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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 09 JULY 2022

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m0018xlb)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:30 The Last Days of Roger Federer by Geoff Dyer (m0018xjs)
Episode 5

Geoff Dyer sets his own encounter with late middle age against the last days and last achievements of writers, painters, athletes and musicians who've mattered to him throughout his life.

With a playful charm and penetrating intelligence, he examines a series of notable endings and considers the intensifications and modifications of experience that come when an ending is within sight. Oh, and there's stuff about Roger Federer and tennis, too.

This book on last things - written while life as we know it seemed to be coming to an end - is also about how to go on living with art and beauty, on the entrancing effect and sudden illumination that a piece of music or work of art can engender in even the most jaded sensibilities. Blending criticism, memoir and repartee into something entirely new, The Last Days of Roger Federer is a summation of Geoff Dyer's passions and the perfect introduction to his sly and joyous work.

Written by Geoff Dyer
Read by David Schofield
Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0018xld)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0018xlg)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0018xlj)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m0018xll)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0018xln)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sarah Joseph


SAT 05:45 Four Thought (m0018xfg)
Grief: A Practical Guide

James Helm gives a practical guide to dealing with grief and sudden single parenthood. Following the early death of his wife Charlotte, he found himself without the love of his life and single-handedly bringing up their three sons. He shares what he has learnt from personal experience - "what helps and what hurts".
"People may think bereavement is in the past when in fact it is very much in the present. And it's really not a weakness to signal when things are tough, or when sadness or loneliness gather like clouds. In my view, it's a sign of real strength."

Presenter: Olly Mann
Producer: Sheila Cook
Production Coordinator: Janet Staples
Editor: Penny Murphy


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m00193l1)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (m0018x3y)
The Search for Summer Snow

Andrew Cotter and Iain Cameron first met on twitter, though neither will admit who made the first move. They've been walking together since 2016 and are often looking for snow. Iain researches snow patches across the Highlands and Andrew seems to enjoy coming along for the ride. On a marvellous early sunlit morning they climb the Grey Corries with producer Miles Warde and try to work out how much snow will survive the summer heat.

Iain Cameron is the author of The Vanishing Ice. He's been drawn to the white patches of the Scottish Highlands since 1983.
Andrew Cotter is a sports reporter and the author of several books about his dogs, Mabel and Olive.

Produced for BBC audio in Bristol by Miles Warde


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m00193l3)
Nearly 670 million people worldwide will be undernourished in 2030 according to The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation, which published its annual assessment of global food security this week. The Covid pandemic and the war in Ukraine are making things worse.

We catch up with a Dutch man who farms in Ukraine. He's just begun this year’s harvest but says they're running out of storage space for the grain and thinks yields will be affected by lack of fertiliser and seed. He warns that in some parts of the region, there may not be a harvest at all next year if the conflict continues.

Leaving the European Union means the subsidy system for farmers is now a devolved decision. The Welsh Government has just announced more details of their new scheme. Farmers in Wales will have to cover at least 10% of their land with trees in order to qualify for public funding in future. Ministers insist they don't want to see widespread land use change, away from farming.

All week on Farming Today we’ve been talking about rural tourism which brings in £4.5 billion to the UK economy every year, according to Visit England. We look at a herd of heritage animals in Northumberland. The Chillingham Wild Cattle Association is opening a new visitor centre to tell the story of the beasts which have never been farmed and used to be hunted. We look at the problems and solutions of too many tourists on Skye and visit a Devon farmer who opened a campsite under lockdown and says it's made a big difference to the farm business.


SAT 06:57 Weather (m00193l5)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 07:00 Today (m00193l7)
Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m00193l9)
Eddie Hearn

Eddie Hearn joins Nikki Bedi and Rev. Richard Coles. One of the biggest boxing promoters in the world, Eddie represents some of the biggest names in the sport, including Anthony Joshua and Katie Taylor. He talks about what drives him to succeed and the biggest challenges he’s faced.

This weekend is the Llangollen Eisteddfod, an international music and dance festival in North Wales, which has been running since 1949. In 1956, when she was 15, Myron Lloyd entered the Welsh singing competition in a traditional costume and had her photograph taken. She thought nothing of it, until a few years later, when she discovered she’d become famous all over Wales, and beyond.

Hip Hop educator Breis grew up in London and Lagos. Music helped him readjust after moving countries. Rather than entering the corporate world after gaining a maths degree, Breis has continued to pursue his passions, creating music and publishing books, including Diary of a Creative Mind.

Louis Theroux chooses his Inheritance Tracks: Janie Jones by The Clash and Sha-La-La (Make Me Happy) by Al Green.

Harpreet Chandi MBE, also known as ‘Polar Preet,’ talks about creating history by becoming the first woman of colour to complete an unsupported solo expedition to the South Pole.

Derek Chisora and Kubrat Pulev are meeting for a second time for a boxing rematch at The O2 on Saturday 9 July 2022.
Theroux the Keyhole by Louis Theroux is out now.

Producer: Claire Bartleet
Editor: Richard Hooper


SAT 10:30 Rewinder (m00193lc)
Naturists, Naturalists and Neighbours

Greg James, host of the Radio 1 Breakfast show, uses his access-all-areas pass to the BBC Archives to track down audio gems, using listener requests, overlooked anniversaries and current stories as a springboard into the vast vaults of past programmes.

