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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 16 JULY 2022

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m00194d4)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:30 The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith (m00194bh)
The Misuses of Memory

Martin Sixsmith witnessed the end of the Cold War first hand, reporting for the BBC from Moscow during the presidencies of Gorbachev and Yeltsin. In The War of Nerves he draws on a vast array of sources as well as his own experiences to take us into the minds of those affected by the simmering tensions and paranoia on both sides of the Iron Curtain.

From the end of the Second World War to the dissolution of the USSR in 1991, the psychodrama played out between the Soviet and American superpowers held the world in thrall. The Cold War, both sides declared, was a contest of competing social, economic, political and ethical systems, each of them professing a monopoly on wisdom and the keys to humankind’s future. It was a conflict in which the battleground was, to an unprecedented extent, the human mind - the aim was to control not just territory, resources and power, but loyalties, belief and the nature of reality.

Both sides in the Cold War had the means to destroy the planet. And decades of rumbling international hostility affected individual mental well-being, manifesting in social paranoia, catastrophising, and surges of collective hysteria.

Until earlier this year, we thought all that was over. But now, in Ukraine, we are forced to reconsider the comforting assumptions of the past 30 years. History, in the sense of a settled global preference for liberal democracy, has evidently not ended.

Martin Sixsmith studied Russian at Oxford, Harvard, the Sorbonne and in St Petersburg, and psychology at Birkbeck and London Metropolitan University. He is the author of two novels and several works of non-fiction, including Philomena and Russia: A 1,000 Year Chronicle of the Wild East.

In this final episode, Martin explores how a failure to understand the psychology of Russia allowed the West to squander the possibility of a peaceful world after the fall of the Iron Curtain, and how Cold War memories are coming back to haunt us in Ukraine.

Abridged and produced by Jane Greenwood
Read by Jonathan Keeble
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00194d8)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00194dd)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00194dk)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m00194dp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0016n5g)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Dr Janet Unsworth.


SAT 05:45 Four Thought (m0019457)
Making Time

Watchmaker Rebecca Struthers shares her passion for the art and science of horology. She warns that this traditional skill and its allied trades to make and restore watches, are endangered in Britain unless we make it easier for the next generation to be trained in them.

"When well-made objects are cared for, it's a cycle of relationships that can span centuries. The oldest family watch I've worked on was five generations and 250 years old. When working on an object that symbolises the passing of time itself, I'm acutely aware of the fact that I've become a moment in the history of this watch, a moment in time for an object that was made centuries before my birth and will live on centuries after I'm gone."

Presenter: Olly Mann
Producer: Sheila Cook
Production Coordinator: Janet Staples
Editor: Penny Murphy


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m00199c0)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (m00194gm)
Aberystwyth Inspiration

Writer Niellah Arboine returns to her university town of Aberystwyth, to remember the landscape which inspired her writing so much. She recalls how shocking it was to arrive in a place so different from her South London home. Niellah meets three other creatives working in Cardigan Bay, and explores their connections with place, art and the natural world.

Produced by Beatrice Fenton


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m00199c2)
16/07/22 Farming Today This Week: harvest fires, the price of butter, EU/NZ trade deal

Will British farmers lose out, because the European Union has struck a better trade deal for their farmers with New Zealand? Anna Hill asks an international trade expert.
All week we've been looking at the UK dairy industry. The price farmers get paid for their milk is at its highest ever level at around 50 pence per litre. But their input costs are also rising fast, and one dairy analyst says if the price they get doesn't keep up, more farmers will leave the industry.
The heatwave has brought a series of field fires as farmers start to gather in the harvest. The combination of working machinery, high temperatures and very dry crops is something farmers have to be vigilant about.

Presented by Steffan Messenger and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


SAT 06:57 Weather (m00199c4)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 07:00 Today (m00199c6)
Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m00199cb)
Delia Smith

Nikki Bedi and Adil Ray are joined by Delia Smith CH CBE, first known for teaching cookery skills on TV and in her books in a no-nonsense style. 50 years worth of recipes later, she is now sharing her thoughts on spirituality.

Liv Thorne wanted a baby, but she was single. Instead of hanging around waiting for Mr Right, she took things into her own hands and bought some sperm, having her son in 2018. Keen to reduce stigma surrounding such choices, she documented her experience and found that revisiting her past, in particular the loss of both her parents when she was a teen, helped her understand why she had struggled maintaining a relationship. She joins us.

A passion for Grime has fuelled Roony “risky” Keefe’s career, first making documentaries about the subject and then music videos for Skepta amongst others, picking up praise from Drake on the way. He also works as a London cabbie, doing the infamous “knowledge” in less than the requisite 4 years. He joins us.

We also have Ed Patrick - NHS doctor by day, comedian by night and author wherever he can find the time. He uses comedy to help find balance in his life as an anaesthetist.

We have the Inheritance Tracks of actor James Buckley who chooses God Only Knows by the Beach Boys and Time For Heroes by The Libertines
and your thank you.

Producer: Corinna Jones


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (m00199cd)
Series 37

Taunton

Jay Rayner and his culinary panel are in Taunton, Somerset. Joining him for the first in a new series are Tim Hayward, Alice Lascelles, Tim Anderson and Professor Barry Smith.

As this year's Glastonbury Festival recedes into the distance, the panellists discuss indulgent festival food, offer recipe suggestions for eggs and dream up their ultimate cheese board.

They're also joined by local cheesemaker Tom Carver and cider connoisseur Matilda Temperley.

Producer - Daniel Cocker
Assistant Producer - Bethany Hocken

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m00199ch)
George Parker of the Financial Times is joined by Foreign Office minister Vicky Ford MP and former Home Office minister Rachel McClean MP to review the first full week of the Conservative leadership campaign.

With most of the leadership contenders promising big upfront tax cuts, former Chancellor Lord Lamont and head of Bloomberg Economics Stephanie Flanders discuss how realistic their plans are.

Former Labour cabinet minister, Lord Mandelson, looks at where Boris Johnson's departure leaves Labour.

And former Conservative MPs, Anna Soubry, who left the party in 2019, and broadcaster Gyles Brandreth discuss how to woo the Tory grassroots.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m00199ck)
The legacy of Shinzo Abe

Japan has been in mourning after the assassination of former prime minister, Shinzo Abe, at an election rally in the Western city of Nara. Mr Abe was a towering figure in Japanese politics. He was known for his efforts to bring Japan out of years of economic stagnation. Yet it was his firm belief that Japan should move away from its pacifist past that proved most divisive. Rupert Wingfield Hayes reflects his legacy.

In Ethiopia, the federal government has been in armed conflict with rebel authorities in the northern region of Tigray since November 2020. Tens of thousands of people have been killed. A state of emergency was imposed between last November and in February this year, and the country’s human rights watch dog said the period was marked by a significant number of arbitrary arrests and illegal detentions. The Ethiopian government is now saying it plans to negotiate with forces from the Tigray region, but a culture of impunity prevails, says Kalkidan Yibeltal.

We visit a mosque and a church in Norway to hear how an agreement between Christian and Muslim leaders, recognising the right to convert between faiths, has affected the respective communities. Maddy Savage is in Oslo.

Jamaica has this year set the process in motion to remove the Queen as head of state and become a Republic. Adina Campbell recently visited the country and found the issue was the subject of fervent discussion wherever she went.

The Shandur Polo Festival in north-west Pakistan is held each July. The event draws enthusiastic crowds from all the surrounding regions, willing to brave the nerve-wracking journey to the highest polo ground in the world, says Hannah McCarthy.

Presenter: Kate Adie
Producer: Serena Tarling
Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith
Production Coordinator: Gemma Ashman


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m00199k8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m00199cp)
Energy costs versus incomes

Families on a low income face spending more than a quarter of the money they have left after paying their mortgage or rent on energy bills from April next year. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation says it's even tougher for single people on a low income with no children, where it rises to more than two thirds. The calculations are based on latest predictions from the energy analyst Cornwall Insight, which says the typical annual bill could reach more than £3,300 in the new year. The data also shows that the government's £37 billion support package has reduced costs this year. We'll get reaction from the government, the energy regulator Ofgem, and Energy UK who represent the industry.

It's not long until school's out for summer, in England and Wales at least - Scotland and Northern Ireland are already deep into that school summer break. We'll take a look at what financial support is on offer for families to help with costs.

How rising inflation is pushing more people into higher tax bands and what you can do about it.

And the listener who paid off her mortgage, only to discover the bank had used her money to pay off someone else’s.

Presenter: Felicity Hannah
Reporter: Katie Barnfield
Researcher: Sandra Hardial
Editor: Jess Quayle

(First broadcast 12pm Saturday 16th July, 2022)


SAT 12:30 Dead Ringers (m00194cj)
Series 22

Episode 5

Penny Mordaunt has come from nowhere to be in the top five Tory leaderships hopefuls, but much more importantly, she makes her debut appearance on Dead Ringers.

The leadership election is analysed in depth, the women’s Euros gets a new presenter, and Scooby Doo gets involved in British politics.

Performed by Jon Culshaw, Lewis MacLeod, Jan Ravens, Debra Stephenson and Duncan Wisbey.

This episode was written by: Nev Fountain & Tom Jamieson, Laurence Howarth, Ed Amsden & Tom Coles, James Bugg, Edward Tew, Robert Darke, Rachel E. Thorn, Sophie Dickson and Sarah Campbell

Produced and created by Bill Dare
Production Co-ordinator: Caroline Barlow


SAT 12:57 Weather (m00199cr)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News and Weather (m00199ct)
The latest national and international news and weather reports from BBC Radio 4


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m00194cq)
Jake Berry MP, Layla Moran MP, Lisa Nandy MP, Ali Miraj

Anita Anand presents political debate and discussion from the Plaza Community Cinema in Liverpool. On this week's panel: Conservative MP Jake Berry, Liberal Democrat MP and Foreign Affairs Spokesperson at Westminster Layla Moran, Labour MP and Shadow Levelling Up Secretary Lisa Nandy, and columnist and financier Ali Miraj.

Producer: Emma Campbell
Lead broadcast engineer: John Benton


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m00199cw)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:45 28ish Days Later (m00199cy)
Day Thirteen: Get It On

It’s day 13 of the cycle and India rides the first oestrogen wave and chats all things cervical mucus with the Gynae Geek Dr Anita Mitra from its texture to its many functions. Maisie Hill, author of Period Power, also joins India to discuss ovulation, the season ‘Summer’ and how to manage it.

Credits:
Presented by India Rakusen.
Producer: Ellie Sans.
Assistant Producer:Jorja McAndrew.
Executive Producer: Suzy Grant.
Original music composed and performed by Rebekah Reid.
Sound design by Olga Reed.

Special thanks to all contributors and audio diarists.

A Listen production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.


SAT 15:00 DH Lawrence: Tainted Love (m000xdss)
The Rainbow

'DH Lawrence: Tainted Love’ dynamically puts centre stage Lawrence's daring writing on the complexity of love and desire.
The Rainbow dramatised by Linda Marshall Griffiths.

It is the dawn of female suffrage and Ursula, now a young woman, strives for sexual and financial independence. Ursula refuses to be tied down by the confines of her gender and the expectations of her family as she searches for sexual and intellectual fulfilment beyond the boundaries of her small town.

Ursula ..... Cassie Bradley
Anton ..... Nico Mirallegro
Anna ..... Rosalie Craig
Will ..... Lee Ingleby
Winifred ..... Tala Gouveia
Harby ..... Graeme Hawley
Young Ursula ..... Florence Hunt

Directed by Nadia Molinari
BBC Audio Drama North Production

Part of 'DH Lawrence Tainted Love’ linking two novels 'The Rainbow' and 'Women in Love' that dynamically put centre stage Lawrence's daring writing on the complexity of human love. Sexual awakening, transgression and repression are explored as his characters try to find happiness and fulfilment in uncertain times. Set in a mining town in Nottinghamshire, 'Tainted Love' is a celebration of Lawrence at his most bold, pushing the boundaries of sexuality in the dawning of the Twentieth Century.

Upon publication in 1915 'The Rainbow' was suppressed on the grounds of obscenity, all copies were destroyed and it remained banned in Britain for 11 years under the Obscene Publications Act 1857.

With thanks to the Estate of Frieda Lawrence Ravagli.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m00199d0)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Recognition for first England women's football team, Harriet Harman MP & the poet Lady Unchained

In a report published on Friday, the Joint Committee on Human Rights says the Government bears ultimate responsibility for the pain and suffering caused by public institutions and state employees that railroaded mothers in the 1950s, 60s and 70s into unwanted adoptions in England and Wales. Anita Rani speaks to Harriet Harman MP, who is Chair of the Joint Committee on Human Rights and Veronica Smith, founder member of the Movement for an Adoption Apology.

TikTok has become one of the most popular social media apps in the world. We hear from author and content creator Tova Leigh who contacted us to say she has noticed more and more disturbing content on the site that encourages violence against women and girls, and BBC Technology reporter Shiona McCallum.

The first international England Women’s football match was in November 1972. 50 years on, we speak to Woman’s Hour listener and reserve goalkeeper for the England team, Sue Whyatt who says the team are still waiting for their 'caps; and we hear from the honorary secretary of the Women’s Football Association, Patricia Gregory who co-organised that match.

Jersey has elected its first ever female Chief Minister. In elections last month, more women won seats in Jersey’s States Assembly than ever before. Emma Barnett speaks to Kristina Moore, a former journalist and TV presenter, to find out how her first few weeks in office are going.

From picking up the pen to survive in prison and since her release, Lady Unchained has made it her mission to become an advocate for life after prison. She is a poet, performer, and award winning broadcaster. We speak to her as she releases her debut poetry book: Behind Bars: On punishment, prison & release.


SAT 17:00 PM (m00199d2)
Full coverage of the day's news


SAT 17:30 Boris (m0019lg0)
2. The University Years: Beauty and the Beast

Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson. A bit of a mouthful. To most people - and there are those that hate it - he’s simply Boris

This series tells the story of Boris Johnson - from boy to man to Prime Minister. In each episode Adam Fleming talks to a range of people who’ve known, watched, worked or dealt with him.

In the second episode we hear about the university years.

Guests:

Anne McElvoy is a columnist and broadcaster at The Economist and her first interaction with Boris Johnson was interviewing him for the student newspaper at Oxford.

Jeya Wilson handed over the Oxford Union presidency to Boris Johnson in 1986.

Simon Kuper is a Financial Times columnist and author of the Chums: How a Tiny Caste of Oxford Tories Took Over the UK

Producers: Ben Carter and Natasha Fernandes
Editor: Emma Rippon
Production co-ordinator: Brenda Brown
Studio Engineer: James Beard


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m00199d4)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m00199d6)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00199d8)
The Cabinet Minister who chaired the government's emergency Cobra committee this afternoon has urged people not to travel on Monday or Tuesday due to the heatwave.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m00199db)
Jayde Adams, Ambreen Razia, Max Dickins, Graham Bartlett, Memorial, Laville, Andrew O'Neill, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Andrew O'Neill are joined by Jayde Adams, Ambreen Razia, Max Dickins and Graham Bartlett for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Laville and Memorial.


SAT 19:00 Profile (m00199dd)
Sarina Wiegman

Born in the Netherlands, the England women's football manager had a successful playing career both at home and in the US, before hanging up her boots. Mark Coles tracks her journey from playing alongside boys at the age of six to the England dugout.

Presenter: Mark Coles
Production team: Sally Abrahams, Diane Richardson and Ben Cooper
Editor: Richard Vadon


SAT 19:15 The Infinite Monkey Cage (m00199dg)
Series 24

Black Holes

Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined by Monty Python's Eric Idle, and cosmologists Dr Netta Engelhardt and Dr Janna Levin as they tackle one of the biggest challenges in cosmology. What happens when you throw something (Robin!) into a black hole? Is the information about Robin lost forever, or is there a chance, sometime in the far future, a super intelligent alien civilisation could piece back some key information to discover proof he ever existed? Are Robin and his cardigans lost for all eternity?

Executive Producer: Alexandra Feachem


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m00199dj)
London 2012: From Waste Land to Gold Rush

Ten years ago, for a few short August weeks, London and Britain was the cultural and sporting capital of the world. Gabby Logan tells the extraordinary story of how London became host city for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, and politicians, planners, architects and builders transformed a neglected chunk of east London into a superb Olympic Park.

Gabby interviews Jessica Ennis Hill and Nicola Adams on sharing the country's joy and the triumphs of their own experiences, revisiting and providing fresh insights into some of the most memorable moments of London 2012, as athletes from Team GB won a shed-load of medals. Sir Chris Hoy returns to the finishing line in the velodrome where he won his sixth gold.

The programme offers fascinating observations on the physical and political build up to the Games - the unlikely alliances of extraordinary characters, political rivals, visionary planners and exotic architects that enabled the Games bid to go ahead and the Park to get built. All this as London mayors and prime ministers came and went, with all the investment made in the shadow of the great 2008 financial crisis.

Gabby also looks at the legacy of the Games - has grassroots sport been boosted, or have those legacy hopes been disappointed?

Finally, the programme explores what enabled Britain, thought by some to be famously bad at delivering big national projects, to make such a huge success of London 2012.

Presenter: Gabby Logan
Writer: Dave Hill
Executive Editor: Michael Foster
Producer: Andrew McGibbon

A Curtains For Radio production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:00 Tumanbay (m000kgpg)
Series 4

Secret Garden

Anton Lesser, Aiysha Hart, Rufus Wright, Rob Jarvis and Kirsty Bushell lead an impressive ensemble cast in this engrossing, historical fantasy from creators John Scott Dryden and Mike Walker.

Convinced she has secured the Balarac’s withdrawal from the city, the murderous Fatima turns her attentions to the throne and how to get it. Meanwhile, Gregor (Rufus Wright) with the help of the Skyrats and his new side-kick, the assassin Aquila (Rob Jarvis), searches for a secret garden in the city where he believes the Hafiz may be hiding.

Cast:
Gregor................ Rufus Wright
Grand Master................ Anton Lesser
Aquila................ Rob Jarvis
Fatima................ Kirsty Bushell
Manel................ Aiysha Hart
Cadali................ Matthew Marsh
Sarp................Joplin Sibtain
Angel................Steffan Donnelly
Piero................Pano Masti
Frog................Misha Butler
Dumpy............... Ali Khan
Physician................Vivek Madan
Hafiz.............. Antony Bunsee
Butcher Hassan................ Gerard McDermott

Original Music by Sacha Puttnam

Sound Design by Eloise Whitmore
Sound Recording by Laurence Farr

Produced by Emma Hearn, Nadir Khan and John Scott Dryden
Written by Mac Rogers
Directed by John Scott Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:45 Rabbit at Rest (m0002bp3)
Episode 7

John Updike’s fourth novel about Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom.

It's the end of the 1980s and Harry has acquired a Florida condo, a second grandchild, and a troubled, overworked heart - not to mention a troubled underworking son. As Reagan’s debt-ridden, AIDS-panicked America yields to that of the first George Bush, Rabbit explores the bleak terrain of late middle age - looking for reasons to live and opportunities to make peace with a remorselessly accumulating past.

