m0010gkc)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (m0019r70)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m0019r70)

Don't Log Off 16:30 MON (m0017k71)

Dr Phil's Bedside Manner 23:30 THU (m000z6xl)

Drama 15:00 SUN (m0019r7c)

Drama 14:15 WED (m000lf9s)

Drama 14:15 THU (m000m56z)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m0019r8t)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m0019r8m)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m0019r1m)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m0019rkq)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m0019r67)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m0019rdr)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (m0019kdd)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (m0019rrx)

Four Thought 05:45 SAT (m0019k6c)

Four Thought 09:30 WED (m0019r41)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (m0019r41)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m0019r94)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m0019r0z)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m0019rk0)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m0019r58)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m0019rd0)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m0019kd6)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m0019rrq)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (m0019rjr)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (m0019rjr)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:04 SUN (m0019k3s)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (m0019r0v)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m0019rk2)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (m0019r4t)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (m0019r4t)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m0019kdb)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m0019rrv)

Limelight 14:15 FRI (p0clfh4t)

Living with the Gods 00:15 SUN (b09dxz1d)

Living with the Gods 14:45 FRI (b09dyxxw)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m0019r83)

Loose Ends 23:00 SUN (m0019r83)

Made of Stronger Stuff 15:30 TUE (p0bjy2pj)

Made of Stronger Stuff 21:00 WED (p0bjy2pj)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m0019kf4)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m0019rb5)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m0019r85)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m0019r17)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m0019rkb)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m0019r5s)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m0019rd9)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (m0019k7d)

Moving Pictures 11:00 FRI (m000pm01)

Mrs Bridge by Evan S Connell 22:45 MON (m0019r15)

Mrs Bridge by Evan S Connell 22:45 TUE (m0019rk6)

Mrs Bridge by Evan S Connell 22:45 WED (m0019r5l)

Mrs Bridge by Evan S Connell 22:45 THU (m0019rd6)

Mrs Bridge by Evan S Connell 22:45 FRI (m0019rsp)

Mucking In 11:30 FRI (m0019rr9)

My Name Is... 11:00 MON (m000ffzx)

New Storytellers 09:30 TUE (m0019rj4)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m0019kfg)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m0019rbf)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m0019r8h)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m0019r1h)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m0019rkl)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m0019r63)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m0019rdm)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m0019rbr)

News Summary 06:00 SUN (m0019r69)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m0019r72)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m0019r03)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m0019rjd)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m0019rhf)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m0019rm4)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m0019rwd)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m0019r8r)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m0019r6h)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m0019r6r)

News and Weather 13:00 SAT (m0019r9b)

News 22:00 SAT (m0019rb3)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (m0019r6c)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m0019r7f)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m0019r7f)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (m0019kkc)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m0019rcl)

PM 17:00 SAT (m0019r9l)

PM 17:00 MON (m0019r0q)

PM 17:00 TUE (m0019rjt)

PM 17:00 WED (m0019r4y)

PM 17:00 THU (m0019rcr)

PM 17:00 FRI (m0019rrz)

Party's Over 12:30 SAT (m0019kdn)

Party's Over 18:30 FRI (m0019rs5)

Pharaohs of the Sun by Guy de la Bédoyère 00:30 SAT (m0019kf6)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m0019r7t)

Positive Thinking 09:00 THU (m0019rbw)

Positive Thinking 21:30 THU (m0019rbw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m0019kfj)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m0019r8k)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m0019r1k)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m0019rkn)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m0019r65)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m0019rdp)

Princess 11:30 WED (p0cj3qch)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m0019r7k)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m0019r7k)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m0019r7k)

Rabbit at Rest 21:45 SAT (m0002cgs)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m0019r6m)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m0019r6m)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m0019r6m)

Sarah Kendall: Talking Story 23:30 FRI (m000x0vb)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m0019r90)

Science Stories 11:00 TUE (b087p0cy)

Screenshot 19:15 FRI (m0019rs9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m0019kfb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m0019rb9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m0019r8c)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m0019r1c)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m0019rkg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m0019r5z)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m0019rdh)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m0019kf8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m0019kfd)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m0019r9q)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m0019rb7)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m0019rbc)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m0019r7m)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m0019r89)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m0019r8f)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m0019r19)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m0019r1f)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m0019rkd)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m0019rkj)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m0019r5x)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m0019r61)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m0019rdf)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m0019rdk)

Sideways 00:15 MON (m0019k67)