Celebrating 100 years of the BBC, the archive team have been selecting their favourite treasures from the vaults. Greg takes a look at some of these archivists' picks, which lead him on a trip to a nudist beach in Yorkshire, where the locals are less than impressed. Staying by the sea, he visits Broadstairs in 1957, taking in the cuisine and eavesdropping on a fractious town council meeting.

An exchange of letters between writer Reverend W Awdry and the BBC reveals a disastrous attempt to broadcast a live Thomas the Tank Engine story in 1953. Greg also finds a fascinating piece of history from a BBC reporter who was stranded in a lighthouse for a month by bad weather.

After 37 years, Neighbours is leaving our screens. To say goodbye, Greg unearths audience feedback from the height of its popularity on the BBC. And the big question back then – is that Kylie Minogue or Rick Astley singing I Should Be So Lucky?

And - why do radio presenters find it so difficult to tell the time?

Producer: Tim Bano


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m00193lf)
Ben Wright and guests reflect on a dramatic week in Westminster following Boris Johnson's announcement that he will resign as Prime Minister. The panel includes the political commentator Steve Richards, Isabel Hardman, Assistant Editor at the Spectator and Matthew Goodwin, Professor of Politics at the University of Kent. There is also an interview with Lord Evans, the chair of the Committee on Standards in Public Life.

Editor: Peter Snowdon


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m00193lh)
Sri Lanka on the edge

Sri Lanka is facing its worst economic crisis since independence, with inflation soaring to the highest rate in Asia. The country’s energy minister warned at the weekend that the country would soon run out of fuel as long queues formed at petrol stations, with many staying for days at a time. President Gotabaya Rajapaksa has even sought help from Russia to help import fuel. Rajini Vaidyanathan has been in Colombo speaking to those most affected.

Will Grant reflects on dual tragedies in Texas: the shooting in a primary school in Uvalde in Texas and 53 migrant deaths in a people-smuggling operation. In both these horrific events, the correspondent heard stories of thwarted hopes – and life ambitions cut short.

In Syria, cities like Damascus and Palmyra were once heralded for their history and architectural grandeur but much of their cultural heritage has been destroyed during the years of civil war. Nick Redmayne travelled to Palmyra on a guided tour, one of a few businesses trying to revive their fortunes despite an ongoing economic crisis.

In Algeria, we hear how people are working to restore the land that was burned in wildfires last year, in the country's northeast. Tens of thousands of hectares were destroyed in flames and much of the natural landscape has morphed into charred remains. Amy Liptrot visited a project which is involved in restoring some of the land destroyed by the fires.

And finally, we hear about one French farmer who has come up with a cunning plan to help generate a new source of revenue at his family-run farm: it's a cabaret show with a difference, far away from the Folies Bergère. Chris Bockman paid it a visit.

Presenter: Kate Adie
Producer: Serena Tarling
Editor: Emma Rippon
Production Coordinator: Gemma Ashman


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m00193lk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m00193lm)
How changes at the top of government could affect your money

It's been quite the week in politics and on this week's Money Box we'll take a look at what it could mean for your personal finances.
One of the biggest challenges the next PM will face is the economy and the many households feeling the squeeze.
It's thought some of the candidates favour tax cuts, but there's also pressure to increase taxes to control government borrowing.
Heather Self a tax expert at Blick Rothenberg and Tom Selby from the investment company AJ Bell will discuss.

According to a new report, out on Monday, more people are falling behind with at least one household bill as the cost of living rises.
Money Box has been given an early look at the Coronavirus Financial Impact Tracker, which suggests one-in-six households are now ‘in serious financial difficulty' compared to one-in-ten in October. Debt is also climbing - particularly among people who were already struggling. We'll speak to Professor Sharon Collard from the University of Bristol, who is one of the authors of the financial impact report which is funded by the Aberdeen Financial Fairness Trust. Plus advice from the debt charity Stepchange.

Also, if you ignore a current account for too long - can your bank really take your money? And how hard is it to get it back? Our reporter Dan Whitworth investigates.

Presenter: Felicity Hannah
Reporter: Dan Whitworth
Researcher: Sandra Hardial
Editor: Jess Quayle

(First broadcast 12pm Saturday 9th July, 2022)


SAT 12:30 Dead Ringers (m0018xkt)
Series 22

Episode 4

Some of the real reasons for resignations, some new sex scandals come to light, and what plans Liz Truss has for the future.

Performed by Jon Culshaw, Lewis Macleod, Jan Ravens, Debra Stephenson and Duncan Wisbey.

This episode was written by: Nev Fountain & Tom Jamieson, Laurence Howarth, Ed Amsden & Tom Coles, Edward Tew, Cameron Loxdale, Peter Tellouche and Sarah Campbell.

Produced and created by Bill Dare
Production Co-ordinator: Sarah Sharpe & Katie Baum


SAT 12:57 Weather (m00193lp)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News and Weather (m00193lr)
The latest national and international news and weather reports from BBC Radio 4


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m0018xl0)
Baroness Jenny Jones, Peter Kyle MP, Jacob Rees-Mogg MP, Anna Soubry

Anita Anand presents political debate and discussion from The Electric Palace in Bridport with the Green Party peer Baroness Jenny Jones, the Shadow Northern Ireland Secretary Peter Kyle MP, the Minister for Brexit Opportunities and Government Efficiency Jacob Rees-Mogg MP and the former MP and government minister Anna Soubry.

Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: Tim Allen


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m00193lt)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:45 28ish Days Later (m00193lw)
Day Six: The Stories We're Told

Joined by Alec Mills, Chella Quint and Dr Camilla Rotsvik, India investigates the impact of images on the way women feel about their periods. From menstrual shame to scented tampons, India assesses the images that have appeared across 100 years of period product advertising shaping menstrual taboo. India also considers the adverts and artists pushing the boundaries and revolutionsing menstrual images.

Credits:
Presented by: India Rakusen.
Producer: Jorja McAndrew.
Series Producer: Ellie Sans.
Executive Producer: Suzy Grant.
Original music composed and performed by Rebekah Reid.
Sound design by Charlie Brandon-King.

Special thanks to all contributors and audio diarists.

A Listen production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.


SAT 15:00 DH Lawrence: Tainted Love (m000x6cx)
The Rainbow

'DH Lawrence: Tainted Love’ dynamically puts centre stage Lawrence's daring writing on the complexity of love. The Rainbow dramatised by Linda Marshall Griffiths

Ursula Brangwen wants to know about passion and desire. Delving into her own family history she defiantly questions the choices open to women.

Ursula ..... Cassie Bradley
Tom ..... Karl Collins
Lydia ..... Aneta Piotrowska
Young Ursula ..... Florence Hunt
Anna ..... Rosalie Craig
Young Anna ..... Lauren Tanner
Will ..... Lee Ingleby

Directed by Nadia Molinari

‘DH Lawrence: Tainted Love’ is a pairing of two novels 'The Rainbow' and 'Women in Love' linked by Ursula Brangwen. Sexual awakening, transgression and repression are explored as his characters try to find happiness and fulfilment in uncertain times. Set in a mining town in Nottinghamshire, 'Tainted Love' is a celebration of Lawrence at his most daring, pushing the boundaries of sexuality in the dawning of the Twentieth Century.

Seen through the eyes of Ursula, ‘The Rainbow’ spans three generations of the Brangwen family from 1840s to 1905 exploring the complexity of desire, sexuality and liberty. As Ursula reflects on her family history, she defiantly questions the choices open to women, rejecting the path taken by her mother Anna who found fulfilment in childrearing and finding inspiration in the advice of her grandmother Lydia, a Polish refugee, who tells her to seek someone who will love her for what she is, not for what he wants. Upon publication in 1915 the novel was suppressed on the grounds of obscenity, all copies were destroyed and it remained banned in Britain for 11 years under the Obscene Publications Act 1857.

With thanks to the Estate of Frieda Lawrence Ravagli.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m00193ly)
Sally Phillips, Nusrat Ghani MP and vice-chair of The 1922 committee, Women's football, Anti-depressants, Soul singer PP Arnold

The actor Sally Phillips on her latest film on Sky Cinema 'How to Please a Woman. Set in Western Australia, Sally plays fifty-something Gina who, having just lost her job, feels invisible and stuck in a sexless marriage, and sets up an all-male house cleaning service that also offers sexual services. Photo © SUCH FEISTY DAMES PTY LTD

As Boris Johnson prepares to step down we hear from Nusrat Ghani the Conservative MP for Wealden and vice-chair of The 1922 committee that represents backbench conservative MPs. The members of the 1922 Committee wield a lot of power in the Conservative Party and runs the selection process for new leaders.

Charlotte Carew Pole the Director of Women2Win, an organisation which aims to increase the number of Conservative women in Parliament.

The rise in women being prescribed anti depressants. Dr Nighat Arif a GP who specialises in women's health explains.

The American soul singer PP Arnold found fame in the 1960s as an Ikette with the Ike and Tina Turner Revue . Her autobiography is called Soul Survivor,

As the Women's Euros get under way, veteran players share their stories.

Presenter: Anita Rani
Producer: Dianne McGregor


SAT 17:00 PM (m00193m0)
Full coverage of the day's news


SAT 17:30 Boris (m0019kxh)
1.The Early Years: The Fifth Beatle

Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson. A bit of a mouthful. To most people - and there are those that hate it - he’s simply Boris.

This series tells the story of Boris Johnson - from boy to man to Prime Minister. In each episode Adam Fleming talks to a range of people who’ve known, watched, worked or dealt with him.

In this first episode we hear about the early years.

Guests:

Andrew Gimson, political journalist and author of Boris - The Making of the Prime Minister.

Sonia Purnell, writer and journalist and author of Just Boris: A Tale of Blond Ambition

Michael Cockerell, broadcaster and journalist who made the acclaimed documentary Boris Johnson: The Irresistible Rise

Producers: Ben Carter and Natasha Fernandes
Editor: Emma Rippon
Production co-ordinator: Brenda Brown
Studio Engineer: Rod Farqahar


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m00193m4)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m00193m6)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00193m8)
Number 10 has criticised Rishi Sunak for his bid to become Conservative party leader. And anti-government protestors in Sri Lanka have stormed the president's official residence.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m00193mb)
Bill Pullman, Jenny Agutter, Simon Callow, Mo Wilde, Rae Morris, Katy J Pearson, Emma Freud, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Emma Freud are joined by Bill Pullman, Jenny Agutter, Simon Callow and Mo Wilde for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Rae Morris and Katy J Pearson.