The novel won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1991, the second "Rabbit" novel to garner that award.

Reader: Toby Jones
Abridger: Eileen Horne
Producer: Clive Brill

A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:00 News (m00199dl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (m001946f)
The Right to Abortion

The Right to Abortion

This weekend thousands of people marched on the White House in support of a woman’s right to choose an abortion. That constitutional principle, established nearly 50 years ago in the case of “Roe v Wade” has just been overturned by the US Supreme Court and already many Republican states have banned abortions. As President Biden moves to try to protect abortion rights, campaigners in the UK have been stirred to action. There have been ‘Pro Life’ demonstrations outside clinics in Northern Ireland and ‘Pro Choice’ protests outside the US Embassy in London.

The number of abortions in England and Wales last year, more than 214,000, was the highest recorded since 1967, when a new law allowed, in most cases, terminations up to the 24th week of pregnancy. This also applied to Scotland but was only extended to Northern Ireland two years ago. Public opinion is clear: 85% of people in Britain think women should have the right to abortion. But should rights also be afforded to the unborn, and if so, at what stage of pregnancy? Has anyone the moral right to dictate whether a woman can have an abortion? For many women, “my body – my choice” is a fundamental principle. With Madeline Page, Professor Ellie Lee, Professor John Milbank and Kerry Abel.

Producers: Jonathan Hallewell and Peter Everett
Presenter: Michael Buerk


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (m00193ts)
Series 12

University of Warwick

A funny, lively and dynamic quiz presented by Steve Punt and recorded on location at a different university each week, pitting three undergraduates against three of their professors.

This week the show comes from the University of Warwick, the specialist subjects are Maths and Statistics, Linguistics and Engineering, and the questions range from Kartvelian Languages and Prismatic Actuators to Yellow Submarines and Vanessa Shanessa Jenkin.

The rounds vary between specialist subjects and general knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students’ knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors’ awareness of television, sport, and pop. And the Head-to-Head rounds, in which students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offer plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

The other universities in this series are University College London, Leeds Beckett, Bangor, Lancaster and Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 23:30 Percy Shelley, Reformer and Radical (m00193rw)
Red Shelley

We think we know Shelley. It is safe to say that we do not.

He comes to most of us in neatly packaged school anthologies which safely repeat the classics (Ozymandias, To a Skylark, and Ode to the West Wind), but Shelley's verse like The Masque of Anarchy shaped the world. Shelley and his two companions drowned off the coast of Italy after their boat ran into difficulties and sank. He was only 29 but he left a body of work which endures. With the bicentenary of his premature death in July 2022, there has never been a better time to re-examine Shelley's enduring legacy.

Benjamin Zephaniah is a huge admirer of Shelley. After a terrible start with the poet at school when the teacher told him he was stupid for not fully understanding what he was reading, Benjamin was turned on to Shelley in his early 20s when he stumbled on a copy of Paul Foot’s 'Red Shelley'. Paul Foot put Shelley’s works into the historical context in which they were written, in the early 19th century, at a time of profound social and political instability.

Understanding the context enabled Benjamin to connect with the radical nature of Shelley and his work. He says, "As a young, angry black man in the 1980s, it was a revelation to find a dead white poet that made sense to me. Good poetry has no age, and no colour." What he found in Shelley changed his life. Benjamin discovered that the poem he had first encountered at school, The Mask of Anarchy, was an angry ballad written by Shelley in response to the Peterloo massacre, and he now has a lifelong attachment to that poem.

Benjamin takes us on his journey from his first encounters with Shelley all the way up to the present: as he looks at a small keepsake of Shelley’s ashes, alleged to have been collected from the beach near Viareggio where Shelley's body was cremated, now held at the British Library, Benjamin says it's the closest he will get to a 'spiritual experience'.

Along the way, Benjamin meets experts and enthusiasts to discover more about what made Shelley tick and to breathe life into his poetry, showing that it's as relevant now as it was when Shelley died 200 years ago.

With Ben Orki, Nora Crook; Richard Holmes; Will Bowers; Alexander Lock, Robin Darwall-Smith, Stephen Hebron and Madeleine Callaghan.

Featured Poems: Ozymandias; A Ballad (Young Parson Richards stood at his gate); Adonais.

Series Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
Sound Design: David Thomas
Reader: Kymberley Cochrane
Series Consultant: Bysshe Coffey (author of Shelley's Broken World, 2021)

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4



SUNDAY 17 JULY 2022

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m00199dn)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:15 Living with the Gods (b09d43wm)
Festivals

Neil MacGregor continues his series on the expression of shared beliefs in communities around the world and across time, and focuses on festivals, and their role in shaping a communal identity.

Producer Paul Kobrak

Produced in partnership with the British Museum
Photograph (c) The Trustees of the British Museum.


SUN 00:30 From Fact to Fiction (m00194c6)
Small Door, Big Man

As Downing Street experiences yet another upheaval, decorator Amina wonders whether she will have a job after being associated with some infamous wallpaper. She reflects on her career and the legacy left in different halls of power.

Written by Yassmin Abdel-Magied
Read by Sirine Saba
Produced by Naomi Walmsley

Yassmin Abdel-Magied is the Sudanese Australian author of the essay collection, Talking About a Revolution. Her previous books include the award-winning teen novel, Listen, Layla, which she is now adapting for television. A regular columnist with The New Arab, Yassmin’s writing also appears in the Guardian, TIME, TLS and more.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00199dq)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00199ds)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00199dv)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m00199dx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m00199dz)
The Church of St Mary, Buriton in Hampshire.

Bells on Sunday comes from the Church of St Mary, Buriton in Hampshire. The tower of this largely Norman church was rebuilt in 1715, following a fire caused by a lightning strike. Today it holds a peal of six bells, the heaviest of which, the tenor bell, weighs eight and a half hundredweight and is tuned to G. We hear them ringing Grandsire Doubles.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m00199dd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Summary (m00199fr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b0118cmj)
Open

Professor of History at Leicester University, and former social worker, Peter King explores 'openness' - does it play a role in enabling us to empathise, to love and to be fully human? The programme includes a look at some of the things which close our lives down - inability to forgive, fear, money, and the need to protect our often-fragile sense of self.

Peter King, a Deacon in the Anglican Church, explains why he feels the word 'open' is sacred and why being open leads to a life of adventure.

Professor King discusses how being open and ready for the new leads to chance encounters which bring fresh insights. He notes that Jesus' life began with Mary's wild and radical openness, trusting God, even though risking public disgrace.

Producer: Kim Normanton
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (m00199fv)
Feeding Your Neighbours

Caz Graham visits Matt and Jenny Swarbrick at their permaculture farm in north Wales. Settled between the sea and the mountains of Snowdon, they combine caring for the environment and regenerating soil, with providing food and prosperity in a less economically favoured area. Using permaculture and agro-ecological methods, they grow vegetables, meat, eggs and milk, on a small and regenerative human scale that provides food and fuel for their home, their visitors and their local community.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs



SUN 06:57 Weather (m00199fx)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m00199fz)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m00199g1)
Faith and Tory Leadership Contest; Krishna Das and his Spiritual Journey; Stories marking 50 years of Uganda Asians in the UK

In 1992 Pope John Paul II beatified just 17 individuals out of nearly 460 whose names were put forward as dying for the faith during the religious and political upheavals of 16th and 17th century Ireland. So what made these individuals stand out from the rest during this period? Former President of Ireland, Dr Mary McAleese chats to Edward Stourton about the stories she uncovered in her new book ‘The 17 Irish Martyrs’.

50 years ago, Idi Amin, then President of Uganda, ordered the expulsion of his country’s Asian minority. Around 60,000 individuals were given just 90 days to leave. Many went to Canada, India, Kenya or Pakistan. Around 28,000 came to the UK. The majority settled in Leicester where a new exhibition ‘Rebuilding Lives’ has just opened at the Museum and Art Gallery. Edward speaks to Nisha Popat, the exhibition's project leader and Mina Patel who has a personal family connection to one of the exhibits on display.

Krishna Das, formerly known as Jeffery Kagel, is a Grammy-nominated vocalist who performs Indian devotional singing known as Kirtan. He took time out during the UK leg of his European tour to tell us how his spiritual journey began.

As the Conservative Leadership contest enters the final stages, the majority of talk has been around tax and the cost of living. But what about religion, could that also play a role in deciding who our next Prime Minister will be? Edward discusses the contenders with Tim Montgomerie, Co-founder of the Conservative Christian Fellowship and Creator of Conservativehome.com and Dr. Ekaterina Kolpinskaya, from the University of Exeter who is researching religion and the voting habits of Conservatives.
Photo Credit: Perry Julien

Producers: Jill Collins and Rosie Dawson
Editor: Tim Pemberton


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m00199g3)
CoppaFeel!

Kris Hallenga makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of CoppaFeel!, the charity she founded.

To Give:
- UK Freephone 0800 404 8144
-You can donate online at bbc.co.uk/appeal/radio4
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘CoppaFeel!’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘CoppaFeel!’.
Please note that Freephone and online donations for this charity close at 23.59 on the Saturday after the Appeal is first broadcast. However the Freepost option can be used at any time.

Registered charity number: 1132366

Kris Hallenga Photo © Jenna Foxton


SUN 07:57 Weather (m00199g5)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m00199g7)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m00199g9)
Festival Manchester

Earlier this month Festival Manchester, described as “the biggest Christian mission in a generation passionately sharing the love of Jesus Christ in words and actions with the hardest-to-reach young people and communities,” visited Manchester’s Wythenshawe Park. Hosted by the Message Trust and Luis Palau Association in partnership with churches across the North West, the festival line up of Christian artists included the Kingdom Choir, Matt Redman and Guvna B. The event was led by Sammy Jabangwe and Lindz West with preacher Andy Hawthorne, OBE.

Music included in this programme:

Love where you live (Soul Children FM Choir)
Nothing but the Blood of Jesus (Guvna B – words: Robert Lowry)
You’re never going to let me down (Guvna B – song by: John Mark McMillan, Sarah McMillan Lyrics © CAPITOL CHRISTIAN MUSIC GROUP, Editora Adorando Ltda., Capitol CMG Publishing)
Blessing and Honour – Ancient of Days (Kingdom Choir – song by: Gary Sadler & Jamie Harvill *© Copyright 1992 Integrity’s Hosanna! Music)
Stand by me (Kingdom Choir (song by: Lieber, Stoller, King)
Blessed be the name of the Lord (Matt Redman – song by: Matthew James Redman / Beth Redman - Blessed Be Your Name lyrics © Thank You Music Ltd.)
Reading: John 6: 1-14
Your love is chasing after me (Kingdom Choir – song by: Sharlene Monique Rodney)

Producer: Philip Billson.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m00194cs)
Chance and Opportunity

As the Tory leadership election highlights questions of social mobility, David Goodhart looks at why some people seem to have more luck than others. To what extent can we create our own opportunities, regardless of background? What role does personality play? And is it really possible to engineer and cultivate our own luck by being open to chance encounters?

Producer: Adele Armstrong
Sound: Peter Bosher
Production coordinator: Gemma Ashman
Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcfq)
Stock Dove

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the stock dove. Perhaps 'stock pigeon' would be a better name, because they're like slightly smaller versions of the woodpigeon. Unlike their bigger relatives they have no white marks on their wings or neck and are more blue-grey in colour. When they fly, they look dumpier ...stockier you might say. Unlike woodpigeons, stock doves haven't taken to a life in town and they're mainly birds of wooded farmland.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m00199gc)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m00199gf)
Writer, Sarah McDonald Hughes
Director and Editor, Jeremy Howe

Ben Archer ….. Ben Norris
Helen Archer ….. Louiza Patikas
Pip Archer ….. Daisy Badger
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Justin Elliott ….. Simon Williams
Toby Fairbrother ….. Rhys Bevan
Clarrie Grundy ….. Heather Bell
Eddie Grundy ….. Trevor Harrison
George Grundy …… Angus Stobie
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Brad Horrobin ….. Taylor Uttley
Chelsea Horrobin ….. Madeleine Leslay
Tracy Horrobin ….. Susie Riddell
Adam Macy ….. Andrew Wincott
Oliver Sterling ….. Michael Cochrane


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (m00199p9)
Kate Ewart-Biggs, Deputy Chief Executive, British Council

Kate Ewart-Biggs is the deputy chief executive of the British Council, which aims to build connections between the UK and countries worldwide, through education programmes, language learning and cultural activities.

Kate was born into a diplomatic family and her early childhood years were spent in France and Belgium. In 1976, when she was eight years old, her father Christopher Ewart-Biggs was appointed British ambassador to Ireland. Two weeks into his new job, he was killed by an IRA landmine. Kate's mother Jane moved the family back to London and began to campaign for peace and reconciliation in Ireland: she became a life peer in 1981.

After studying anthropology at university, Kate worked on charity projects for street children in Brazil and South Africa before joining the British Council. Her career has taken her all around the world including postings in Uganda, Tanzania and Indonesia.

She lives in London with her daughter.

DISC ONE: I Could Have Danced All Night by My Fair Lady Orchestra, My Fair Lady Chorus, Marni Nixon (soprano), André Previn (conductor), Mona Washbourne (played Mrs. Pearce), My Fair Lady Original Motion Picture Cast and Warner Brothers Studio Orchestra
DISC TWO: Et Si Tu N’existais Pas by Joe Dassin
DISC THREE: Mr Tambourine Man by Bob Dylan
DISC FOUR: I Don’t Like Mondays by The Boomtown Rats
DISC FIVE: Lambada by Kaoma
DISC SIX: Namagembe by Madoxx Sematimba
DISC SEVEN: I And Love And You by The Avett Brothers
DISC EIGHT: American Pie by Don McLean

BOOK CHOICE: The Complete Novels of Jane Austen
LUXURY ITEM: An asthma inhaler
CASTAWAY'S FAVOURITE: Mr. Tambourine Man by Bob Dylan

Presenter Lauren Laverne
Producer Sarah Taylor


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m00199pf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (m00193v2)
Series 77

Episode 1

This 50th Anniversary Series of Radio 4's multi award-winning ‘antidote to panel games’ promises yet more quality, desk-based entertainment for all the family. The celebrations begin in London’s Royal Albert Hall where Tony Hawks and Pippa Evans are pitched against Harry Hill and the programme’s creator Graeme Garden, with Jack Dee in the role of reluctant chairman. Regular listeners will know to expect inspired nonsense, pointless revelry and Colin Sell at the piano.

Producer - Jon Naismith
A BBC Studios production


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m00199pk)
Michael Caines: A Life Through Food

The award winning and inspirational chef tells his food story to Dan Saladino. One of his mentors, Raymond Blanc, explains why Michael is one of the best chefs of his generation.

Produced and presented by Dan Saladino.


SUN 12:57 Weather (m00199pp)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m00199pt)
Radio 4's look at the week's big stories from both home and around the world


SUN 13:30 The Listening Project (m00199px)
Consuming Passions

Four conversations between strangers presented by Kofi Smiles.

This week: Kirsty and Angela, cyclist and taxi driver respectively, argue over which set of wheels causes most problems on the roads; Neville and Mike debate the pros and cons of having your body cryogenically frozen; Autumn and Adam put the case for and against vinyl records and streaming; and with the Women’s Euros underway, teens Lacey and Sam share their passion for the beautiful game, their thoughts on the women’s game and England’s Lionesses.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation lasts up to an hour and is then edited to extract the key moments of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in this decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m00194c4)
Narberth

Horticultural programme featuring a group of gardening experts. Kathy Clugston is joined by Pippa Greenwood, Anne Swithinbank and Chris Beardshaw. Together, they answer your gardening queries.

The panellists are in Narberth, Wales, where they explain what to do when lupins stop flowering, and what they really think about weed-control fabrics. They also diagnose a poorly clematis, and suggest some interesting types of Phlomis to grow.

Away from the questions, Anne heads over to The National Botanic Garden of Wales and speaks to Elle James and Matt Smith about their boulder garden.

Producer: Daniel Cocker
Assistant Producer: Aniya Das

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 28ish Days Later (m00199q1)
Day Fourteen: Ovulation

Oestrogen has peaked and ovulation is imminent. Professor Evelyn Telfer from the University of Edinburgh discusses the formation and release of eggs, as well as key new research into whether women can make new eggs.

Credits:
Presented by India Rakusen.
Producer: Ellie Sans.
Assistant Producer:Jorja McAndrew.
Executive Producer: Suzy Grant.
Original music composed and performed by Rebekah Reid.
Sound design by Olga Reed.

Special thanks to all contributors and audio diarists.

A Listen production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.


SUN 15:00 Drama (m00199q5)
Mansfield Park. Part 2

by Jane Austen
Adapted by Clara Glynn

A new version of Austen’s most overlooked novel.
This is the only Austen book that tells the story of its protagonist from childhood. We first meet Fanny Price when she is nine years old and we witness how she’s shaped by family and adversity. At the centre of the book is a displaced child with an unshakeable conscience. A true heroine.

MANSFIELD PARK, where goodness is valued over glamour, feels like the Jane Austen for our times.

Episode Two - Fanny Price's true strength of character is revealed.

Fanny Price - Lydia Wilson
Edmund Bertram - Bryan Dick
Mary Crawford - Tala Gouveia
Henry Crawford - Tom Mothersdale
Mrs Norris/Mrs Grant - Janice Acquah
Lady Bertram - Madeleine Worrall
Tom Bertram/William Price - Joshua Riley
Sir Thomas - John Hollingworth
Maria Bertram - Faith Alabi

Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m00199q9)
Summer Reading and Benjamin Wood

Chris Power talks to Benjamin Wood about his novel The Young Accomplice. Set in 1952 the novel explores how Frank Lloyd Wright’s modernist vision inspired a married couple to set up their own architectural office in rural Surrey, where they offer a creative education and opportunity to orphaned siblings fresh out of borstal.
And critics Johanna Thomas -Corr and Max Liu join Chris to discuss their richly varied recommendations for summer reading.

Book List – Sunday 17 July and Thursday 21 July

Original Sins: A Memoir by Matt Rowland Hill
Yoga by Emmanuel Carrère
This One Sky Day by Leone Ross
Acts of Service by Lillian Fishman
Fight Night Miriam by Toews
The Passengers by Will Ashon
Godmersham Park by Gill Hornby
Harlem Shuffle by Colson Whitehead
The Makioka Sisters by Jun'ichirō Tanizaki
The Young Accomplice by Benjamin Wood
The Bellwether Revivals by Benjamin Wood
The Ecliptic by Benjamin Wood
A Station on the Path to Somewhere Better by Benjamin Wood
The Big Rock Candy Mountain by Wallace Stegner
All the Little Live Things by Wallace Stegner
Home by Marilynne Robinson


SUN 16:30 Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets (m00199qf)
Hull

The popular series soaking up poetry and dialect from different corners of the UK returns - and in the first episode playwright, comedian and poet Gill Adams explores the way people speak in her home city of Kingston upon Hull on Yorkshire's East Coast.

From the heart of Hessle Road in the centre of Hull, once a thriving fishing community, to the banks of the river Humber, Gill goes back to her roots with fellow poets Dean Wilson, Carol Coiffat, Ian Winter and David Okwesia.