Sideways 09:00 WED (m0019r3z)

Sideways 16:00 WED (m0019r3z)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m0019r9v)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m0019r7r)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m0019r0s)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m0019rjw)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m0019r52)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m0019rcw)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m0019rs3)

Sketches: Stories of Art and People 16:00 MON (m0019r0n)

Sliced Bread 12:32 THU (m0019rcb)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01np0zy)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01np0zy)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m0019r6t)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m0019r6k)

Surviving the Cost of Living 12:04 SAT (m0019r4q)

Surviving the Cost of Living 21:00 SUN (m0019r4q)

Surviving the Cost of Living 15:00 WED (m0019r4q)

Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui 09:45 MON (m0019qzy)

Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui 00:30 TUE (m0019qzy)

Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui 09:45 TUE (m0019rj6)

Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui 00:30 WED (m0019rj6)

Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui 09:45 WED (m0019r5v)

Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui 00:30 THU (m0019r5v)

Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui 09:45 THU (m0019rdc)

Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui 00:30 FRI (m0019rdc)

Takeaway: Stories from a Childhood Behind the Counter by Angela Hui 09:45 FRI (m0019rst)

Techno: A Social History 11:30 TUE (m0019rjb)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (m0019k3h)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m0019r6y)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m0019r0g)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m0019r0g)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m0019r0x)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m0019r0x)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m0019r4n)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m0019r4n)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m0019r56)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m0019r56)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m0019rcy)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m0019rcy)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (m0019rs7)

The Bottom Line 11:30 MON (m0019kks)

The Briefing Room 11:00 SAT (m0019kkq)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (m0019rd2)

The Brig Society 18:30 THU (m0019thn)

The Climate Tipping Points 09:30 THU (m001812w)

The Cost of Economic War 20:00 TUE (m00181ln)

The Digital Human 20:30 THU (m0010gg4)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m0019r0l)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m0019r0l)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 19:15 SAT (m0019r9y)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:00 THU (m0019r9y)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (m0019r92)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (m0019r92)

The Last Request 13:45 MON (m0019r0c)

The Last Request 13:45 TUE (m0019rjn)

The Last Request 13:45 WED (m0019r4l)

The Last Request 13:45 THU (m0019rcj)

The Last Request 13:45 FRI (m0019rrm)

The Long History of Argument 09:00 TUE (m0019rj2)

The Long History of Argument 21:30 TUE (m0019rj2)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m0019r4w)

The Media Show 21:30 WED (m0019r4w)

The Silent Mind 20:00 MON (m0019r11)

The Silent Mind 11:00 WED (m0019r11)

The Smugglers' Trail 21:30 MON (m0015vl7)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m0019r77)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m0019r13)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m0019rk4)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m0019r5j)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m0019rd4)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m0019rsk)

This Cultural Life 09:00 MON (m0014wng)

Three Fires 19:45 SUN (m0019r7y)

Today 07:00 SAT (m0019r8y)

Today 17:00 SUN (m0019t4g)

Today 06:00 MON (m0019qzw)

Today 06:00 TUE (m0019rj0)

Today 06:00 WED (m0019r3x)

Today 06:00 THU (m0019rbt)

Today 06:00 FRI (m0019rr3)

Tom Mayhew Is Benefit Scum 23:00 WED (m0019r5n)

Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets 23:30 SAT (m0019jvp)

Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets 16:30 SUN (m0019r7h)

Trust 14:15 MON (m0010090)

Trust 14:15 TUE (m001020r)

Tumanbay 21:00 SAT (m000kw4l)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04t0v50)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b04t0qpk)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b04t0vqb)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b04t0m9x)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b04sxv25)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b04hkyr5)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m0019r8w)

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Welcome to the Neighbourhood 23:15 WED (m0019r5q)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m0019r81)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m0019r9j)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m0019r01)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m0019rj8)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m0019r45)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m0019rc0)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m0019rr7)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (m0019jyf)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (m0019b5l)

World at One 13:00 MON (m0019r09)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m0019rjl)

World at One 13:00 WED (m0019r4j)

World at One 13:00 THU (m0019rcg)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m0019rrk)

You and Yours 12:04 MON (m0019r05)

You and Yours 12:04 TUE (m0019rjg)

You and Yours 12:04 WED (m0019r4d)

You and Yours 12:04 THU (m0019rc8)

You're Dead To Me 23:30 MON (p0853185)

Your Place or Mine with Shaun Keaveny 23:00 THU (p0c2nmg0)