SAT 19:00 Profile (m00193md)
Nadhim Zahawi

The new Chancellor who came to the UK as a child refugee, began a business selling Teletubbies merchandise and is now tipped by some to become Prime Minister. Mark Coles charts the meteoric rise to power of the man who's been in the cabinet less than a year.

Presenter: Mark Coles
Production team: Sally Abrahams and Kirsteen Knight
Editor: Richard Vadon


SAT 19:15 The Infinite Monkey Cage (m00193mg)
Series 24

The Wood Wide Web

Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined by Ted Lasso's Brendan Hunt, Professor of forest ecology and author of "The Mother Tree", Suzanne Simard and botanist Mark Spencer to discover how trees and plants communicate and what they are saying. Suzanne's incredible discovery that trees form a wood wide web of communication has changed our entire understanding of forests and how they work. With the help of amazing fungi, this incredible network of communication allows the trees and plants in a forest to pass information backwards and forwards to help protect themselves against predators and optimize resource. Incredibly, this could even be viewed as a form of intelligence. Brian and Robin find out how this should change the way we look at all plants, and in particular how we manage our forests and discover some of the secrets of those whispering trees.

Executive Producer: Alexandra Feachem


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m00193mj)
A Hard Look at Soft Power

Professor Joseph Nye, who served in the Clinton and Carter administrations, came up with the term 'soft power' over thirty years ago, to describe a means of increasing international influence not through military or economic force but through attraction and persuasion. At that point, with the Cold War coming to an end, the United States was undoubtedly the world's true soft power super-power, pushing its political values across the globe through a mixture of diplomacy and both popular and consumer culture.

Since then, of course, much has changed, and Professor Nye considers how instances such as the invasion of Iraq in 2003, the isolationism of Donald Trump and the widespread reporting of mass shootings have tarnished America's soft power, while other countries both democratic and authoritarian have sought to push their own soft power credentials through music, sport and language.

Nye talks with Gavin Esler about the role of soft power during the dying days of the Cold War, and Tony Blair's efforts to corral the UK's leading cultural figures in a bid to bolster its own soft power potential. Professor Ngaire Woods describes the importance of making sure soft power is implemented effectively in order to maintain a united front against Russia in Ukraine. Maria Repnikova charts the varying fortunes of China and South Korea in their sustained efforts to extend their influence through soft power, and Frank Cottrell Boyce recalls the soft-power messages around, for example, the NHS and same-sex relationships that helped re-invent the image of Britain across the world.

Produced by Geoff Bird


SAT 21:00 Tumanbay (m000k7jc)
Series 4

The Watchers

Anton Lesser, Aiysha Hart, Rufus Wright, Rob Jarvis and Kirsty Bushell lead an impressive ensemble cast in this engrossing, historical fantasy from creators John Scott Dryden and Mike Walker.

Frustrated at the Balarac's continued presence in Tumanbay, Fatima (Kirsty Bushell) lays down a challenge to their leader, the blind Grand Master (Anton Lesser). Former spymaster, Gregor (Rufus Wright) is on the trail of the missing Hafiz with the help of talkative assassin, Aquila (Rob Jarvis).

Cast:
Gregor................ Rufus Wright
Grand Master................ Anton Lesser
Fatima................ Kirsty Bushell
Aquila................ Rob Jarvis
Manel................ Aiysha Hart
Cadali................ Matthew Marsh
Pilaar................Enzo Cilenti
Heaven................Olivia Popica
Piero................Pano Masti
Angel................Steffan Donnelly
Physician................Vivek Madan
Frog................Misha Butler
Bello................Albert Welling
Dumpy............... Ali Khan
Landlady............... Arita Sadiku
Cafe Owner................ Gerard McDermott
General Barbarossa................ Nadir Khan

Original Music by Sacha Puttnam

Sound Design by Eloise Whitmore
Sound Recording by Laurence Farr

Produced by Emma Hearn, Nadir Khan and John Scott Dryden
Written by Mike Walker
Directed by John Scott Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:45 Rabbit at Rest (m0002bb4)
Episode 6

John Updike’s fourth novel about Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom.

It's the end of the 1980s and Harry has acquired a Florida condo, a second grandchild, and a troubled, overworked heart - not to mention a troubled underworking son. As Reagan’s debt-ridden, AIDS-panicked America yields to that of the first George Bush, Rabbit explores the bleak terrain of late middle age - looking for reasons to live and opportunities to make peace with a remorselessly accumulating past.

The novel won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1991, the second "Rabbit" novel to garner that award.

Reader: Toby Jones
Abridger: Eileen Horne
Producer: Clive Brill

A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:00 News (m00193ml)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (m0018xfd)
'Unacceptable' Opinions

“Unacceptable” Opinions

Have you ever felt that you can’t say what you really think, that your honest opinions have become somehow unacceptable? It’s a common complaint that freedom of speech is being restricted, that more and more views have become inadmissible or rejected as intolerable. On social media, people expressing thoughts that would have hardly raised an eyebrow a generation ago, are viciously attacked and branded as bigots.

If that is a problem - and opinions differ - the government may be about to make it worse. Its Online Safety Bill, going through Parliament just now, is aimed at making the UK the safest place in the world to go online, but there are concerns that it could involve more censorship and less freedom.