Gill asks if the Hull dialect with its flat vowels and unique terminology come from the fact that it's a port and gateway to Europe? Or are we still hanging onto the sayings our Mams and Grannies used to keep us in check when the men were away at sea?

Gill visits Rayners, the pub at the very heart of the sea-faring community, she talks about her childhood and growing up in Hull, hears from experts about how the unique dialect of Hull has evolved over the years, and finds out how new writers are using the changing dialect and accent in their poetry.

Other episodes in the series explore poetry and dialect in Portsmouth, LIverpool and Cornwall.

A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m00193pk)
Assaulted by my massage therapist

The massage industry has bounced back since covid, but File on 4 investigates the darker side of this industry. Hannah Price speaks to women who were sexually assaulted by massage therapists. In some cases, the therapist went on to assault other women even after they’d been arrested.

The programme reveals how the industry is largely unregulated - with no licensing of practitioners. It means anyone, even without qualifications or with a criminal conviction, could practice as a massage therapist.

Sexual assault victims and professional bodies in the sector are calling for more regulation to be introduced to protect both clients and therapists from sexual violence and harm.

Reporter: Hannah Price
Producers: Paul Grant and Eleanor Layhe
Editor: Carl Johnston


SUN 17:40 Profile (m00199dd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m00199qk)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m00199qn)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00199qq)
The five Conservative leadership contenders go head-to-head in the second TV debate.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m00199qt)
Jon Holmes

Jon Holmes, creator and producer of Radio 4’s scathing satirical soundscape The Skewer, travel writer and licensed drone pilot chooses his highlights from the past week on BBC Radio and BBC Sounds. He ascends with the lark to the music of Vaughan Williams, joins Alexei Sayle on a train, and gets a huge surprise to discover that Elgar wrote heavy metal music. He takes a walk with Aaron Sorkin, and goes back in time to the TV themes of his childhood. And he shares the moving moments as a fellow BBC Radio presenter says an emotional goodbye to his Mum.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m00199gp)
Clarrie visits Natasha to see how she’s getting on, but instead of it being a relaxing visit, Clarrie unintentionally winds Natasha up about how exhausting it is having little ones. Natasha anxiously exclaims there’s no way she can cope on her own with two babies. Clarrie gives her a gift of hand- knitted cardies – blue for the boy and pink for the girl.

Oliver tries to apologise to Brad for hiring the telehandler – he hadn’t realised the impact it would have on Brad’s work. Tracy appears and is icy with Oliver for pulling the plug on Brad’s haymaking. Oliver’s contrite, saying he knew Brad was saving up for a summer school. Tracy must be proud. Later Tracy asks Brad what he meant? After some coaxing Brad tells her about his free scholarship for a Maths summer school. But he can’t go because he can’t afford the expenses. When he mentions he’s thinking of working at the chicken factory, alarmed Tracy explains he wouldn’t be able to deal with the banter there. Despondent Brad says he’d better get used to it, hadn’t he?

Later Oliver tells Clarrie about his bruising encounter with Tracy; he’s reinforced Tracy’s conviction that he’s a penny-pinching fat-cat who doesn’t care about people and she’s not the only one who thinks that. Clarrie’s reassuring; where would they be without Oliver’s generosity? She’s glad the village will be welcomed to the launch of the ‘Future Grey Gables’. When Oliver reveals his plans, she’s sure there’ll be opportunities for everyone.


SUN 19:15 Alexei Sayle's Strangers on a Train (m00199gr)
Series 1

London to Glasgow

Author, actor and comedy icon, Alexei Sayle continues his travels across the country by rail in the second of his six part series for Radio 4.

Alexei’s mission is to break the golden rule of travelling by train and actually talk to his fellow passengers in a quest for conversations that reveal their lives, hopes, dreams and destinations. There’s humour, sadness and surprise as people talk about what is going on in their lives and, as Alexei passes through familiar towns and cities, he also tells stories and memories from his career and childhood.

Alexei has a lifelong "ticket to ride" in his DNA. His father was a railway guard and the Sayle family benefitted from free travel in the UK and across Europe. As a boy, Alexei and his family roamed far and wide from the family home in Anfield, Liverpool. At a time when most people thought an exciting trip by train was to Brighton or Blackpool, Alexei travelled thousands of miles to mysterious towns with unpronounceable names in far flung corners of the continent.

In each programme in the series, Alexei embarks on a rail journey, taking a chance on who he might meet and inviting them to have a conversation with him. In this episode, he travels from London to Glasgow and meets Roshny and Sharon, on holiday from Indonesia, who have just fulfilled a lifetime’s dream of watching Liverpool play at Anfield. He also talks to Laurence who has been to his public speaking club which he joined to overcome his extreme shyness and Kirsty who has lived most of her life on a sheep farm overlooking the stunningly beautiful Holy Loch in Argyll and Bute.

Producers Peter Lowe and Nick Symons
A Ride production for Radio 4


SUN 19:45 Three Fires (m00199gt)
Episode 1: Girolamo Hears God

This new five-part serial from award-winning crime writer Denise Mina takes a cool, contemporary look at Renaissance-era Florence. In a corrupt city riven by factionalism, wealth inequality and suffering from a rampant outbreak of plague, the pressure is building. It will take the intervention of one special man to bring matters to a head.
Read by Kieran Hodgson
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


SUN 20:00 Feedback (m00194cb)
Are BBC journalists enjoying the Conservative party leadership crisis a little too much? Even delighting in the demise of Boris Johnson? That is the suspicion of some Feedback listeners. Roger Bolton puts this accusation to the Today Programme’s Justin Webb, who also discusses impartiality and what it is like to be in the middle of a political maelstrom.

Roger Mosey the former Editorial Director of the BBC gives his thoughts on the proposed move of Radio 4 Extra to online only.

And why remake T S Eliot’s The Waste Land as a drama, 100 years on?

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Alun Beach
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m00194c8)
Shinzo Abe (pictured), Mona Hammond OBE, Lorna de Smidt, Monty Norman

Kirsty Lang on

Shinzo Abe - Japan’s longest-serving prime minister who sought to end a wartime legacy of defeat and occupation and to tackle the economy through ‘Abenomics’.

Actor Mona Hammond is best known for her TV role in Eastenders.

Lorna de Smidt, the anti-apartheid and anti-racist activist who cut her political teeth in the Black Consciousness Movement in South Africa in the late 1960s.

And Monty Norman - Composer and singer who wrote the James Bond main theme and a string of successful musicals as well.

Producer: Neil George

Interviewed guest: Nakano Koichi
Interviewed guest: Dr Kristin Surak
Interviewed guest: Michael Buffong
Interviewed guest: Graham de Smidt
Interviewed guest: Matthew Sweet

Archive clips used: BBC News, Report on death of Shinzo Abe, 08/07/2022; BBC Radio 4, The World This Weekend, Votes counted for Japanese election, 29/07/2007; BBC One, Eastenders 25/10/2010; Humphrey Barclay Productions for Channel 4, Desmond's S01E04 26/01/1989; BBC Radio 4, The Archers 28/12/2003; BBC Two, Storm Damage (1989), 23/01/2000; Paramount Pictures/ Albert S. Ruddy Productions/ Alfran Productions, The Godfather Part 1 (1972); BBC Radio 4, News Bulletin19/03/2001; BBC Two Omnibus - Monty Norman interview 17/10/1982.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m00199cp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m00199g3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (m00193v9)
What is childcare for?

Is formal childcare for pre-school children there to provide an early years education? Or to allow parents to go out to work?

Politicians would say both, but many argue the UK’s system is failing to do either.

Charlotte McDonald explores what improvements could be made and ask – do we want a big overhaul of our current system?


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m00199gx)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 Loose Ends (m00199db)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b0118cmj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 18 JULY 2022

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m00199h0)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Sideways (m0019455)
25. A Nuclear Awakening

It’s a little girl’s eighth birthday. She wakes to a sight that looks like the end of the world. A radioactive mushroom cloud rises 130,000 feet in the air. And the world wakes up to the devastating fallout of nuclear weapons.

In this new mini series from Sideways, writer and Times columnist Matthew Syed is calling for a nuclear awakening. Since the end of the Cold War, when relations between two of the world’s nuclear superpowers - the former USSR and the USA - seemed more rosy, Matthew argues that many of us have slipped into a kind of comfortable amnesia about the presence of these destroyers of worlds.

The wake up call came when President Vladimir Putin launched the invasion of Ukraine in February accompanied by veiled nuclear threats. It was a reminder of the mind bending fact that there are weapons in existence that are capable of eradicating our species.

Over four episodes, Matthew explores the intellectual and strategic frameworks birthed by the bomb and the tensions of the Cold War, which sought to contain the ultimate destructive force. From deterrence to disarmament and non-proliferation, these ideas all aim at one goal - protection from catastrophic nuclear use. Understanding their origins and complexities is urgently needed, Matthew argues.

Ultimately, Matthew will be asking if the actions of Putin in Ukraine call for a new intellectual framework to help make our world safe.

Presenter: Matthew Syed
Producer and Series Editor: Katherine Godfrey
Researcher: Nadia Mehdi
Sound Designer: Rob Speight
Special thanks to Jessica A Schwartz for her recordings of Lijon Eknilang which form part of the material for her book Radiation Sounds. Also to Ali Raj and Susanne Rust, whose reporting for the LA Times informed this episode.

Contributors:
Evelyn Ralpho Jeadrik, daughter of Lijon Eknilang, Marshallese singer, composer and anti-nuclear activist.
Ariana Tibon, Commissioner, Royal Marshall Islands National Nuclear Commission
Alex Wellerstein, historian of science and nuclear weapons and a professor at the Stevens Institute of Technology.
David Holloway, Raymond A. Spruance Professor of International History and author of Stalin and the Bomb: The Soviet Union and Atomic Energy, 1939-1956


A Novel production for BBC Radio 4


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m00199dz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00199h2)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00199h4)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00199h6)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m00199h8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00199hb)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Dr Janet Unsworth.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m00199hd)
With the UK under the first ever red extreme heat warning to be issued by the Met Office, farmers are being warned to take extra steps to keep themselves and their animals safe in temperatures that could reach a life-threatening 40 degrees in some parts. Fields are tinder dry, and machinery - with its hot moving parts, dust and diesel - is already under higher risk of catching fire. We get advice from the Farm Safety Foundation.
As the price of fertilizer rockets - largely due to the war in Ukraine - we meet a farmer who's found an unexpected result of growing more environmentally friendly sward is that he doesn't need as much fertilizer, as the plants fix nitrogen in the soil.
And this week we look at the UK's animal feed industry. We manufacture sixteen million tonnes of it every year for the nation's cattle, sheep, pigs, poultry and fish farms too.
The presenter is Steffan Messenger.


MON 05:56 Weather (m00199hg)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcq9)
Fulmar

Kate Humble presents the fulmar, a familiar cliff nesting seabird during the breeding season. For the rest of the year fulmar can be found over the cold subarctic northern oceans of the Atlantic and the Pacific. Coming to land only to breed, these tubenose birds despite resembling other seabirds, are closely related to petrels and albatrosses.


MON 06:00 Today (m00199vn)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 This Cultural Life (m00159tb)
Maggi Hambling

Artist Maggi Hambling is a painter known for evocative portraits, and powerfully energetic seascapes of the Suffolk coastline where she grew up. She’s also a sculptor, whose public artworks, including tributes to Oscar Wilde, Benjamin Britten and more recently Mary Wollstonecraft, have been the focus of both acclaim and controversy.

She tells John Wilson about her unconventional family life in Suffolk, discovering her artistic talent as child and studying with the East Anglian school of painting under Sir Cedric Morris and Arthur Lett-Haines. She explains how Rembrandt's portraits were a major influence on her own work, and reveals how a trip to New York in 1969 proved to be a formative experience, not least because she found herself at the legendary Woodstock Festival that year. She also speaks candidly about how painting family members and close friends after they have died, including both her parents and her partner in their coffins, helped keep their memory alive for her.

Producer: Edwina Pitman


MON 09:45 The Expectation Effect by David Robson (m00199wm)
The Prediction Machine

The Expectation Effect is David Robson's book about the remarkable science of our mindset, and how your brain can change your world for the better.

In this episode David looks at our brains as ‘prediction machines’, and learns how our subjective experiences can become our objective realities.

David Robson has worked at The New Scientist and BBC Future. His writing has also appeared in the Guardian, the Atlantic, Aeon, Men’s Health and many more outlets. In 2021, David received awards from the Association of British Science Writers and the UK Medical Journalists’ Association for his writing on misinformation and risk communication during the COVID pandemic. David’s first book, The Intelligence Trap, was published in 2019.

Written and read by David Robson
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Anne Isger
A BBC Books Production


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m00199vs)
R J Palacio, Dr Nneka Ikeogu, Rajini Vaidyanathan, Dr Radikha Vohra and Dr Jo Mountfield

American author R J Palacio talks to Krupa Padhy about her latest novel "White Bird"

Following the overturning of Roe V Wade in the US more women have talked openly about having had an abortion but many never speak openly about their experiences. In a series first broadcast in 2019 we hear five different personal testimonies from women. Today, a woman we are calling Amanda who only came to terms with her abortion 25 years later.

How can learning your child’s ‘love language’ help you become a better parent? Child and Educational Psychologist, Dr Nneka Ikeogu, talks us through the 5 languages of love and explains how children give, and receive, love using them.

We hear from the BBC’S South Asia Correspondent Rajini Vaidyanathan about how the economic crisis in Sri Lanka is affecting families across the country

And how do women's bodies respond to extreme heat? We talk to GP Dr Radikha Vohra and Dr Jo Mountfield from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.


Presenter: Krupa Padhy
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson
Studio Manager: Gayl Gordon

Picture Credit: Heike Bogenberger


MON 11:00 My Name Is... (m00199vv)
My Name Is Ricardo P Lloyd

My name is Ricardo P Lloyd, and I’m a British actor who has worked alongside Oscar winners and top stars in many stage productions. But yet I’ve struggled to make the transition to the screen in the UK. I believe that part of the reason is because I refuse to perpetrate the negative stereotypes in so many of the roles available for black actors. In this programme I examine why I and others feel that things need to change in the industry.

When I started my acting career, this wasn’t the thing that initially held me back. If anything, the struggle then was to fund a career in an industry that’s hard for low-income families to navigate. Thankfully, I did well and started making a name for myself on the stage, working alongside Mark Rylance and being mentored by him. I’ve performed in productions produced by the Shakespeare Globe and am tipped as one to watch by newspapers like The Voice. Given how well I was doing, I hadn’t imagined how hard it would be to move to screen roles.

In this edition of My Name is.... I’ll be exploring the challenges faced by young black actors in the UK and what happens in the audition process and beyond.

Why are so many of the roles earmarked for us so detrimental to the representation of black people and what can we do to challenge the racism that’s holding us back?

My recordings will feature a range of different people across the industry. Including stars like Tobi Bakare, who recently decided to quit the hit BBC show Death in Paradise. And Aml Ameen, the acclaimed British actor who successfully paved a career in Hollywood and has starred in Sense8, the Maze Runner, and The Butler, just to name a few.

I’ll be investigating the compromises we’ve made and exposing those that we feel are unacceptable.
In my early twenties, I was used to reading for small “gang roles”, but after a successful run in a special birthday celebration of Shakespeare at Westminster Abbey, I was cut short by a theatrical agent. He greeted me with the words: ”Diversity is the new thing:” an automatic red flag that immediately put me on guard. His rejection letter came with the cursory words:

“We’ve already got someone who looks like you on our books.”

I want to challenge this and help pave the way for black youngsters still in school and dreaming of following this path in life. There are already so many obstacles in their way, from fees for drama school, through to the difficulties of navigating class barriers that can hold them back. As black actors go further on in our careers, we know how much is still left to do. The industry has been shutting us out for too long and we won’t let this keep happening.

It is time that our voices are heard and acknowledged and there are solid changes made!

Presented & written by: Ricardo P Lloyd


MON 11:30 The Bottom Line (m00194h3)
Woke or Broke?

From Disney to the Halifax bank, companies are increasingly willing to take a stance on everything. But what is driving this trend and will it continue? Ultimately isn't it the job of a business to make money for its shareholders and not get involved in politics and contentious social issues? Evan Davis and guests discuss.

GUESTS

Nina Bhatia, Executive Director, Strategy and Commercial Development, John Lewis Partnership

Ian Leslie, Journalist and Author of 'Conflicted'

Becky Willan, CEO and Co-founder, Given Agency

Nicola Kilner, CEO and Co-founder of Deciem

Producer: Julie Ball
Sound: James Beard
Editor: Jon Bithrey
Production Co-Ordinators: Siobhan Reed and Helena Warwick-Cross


MON 12:00 News Summary (m00199wv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 You and Yours (m00199vz)
Coffee, New Cars and Passport Couriers

Coffee prices are up, but will we be paying even more for our fix from this heat-sensitive crop in future? Weeks, months, years? Who knows when your new car will arrive?


MON 12:57 Weather (m00199w1)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m00199w3)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


MON 13:45 28ish Days Later (m00199w5)
Day Fifteen: Baby Steps

On day 15 of the cycle, India looks at fertility and the process of trying to conceive - and explores the tragic reality that not all pregnancies are successful. Dr Dornu Lebari takes us through a fertility consultation, and discusses the stigma that surrounds reproductive health. Dame Lesley Regan speaks with India about early miscarriage.

Credits:
Presented by India Rakusen.
Producer: Ellie Sans.
Assistant Producer: Jorja McAndrew.
Executive Producer: Suzy Grant.
Original music composed and performed by Rebekah Reid.
Sound Design by Charlie Brandon-King.

Special thanks to all contributors and audio diarists.

A Listen production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.


MON 14:00 The Archers (m00199gp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (m000kp5p)
The Apple, The Tree

Potent family drama by Ali Taylor.

Beth’s about to be visited by her daughter for the first time since beginning her prison sentence. But she doesn’t want to see her daughter. Ever again.

Cast:

Beth …Victoria Liddelle
Megan … Anna Russell-Martin
Kat …Hannah Donaldson
David ... Robert Jack

Directed by Kirsty Williams


MON 15:00 The 3rd Degree (m00199w7)
Series 12

Bangor University

A funny, lively and dynamic quiz presented by Steve Punt and recorded on location at a different university each week, pitting three undergraduates against three of their professors.

This week the show comes from Bangor University, the specialist subjects are Education, Film Studies and Zoology with Herpetology, and the questions range from the Miracle at Cana to the sex life of Komodo Dragons. And you can play along to the well-known game, Name Five Famous Spaniards.

The rounds vary between specialist subjects and general knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students’ knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors’ awareness of television, sport, and pop. And the Head-to-Head rounds, in which students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offer plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

The other universities in this series are University College London, Warwick, Leeds Beckett, Lancaster and Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m00199pk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Sketches: Stories of Art and People (m00199wb)
On Dartmoor

Writer Anna Freeman presents stories of three people with a deep connection to Dartmoor and finds out how this landscape unlocked something creatively for each of them.