It is surely good to have a diverse range of views openly and freely expressed in public, important for democracy for honest discourse and a sure sign of true freedom of speech. But others feel that cleaning up the public space of unsavoury, prejudiced and hateful views makes for a more civilised society. It creates safer, more respectful places for everyone. Offensive comments that were shamelessly expressed in the past about, for example black, gay or trans people are rarer now. Is this evidence that modern values like equality are being widely embraced, or a sign that people feel muzzled and their views, far from going away, are festering into conspiracy theories, extremism and even the threat of violence? Does it matter if the range of views we can express becomes narrower? With Eric Heinze, James Bloodworth, Joe Mulhall and Jeevun Sandher.

Producers: Jonathan Hallewell and Peter Everett
Presenter: Michael Buerk


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (m0018x0f)
Series 12

Gonville & Caius College Cambridge

A funny, lively and dynamic quiz presented by Steve Punt and recorded on location at a different university each week, pitting three undergraduates against three of their professors.

This week the show comes from Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, the specialist subjects are Physics, Economics and History, and the answers involve the isotropy of the universe, pre-war Poland's relation to the Gold Standard and a song about sausage rolls.

The rounds vary between specialist subjects and general knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students’ knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors’ awareness of television, sport, and pop. And the Head-to-Head rounds, in which students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offer plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

The other universities in this series are University College London, Warwick, Bangor, Lancaster and Leeds Beckett.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 23:30 Percy Shelley, Reformer and Radical (m0018wy2)
The Original Dub Poet

We think we know Shelley. It is safe to say that we do not.

He comes to most of us in neatly packaged school anthologies which safely repeat the classics (Ozymandias, To a Skylark, and Ode to the West Wind), but Shelley's verse like The Masque of Anarchy shaped the world. Shelley and his two companions drowned off the coast of Italy after their boat ran into difficulties and sank. He was only 29 but he left a body of work which endures. With the bicentenary of his premature death in July 2022, there has never been a better time to re-examine Shelley's enduring legacy.

Benjamin Zephaniah is a huge admirer of Shelley. After a terrible start with the poet at school when the teacher told him he was stupid for not fully understanding what he was reading, Benjamin was turned on to Shelley in his early 20s when he stumbled on a copy of Paul Foot’s 'Red Shelley'. Paul Foot put Shelley’s works into the historical context in which they were written, in the early 19th century, at a time of profound social and political instability.

Understanding the context enabled Benjamin to connect with the radical nature of Shelley and his work. He says, "As a young, angry black man in the 1980s, it was a revelation to find a dead white poet that made sense to me. Good poetry has no age, and no colour." What he found in Shelley changed his life. Benjamin discovered that the poem he had first encountered at school, The Mask of Anarchy, was an angry ballad written by Shelley in response to the Peterloo massacre, and he now has a lifelong attachment to that poem.

Benjamin takes us on his journey from his first encounters with Shelley all the way up to the present: as he looks at a small keepsake of Shelley’s ashes, alleged to have been collected from the beach near Viareggio where Shelley's body was cremated, now held at the British Library, Benjamin says it's the closest he will get to a 'spiritual experience'.

Along the way, Benjamin meets experts and enthusiasts to discover more about what made Shelley tick and to breathe life into his poetry, showing that it's as relevant now as it was when Shelley died 200 years ago.

With Ben Okri, Nora Crook; Richard Holmes; Bysshe Coffey; Will Bowers, Alexander Lock and John Webster.

Featured Poems: The Masque of Anarchy; Ode to the West Wind

Series Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
Sound Design: David Thomas
Series Consultant: Bysshe Coffey (author of Shelley's Broken World, 2021)

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4



SUNDAY 10 JULY 2022

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m00193mn)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:15 Past Forward: A Century of Sound (m0015vlp)
Save our Steelworks

Greg Jenner hears an archive clip of Welsh women trying to save Ebbw Vale steelworks in 1975. He talks Professor Louise Miskell about how important women were in political activism in Wales in the 1970s, and to Sophie Williams about how she approaches activism in 2022.

Marking the centenary of the BBC, Past Forward uses a random date generator to alight somewhere in the BBC's vast archive over the past 100 years. Greg Jenner hears an archive clip for the first time at the top of the programme, and uses it as a starting point in a journey towards the present day. The archive captures a century of British life in a unique way - a history of ordinary people’s lives, as well as news of the great events. Greg uncovers connections through people, places and ideas that link the archive fragment to Britain in 2022, pulling in help from experts and those who remember the time, and looking at how far we've come since then.

Producer: Dan Potts


SUN 00:30 From Fact to Fiction (m0018xkh)
Ten Small Hands

The cost of food is soaring, the bills are coming in and there could be another toddler in Jo's group at nursery. Ten little hands for her two. Has any of these government-types ever tried looking after five young children, all in nappies, for twelve hours straight?

Writer and comedian Amy Mason creates a fictional response to a story in this week's news.

This week, despite the upheaval in Whitehall, the cost of living crisis continues. The government has outlined new proposals to bring down the cost of childcare, one of which is to increase the ratios of children to staff. Latest UN reports on food prices and food security, out this week, suggest it's all going in the wrong direction. How does all this translate into life on the ground for a nursery nurse?

Amy Mason is an award-winning playwright and performer based in Bristol. Her five-star-reviewed autobiographical show 'The Islanders' won the 2013 Ideas Tap/Underbelly Edinburgh Fringe Fund and was lauded as a 'must see' show in The Stage. Amy also writes for television, is an award-winning novelist and a stand-up comedian, putting outsider women at the centre of her stories.

"Tonight we discovered a genius called Amy Mason….Find her. Watch her." Dawn O’Porter

Producer Mary Ward-Lowery


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00193mq)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00193ms)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00193mv)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m00193mx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m00193mz)
The Church of St Nicholas, Leeds in Kent.

Bells on Sunday comes from the Church of St Nicholas, Leeds in Kent. The grade one listed church dates from the 11th century with a large Norman tower holding ten bells including two 17th and six 18th century bells. The oldest bell is the tenor which was cast by Joseph Hatch. It weighs seventeen and a half hundredweight and is tuned to E. We hear them ringing Kent Treble Bob Royal.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m00193md)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Summary (m00193qh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01k9m9z)
Prayer Before a Five Pound Note

Money occupies a central position in the lives of people around the world - no matter the culture or currency. And yet few of us ever pause in our earning and spending to consider what is its real role within our society? What is its weight in our lives?

In this edition of Something Understood, Mark Tully explores our human relationship with money and asks, given its immense power, what should be our Prayer Before a Five Pound Note?

We hear readings from a broad range of writers, with all sorts of viewpoints on money, from Christian activist Monica Furlong to publishing magnate and poet Felix Dennis. Music includes Michael Head's exaltation of poverty, "Money O!" and JJ Cale's "Money Talks".

Mark speaks to Professor Jacob Needleman, who believes most people ignore the spiritual implication of money in their day to day lives, and do so at their peril. This is a strange attitude to take towards something which has such a singular power over us, as shown by Jacob's own experiments, in which he attempts to hand a five-dollar bill to strangers in the streets. Their reactions, and his own feelings on giving away money in this way, reveal great deal about our often-fraught interactions with it.

It seems that humanity teeters between the obsessive pursuit of money and often futile attempts to rid themselves of it. Perhaps the most productive way to engage with it is to abandon those two extremes and instead use it as a mirror to show us ourselves - the way we spend reveals our priorities in often surprising ways. Should our prayer before a five-pound note be "please, help me to understand myself"?

Producer: Hannah Marshall
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (m00193qk)
Menai Shellfish

Caz Graham visits the island of Anglesey, just off the north coast of Wales, where oysters are farmed in the waters of the Menai Strait. The strong currents which ebb and flow around the sandbanks bring a steady supply of food for the shellfish. Caz finds out how they are grown and cultivated, and learns about the effect that rising water temperatures are having. She meets the farm's owners, who have also made the most of their location, with its views of Snowdonia National Park, to set up a camping and caravan site.

Produced by Caitlin Hobbs


SUN 06:57 Weather (m00193qm)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m00193qp)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m00193qr)
A look at the ethical and religious issues of the week


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m00193qt)
Railway Children

Presenter and broadcaster Nikki Bedi makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Railway Children.

To Give:
- UK Freephone 0800 404 8144
-You can donate online at bbc.co.uk/appeal/radio4
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Railway Children’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘Railway Children’.
Please note that Freephone and online donations for this charity close at 23.59 on the Saturday after the Appeal is first broadcast. However the Freepost option can be used at any time.

Registered charity number: 03265496


SUN 07:57 Weather (m00193qw)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m00193qy)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m00193r0)
Sea Sunday

A service from Portsmouth Cathedral to mark Sea Sunday.

The preacher is The Venerable Andrew Hillier QHC, Chaplain of the Fleet and Archdeacon for the Royal Navy. The music is sung by the Cathedral Choir – made up for the broadcast of Girl Choristers, Lay Clerks and Choral Scholars. The readings are: Jonah 2: 1-10 and Mark 4:35-41.

main image credit: Sophie Henstridge-Brown
Producer: Alexa Good


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m0018xl2)
The Meanings of Conservatism

'We're witnessing a major change in British politics,' writes John Gray. 'But to what?' With Boris Johnson on the way out, many Conservatives, he says, believe the party needs a new 'big idea'. But that is a fundamental error, he believes. 'What the party needs is not another new philosophy but a healthy dose of pragmatism...new thinking, but not some grand new theory'.

Producer: Adele Armstrong
Sound: Peter Bosher
Production coordinator: Gemma Ashman
Editor: Penny Murphy


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tvryl)
Common Buzzard

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the common buzzard. Common buzzards are stocky birds of prey which often soar on upturned wings. In Scotland they're sometimes called the tourists' eagle because of many golden eagles claimed by hopeful visitors. Common buzzards are increasing their range and numbers and range in the UK and their soaring flight over their territories is now a regular sight nearly everywhere.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m00193r2)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m00193r4)
Writer, Sarah Hehir
Director, Dave Payne
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Ben Archer ….. Ben Norris
Helen Archer ….. Louiza Patikas
Josh Archer ….. Angus Imrie
Natasha Archer ….. Mali Harries
Pat Archer ….. Patricia Gallimore
Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Tony Archer ….. David Troughton
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Beth Casey ….. Rebecca Fuller
Steph Casey ….. Kerry Gooderson
Vince Casey ….. Tony Turner
Will Grundy ….. Phillip Molloy
Chelsea Horrobin ….. Madeleine Leslay
Tracy Horrobin ….. Susie Riddell
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Jim Lloyd ….. John Rowe
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Lynda Snell MBE ….. Carole Boyd
Oliver Sterling ….. Michael Cochrane
Denise ….. Clare Perkins
Gemma ….. Dawn Butler


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (m00193r6)
Andrew Ramroop, tailor

Andrew Ramroop is a Savile Row tailor, whose international client list has included film stars and royalty.