"It seemed like it would go on forever, this vastness of terrain and weather - it was the only place i felt reflected". Tanoa Sasraku grew up in Plymouth and first came to Dartmoor as a teenager on an army cadet expedition. Something about the wild landscape with its bogs and mists helped her unpack her own experiences of growing up as gay and biracial in Devon. She shows Anna her Terratypes, sculptural works built up from many layers of paper, coloured with foraged pigments, stitched and torn, and submerged in the water of a Dartmoor bog.

"I really found my Muscogee feet on the land here... there's something really holding about the valleys". Melinda Schwakhofer is an American textile artist and citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation who now lives and works on Dartmoor. She has reconnected with her Native American ancestors through learning about hide-tanning and working with buckskin, in a workshop at the edge of the moor.

"It's like all the best bits of the rest of the British countryside but on steroids... It lights something in my soul... it changed my writing". Tom Cox is a writer who has made his home at the southern edge of the moor. He introduces Anna to some favourite spots along the River Dart and the densely wooded folds of the valleys he loves to walk in. This is a landscape that has continually sparked something for him, and that is woven into his fiction and essays. He had often wondered why the hills of Dartmoor kept calling him back and recently discovered a family link to the moor that made sense of everything.

Produced by Maggie Ayre and Mair Bosworth


MON 16:30 Don't Log Off (m001740k)
Series 13

People Are Alike All Over

For the last decade Alan Dein has crossed the globe via the internet to gather stories from total strangers & occasional old friends. In Uganda, Marion the midwife has been picking up the pieces of community life still ravaged by Covid. In Kenya taxi driver Steve ponders his country's up coming elections & reveals a turbulent life whilst Roberta in Zambia recalls her parents struggles for independence & the preciousness of education.

Producer Mark Burman


MON 17:00 PM (m00199wd)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00199wj)
Britain copes with an intense heatwave, as Wales records its hottest day ever


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (m00199wn)
Series 77

Episode 2

This 50th Anniversary Series of Radio 4's multi award-winning ‘antidote to panel games’ promises more homespun wireless entertainment for the young at heart. This week the programme pays a return visit to London’s Royal Albert Hall where Tony Hawks and Pippa Evans are pitched against Harry Hill and the programme’s creator Graeme Garden, with Jack Dee in the chair. At the piano - Colin Sell.

Producer - Jon Naismith
A BBC Studios production


MON 19:00 The Archers (m00199wr)
When Natasha has Braxton Hicks contractions, Tom worries the babies are on their way. Natasha reassures him; she’s sure the babies will be born on Friday as planned.

Helen mentions to Adam that their new marketing strategy on the website seems to have been successful; telling the truth clearly works. Adam talks about the WI pizza tasting at the Village Hall tomorrow – he and Ian have been practising all weekend. Tom tells them that Natasha’s anxiety levels about the babies have sky-rocketed and wonders if it was something Clarrie said.

Helen admires Clarrie’s knitted cardies for the babies, but Natasha scoffs at the pink and blue. She thought the world had moved on from gender distinctions, and her boy will be wearing the pink one. Natasha thinks Tom’s terrified something will go wrong with the twins because of what happened with Wren. And she’s scared - when the babies arrive she can’t imagine how she’s going to cope. Her mum’s visiting in a couple of weeks, but she wishes she was here now.

Jazzer finds Tracy crying and feeling guilty about Brad. It’s heartbreaking that she can’t scrape enough cash together for his summer school expenses. All she can do is put in a good word for him at the chicken factory – but she won’t do that because it’s a hell hole. Gemma, her supervisor, has got it in for her. Tracy makes Jazzer promise not to tell anyone. She can’t afford to leave, but what she can do is make sure Brad never sets foot in the chicken factory.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m00199ww)
Kraftwerk's Karl Bartos, the Spooky Men’s Chorale, playwright Lucy Kirkwood

Karl Bartos, musician and composer, on his life in the German band Kraftwerk - as told in his new memoir The Sound of the Machine.

Playwright and screenwriter Lucy Kirkwood on her play Maryland - devised in response to normalisation of violence against women, and originally staged at Royal Court Theatre in London in 2021, it has now been adapted for BBC TV screens.

The Spooky Men’s Chorale: the strangely comedic but musically marvellous and popular Australian male voice choir stop off in the middle of their UK tour to sing and talk to Samira Ahmed about Georgian polyphony, Swedish folk band Abba, and not being a men’s group.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Julian May

Image credit: Markus Wustmann


MON 20:00 Peter Brook (m000v2wk)
This intimate and personal look at Peter Brook's theatre work is in conversation with Glenda Jackson and was recorded just a year before his death. With landmark productions that changed the face of British theatre, such as the electrifying Marat Sade and the liberating, landmark acrobatic production of Midsummer Night's Dream, and since moving to Paris, internationally renowned The Mahabharata, this is a moving tribute to a world class director.

Presented by Glenda Jackson
Produced by Pauline Harris
BBC Audio, North


MON 20:30 Analysis (m00199x1)
Is the UK the new sick man of Europe?

Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, the United Kingdom was sometimes characterised as the 'sickman of Europe' due to industrial strife and poor economic performance compared to other European countries.

Today, inflation is once again rising and growth is forecast to slow considerably and economists predict that the UK could suffer a greater hit to living standards next year than any other major European country.

BBC economics correspondent Dharshini David asks just how hard the times ahead will be and how might we find a cure to avoid the mantle of 'sick man of Europe' once more?

Producer: Caroline Bayley
Editor: Richard Fenton - Smith
Sound Engineer: Rod Farquhar
Production Coordinators: Maria Ogundele and Helena Warwick-Cross


MON 21:00 Plant Based Promises (m00193nd)
Plant-based diets and health

Giles Yeo learns how to make a Thai green curry with Meera Sodha. This is a recipe without meat or prawns but with tofu and lots of vegetables. If we need to eat less meat and dairy to help prevent global warming- what difference will altering our diets make to our health. For a long time now people have been urged to cut down on red meat and processed foods but if you have been eating them all your life it takes an effort to develop new habits. Plant based products that can replace for example dairy milks, cheeses, sausages, burgers and meat based dishes such as lasagne can be helpful in making this transition but are they healthier?


MON 21:30 The Smugglers' Trail (m0015bb3)
Crossings by Boat and Lorry

In programme two Rob and Sue reveal the extent of frustration felt by families of those who died in the Channel in November. Relatives of some of the 27 victims have been trying to track the smugglers themselves and feel let down by the authorities - some have even gone as far as offering reward money to carry out the ultimate revenge on those they say are responsible.

Two sisters speak of the friendship they formed on the French camp with a seven year old girl called Hesty. She had made the journey from northern Iraq with her mother, Kajal, sister, Hadia, and brother, Mobin. Their father, Rizgar, is a policeman and had stayed behind to earn enough money to pay smugglers for his passage at a later date. When word of the deaths at sea spread the sisters tried desperately to find out more: they knew that Hesty was making the crossing and immediately feared the worse.

As they describe the anguish of waiting for news they reveal how their own sea crossing, just three days earlier, had also been beset with dangers. But they made it and are now settling into new lives in Blackpool. Their friend from the camp didn't and as they come to terms with what's happened they speak of their hatred of the smugglers involved and their fear that these ruthless individuals might ultimately evade justice.

Reporter: Sue Mitchell


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m00199x3)
Day 1 of intense UK heatwave

In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 Winchelsea by Alex Preston (m00199x5)
Episode 6

A tale of revenge, identity and smuggling, set in Sussex in the 18th Century.

Winchelsea is a smugglers’ town. Beneath it there runs a network of cellars and caves from under its streets as far as the King’s Cliff. All manner of goods are stored there, safe from the excise men. The Cellarman holds the keys to the cellar gates, a position held in Goody Brown’s family since the founding of the town.

Episode Six
At the revels at Arthur Gray’s house at Seacox Heath, Goody becomes the focus of attention for Lily and Gray.

Alex Preston is an author and journalist who lives in Kent. His personal anthology of nature writing, As Kingfishers Catch Fire, was published in 2017. Winchelsea, published in 2022, is his fourth novel.

Writer: Alex Preston
Reader: Jessica Gunning
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (m00193p3)
My Stammer Story

Michael Rosen asks William Laven about how he has learnt to embrace language and life with a stammer.

For the first 10 years of his life, William Laven went to speech therapy with a stammer that was so severe he could not form a full sentence. Fast forward to today, William is now a 23-year-old podcast founder, Tedx speaker, stammer advocate, awareness raiser and campaigner. He is devoted to improving expectations for those with speech impediments, to challenge the stigma surrounding stammers, and to encourage children with stammers to believe in themselves.

When it comes to his own stammer, he now believes it’s his superpower!

Produced for BBC Audio Bristol by Becky Ripley


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m00199x7)
Sean Curran reports as MPs vote on whether they have confidence in the government.



TUESDAY 19 JULY 2022

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m00199x9)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 00:30 The Expectation Effect by David Robson (m00199wm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00199xc)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00199xf)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00199xh)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m00199xk)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00199xm)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Dr Janet Unsworth.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m00199xp)
19/07/22 - Sustainability of animal feed, poultry feed processing, the Royal Welsh agricultural show

40% of UK arable land is used to grow animal feed, the WWF says the system must change to address climate change, biodiversity loss and food security challenges.

After three years of no show it’s full steam ahead this week, as the Royal Welsh agricultural show gets back to business. But after a three-year break due to Covid, and amid warnings of dangerously high temperatures, organisers have admitted this year's event has been one of the most challenging to get up and running.

All week we're looking at animal feed. It's perhaps the biggest cost a meat producer faces and those costs have been soaring, and that's certainly true in the poultry industry. We visit a feed processor near Winchester.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcdf)
Little Grebe

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the little grebe. Little grebes are our smallest grebes. They're dumpy birds with dark brown feathers and in the breeding season have a very obvious chestnut patch on their necks and cheeks. Little grebes are secretive birds, especially in the breeding season when they lurk in reeds and rushes or dive to avoid being seen.


TUE 06:00 Today (m00199xr)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Long History of Argument (m00199xw)
From Socrates to Social Media

Thesis

Rory Stewart explores the strange human phenomenon of arguing and why it matters so deeply to our lives.

Argument became the way in which we answered the deepest questions of philosophy, established scientific rules, and made legal decisions. It was the foundation of our democracies and the way in which we chose the policies for our state.

Rory grew up believing that the way to reach the truth was through argument. He was trained to argue in school, briefly taught classical rhetoric and he became a member of parliament. But the experience of being a politician also showed him how dangerous arguments can be, and how bad arguments can threaten our democracies, provoke division and hide the truth.

In this episode, Rory explores why speaking and arguing well were seen for millennia as the key to a good education and the cornerstone of civilisation.

Producer: Dan Tierney.


TUE 09:30 New Storytellers (m00199y0)
Down on the Farm

The stressed-filled lives of Britain’s small farmers is a subject rarely spoken of outside the confines of the farming community (and Farming Today). Up before dawn, often not in bed until the small hours. The multiple pressures of livestock, spiralling costs and bad weather can conspire to drive farmers to the edge of suicide.

With at least one farmer in the UK taking their own life each week, Down On The Farm explores the struggles within the agricultural industry - through poetry (Border Country by Owen Sheers), music and verbatim voice. One farmer recounts the impact it’s had on his community, and on his own mental health.

New Storytellers presents the work of new radio and audio producers, and this series features the winners of this year’s Charles Parker Prize 2022 for the Best Student Radio Feature.

Down on the Farm was made by University of Sunderland MA student Megan Hayward, and the judges were impressed with its "impressive storytelling – frank and raw and honest," and a mixture of poetry and song which was "beautiful and well delivered’.

Producer: Megan Hayward
A Soundscape production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 09:45 The Expectation Effect by David Robson (m00199z0)
A Pious Fraud

The Expectation Effect is David Robson's book about the remarkable science of our mindset, and how your brain can change your world for the better.

In this episode David looks at the power of the placebo effect, and how it can work even when we know about it.

David Robson has worked at The New Scientist and BBC Future. His writing has also appeared in the Guardian, the Atlantic, Aeon, Men’s Health and many more outlets. In 2021, David received awards from the Association of British Science Writers and the UK Medical Journalists’ Association for his writing on misinformation and risk communication during the COVID pandemic. David’s first book, The Intelligence Trap, was published in 2019.

Written and read by David Robson
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Anne Isger
A BBC Books Production


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m00199y4)
Surviving in Scrubs, Male Contraception, Little Women Opera, Caps for England Women's Team

It’s being called medicine’s Me Too moment. Two female doctors have launched an online campaign gathering testimony about sexual harassment and a culture of sexism in the world of health care. Dr Becky Cox and Dr Chelcie Jewitt join Krupa to explain why they launched Surviving in Scrubs.

Last week we looked at radical solutions to the ageing population and slowing birth rate, including a tax on the childfree. One country which has taken a unique approach is Hungary which introduced tax breaks and loans to encourage women to have more children in 2019. The BBC’s Nick Thorpe’s joins Krupa to discuss how successful the policy has been.

Back in 1972, the very first England Women's Football Team beat Scotland in their first international victory, but unlike the men’s team, the Lionesses were not awarded official caps. Pressure has been mounting for the Football Association to recognise the 1972 team with caps. The reserve goalkeeper, Sue Wyhatt, joins us as the FA announce they will award the caps.

The male contraceptive pill has been talked about for decades but so far has never got past the research stages. There is a current clinical trial though that is already yielding good results – however it’s not a pill, it’s a gel. It’s also had positive feedback from the couples who tried it. Krupa is joined by Dr Diana Blithe, who leads the Contraceptive Development Program at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in the US.

The UK premiere of Little Women opens at Opera Holland Park later this week. The award winning director Ella Marchment, joins Krupa Padhy, along with Charlotte Padham, who makes her professional debut as Jo.

Presenter: Krupa Padhy
Producer: Emma Pearce


TUE 11:00 Science Stories (b0858v5m)
Series 4

The Woman Who Tamed Lightning

In the 1870s with a degree from Cambridge University, Herta Marks was making a living teaching and inventing. She sold maths puzzles to magazines and designed a draftsman’s device which divided lines into equal parts and enlarged or shrank drawings. The “Marks’ Patent Line Divider” was very well reviewed. Herta had worked much of her early life as her father had died when she was seven leaving the family with debts.

Still eager to learn, Hertha Marks signed up for a series of classes about the exciting new field of electricity at Finsbury Technical College, taught by William Ayrton. She went on to marry William Ayrton. Her marriage gave her the stability and income to be able to do more inventing. Arc lights had started to be use as street lighting but they flickered and could send out sparks that caused fires. Herta Marks Ayrton found a way to make safer arc lights.

Naomi Alderman tells the story of Herta Marks Ayrton. She talks to Dr Naomi Paxton, cultural historian at the University of London, about the impact of the invention of safe street lighting on women's lives at the start of the 20th century, and to Naomi Climer, the first female president of the Institution of Engineering and Technology, which - unlike the Royal Society - was quick to acknowledge Hertha Marks Ayrton’s achievements, about the legacy of arc lighting.


TUE 11:30 Techno: A Social History (m00199y6)
Detroit

In the early 60s, Detroit was known for two things - automobiles and Motown records. They were the dual-foundation of a progressive, cosmopolitan city, with a thriving black middle class. But after the Civil Rights riots of 1967, the cosmopolitan dream of Motor City curdled. The car jobs disappeared, and so did Motown. The once prosperous city became a post-industrial ghost town, setting the stage for a radical new culture.

DJ, producer, and Detroit native Ash Lauryn traces the birth of Techno, a sparse, futuristic music that reimagined the wasteland of Motor City as a futuristic utopia, and reinvigorated the young generation who had been abandoned there.

Part one of Techno: A Social History features stories from the genre’s first architects, elevators, and disciples - Juan Atkins, Kevin Saunderson, DJ Minx, and Richie Hawtin. They had no idea that this new sound of Detroit could thrive elsewhere – but soon enough, their strange music was being packaged up, exported, and applied to disparate contexts the world over.

Produced by Frank Palmer
Sound Design by Granny Eats Wolf
A Cup & Nuzzle production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m0019b4j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 You and Yours (m00199yc)
Call You and Yours - Heat Wave

On call You and Yours we’re doing what the British do best and talking about the weather.

With red extreme heat warnings in place from the Met Office until Wednesday and parts of England hitting record temperature highs, we’re asking how are you coping with the heat?

Do you live somewhere with a lot of plate glass? Are you worried about your friends, relatives or animals? Is your business being affected or your travel disrupted? And do you have any tips for keeping cool? Email us at: youandyours@bbc.co.uk and leave your phone number so we can call you back.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Kate Holdsworth/Miriam Williamson


TUE 12:57 Weather (m0019b4q)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m0019b4x)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


TUE 13:45 28ish Days Later (m0019b53)
Day Sixteen: Oh Progesterone

We've entered the luteal phase and welcome a fascinating temporary organ into the reproductive system. It only lasts 14 days and it's one big job is to pump out progesterone. India also finds out what progesterone is doing to our brains and our bodies.

Credits:
Presented by India Rakusen.
Producer: Ellie Sans.
Assistant Producer: Jorja McAndrew.
Executive Producer: Suzy Grant.
Original music composed and performed by Rebekah Reid.
Sound Design by Charlie Brandon-King.

Special thanks to all contributors and audio diarists.

A Listen production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m00199wr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (m0019b59)
Perfidy and Perfection

A beautifully constructed comic duet told entirely via the couple’s letters. Starring two outstanding American actors, directed by Martin Jarvis. Written by Yuri Rasovsky.

This ‘Edwardian’ romance is set in 1912 Boston, then Paris, Rome and beyond. We hear that penniless young fortune hunter James, having borrowed money, is setting out to court homely charitable-worker Julia, daughter of a tyrannical, rich Bostonian. She quickly falls under James’ spell. Despite father’s violent objections, she continues to communicate with the dashing young man.

All is discovered. She’s banished to Europe. James pursues her.

When the lovers are left unchaperoned, Julia proves a surprisingly liberated young woman. James’ secret agenda may involve the 1912 mafia. Murder? But does Julia have a plan too?

A devastating twist. Thrilling conclusion. Fun, devilish, surprising. A perceptive study in male/female psychology.

Starring Simon Helberg (The Big Bang Theory, Florence Foster Jenkins), Jocelyn Towne (The Kominsky Method, Gilmore Girls, We’ll Never Have Paris). Specially composed music by award-winning A-Mnemonic.

Cast
James… Simon Helberg
Julia… Jocelyn Towne

Writer: Yuri Rasovsky

Specially composed music: A-Mnemonic

Producer: Rosalind Ayres
Director: Martin Jarvis

A Jarvis and Ayres production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (m00199cd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Made of Stronger Stuff (p0bgc3nb)
Feet

Psychologist Kimberley Wilson and Dr Xand van Tulleken continue their journey around the human body, asking what our insides can reveal about our lives and the world around us.

This time, Xand and Kimberley marvel at the imperfect feats of engineering that are the arches of our feet, exploring how these arches are the key to our capacity to run, whether we should ditch our shoes for good, and finding out which animal has the ultimate foot.