Andrew grew up in a remote village in Trinidad and sewed his first garment at the age of nine, creating a simple pair of trousers from a pillowcase. He left school at 13 and was apprenticed to a local tailor who told him tales about the pinnacle of sartorial excellence, Savile Row – the place where James Bond’s suits were cut.

Inspired by this vision, Andrew saved up for a ticket to sail to the UK: he emigrated at the age of 17, only the second person to leave his village. He found work on Savile Row, went on to complete a degree at the London College of Fashion, and then gained a job at Maurice Sedwell, eventually taking over the business when Maurice retired.

In recent years, Andrew has been closely involved in training the next generation of tailors. He was awarded an OBE in 2009, for his work in tailoring and training, and was the UK’s Black Business Person of the Year in 2017.

DISC ONE: Portrait of Trinidad by The Mighty Sniper
DISC TWO: Another Brick In The Wall, Pt. 2 by Pink Floyd
DISC THREE: Time Will Tell by Jimmy Cliff
DISC FOUR: The Boxer by Simon & Garfunkel
DISC FIVE: It's a Man's Man's Man's World by James Brown & The Famous Flames
DISC SIX: Desiderata by Les Crane
DISC SEVEN: Maria La O by Neil Latchman
DISC EIGHT: Bridge Over Troubled Water by Simon & Garfunkel

BOOK CHOICE: Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
LUXURY ITEM: A tenor steel pan drum
CASTAWAY'S FAVOURITE: Bridge Over Troubled Water by Simon & Garfunkel

Presenter Lauren Laverne
Producer Sarah Taylor


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m00193r8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (m0018wyz)
Series 89

Ivy League, Banned Books and The Art of Seduction

Sue Perkins challenges Paul Merton, Desiree Burch, Daliso Chaponda and Lucy Porter to speak for 60 seconds without repetition, deviation or hesitation.

The long-running Radio 4 national treasure of a parlour game is back for a new series with subjects this week ranging from Banned Books to The Art of Seduction.

Production co-ordinator: Caroline Barlow
Sound editor: Marc Willcox
Producer: Sarah Sharpe

A BBC Studios Production


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m00193rb)
Mindful Food and the Art of Attention

In a world where our attention spans are getting shorter, where we are rewarded not for the attention we pay to others but the attention we receive – is it time we re-evaluated the value of attentive growing and farming, and mindful eating?

Could paying attention, as cheesemonger and podcast host Sam Wilkin argues, be the secret to great food and drink production and relishing what we consume on a daily basis?

Sam takes us to Westcombe Dairy, where he’s been following their transition to regenerative agriculture for the past year, as part of the Westcombe Project. We visit a pioneering island distillery in the Inner Hebrides, as well as growers and brewers at an inaugural organic food festival in the East Neuk of Fife.

The common thread that binds them? The belief that a more attentive approach has the power to transform the food system and improve our lives in the process.

Presented by Jaega Wise.
Produced by Robbie Armstrong in Glasgow.


SUN 12:57 Weather (m00193rd)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m00193rg)
Radio 4's look at the week's big stories from both home and around the world


SUN 13:30 The Listening Project (m00193rj)
Living History

Three conversations between strangers presented by Fi Glover.

This week: Norman and Steve remember the miners' strike of 1984 from different perspectives - one was a striking miner, the other a young policeman with the task of keeping order on the picket lines; Ayesha and Imran talk about what Muslim representation in the media means to them and the positive impact of Ms Marvel, a new Disney series which has a first for Marvel - a female Muslim superhero.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation lasts up to an hour and is then edited to extract the key moments of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in this decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0018xkf)
South Kesteven

Horticultural programme featuring a group of gardening experts. Chairing this week is Peter Gibbs, and answering your questions are Bunny Guinness, Bob Flowerdew, and Matthew Pottage.

As judging commences for this year's RHS Britain in Bloom, Peter speaks with local Stamford in Bloom coordinator Ann Ellis about what they've done to make Stamford a greener place.

In the hall, the panellists answer questions on how best to secure a climbing rose to a wall, as well as giving advice on ivy that's getting out of control. They also explain when to prune a hydrangea, and how to help a variegated plant that is reverting.

Away from the questions, Dr Chris Thorogood speaks to Beverley Glover at Cambridge Botanic Garden to find out why bees are attracted to certain plants.

Producer: Jemima Rathbone
Assistant Producer: Aniya Das

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 28ish Days Later (m00193rl)
Day Seven: Oestrogen Rising

India introduces the series to oestrogen, the hormone of sass, sex and energy. Dr Jackie Maybin explains the role of oestrogen in preparing the body for ovulation and Dr. Sarah Hill explains her research on the effect of oestrogen on the brain. Maisie Hill also pops in with some tips for Spring.

Credits:
Presented by: India Rakusen.
Producer: Ellie Sans.
Assistant Producer:Jorja McAndrew.
Executive Producer: Suzy Grant.
Original music composed and performed by Rebekah Reid.
Sound design by Olga Reed.

Special thanks to all contributors and audio diarists.

A Listen production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.