Producer: Georgia Mills
Researcher: Leonie Thomas
Executive Producer: Robert Nicholson
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (m0019m7c)
Lords and Ladies: Folk Names for Plants and Flowers

Snotty Gogs and Moggie Nightgown may not immediately mean a lot to you but as common or folk names for the Yew berry and Wood anemone they reveal a fascinating social and cultural history of the countryside. Michael Rosen talks to the natural history broadcaster Brett Westwood about the informative, often funny sometimes bawdy names given to British plants and flowers.

Producer: Maggie Ayre


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (m0019b5s)
Melanie Reid and Andrew Cotter

Columnist Melanie Reid adores This is Not About Me by Janice Galloway, a tragicomic account of her turbulent childhood in mid-century Scotland. Presenter Harriett Gilbert thinks John le Carré’s Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is a true masterpiece, and sports broadcaster (and famous dog owner) Andrew Cotter recommends The Wild Places by fellow mountain-lover Robert Macfarlane.

Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Sarah Goodman.


TUE 17:00 PM (m0019b5z)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0019b64)
The UK records temperatures of over 40C for the first time


TUE 18:30 Andrew Maxwell Values (m0019b6b)
Series 1

Episode 1

Since the COVID-19 pandemic, we have started to reflect more on our working lives and increasingly question the relative value of different occupations around the UK. Andrew Maxwell investigates why until now we have traditionally valued some jobs above others and what a new understanding of “work” might mean for how we approach our changing world.

This week, Andrew looks at the history of jobs, and his guests are Richard Donkin, the author of "The History of Work", and DIY expert and entrepreneur Jo Behari.

Producer: Richard Morris
Production co-ordinator: Ryan Walker-Edwards

A BBC Studios Production


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m0019b6n)
Josh is avoiding David – he can’t face another rant about how they wouldn’t have embarked on the new cow house and slurry system if they’d known about rising costs. But they do have solar panels, which should earn their keep. Pip asks Josh if he thinks Rosie’s getting a bit fat. They’re really careful with her diet. When Josh says Jill loves baking treats for Rosie, Pip realises where the problem lies, though she’s anxious about talking to Jill. Josh suggests Rosie exercises more; he and Ben will give her a balance bike for her birthday.

Chelsea wants to treat Tracy for her birthday on Saturday. Jazzer can’t afford much, but Chelsea tells Susan that Brad and Chelsea could pay for a spa day and say it’s from them all. Initially Brad refuses to use his Grange Farm earnings, but later he changes his mind. When Chelsea asks what he was going to use the money for, Brad won’t say.

Alice pays Shula the outstanding balance on her rehab loan, telling Shula she’s been amazing. Shula reciprocates, saying Alice was her saviour last week over equine therapy with Justin. Alice explains the secret is to persuade Justin there’s a profit to be made. Alice notices Shula’s tired and Shula admits it’s because she’s thinking of making a fresh start, maybe working for the Anglican Community of Pioneers. She’s not sure what to do for the best. Alice says Shula has the gift of empathy – she helped Alice, and also Alistair through his gambling addiction. She should use her talent.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m0019b6s)
Jean Paul Gaultier, Much Ado About Nothing, Music Tours

Reflecting on his 50 years in fashion, designer Jean Paul Gaultier sits down with Samira Ahmed to talk about his life, Madonna, London and how it has inspired his new show at the Roundhouse Fashion Freak Show.

An all party parliamentary report has been released documenting the current state of music touring. The Chief Executive of UK Music Jamie Njoku-Goodwin and Jack Brown of the band White Lies join the discussion.

Much Ado about Nothing is this year’s Shakespeare play, with a production in Stratford in the spring, one that opened at the National Theatre yesterday, another at Shakespeare’s Globe, running into winter, and one at The Crucible in Sheffield which will open in September. Front Row brings three directors – Simon Godwin (National), Lucy Bailey (Globe) and Robert Hastie (Crucible) – together to discuss the fascination of this funny, but disturbing, love story with Samira Ahmed.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Nicki Paxman

Photo Credit: Mark Senior


TUE 20:00 Welcome to Rwanda (m0019b6x)
The government has described Rwanda, where it intends to send some people who arrive illegally in the UK, as "one of the world's safest nations". But this small, landlocked country in east Africa divides opinion. To some, it’s the Singapore of Africa, with a burgeoning economy, clean streets and gleaming skyscrapers. It’s also heralded for having the highest proportion of women parliamentarians in the world. But to others, Rwanda is a frightening and repressive place.

In this programme, Victoria Uwonkunda looks at what’s happening in the country of her birth, which she fled as a child during the genocide of 1994. Is this country a developmental model for the rest of the continent – or an autocratic and ruthless state?


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m0019b71)
The Cost of Living Crisis; Cornea Transplant Delays

Prior to the current cost of living crisis, the Royal National Institute of Blind People found that one in five blind and partially sighted people had difficulty in making ends meet. People with sight loss already have extra living costs and are more reliant on benefits than others as a result of low employment rates. Recently, the government have introduced financial aid and have increased benefits, but the RNIB say that these measures don't go far enough. We hear the story of Alex Ramzan, who has been struggling with the cost of living crisis and we speak to David Aldwinkle, who is the Director of Insight and Customer Voice at the RNIB, about the problems they are hearing and their campaign.

The cornea is a very delicate part of the eye. It is essentially the surface through which you see, so if it becomes scarred or damaged in any way, what you see can become increasingly impaired. The cornea can be replaced though, and the effects can be dramatic. But the supply of donated corneas has not kept up with demand. Currently, one in 10 people on the NHS Organ Donor Register have indicated that they do not wish to donate their corneas, making donations low and waiting times for replacements high. We hear about the causes behind this and the implications for people waiting from Kyle Bennett, who is the Assistant Director of Tissue & Eye Services at NHS Blood and Transplant. We also hear from Shelly Hague, who recently had her corneas replaced. She tells us about the impact this has had on her life.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Beth Hemmings
Production Coordinator: Liz Poole

Website image description: pictured is an extreme close up of a brown eye on a black background.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (m00199ym)
Monkeypox, mind body connections, are children exercising less since Covid?

What do you think bendy joints has to do with the way the brain works? Well you may be in for surprise. Scientists have found a connection with autism, attention deficit and Tourettes. So what does this tell us about how our brain and body work? We’re asking whether we’re stuck with monkeypox forever now or do we still have the chance to stop it spreading? And has the pandemic left a permanent scar on children’s activity levels.


TUE 21:30 The Long History of Argument (m00199xw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m00199yp)
British temperature record broken

In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Winchelsea by Alex Preston (m00199yr)
Episode 7

A tale of revenge, identity and smuggling, set in Sussex in the 18th Century.
Winchelsea is a smugglers’ town. Beneath it there runs a network of cellars and caves from under its streets as far as the King’s Cliff. All manner of goods are stored there, safe from the excise men. The Cellarman holds the keys to the cellar gates, a position held in Goody Brown’s family since the founding of the town.

Episode Seven
With a Jacobite invasion seemingly imminent, Goody and Francis sail to Dunkerque with gold for the Young Pretender.

Alex Preston is an author and journalist who lives in Kent. His personal anthology of nature writing, As Kingfishers Catch Fire, was published in 2017. Winchelsea, published in 2022, is his fourth novel.

Writer: Alex Preston
Reader: Jessica Gunning
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 23:00 Fortunately... with Fi and Jane (m00199yt)
242. Pews for the Deeply Cynical, with Your Emails

This week on the Fortunately podcast, Fi and Jane choose some of their favourite listener emails from the past few weeks. As it's the last episode before a summer break, there are some book recommendations too. Emails cover a host of topics including the male menopause, views from the pulpit, tales from local council phone handlers and there's a very interesting parcel to open.

Authors & Books mentioned:
Meg Mason - Sorrow and Bliss
Jane Harper
Chris Hammer
Julia Boyd - Travellers in the Third Reich, A Village in the Third Reich
Viola Davis - Finding Me: A Memoir
Nora Ephron - I Feel Bad About My Neck, Crazy Salad: Some Things About Women
Maggie O’Farrell
Richard Yates - Revolutionary Road
Nevil Shute - On the Beach, A Town Like Alice
Peter Papathanasiou -The Stoning
Abi Morgan - This Is Not a Pity Memoir
Abi Dare - The Girl with the Louding Voice
Lucy Caldwell - Intimacies
Amor Towles - Gentleman in Moscow, Rules of Civility, The Lincoln Highway

Fortunately returns Friday 26th August 2022

Get in touch: fortunately.podcast@bbc.co.uk


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m00199yw)
All the news from today's sitting at Westminster.



WEDNESDAY 20 JULY 2022

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m00199yy)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


WED 00:30 The Expectation Effect by David Robson (m00199z0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00199z2)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00199z4)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00199z6)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m00199z8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00199zb)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Dr Janet Unsworth.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m00199zd)
The EU is proposing to block the importation of food, grown using the banned pesticides neonicotinoids, in an effort to reduce their environmental impact in other countries. This would be the first time that a World Trade Organisation member used environmental impacts, rather than consumer health, to restrict pesticide use in trade. Alan Matthews, Professor Emeritus of European agricultural policy at Trinity College Dublin, has described the move as 'throwing a hand grenade into global agri-food trade’.
Faith in British food has fallen, according to a survey just released by the Red Tractor food standards label. Their annual ‘Trust in Food’ index showed although UK food is trusted more than imported goods, it declined by 8% overall, from last years’ figures.
All week we’re talking about animal feed. Most commercial egg producers rely on soya to provide protein for their chickens which they need for laying. Organic farmer Mike Mallett at Maple Farm in Suffolk has 2000 free range birds and he’s rejected soya as a feed. For the last nine years he's been working to give his chickens only home-grown organic feed and he’s nearly succeeded.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrc82)
Meadow Pipit (Spring)

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the meadow pipit. No-one would give the meadow pipit any prizes in a beauty competition but this small streaky bird has its own charm, as it bustles through the turf with a jerky motion. If you're hiking across the moor it will rise ahead of you, dither in mid-air and then dart off, buffeted by the spring breeze.


WED 06:00 Today (m0019b8c)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Sideways (m0019b8f)
26. War Games in the Pink Tower

In 1961, a group of American officials decided to play a game of war. Sitting around a table, they tried imagining a nuclear crisis - and how it could be resolved. The outcome of their thought experiment surprised them all, raising far reaching questions about the strength of America’s nuclear strategy.

Once nuclear weapons were unleashed into our world in the 1940s, it was obvious that a completely new set of rules of war had to be designed to prevent nuclear annihilation. In this episode, Matthew travels back to 1940s Santa Monica Beach to explore the origins of an idea that would become the guiding principle of nuclear strategy - deterrence. The threat posed by these new weapons had to be used to avoid war, not to start it.

Matthew learns about the original think tank - the RAND corporation - where nuclear strategists first gave shape to nuclear deterrence and came up with ways to strengthen the credibility of the US government’s deterrence strategy. The most bombastic thinker amongst them was Herman Kahn - the inspiration for Stanley Kubrick’s Doctor Strangelove. Kahn’s ideas were provocative in the way they urged leaders to consider just how many people they would be willing to kill in a nuclear war in order to make their nuclear threats appear credible.

And as the 1960s progressed, the nuclear stockpile grew and tensions ratcheted up. The strategists gained more ground with successive US administrations, wargaming out scenarios in order to test the validity of deterrence. The ‘godfather of nuclear deterrence’ and Nobel prize winning economist, Thomas Schelling, enters the frame just at the right time. Through Schelling’s innovative work on nuclear deterrence, Matthew reflects on the importance of communication in nuclear crises.

But in the 1980s, the Reagan administration played a new game. With a shocking outcome. Perhaps nuclear deterrence wouldn’t always prevent war.

Guests:
Fred Kaplan - The national security columnist at Slate, the author writing about the history of nuclear strategy.
Sir Lawrence Freedman - Emeritus professor of war at King’s College London and nuclear strategy expert.
Sharon Ghamari-Tabrizi - A historian of science and technology and the author of ‘The Worlds of Herman Kahn’.
Graham Allison - Former dean of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and nuclear expert.
Paul Bracken - Professor of political science and business at Yale University and nuclear expert.
A special thanks to Stephen Downes-Martin of the Connections War Gaming Conference for his generous help in sourcing archival footage of Thomas Schelling’s keynote speech.

Presenter: Matthew Syed
Producer: Jake Otajovic
Series Editor: Katherine Godfrey
Researcher: Nadia Mehdi
Sound Design: Rob Speight
Theme tune by Ioana Selaru

A Novel production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 09:30 Four Thought (m0019b7g)
Cities made for our mental health

Dr Layla McCay asks us to think again about how our buildings and towns can both benefit and harm our mental health.
As a trained psychiatrist and head of the Centre for Urban Design she has brought together the research around this topic for the first time.

Looking at how plants and water can reduce the risk of psychosis and ‘bumping’ places, where people can casually meet to form connections and potentially ease depression.

Layla’s work as the Director of the NHS Confederation has convinced her of the importance of design and physical health but also how little attention has been paid to it’s impact on the mind.

She says the concept of ‘restorative cities’ - those that help heal or calm the mind are what we should be aiming for. Designing places that help counter loneliness, improve connections and keep depression at bay. Post Pandemic can we redesign our surroundings to support a happier and healthier life?

Presenter Olly Mann
Producer- Jordan Dunbar
Editor- Tara McDermott


WED 09:45 The Expectation Effect by David Robson (m0019bxq)
Faster, Stronger, Fitter

The Expectation Effect is David Robson's book about the remarkable science of our mindset, and how your brain can change your world for the better.

In this episode David dives into fitness, and explores how exercise can be a matter of mind over muscle.

David Robson has worked at The New Scientist and BBC Future. His writing has also appeared in the Guardian, the Atlantic, Aeon, Men’s Health and many more outlets. In 2021, David received awards from the Association of British Science Writers and the UK Medical Journalists’ Association for his writing on misinformation and risk communication during the COVID pandemic. David’s first book, The Intelligence Trap, was published in 2019.

Written and read by David Robson
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Anne Isger
A BBC Books Production


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0019b8k)
England's Lionesses Quarter Final against Spain; Women's Health Strategy; Women and the Web;

Today the government launches its much awaited Women’s Health Strategy for England. For generations women have lived with a healthcare system that is designed by men, for men. Despite making up 50 percent of the population and living longer than men, women have been under-represented in research, with little known about some female-specific issues, spending a greater proportion of their lives in ill health and disability, with growing geographic inequalities in women’s life expectancy. Having spoken to nearly 100,000 women the government say this will reset the dial on women’s health. Krupa Padhy speaks to Women's Health Minister Maria Caulfield and Dame Professor Lesley Regan the newly appointed Women's Health Ambassador.

Tonight England's Lionesses will take on Spain in the quarter finals. The two teams will go head to head in Brighton, in what will be the first knockout game of the tournament. Although both are strong teams, England and Spain have previously competed against each other 15 times resulting in the Lionesses winning twice as many games as their opponents. England have also been scoring more goals than any team has ever done in the group stage. BBC Women's Sport Reporter, Jo Currie gives us an overview of the brilliant Lionesses taking to the pitch this year.

Tim Berners Lee is often credited as the inventor of the World Wide Web. But who are some of the women who played an instrumental role in building the internet and the technology that surrounds it? We hear about Karen Spärck Jones, Sophie Wilson and Hedy Lamarr. And with a fifth of women in the UK experiencing online harassment and abuse, how can the internet be made more friendly to women? Krupa Padhy speaks to Charlotte Webb, who teaches internet equality at University of the Arts London and is the co-founder of the Feminist Internet and to Dame Stephanie Shirley who founded an all-women software company in the 1960s.

Presenter: Krupa Padhy
Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Interviewed Guest: Marie Caulfield
Interviewed Guest: Dame Professor Lesley Regan
Interviewed Guest: Catherine Burns
Interviewed Guest: Jo Currie
Interviewed Guest: Dame Stephanie Shirley
Interviewed Guest: Charlotte Webb


WED 11:00 Peter Brook (m000v2wk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Music Made in the Middle (m0019b8m)
Music Made in the Middle Part 2

Singer Jamelia, who was born and grew up in Birmingham, explores music made in the West MIdlands - asking if it has a distinct identity.

In this second episode of a two part series, Jamelia hears from more musical Midlanders and digs deeper into the area's rich diversity. Is Birmingham the original diverse city?

People from the city and the conurbation have made a huge contribution to music all over the world, but Birmingham rarely seems to get the recognition given to other cities like Liverpool, Manchester, Sheffield or London. Is it time to shout more about the region's achievements in music?

Jamelia continues her look at the unique and eclectic musical identity and hears how the city can lay claim to giving birth to a UK style of bhangra. She also asks if the West Midlands accent actually helps contribute to the area's musicality?.

Across the series, Jamelia hears how the various genres that have been championed in Birmingham and the West Midlands have often connected and crossed over. Would Elgar have been into heavy metal were he alive today?

Among those contributing to the series are Toyah Wilcox, ELO drummer Bev Bevan, Jaki Graham, reggae singer Pato Banton, Muff Winwood from the Spencer Davis Group, Duran Duran original Stephen Duffy and Apache Indian.

Jamelia also visits the legendary Grosvenor Road Studios and finds outs if she's made the Midlands music map.

A MIM production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:00 News Summary (m0019b8p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 You and Yours (m0019b8r)
Funeral plans, pets in rented homes, airport baggage backlog, passport problems

From the end of this month, any funeral plan providers will need to authorised by the FCA. The plans cost thousand of pounds and firms promise to give people peace of mind that their loved ones will not be hit with a big bill when they die. But now providers face a major clampdown after an investigation exposed evidence of misselling and high-pressure sales tactics.

Edinburgh Airport passengers have waited for hours in the sweltering heat to collect their luggage. This is the latest in a series of issues linked to baggage processing.
To deal with an ongoing backlog, international cargo handler Swissport opened a temporary outdoor facility on the day the UK saw its highest recorded temperatures. We look at what's been going wrong with airport baggage and how passengers can try to protect themselves.

More than half of UK households have a pet. But having one in rented accommodation can be a challenge. A recent study by the Landlords Association found that just over 85 per cent of landlords and agents have seen damage to their property caused by pets. Landlords say that they have had to spend hundreds of pounds repairing properties and they were unable to recoup the cost.

Issues with getting your parcels and dealing with courier firms is something we hear a lot on You and Yours and now the UK's communications regulator, Ofcom have said that people in the UK who send and receive parcels would receive greater protection under new rules designed to improve how companies handle complaints, we find out how it's set to work.

PRESENTER: Peter White
PRODUCER; Linda Walker


WED 12:57 Weather (m0019b8t)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m0019b8w)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


WED 13:45 28ish Days Later (m0019b8y)
Day Seventeen: PMS

India and Dr Anita Mitra discuss the causes and symptoms of Premenstrual Stress (PMS), and Maisie Hill offers up advice for PMS in the autumn season of the cycle. We also hear from two women who live with Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) and explore the reality of the condition.

Credits:
Presented by India Rakusen.
Producer: Ellie Sans.
Assistant Producer: Jorja McAndrew.
Executive Producer: Suzy Grant.
Original music composed and performed by Rebekah Reid.
Sound Design by Charlie Brandon-King.

Special thanks to all contributors and audio diarists.

A Listen production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.


WED 14:00 The Archers (m0019b6n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (m000l8fg)
Bird in the Sky

By Emma Jane Kirby

Emma Jane Kirby investigates the extraordinary mystery of 23-year-old Sergeant Paul Meyer, a successful, respected mechanic in the US Air Force who, at the height of the Cold War in 1969, stole a plane from his base in East Anglia and disappeared mid-flight. What made the airman crack so suddenly and why was neither his plane nor his body ever recovered?

Paul . . . . . Adam Gillen
Jane . . . . . Julianna Jennings
Colonel Kingery . . . . . Elliot Cowan
Sergeant Alexander . . . . . Ewan Bailey
Sergeant Johnson . . . . . Joseph Ayre
Sergeant Vince . . . . . Joe Jameson

Director . . . . . Sasha Yevtushenko


WED 15:00 Money Box (m0019b90)
Gender Identity and Finance

Being transgender or non-binary means you can have a lot of extra things to manage and finances, along with the admin involved, can be a big one.

Felicity Hannah is joined by a panel of experts to discuss changing your name and gender at the bank, the lack of options when filling in forms, and raising money for medical care.

Panel:

jane fae – Director – TransActual

Cleo Madeleine – Spokesperson – Gendered Intelligence

More info:

https://genderedintelligence.co.uk/
https://www.transactual.org.uk/


WED 15:30 Inside Health (m00199ym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Sideways (m0019b8f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m0019b92)
Inside the Tory TV showdowns

There’s a balance of risk and reward for any politician taking part in a TV debate but what's at stake for the presenters? Julie Etchingham and Krishnan Guru-Murthy both grilled the Conservatives candidates for PM over the weekend. They tell us about the negotiating, the cajoling and the hard graft that makes these live TV events happen, and whether you can ever predict what will make candidates get personal.

Sky News announced this week that Rishi Sunak and Liz Truss had declined to take part in their planned third debate, effectively cancelling it. Their head of newsgathering Jonathan Levy tells us what he wants to do to take this power out of the politicians hands in future.


WED 17:00 PM (m0019b94)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0019b96)
Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak reach final two in the contest to become prime minister


WED 18:30 Anneka Has Issues (m0019b98)
Series 1

Family

Anneka Rice has led a fascinating and adventure-filled life. In a new stand-up series, she examines four tricky issues that are of particular importance to her. Bringing insight and a refreshingly eccentric but practical mindset to these sometimes taboo subjects she'll explain how her life has been shaped by her background and experiences.

In this episode, Anneka looks at how her perplexing and mysterious family background has left her with all sorts of issues. She's been on a constant quest to find a 'home', whether it's with topless hostesses in a Hong Kong bar or with her Challenge Anneka family. She and her audience share their hilarious experiences.

Producer: Alison Vernon-Smith
Production Coordinator: Katie Baum, Beverly Tagg
A BBC Studios Production

Archive material:
Grayson's Art Club / Swan Films Ltd for Channel 4
My Teenage Diary / Talkback for BBC Radio 4


WED 19:00 The Archers (m0019b9d)
Jill tells Pip that the WI were won over at Adam and Ian’s pizza tasting, but then Jean Harvey choked on an olive. Ian had to give her the Heimlich manoeuvre. Now Jean’s saying they’re going to rethink having the pizza van at the fete.

When Jill says she’s buying Rosie an ice-cream making kit for her birthday, Pip broaches the subject of Rosie’s diet. Pip points out that Rosie’s getting quite plump, and she doesn’t think Jill’s baked treats are helping. Jill’s mortified and says she’ll take the ice-cream maker back to the shop.

Alice mentions to Shula that she was thinking about her future and couldn’t imagine Shula as a vicar, it’s too staid. Shula admits it chimes with what she’s thinking. She’s really inspired by the pioneer project, particularly one up north. And she could continue with her training there. Alice says she can’t imagine Ambridge without Shula, but she must go where her heart’s pulling her.

Lilian despairs at the mayhem the kitchen people are making in her house. Lynda suggests she stays at Ambridge Hall, Adil shah’s the only guest there and Robert’s away so she’d be glad of the company. Lynda admits she finds it hard having Adil as a guest; he’s ruined so many lives in the village. Talk turns to Adil’s ‘Future of Grey Gables’ event – they’ve both been invited. Later Lynda’s very civil to Adil. When Lilian remarks on this, Lynda replies she’s “keeping her friends close, but keeping her enemies closer.”


WED 19:15 Front Row (m0019b9g)
Where The Crawdads Sing; On Sonorous Seas; Maison Margiela's Cinema Inferno

Where The Crawdads Sing: director Olivia Newman on bringing the multi-million copy best-selling novel to the big screen.

Cinema Inferno: the new catwalk production by Leeds theatre company Imitating the Dog for fashion house Maison Margiela - combining theatre, film, and fashion show. Is this the future of haute couture?

On Sonorous Seas: Hebridean artist Mhairi Killin on her multi-media exhibition on the Isle of Mull. Fusing sound, video, whalebone artefacts, and poetry, the work is inspired by research into military sonar in Scottish waters and recent mass strandings of whales.

Presenter: Nick Ahad
Producer: Ekene Akalawu


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m0019b9j)
The Future of the NHS

The Future of the NHS

Can the UK keep its promise of free healthcare for everyone? NHS spending is higher than ever, yet waiting lists are getting longer and patient satisfaction is falling. The worst of the pandemic may have passed, but weekly Covid admissions remain high and many services are still struggling. While many patients feel delighted with the treatment and care they receive, stories of missed targets, staff shortages and crumbling buildings are common. Whether its waiting for an operation, mental health support, getting a GP appointment or just hoping an ambulance arrives in time, our cherished and beloved NHS is letting many people down, in spite of the heroic efforts of its staff. The people vying to be our next Prime Minister have acknowledged the problems, but are not promising big improvements. Is it time for a new model?

Some believe it’s about funding, and we need to accept that the NHS we want and need will cost us much more. But in a cost of living crisis, are people really prepared to pay higher taxes to improve the NHS, and if not, why do we still expect a Rolls Royce health system? Others think it’s a bottomless pit of demand and it’s time to reduce our expectations. Can we afford the NHS to be anything more than a safety net for the sickest and poorest? Is it right to promise care to everyone, even those who can afford to go private? Or, might the public’s willingness to pay for the NHS evaporate, if it's no longer there for all of us? We may love our NHS, but how much should we expect of it, and how much are we willing to pay? With Tim Knox, Dr Jennifer Dixon, Matthew Lesh and Prof Allyson Pollock.

Producers: Jonathan Hallewell and Peter Everett
Presenter: Michael Buerk


WED 20:45 Four Thought (m0019b7g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 Made of Stronger Stuff (p0bgc3nb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 The Media Show (m0019b92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m0019b9l)
The race for Number 10

In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 Winchelsea by Alex Preston (m0019b9n)
Episode 8

A tale of revenge, identity and smuggling, set in Sussex in the 18th Century.

Winchelsea is a smugglers’ town. Beneath it there runs a network of cellars and caves from under its streets as far as the King’s Cliff. All manner of goods are stored there, safe from the excise men. The Cellarman holds the keys to the cellar gates, a position held in Goody Brown’s family since the founding of the town.

Episode Eight
Goody continues her search for Francis, before heading north to join the Jacobite rebellion.

Alex Preston is an author and journalist who lives in Kent. His personal anthology of nature writing, As Kingfishers Catch Fire, was published in 2017. Winchelsea, published in 2022, is his fourth novel.

Writer: Alex Preston
Readers: Jessica Gunning and Finlay Robertson
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:00 Tom Mayhew Is Benefit Scum (m0019b9q)
Series 2

Man of the Match

Comedian Tom Mayhew takes his grandpa to the match. This episode is all about the beautiful game and its unattractive obsession with money.

Tom Mayhew Is Benefit Scum is an autobiographical stand-up series where the comedian shares stories about his life growing up working class and his time on benefits. The show takes a wry, sideways look at the prejudices that people have towards benefits claimants and turns those assumptions on their head.

Written and Performed by Tom Mayhew
Featuring Chris Cantrill
Additional Material – Olivia Phipps
Production Coordinator – Katie Baum
Producer – Benjamin Sutton
A BBC Studios Production.


WED 23:15 Welcome to the Neighbourhood (m0019b9s)
Ep 4: Josh Jones

Jayde Adams and guest Helen Bauer dive into the feisty world of community apps and messageboards, sifting through the angry neighbourhood bins to find disgruntled comedy gold.

From biggest beefs to weirdest news, Jayde discovers a hotbed of (largely unintentional) hilarity with graffiti-daubed wheelie bins, stray cats, e-scooters and more.

Jayde and the production team would like to hear about what's riling up the neighbours around Britain. Are your groups kicking off? Listeners can submit screenshots of the funniest and freakiest posts and threads to welcometotheneighbourhood@bbc.co.uk.

Presenter: Jayde Adams
Producer: Cornelius Mendez

An unusual production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0019b9v)
Sean Curran reports on Boris Johnson's rather raucous final Prime Minister's Question Time.



THURSDAY 21 JULY 2022

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m0019b9x)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


THU 00:30 The Expectation Effect by David Robson (m0019bxq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0019b9z)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0019bb1)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0019bb3)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m0019bb5)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0019bb7)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Dr Janet Unsworth.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m0019bb9)
The Government has failed to give MPs the chance to debate the trade deal with Australia in the House of Commons. Australia is the first post-Brexit trade deal to be negotiated from scratch. Farmers have objected to its terms; they say it will let in too much beef and lamb produced at standards below those in the UK. Parliamentary scrutiny was promised many times over the last few years. We ask what happened.
As part of our week looking at livestock feed, today we hear from a dairy farmer. The recent uncertainty has pushed up animal feed prices which in turn has trickled down to shoppers.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrc8z)
Green Woodpecker

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the green woodpecker. The maniacal laughing call, or 'yaffle', of a green woodpecker was supposed to herald rain, hence its old country name of 'rain bird'. You can hear their yodelling calls in woods, parks, heaths and large gardens throughout most of the UK. Altough green woodpeckers do nest in trees they spend a lot of their time on the ground, probing lawns and meadows for their main food, ants and their pupae.


THU 06:00 Today (m0019bvy)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 Can the Police Keep Us Safe? (m0019bw2)
Consent

Helena Kennedy QC with Police Assistant Commissioner Rob Beckley explore our expectations of policing today and changing ideas of safety - in public, in private and online.

Can the police keep us safe? It’s argued policing has never been good at dealing with crime after the event and struggles now under the weight of increasing expectations. Definitions of harm have widened hugely in recent years and with this, more complicated ideas of what safety means to communities.

In this episode, Helena and Rob turn to the question of safety and harms in the domestic sphere, especially violence against women and girls – a situation heightened during the pandemic. And will the publication of the Police’s new Race Action Plan help secure consent and trust in the UK’s Black communities, where distrust, historically, runs deep?

With public trust in the police shaken by a series of high-profile scandals, the 2021 murder of Sarah Everard by a serving police officer and forces such as the Metropolitan Police and Greater Manchester Police now in special measures, is the social contract between police and public corroding? Did it ever exist for some sections of the public? Robert Peel once wrote ‘the police are the public, and the public are the police’– a formula at the heart of policing by consent. But the UK has different publics, multiple communities, which are policed differently. Certainly some communities feel safer around the police than others.

Talking to all ranks of the police across the UK, to criminologists and critics, Helena and Rob consider what we expect from the police now - is it too much, can they really deliver? - and what is the primary purpose of the police today? Over the course of the series they will ask if this is the moment for a new kind of social contract between public and police, where other institutions, both public and private - as well as citizens themselves, all of us – take more responsibility for safety and care in our communities, independent of policing.

Contributors this episode include: Founder of the Metropolitan Black Police Association and former Superintendent Paul Wilson, author and advisor to government on crime prevention Tom Gash, former Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary Zoe Billingham, poet, musician and author Benjamin Zephaniah, Chief Executive of the College of Policing and Chief Constable Andy Marsh, criminologist Patrick Williams, independent chair of the oversight board for the 2022 Police Race Action Plan Abimbola Johnson, PC Dunn and PC Howe, response officers from Avon Somerset Police and DI Upile Mtitimila, Cheshire Constabulary.

Presented by Helena Kennedy QC with Police Assistant Rob Beckley
Produced by Simon Hollis

A Brook Lapping Production for BBC Radio 4

This series is dedicated to the late Roger Graef, criminologist and documentary maker


THU 09:30 The Climate Tipping Points (m00180l4)
2. Ocean Circulation

Justin Rowlatt looks at the enormous and widespread implications of a slowdown in the rate at which water is able to circulate between the ocean's surface and its depths. This series examines how global warming may trigger irreversible changes to our planet.
Producer: Laurence Knight


THU 09:45 The Expectation Effect by David Robson (m0019b3j)
The Food Paradox

The Expectation Effect is David Robson's book about the remarkable science of our mindset, and how your brain can change your world for the better.

In this episode David asks whether our minds can affect our waistlines.

David Robson has worked at The New Scientist and BBC Future. His writing has also appeared in the Guardian, the Atlantic, Aeon, Men’s Health and many more outlets. In 2021, David received awards from the Association of British Science Writers and the UK Medical Journalists’ Association for his writing on misinformation and risk communication during the COVID pandemic. David’s first book, The Intelligence Trap, was published in 2019.

Written and read by David Robson
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Anne Isger
A BBC Books Production


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0019bw6)
Vicky Pattison, Women's Darts, Period Loss and Iranian Feminists Cyberattack.

TV personality Vicky Pattison shot to fame on the reality show Geordie Shore, where her extreme party-girl lifestyle in Newcastle was lived out in front of the cameras. Now, she’s taking a long, hard look at her past in a new documentary which centres around her father’s struggle with alcoholism for most of his adult life. She explains to Nuala McGovern how this has, in part, contributed towards her own unhealthy relationship with drinking.

We look ahead to this weekend’s historic event in the world of women’s darts as the World Matchplay tournament which takes place in Blackpool is the first female tournament to be fully televised. We catch up with the woman known as ‘Queen of the Palace’, Fallon Sherrock, about her career, her success and also about how the sport has grown.

Did you know that diet and exercise can cause period loss, even if you're considered to be a generally healthy person? FHA – functional hypothalamic amenorrhea – is when over-exercising, under-eating or stress causes the body to stop menstruating. It's estimated that FHA affects between 2-5% of women, with 30% of women who exercise, including elite athletes considered to be at peak health, experiencing period loss. On Tiktok, the hashtag #periodloss has over 2.9 million views, and is full of women talking about their experiences with FHA. Nuala is joined by Martha Williams, a Senior Clinical Advice Coordinator at Beat, a charity working to tackle eating disorders, and Olivia Nevill, an online fitness coach who has experienced FHA.

At least 20 Iranian feminists, most connected to Iran's #MeToo Movement, have written a letter of complaint to Instagram and Facebook after they were bombarded with thousands of fake followers. They say they've been deliberately targeted and want META - the owner of the social media platforms - to take action. They say they're under a "coordinated cyberattack". Because the bots have made their accounts unmanageable, they've had to put their accounts on private mode which limits their social media reach and the community they're trying to build. Nuala is joined by Samaneh Savadi, an Iranian women’s rights activist based here in the UK.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (m0019bw8)
The Crown Prince and the President

The meeting between US President, Joe Biden and Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince, Mohammed bin Salman, at the weekend was closely watched back in Washington. Mr Biden said his visit would focus mainly on human rights and regional security - but a request for an increase in oil output was also on the agenda. Anna Foster was in Jeddah.

Beyond the official meetings, Sebastian Usher speaks to artists who are taking part in an exhibition in Qatif, in Saudi Arabia's east, reflecting on some of the lost heritage both there and in the historic quarter of Jeddah, amid the rapid pace of development in the Kingdom.

Wildfires have broken out across Europe as a heatwave has brought soaring temperatures. Portugal has seen 30,000 hectares of land destroyed by wildfires already this year, and its leaders have moved quickly to try and avoid repeating the same mistakes they did in the deadly fires of 2017. Alison Roberts has been following the story.

We visit the town of Pacific Grove, California which has become renowned for its butterfly visitors over the years, which migrate from the frostier climes of Canada to the Golden State. Ben Wyatt hears about efforts by locals in 'Butterfly Town USA' to help protect the various species of butterflies which are at risk of extinction.

Finally, we're in Greenland, which is prioritising tourism as a means of growing its economy, rather than mineral exploration. The island remains a challenging environment in which to travel but is not lacking for luxury, as Tim Ecott finds. On his visit, he discovers a Michelin-starred restaurant on the shores of an Ice Fjord.

Presenter: Kate Adie
Producer: Serena Tarling
Production Coordinator: Gemma Ashman
Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith


THU 11:30 Fairy Meadow (p0bk7kd9)
7. Mercury's Story

Jon tries to approach Mercury to hear his side of the story.

Producer: Chris Ledgard
Music: Elizabeth Purnell
Studio engineer: Jacques Sweeney
Editor: James Cook


THU 12:00 News Summary (m0019by5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 You and Yours (m0019bwf)
Gap Finders - Rachel Watkyn

Today's guest is Rachel Watkyn, founder of The Tiny Box Company - which offers only recycled packaging and eco-friendly packaging for gifts like jewellery boxes and gift bags made from recycled paper or recyclable / FSC.

Rachel set up the company in 2007, and following an appearance on Dragon's Den in 2008, received investment from Theo Paphitis and Peter Jones, and it has grown each year since the investment.

Rachel spent part of her formative years in care after a traumatic early childhood, and has had periods of ill health. She says trauma in her personal life prepared her for the struggles that come with running a business. Whilst working in Sierra Leone during the military coup, the extreme poverty she witnessed drove her vision for a Fairtrade business. This began as a jewellery company, but trying to find recycled and environmentally friendly packaging sparked the idea for Tiny Box Company, supplying businesses with attractive, ethical packaging.

Presenter: Shari Vahl
Producer: Miriam Williamson


THU 12:32 Sliced Bread (m0019bwh)
Fat Burning Pills

Is there really a pill that can help you burn fat? Sticking to a good diet and exercising to lose weight takes hard work and discipline, so what if there was something you could take that could do some of that work for you?

Listener June got in touch wanting to know if this is the case, or if it’s too good to be true? Are there really pills being sold online and on the high street that can help you burn fat, or speed up your metabolism?

Greg Foot investigates, hearing from some people who’ve tried them, scientists and dieticians about what exactly is in these pills, and asking if there is any evidence to back up their claims that they can burn fat.

This series, we’re testing your suggested wonder-products. If you’ve seen an ad, trend or fad and wonder if there's any evidence to back up a claim drop us an email to sliced.bread@bbc.co.uk or you can send us a voice note to our new WhatsApp number: 07543 306807

PRESENTER: Greg Foot
PRODUCER: Kate Holdsworth


THU 12:57 Weather (m0019bwk)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m0019bwm)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


THU 13:45 28ish Days Later (m0019bwp)
Day Eighteen: Second Spring

The perimenopause is a challenging time for many women but there is help and there are ways you can prepare.

In this episode, India sits down with her mum to discuss her own transition to menopause. And we hear from Dr Marion Gluck and Dr Radhika Vohra to discuss the history and role of HRT in treating perimenopausal symptoms.

Credits:
Presented by India Rakusen.
Producer: Ellie Sans.
Assistant Producer: Jorja McAndrew.
Executive Producer: Suzy Grant.
Original music composed and performed by Rebekah Reid.
Sound Design by Charlie Brandon-King.

Special thanks to all contributors and audio diarists.

A Listen production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.


THU 14:00 The Archers (m0019b9d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (m000mznj)
Emergency

Emergency - written by poet Jacob Polley. Part of Contains Strong Language, the BBC's Poetry and Spoken word festival.

I’m not in normal weather. This isn’t a normal rain event… What’s it like to be caught up in an emergency?

In a play swirling with voices – voices called up from the near past and from ancient history, voices breaking in, voices capsizing one another – Jacob Polley explores the experience of a love-struck couple in Carlisle during the catastrophic Cumbrian flood event of 2005. Described at the time as a ‘once in 100-year event’, Cumbria was flooded again in 2015 and again in 2020, and in the play becomes a place representative of the consequences of the wider climate emergency.

It’s enough to make you giddy, isn’t it? Pitching between a mortal perspective and the perspective of, say, twenty generations; between a human scale of living rooms, streets and houses, and an elemental scale of airmasses drawn in thousand-mile swirls across the earth…

Through a 1200-year-old Old English riddle, which draws on texts from the even more ancient classical world, Polley gives voice to Storm itself, dramatizing the shock, awe and conflicting witnessings that have been fundamental to the human experience of catastrophe. ‘Emergency’ is a giddy, poetic and symphonic exploration of a specific event and place, and of the elemental powers of the natural world, conjured in a unique soundscape composed by the Dutch musicians, Strijbos and van Rijswijk.

STORM ................................Joe Dixon
HIM........................................James Cooney
HER .......................................Jeanette Percival
PLINY/LANDLORD............Simeon Truby
REPORT/Resident .............Emily Pithon

With specially composed music by world renowned sound artists Strijbos & Van Rijswijk.

Directed by Susan Roberts A BBC Audio Drama North Production


THU 15:00 Open Country (m0019bwr)
Uncharted Stories of the Causeway Coast

Helen Mark is in Northern Ireland to hear little known histories about the Causeway Coast. A new project is gathering stories from the local community to add to a digital map, before they are forgotten forever.

Produced by Beatrice Fenton.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m00199g3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m00199q9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (m00199dg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:15 on Saturday]


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m0019bwv)
Multiverses, melting glaciers and what you can tell from the noise of someone peeing

The Multiverse
Laura Mersini-Houghton is an internationally renowned cosmologist and theoretical physicist and one of the world's leading experts on the multiverse and the origins of the universe. She talks to Gaia Vince about finding evidence that supports her multiverse theory as more than just a hypothetical collection of diverse universes, including the one that houses our planet. She also shares her story of growing up with the horrors of a brutal Albanian communist regime.

Glacier Collapse
In Italy this month eleven people were killed when Marmolada glacier collapsed. A few days later, hikers recorded another huge glacier collapse in Kyrgyzstan. Is there any way of monitoring glaciers to give us a warning of these events? Glaciologist Liam Taylor, a researcher at Leeds University explains to Gaia our options for monitoring vulnerable glaciers, and why a black spot in those observations is about to open up.

Pees and queues.
Lower urinary tract symptoms are common and affect an estimated 60% of men and 57% of women. These can be detected using a gadget called a uroflowmetre, but patients often face delays getting to clinics to use one. Dr Lee Han Jie and Professor Ng Lay Guat, with colleagues at Singapore General Hospital and the Singapore University of Technology and Design have developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that is trained to listen to patients pass urine. From just the noise of peeing, the AI is able to identify abnormal flows and could be a useful and cost-effective means of monitoring and managing urology patients at home.

Heatwave Records
Richard Betts from the Met Office explains why the official highest temperature is only 40.3C, whereas many of us have clocked temperature in the mid forties in our cars and on patios.


THU 17:00 PM (m0019bwx)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0019bx1)
Liz Truss claims the economic policies of the past twenty years have not delivered growth


THU 18:30 The Ultimate Choice (m0019bx3)
Pilot Episode

Steph McGovern leads a pair of seriously funny minds through some devious Would You Rather dilemmas, to find definitive answers to the great questions of our age. Or not.

In this episode, comedians Russell Kane and Ria Lina step up to the plate, with their fates to be decided by the wise and all-powerful studio audience, who will make the ultimate choice.

Starring Steph McGovern, Russell Kane and Ria Lina
Devised by Jon Harvey and Joseph Morpurgo
Mixed by David Thomas
Production Support: Leah Marks
Associate Producer: Joseph Morpurgo
Produced and edited by Jon Harvey
Executive Producer: Ed Morrish

A Naked production for BBC Radio 4


THU 19:00 The Archers (m0019b45)
Oliver wants to drop a birthday card round to Tracy, but Brad puts him off and says he’ll take it. Tracy’s still mad at Oliver for putting Brad out of the job at Grange Farm. Oliver wishes he and Tracy could be friends again. When he asks if Brad’s found another job, Brad says he’s just had an interview, but won’t say what for in case he jinxes it. Oliver’s concerned when Brad says he’s no longer doing the maths summer school. Brad explains that his mum’s struggle with debt has made him realise how unimportant it is.

When Tom worries about handing over his Bridge Farm tasks, Pats says they’ll cope without him. Tom admits he knows where he is with farm work, but he hasn’t a clue about babies. Pat reminds him she’s only a phone call away. She can’t wait to meet her new grandchildren.

At the hospital Natasha’s feeling anxious about tomorrow’s caesarean, on top of coping with the twins when they’re born. Natasha’s mum Caitlin rings and Tom’s unsettled when Natasha says Caitlin’s coming to stay with them on Saturday, earlier than expected. She’ll be there when they bring the babies home. Natasha explains knowing her mum will be there makes all the difference; she needs her mum.

Later Tom shares his concerns about Caitlin staying to Pat - he had a vision of him and Natasha alone with their little family. But Pat’s pragmatic, saying it will be great for them to have an extra pair of hands. And Pat will still be there if he needs her.


THU 19:15 Front Row (m0019bx6)
Notre-Dame On Fire and novel Milk Teeth reviewed; Jennifer Walshe performs live; writer Alan Grant remembered

Notre-Dame On Fire, directed by Jean-Jacques Annaud, is a film dramatising the events of the horrifying night on April 15, 2019 when the cathedral that symbolises so much in France and beyond started to burn. Milk Teeth is the second novel from Jessica Andrews, whose debut Saltwater won the Portico Prize in 2020. It explores appetite, control and desire in a young woman from the north of England who finds herself in the heat of Spain. The writer Sarah Hall and the journalist Agnès Poirier review both.

Ahead of her upcoming Proms performance in the Royal Albert Hall, composer and vocalist Jennifer Walshe joins Tom Sutcliffe to perform one of her original compositions live in the studio. Walshe’s soundscape has been described as transcending the contemporary classical music world and she explains her approach to composing original works.

And Sam Leith, literary editor of The Spectator magazine, joins Tom to remember the comic book writer Alan Grant, whose death was announced today.

Presenter: Tom Sutcliffe
Producer: Kirsty McQuire


Photo: a still from the film Notre-Dame On Fire Photo Credit: Mickael Lefevre


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (m0019bx8)
Ukraine: Who is winning?

The war in Ukraine is about to enter its sixth month. The cost of Russia’s invasion has been enormous: millions of refugees; thousands of dead soldiers; thousands more dead civilians; and billions of dollars’ worth of physical damage. It’s the most consequential military conflict for a generation.

This week the Briefing Room investigates what’s happening now on the ground and whether either side is close to victory or collapse. Joining David Aaronovitch are:

Nina Kuryata, Ukrainian journalist with Tortoise Media
Shashank Joshi, Defence Editor at The Economist
Samantha de Bendern, Associate Fellow in the Russia and Eurasia Programme at Chatham House
Sir Lawrence Freedman, Emeritus Professor of War Studies at King’s College, London

Producers: Tim Mansel, Kirsteen Knight and Simon Watts. Editor: Richard Vadon. Studio Manager: Neil Churchill. Production co-ordinators: Siobhan Reed & Helena Warwick-Cross

PHOTO CREDIT: Miguel Medina/AFP via Getty Images


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (m0019bxb)
Russian Exodus

Hundreds of western businesses have decided to stop operating in Russia as a result of the invasion of Ukraine. But what does leaving Russia actually mean in practical terms – how do you go about it and who bears the cost? Can you end up hurting your own company and your Russian workers more than the Russian state? Evan Davis debates with his guests, one of whom leads a global automotive dealer that has just sold its business in Russia to its local managers.

GUESTS:
James Alexander, Chief Executive of the UK Sustainable Investment and Finance Association
John Morrison, CEO of the Institute for Human Rights and Business
Duncan Tait, CEO of automotive dealer Inchcape

Producer: Lucinda Borrell
Sound: Rod Farquhar
Editor: Jon Bithrey
Production Co-Ordinators: Siobhan Reed and Helena Warwick-Cross


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m0019bwv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 How Covid Changed Science (m00194bm)
Episode 2

In the Second of our series How Covid Changed Science, Devi Sridhar Professor of Global Health at Edinburgh University looks at the scientific messaging. Just how do you explain to both politicians and the public that a growing global pandemic is likely to kill many people, and unprecedented measures such as a nationwide lockdown are needed to prevent even more deaths. What information should be imparted and how?

Similarly how to address the clamour for information on the development of vaccines and other potential treatments when there often wasn’t clarity? And with the rise of misinformation how did individual scientists who became the subject of conspiracy theories cope with being targeted?

In this programme we hear from scientists and politicians directly involved with the pandemic response. For some the experience of explaining their often highly technical research to the general public was a daunting experience. For others it became a mission to answer the publics concerns and fears.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m0019bxd)
Ukraine to resume exports of grain through the Black Sea

In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 Winchelsea by Alex Preston (m0019bxg)
Episode 9

A tale of revenge, identity and smuggling, set in Sussex in the 18th Century.

Winchelsea is a smugglers’ town. Beneath it there runs a network of cellars and caves from under its streets as far as the King’s Cliff. All manner of goods are stored there, safe from the excise men. The Cellarman holds the keys to the cellar gates, a position held in Goody Brown’s family since the founding of the town.

Episode Nine
Arnold Nesbitt recounts the tyranny of the Hawkhurst Gang over the towns of the Weald.

Alex Preston is an author and journalist who lives in Kent. His personal anthology of nature writing, As Kingfishers Catch Fire, was published in 2017. Winchelsea, published in 2022, is his fourth novel.

Writer: Alex Preston
Reader: Finlay Robertson
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:00 Robin Ince's Reality Tunnel (m0019bxj)
Outside Robin Ince

Escaping the confines of The Infinite Monkey Cage, comedian Robin Ince takes us on a journey through his Reality Tunnel in this two-part stand-up show, recorded specially for Radio 4.

Performing in front of a live audience in Manchester, Robin examines the brain’s relationship with reality and over the two episode series, he looks at the difference between the inner and the outer self and considers how we put together our picture of the world.

Written and performed by Robin Ince
Produced by Carl Cooper

Sound Manager - Jerry Peal
Sound Editor - Joshan Chana
Production Coordinator - Katie Baum
Picture by Steve Best

This was a BBC Studios production


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0019bxl)
All the news from today's sitting at Westminster.



FRIDAY 22 JULY 2022

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m0019bxn)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 00:30 The Expectation Effect by David Robson (m0019b3j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0019bxs)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0019bxv)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0019bxx)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m0019bxz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0019by1)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Dr Janet Unsworth.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m0019by3)
22/7/22 - Farm safety; insects as animal feed; new trade campaign group

A farmer talks about a tragic accident which cost his nephew his life, in the hope it'll be a reminder to other farmers not to allow children on farm equipment. Brian Nutter was convicted by the Health and Safety Executive, after allowing his four year old nephew to ride on his digger.
In 2017 the UK produced just under 14 million tonnes of feed - but 6 million tonnes of the ingredients were imported, and the cost has risen dramatically. So could the answer be getting animals to eat home-grown insects? In the European Union insects can now be fed to pigs. But the law here in the UK is lagging behind. A company which provides the technology to farm insects is lobbying for this to change.
A group of conservationists, farming groups and policy advisers have launched what they call a UK Climate and Trade Commission. It’s been set up by Queen Mary University of London and the Trade Justice Movement, and its 15 members include experts from the United Nations, former senior government officials, environmental and farming groups, businesses and trade unions. Members hope it'll help bridge the gap between trade and climate organisations.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrc9l)
Hoopoe

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the hoopoe. The hoopoe, a salmon-coloured bird with a long curved bill and a black-tipped crest, which it can spread like a fan when excited, is so outrageously exotic that its call reminds us of the Mediterranean. Several hoopoes arrive in the UK each spring and autumn. These are usually birds which have overshot their migration routes and almost certainly won't find a mate here, though they do breed very occasionally.


FRI 06:00 Today (m0019b3g)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m00199p9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 The Expectation Effect by David Robson (m0019js4)
The Super-Agers

The Expectation Effect is David Robson's book about the remarkable science of our mindset, and how your brain can change your world for the better.

In this episode David looks at how we can re-evaluate our attitudes to ageing for the better.

David Robson has worked at The New Scientist and BBC Future. His writing has also appeared in the Guardian, the Atlantic, Aeon, Men’s Health and many more outlets. In 2021, David received awards from the Association of British Science Writers and the UK Medical Journalists’ Association for his writing on misinformation and risk communication during the COVID pandemic. David’s first book, The Intelligence Trap, was published in 2019.

Written and read by David Robson
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Anne Isger
A BBC Books Production


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0019b3l)
Bananarama, The Baby, Tour De Femmes

Sara Dallin and Keren Woodward from Bananarama come into the Woman's Hour studio to talk about how it all started, their friendship and their new album, Masquerade.

The Baby is a new TV drama about a woman who suddenly gets a baby. It literally lands in her arms without warning. What's she going to do when she never wanted a baby in the first place? We have Michelle de Swarte who plays 38-year-old Natasha who finds herself with the baby, and Executive Producer Naomi De Pear.

This Sunday we've got the Tour de France Femmes. It’s been called a “seminal” moment for women’s cycling because for the first time women will be able to wear the yellow jersey across eight days of gruelling cycling. We have Dani Every from British Cycling and cyclist Elinor Barker, an Olympic gold medallist and five-time world champion.

This week the government launched its Women's Health Strategy, pledging to take women's health much more seriously, at every stage of a woman's life. Period education is only briefly mentioned, but we talk to Chella Quint, teacher and period campaigner, about her ideas to get it into the school curriculum for boys and girls.


FRI 11:00 How Covid Changed Science (m0019b3n)
Episode 3

In the third and final part of our series How Covid Changed Science, Devi Sridhar Professor of Global Health at Edinburgh University looks at the legacy and lessons of the pandemic for scientific research. Tackling the virus became a global issue, but many have pointed out the inequality of both resources and effort in the response. Going forward do we need to be directing research more towards improving health and disease surveillance in less wealthy parts of the world, would investing there help prevent future pandemics?


FRI 11:30 Mucking In (m0019b3q)
Series 1

Secrets, Lies and Pointless Piles of Paperwork

On Dangerfield Farm, the annual organic inspection is Ben and Cicely’s nightmare. Not just because every aspect of Ben’s management will be probed, but also because Cicely has forgotten to keep the Visitors’ Book up to date. and has to forge it at the last minute.

And then there’s Beatrix’s unexpected arrival from London. Have she and Archie split up and will Beatrix’s louche behaviour affront the inspector?

By Sue Limb and Betsy Vriend

Cast:
Alison Steadman – Cicely
Nigel Planer – Ben
Morwenna Banks – Beatrix
Tony Gardner – Archie

A Little Brother production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m0019b3v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 AntiSocial (m0019b3x)
Gaslighting and relationships

Love Island has sparked debate about gaslighting and narcissism.

The reality TV show Love Island has once again ignited discussion about the way men treat women in relationships. Two domestic violence charities called out what they called gaslighting and coercive control. Meanwhile on social media a wider conflict about these new terms has rumbled on.

Presenter: Adam Fleming
Producers: Josephine Casserly & Lucy Proctor
Researcher: Ellie House
Production Coordinator: Brenda Brown
Studio Manager: Hal Haines
Music: Oskar Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon


FRI 12:57 Weather (m0019b3z)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m0019b41)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Edward Stourton.


FRI 13:45 28ish Days Later (m0019b43)
Day Nineteen: Kenny

India speaks with Kenny Ethan Jones, the first transgender man to front a period product campaign. They talk about Kenny’s experience with menstruation, and transitioning. As well as Kenny's work as an activist, and his journey to peace.

Credits:
Presented by India Rakusen.
Producer: Ellie Sans.
Assistant Producer: Jorja McAndrew.
Executive Producer: Suzy Grant.
Original music composed and performed by Rebekah Reid.
Sound Design by Charlie Brandon-King.

Special thanks to all contributors and audio diarists.

A Listen production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m0019b45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Limelight (m0019b49)
English Rose

English Rose - Episode 2: Hunted

by Helen Cross.
Eighteen-year-old Rose has travelled from Whitby to New York to work as a nanny to a wealthy and secretive family. Manhattan is a culture shock and she has to stay alert to the dangers all around her.

But it turns out she is quite capable of looking after herself: bloody revenge is her speciality.

She's not like the other girls. And Gulliver is no ordinary baby. This is a world not just of champagne, but shadows, where all is definitely not as it seems.

Stylish and surprising fantasy horror with a comic twist, starring Alexandra Mardell (Coronation Street) and Demetri Goritsas (Ten Percent). With music by Dana Margolin and Sam Yardley of Mercury-nominated band, Porridge Radio.

Helen Cross wrote ‘My Summer of Love’ which won a Betty Trask award and was made into a Bafta-winning film with Emily Blunt (recently rated her best film in The Guardian top ten Emily Blunt films). Mary Ward-Lowery won Best Director in 2020 Audio Drama Awards.

Rose ... Alexandra Mardell
Maya ... Miranda Braun
Austin ... Demetri Goritsas
Siobhan ... Deirdre Mullins
Delphine ... Yasemin Özdemir
Randy ... Michael Begley
Art Guy ... Mathew Durkan
Beatrice ... Alexandra Hannant
Newsreader ... Tayla Kovacevic-Ebong
Jason ... Joseph Tweedale
Mam ... Jane Thornton

Including the voices of Jo Makel, Paul Murphy, James Hoggarth, Freya Pollaidh, Augusta Chapman, Becky Ripley and Ben Casswell.

Original music written and performed by Dana Margolin and Sam Yardley of Porridge Radio, and produced, mixed and engineered by Sam Yardley.

Sound design by Ilse Lademann
Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery


FRI 14:45 Living with the Gods (b09dtd3p)
The Protectoresses

Neil MacGregor's series on the role and expression of beliefs continues this week with a focus on images.

In Mexico, the image of Our Lady of Guadalupe came not from the hand of an artist, but was directly given from heaven - according to its history. Our Lady of Guadalupe is now the most powerful of presiding images, and the Basilica of Guadalupe near Mexico City is said to be the most visited Roman Catholic pilgrimage site in the world.

The sanctuary of the goddess Artemis in the great trading city of Ephesus, now in western Turkey, was by far the most celebrated temple of the antique Mediterranean, and the cult of Artemis spread eastwards towards the Black Sea, and westwards towards Spain. Artemis was thought to protect the vulnerable at their moments of greatest personal danger.

Neil MacGregor also visits a shrine devoted to a woman sometimes perceived as a contemporary protectoress.

Producer Paul Kobrak

The series is produced in partnership with the British Museum, with the assistance of Dr Christopher Harding, University of Edinburgh.
Photograph (c) The Trustees of the British Museum.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0019b4g)
London Stadium: 2012 Olympics 10th anniversary

Kathy Clugston and team are at the London Stadium for the tenth anniversary of the 2012 Olympics. Fielding questions from a live audience are experts Matthew Wilson, Christine Walkden and James Wong.

This week, the panellists answer queries on biodiversity in playgrounds, improving soil quality, and how much neglect the resilient pelargonium can take.

Over in the Queen Elizabeth Park, Ashley Edwards chats to Design Principal Ruth Holmes about the special legacy held by the park's horticulture and, down on the pitch, Head Groundsman James Williams tells us how they keep the stadium turf in tip top shape.

Producer: Daniel Cocker
Assistant Producer: Bethany Hocken

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 Commonwealth Stories (m0019b4n)
Indecent Exposure

To celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Commonwealth Short Story Prize, and mark this year’s Commonwealth Games celebrations, three recent prize winners have written specially commissioned stories for Radio 4.

Today’s story is by Kanya D’Almeida, from Sri Lanka, who won the 2021 prize with I Cleaned the …. . Her new story, Indecent Exposure, is a quietly searing tale of motherhood, poverty and longing. A young woman finds herself in court and knows that the forces ranged against her will never understand or pardon the desperate need that brought her there.

Kanya D’Almeida has an MFA in fiction from Columbia University’s School for the Arts. She is writing a collection of short stories about women and mental health, and is the host of The Darkest Light, a podcast on birth and motherhood in Sri Lanka.

The Commonwealth Short Story Prize attracts between 6,000 – 7,000 entries every year from nearly all the 54 Commonwealth countries, and taps into a rich, rewarding vein of storytelling from around the world. Five regional prizes are awarded from which one writer is chosen as the overall winner.

Producer: Sara Davies
Sound Design: Lucinda Mason Brown
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m0019b4y)
Tony Sirico (pictured), José Eduardo dos Santos, Ann Shulgin, Ivana Trump

John Wilson on

Tony Sirico, the former armed robber turned actor who found fame playing the role of mobster Paulie Walnuts in ground-breaking television series The Sopranos.

José Eduardo dos Santos, who ruled Angola as president for 37 years, steering the country through a bloody civil war, and reaping the benefits of an oil boom while being accused of huge levels of corruption.

Ann Shulgin, a therapist who pioneered the use of psychedelics and MDMA in therapy together with her chemist husband Sasha.

And Ivana Trump, the Czechoslovakian skier and model whose marriage to Donald Trump made her a fixture of tabloid and society pages for decades.

Producer: Tim Bano

Interviewed guest: Fr Robert Sirico
Interviewed guest: Dr Justin Pearce
Interviewed guest: Amanda Feilding
Interviewed guest: Professor David Nutt

Archive clips used: Paramount Pictures, The First Wives Club (1996); American Playhouse, The Big Bang (1989); NBC Today, 20th Anniversary of 'The Sopranos' 10/01/2019; HBO, The Sopranos (1999); Miramax/ Sweetland Films/ Magnolia Production, Bullets Over Broadway (1994); YouTube, Comício José Eduardo dos Santos - Angola 1992 16/09/2010; BBC Sound Archive, Independence celebrations in Angola 11/11/1975; BBC Radio 4, News 23/02/2002; BBC News Archive, Angola vote in first election for 16 years 05/09/2008; BBC Two, Panorama - The Corrupt Billionaire 25/01/2020; Viveka Films, MDMA The Movie - Promo Clip (2016); CBS News, When Ecstasy was legal 1985; gaiamedia/ YouTube channel, Ask the Shulgins 17/03/2014; BBC One, Wogan - Ivana Trump interview 03/06/1992; CBS Sunday Morning, Ivana Trump interview 08/10/2017; BBC Radio 4, Woman's Hour - Ivana Trump interview 03/06/1992; HBO/ Harpo Productions, The Oprah Winfrey Show 25/04/1998; BBC One, Modern Times - The Fame Game 03/01/1996; Del Monte/ Brian Jackson, UK Del Monte pears advert (2014).


FRI 16:30 Feedback (m0019b54)
The BBC’s Environment Analyst tells Roger Bolton he is scared about what is happening to the climate. Roger Harrabin, who is shortly to leave the Corporation, gives Feedback a frank and revealing interview about climate change, the way politicians are dealing with it, and the way the BBC covers it.

Adam Fleming talks about his new eight part podcast and series on Radio 4 about the origins and downfall of Boris Johnson. Is it too much and too late?

And listeners compare live theatre and radio drama.

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Alun Beach
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 17:00 PM (m0019b5b)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0019b5j)
Russia and Ukraine sign a deal to unblock grain exports, which may ease the food crisis


FRI 18:30 Dead Ringers (m0019b5q)
Series 22

Episode 6

Topical satire show, featuring characters drawn from the worlds of celebrity and politics.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (m0019b5x)
Writer, Caroline Harrington
Director, Peter Leslie Wild
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Jill Archer ….. Patricia Greene
Josh Archer ….. Angus Imrie
Pip Archer ….. Daisy Badger
Pat Archer ….. Patricia Gallimore
Helen Archer ….. Louiza Patikas
Natasha Archer ….. Mali Harries
Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Justin Elliott ….. Simon Williams
Clarrie Grundy ….. Heather Bell
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Brad Horrobin ….. Taylor Uttley
Chelsea Horrobin ….. Madeleine Leslay
Tracy Horrobin ….. Susie Riddell
Adam Macy ….. Andrew Wincott
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Adil Shah ….. Ronny Jhutti
Lynda Snell MBE ….. Carole Boyd
Oliver Sterling ….. Michael Cochrane
Obstetrician ….. Janice Acquah


FRI 19:15 Add to Playlist (m0019b63)
Sean Shibe and Camilla George take us from the Ozark Mountains to Jupiter

Saxophonist Camilla George and guitarist Sean Shibe take us on a global journey and beyond as they help choose the next five tracks for the playlist.

Cerys Matthews and Jeffrey Boakye also explore the finer details with guests John Dillon, Cathy Jordan and David Owen Norris.

Presenters Cerys Matthews and Jeffrey Boakye
Producer Jerome Weatherald

The five tracks in this week's playlist:

Beauty in the River by The Ozark Mountain Daredevils
The Green Gowned Lass by Dervish
Taximen by Amadou Balaké
Scarborough Fair by Incantation
Jupiter from The Planets by Gustav Holst

Other music in this episode:

Spacer by Sheila
Abasi Isang by Camilla George
Wuthering Heights by Kate Bush
Scarborough Fair by Simon & Garfunkel
Scarborough Fair by Martin Carthy


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m0019b69)
Kirsty Blackman MP, Iain Macwhirter, Ian Murray MP, Iain Stewart MP

Anita Anand presents political debate and discussion from MacRobert Memorial Hall, Tarland, with SNP Work and Pensions spokesperson at Westminster Kirsty Blackman MP, columnist at The Herald Iain Macwhirter, Shadow Secretary of State for Scotland Ian Murray MP and Minister in the Scotland Office Iain Stewart MP.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: Fraser Jackson


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m0019b6k)
Climate Change and the Fall of Icarus

Tom Shakespeare decided several years ago he was no longer going to fly for pleasure. But his father's cousin - who lives in the US - has just turned 90 and he'd love to see her again. He describes his fraught decision - as he grapples with his environmental conscience.

Reading from WH Auden's poem, 'Musée des Beaux Arts'.

Producer: Adele Armstrong
Sound: Peter Bosher
Production coordinator: Gemma Ashman
Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith


FRI 21:00 Archive on 4 (m00199dj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m0019b6p)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 Winchelsea by Alex Preston (m0019b6t)
Episode 10

A tale of revenge, identity and smuggling, set in Sussex in the 18th Century.

Winchelsea is a smugglers’ town. Beneath it there runs a network of cellars and caves from under its streets as far as the King’s Cliff. All manner of goods are stored there, safe from the excise men. The Cellarman holds the keys to the cellar gates, a position held in Goody Brown’s family since the founding of the town.

Episode Ten
Arnold Nesbitt describes the Battle of Goudhurst, and learns the true identity of William Stuart.

Alex Preston is an author and journalist who lives in Kent. His personal anthology of nature writing, As Kingfishers Catch Fire, was published in 2017. Winchelsea, published in 2022, is his fourth novel.

Writer: Alex Preston
Readers: Finlay Robertson and Jessica Gunning
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (m0019b5s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0019b6y)
In the season finale, Mark D'Arcy looks back at Boris Johnson's time in Parliament.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

28ish Days Later 14:45 SAT (m00199cy)

28ish Days Later 14:45 SUN (m00199q1)

28ish Days Later 13:45 MON (m00199w5)

28ish Days Later 13:45 TUE (m0019b53)

28ish Days Later 13:45 WED (m0019b8y)

28ish Days Later 13:45 THU (m0019bwp)

28ish Days Later 13:45 FRI (m0019b43)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (m0019b5s)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (m0019b5s)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m00194cs)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m0019b6k)

Add to Playlist 19:15 FRI (m0019b63)

Alexei Sayle's Strangers on a Train 19:15 SUN (m00199gr)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (m00193v9)

Analysis 20:30 MON (m00199x1)

Andrew Maxwell Values 18:30 TUE (m0019b6b)

Anneka Has Issues 18:30 WED (m0019b98)

AntiSocial 12:04 FRI (m0019b3x)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m00199cw)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m00194cq)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m0019b69)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m00199dj)

Archive on 4 21:00 FRI (m00199dj)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m0019bwv)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m0019bwv)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m00199dz)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m00199dz)

Boris 17:30 SAT (m0019lg0)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m00199gc)

Can the Police Keep Us Safe? 09:00 THU (m0019bw2)

Commonwealth Stories 15:45 FRI (m0019b4n)

DH Lawrence: Tainted Love 15:00 SAT (m000xdss)

Dead Ringers 12:30 SAT (m00194cj)

Dead Ringers 18:30 FRI (m0019b5q)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (m00199p9)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m00199p9)

Don't Log Off 16:30 MON (m001740k)

Drama 15:00 SUN (m00199q5)

Drama 14:15 MON (m000kp5p)

Drama 14:15 TUE (m0019b59)

Drama 14:15 WED (m000l8fg)

Drama 14:15 THU (m000mznj)

Fairy Meadow 11:30 THU (p0bk7kd9)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m00199c2)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m00199hd)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m00199xp)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m00199zd)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m0019bb9)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m0019by3)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (m00194cb)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (m0019b54)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (m00193pk)

Fortunately... with Fi and Jane 23:00 TUE (m00199yt)

Four Thought 05:45 SAT (m0019457)

Four Thought 09:30 WED (m0019b7g)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (m0019b7g)

From Fact to Fiction 00:30 SUN (m00194c6)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m00199ck)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (m0019bw8)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m00199ww)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m0019b6s)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m0019b9g)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m0019bx6)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m00194c4)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m0019b4g)

How Covid Changed Science 21:30 THU (m00194bm)

How Covid Changed Science 11:00 FRI (m0019b3n)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:04 SUN (m00193v2)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (m00199wn)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m0019b71)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (m00199ym)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (m00199ym)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m00194c8)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m0019b4y)

Limelight 14:15 FRI (m0019b49)

Living with the Gods 00:15 SUN (b09d43wm)

Living with the Gods 14:45 FRI (b09dtd3p)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m00199db)

Loose Ends 23:00 SUN (m00199db)

Made of Stronger Stuff 15:30 TUE (p0bgc3nb)

Made of Stronger Stuff 21:00 WED (p0bgc3nb)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m00194d4)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m00199dn)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m00199h0)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m00199x9)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m00199yy)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m0019b9x)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m0019bxn)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m00199cp)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m00199cp)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m0019b90)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (m001946f)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (m0019b9j)

Mucking In 11:30 FRI (m0019b3q)

Music Made in the Middle 11:30 WED (m0019b8m)

My Name Is... 11:00 MON (m00199vv)

New Storytellers 09:30 TUE (m00199y0)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m00194dp)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m00199dx)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m00199h8)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m00199xk)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m00199z8)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m0019bb5)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m0019bxz)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m00199k8)

News Summary 06:00 SUN (m00199fr)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m00199pf)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m00199wv)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m0019b4j)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m0019b8p)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m0019by5)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m0019b3v)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m00199c0)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m00199fz)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m00199g7)

News and Weather 13:00 SAT (m00199ct)

News 22:00 SAT (m00199dl)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (m00199fv)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m00199q9)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m00199q9)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (m00194gm)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m0019bwr)

PM 17:00 SAT (m00199d2)

PM 17:00 MON (m00199wd)

PM 17:00 TUE (m0019b5z)

PM 17:00 WED (m0019b94)

PM 17:00 THU (m0019bwx)

PM 17:00 FRI (m0019b5b)

Percy Shelley, Reformer and Radical 23:30 SAT (m00193rw)

Peter Brook 20:00 MON (m000v2wk)

Peter Brook 11:00 WED (m000v2wk)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m00199qt)

Plant Based Promises 21:00 MON (m00193nd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m0016n5g)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m00199hb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m00199xm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m00199zb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m0019bb7)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m0019by1)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m00199dd)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m00199dd)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m00199dd)

Rabbit at Rest 21:45 SAT (m0002bp3)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m00199g3)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m00199g3)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m00199g3)

Robin Ince's Reality Tunnel 23:00 THU (m0019bxj)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m00199cb)

Science Stories 11:00 TUE (b0858v5m)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m00194dd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m00199ds)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m00199h4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m00199xf)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m00199z4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m0019bb1)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m0019bxv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m00194d8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m00194dk)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m00199d4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m00199dq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m00199dv)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m00199qk)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m00199h2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m00199h6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m00199xc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m00199xh)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m00199z2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m00199z6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m0019b9z)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m0019bb3)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m0019bxs)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m0019bxx)

Sideways 00:15 MON (m0019455)

Sideways 09:00 WED (m0019b8f)

Sideways 16:00 WED (m0019b8f)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m00199d8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m00199qq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m00199wj)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m0019b64)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m0019b96)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m0019bx1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m0019b5j)

Sketches: Stories of Art and People 16:00 MON (m00199wb)

Sliced Bread 12:32 THU (m0019bwh)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b0118cmj)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b0118cmj)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m00199g9)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m00199g1)

Techno: A Social History 11:30 TUE (m00199y6)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (m00193ts)

The 3rd Degree 15:00 MON (m00199w7)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m00199gf)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m00199gp)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m00199gp)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m00199wr)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m00199wr)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m0019b6n)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m0019b6n)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m0019b9d)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m0019b9d)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m0019b45)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m0019b45)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (m0019b5x)

The Bottom Line 11:30 MON (m00194h3)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (m0019bxb)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (m0019bx8)

The Climate Tipping Points 09:30 THU (m00180l4)

The Expectation Effect by David Robson 09:45 MON (m00199wm)

The Expectation Effect by David Robson 00:30 TUE (m00199wm)

The Expectation Effect by David Robson 09:45 TUE (m00199z0)

The Expectation Effect by David Robson 00:30 WED (m00199z0)

The Expectation Effect by David Robson 09:45 WED (m0019bxq)

The Expectation Effect by David Robson 00:30 THU (m0019bxq)

The Expectation Effect by David Robson 09:45 THU (m0019b3j)

The Expectation Effect by David Robson 00:30 FRI (m0019b3j)

The Expectation Effect by David Robson 09:45 FRI (m0019js4)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m00199pk)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m00199pk)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 19:15 SAT (m00199dg)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:00 THU (m00199dg)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (m00199cd)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (m00199cd)

The Listening Project 13:30 SUN (m00199px)

The Long History of Argument 09:00 TUE (m00199xw)

The Long History of Argument 21:30 TUE (m00199xw)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m0019b92)

The Media Show 21:30 WED (m0019b92)

The Smugglers' Trail 21:30 MON (m0015bb3)

The Ultimate Choice 18:30 THU (m0019bx3)

The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith 00:30 SAT (m00194bh)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (m00199ch)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m00199pt)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m00199x3)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m00199yp)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m0019b9l)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m0019bxd)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m0019b6p)

This Cultural Life 09:00 MON (m00159tb)

Three Fires 19:45 SUN (m00199gt)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (m00199x7)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (m00199yw)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (m0019b9v)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (m0019bxl)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (m0019b6y)

Today 07:00 SAT (m00199c6)

Today 06:00 MON (m00199vn)

Today 06:00 TUE (m00199xr)

Today 06:00 WED (m0019b8c)

Today 06:00 THU (m0019bvy)

Today 06:00 FRI (m0019b3g)

Tom Mayhew Is Benefit Scum 23:00 WED (m0019b9q)

Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets 16:30 SUN (m00199qf)

Tumanbay 21:00 SAT (m000kgpg)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03zrcfq)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03zrcq9)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03zrcdf)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03zrc82)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03zrc8z)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03zrc9l)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m00199c4)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m00199cr)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m00199d6)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m00199fx)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m00199g5)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m00199pp)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m00199qn)

Weather 05:56 MON (m00199hg)

Weather 12:57 MON (m00199w1)

Weather 12:57 TUE (m0019b4q)

Weather 12:57 WED (m0019b8t)

Weather 12:57 THU (m0019bwk)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m0019b3z)

Welcome to Rwanda 20:00 TUE (m0019b6x)

Welcome to the Neighbourhood 23:15 WED (m0019b9s)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m00199gx)

Winchelsea by Alex Preston 22:45 MON (m00199x5)

Winchelsea by Alex Preston 22:45 TUE (m00199yr)

Winchelsea by Alex Preston 22:45 WED (m0019b9n)

Winchelsea by Alex Preston 22:45 THU (m0019bxg)

Winchelsea by Alex Preston 22:45 FRI (m0019b6t)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m00199d0)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m00199vs)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m00199y4)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m0019b8k)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m0019bw6)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m0019b3l)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (m00193p3)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (m0019m7c)

World at One 13:00 MON (m00199w3)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m0019b4x)

World at One 13:00 WED (m0019b8w)

World at One 13:00 THU (m0019bwm)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m0019b41)

You and Yours 12:04 MON (m00199vz)

You and Yours 12:04 TUE (m00199yc)

You and Yours 12:04 WED (m0019b8r)

You and Yours 12:04 THU (m0019bwf)