SUN 15:00 Drama (m00193rn)
Mansfield Park. Part 1

by Jane Austen
Adapted by Clara Glynn

A new version of Austen’s most overlooked novel.
This is the only Austen book that tells the story of its protagonist from childhood. We first meet Fanny Price when she is nine years old and we witness how she’s shaped by family and adversity. At the centre of the book is a displaced child with an unshakeable conscience. A true heroine.

MANSFIELD PARK, where goodness is valued over glamour, feels like the Jane Austen for our times.

Episode One - As a child, Fanny Price is sent to live with her rich relatives at Mansfield Park.

Fanny Price - Lydia Wilson
Edmund Bertram - Bryan Dick
Mary Crawford - Tala Gouveia
Henry Crawford - Tom Mothersdale
Mrs Norris/Mrs Grant - Janice Acquah
Lady Bertram - Madeleine Worrall
Tom Bertram/William Price - Joshua Riley
Sir Thomas - John Hollingworth
Mr Rushworth- Samuel Valentine
Maria Bertram - Faith Alabi
Julia Bertram - Hollie Burgess

Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m00193rr)
Sheffield

Johny Pitts returns home to Sheffield to explore its rich and varied literary landscapes.

Poet and novelist Helen Mort talks about writing from the perspective of the places which are important to her and the people of the city.

Professor David Forrest leads a delve into the archives of local hero Barry Hines, including the handwritten manuscript for A Kestrel for a Knave - the iconic novel which became the Ken Loach-directed film Kes.

Catherine Taylor picks some of the authors who have defined, in very different ways, the often maligned city where she grew up. And Désirée Reynolds takes us to an old haunt, which has inspired her writing and own attempts to excavate unheard voices of the past.

With thanks to the University of Sheffield Library's Special Collections team and Catie Evans at the Sheffield General Cemetery Trust
Producer: Ciaran Bermingham

Book List – Sunday 10 July and Thursday 14 July

Black Car Burning by Helen Mort
The Illustrated Woman by Helen Mort
Ours Are the Streets by Sunjeev Sahota
The Year of the Runaways by Sunjeev Sahota
Barry Hines: Kes, Threads and Beyond by David Forrest and Sue Vice
A Kestrel for a Knave by Barry Hines
The Gamekeeper by Barry Hines
Looks and Smiles by Barry Hines
Granny Was A Buffer Girl by Berlie Doherty
The Book of Sheffield edited by Catherine Taylor
My Own Worst Enemy by Robert Edric
Remembered by Yvonne Battle-Felton
The Storm by Akeem Balogun
Safe Metamorphosis by Otis Mensah
Tea with Cardamom by Warda Yassin


SUN 16:30 Percy Shelley, Reformer and Radical (m00193rw)
Red Shelley

We think we know Shelley. It is safe to say that we do not.

He comes to most of us in neatly packaged school anthologies which safely repeat the classics (Ozymandias, To a Skylark, and Ode to the West Wind), but Shelley's verse like The Masque of Anarchy shaped the world. Shelley and his two companions drowned off the coast of Italy after their boat ran into difficulties and sank. He was only 29 but he left a body of work which endures. With the bicentenary of his premature death in July 2022, there has never been a better time to re-examine Shelley's enduring legacy.

Benjamin Zephaniah is a huge admirer of Shelley. After a terrible start with the poet at school when the teacher told him he was stupid for not fully understanding what he was reading, Benjamin was turned on to Shelley in his early 20s when he stumbled on a copy of Paul Foot’s 'Red Shelley'. Paul Foot put Shelley’s works into the historical context in which they were written, in the early 19th century, at a time of profound social and political instability.

Understanding the context enabled Benjamin to connect with the radical nature of Shelley and his work. He says, "As a young, angry black man in the 1980s, it was a revelation to find a dead white poet that made sense to me. Good poetry has no age, and no colour." What he found in Shelley changed his life. Benjamin discovered that the poem he had first encountered at school, The Mask of Anarchy, was an angry ballad written by Shelley in response to the Peterloo massacre, and he now has a lifelong attachment to that poem.

Benjamin takes us on his journey from his first encounters with Shelley all the way up to the present: as he looks at a small keepsake of Shelley’s ashes, alleged to have been collected from the beach near Viareggio where Shelley's body was cremated, now held at the British Library, Benjamin says it's the closest he will get to a 'spiritual experience'.

Along the way, Benjamin meets experts and enthusiasts to discover more about what made Shelley tick and to breathe life into his poetry, showing that it's as relevant now as it was when Shelley died 200 years ago.

With Ben Orki, Nora Crook; Richard Holmes; Will Bowers; Alexander Lock, Robin Darwall-Smith, Stephen Hebron and Madeleine Callaghan.

Featured Poems: Ozymandias; A Ballad (Young Parson Richards stood at his gate); Adonais.

Series Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
Sound Design: David Thomas
Reader: Kymberley Cochrane
Series Consultant: Bysshe Coffey (author of Shelley's Broken World, 2021)

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m0018x1h)
Ukraine War Stories: What Happened Next?

In March 2022, File on 4 told the stories of six people whose lives were changed forever by war in Ukraine.
They were not soldiers, activists or politicians. They were civilians, not used to war or how to deal with it.
They kept audio diaries that told a raw truth about loss, hope and even love.
Some packed up and left with their children while others remained in the eye of the storm.
Among them, a language teacher from Mariupol who did not know if her parents were still alive – and a model who was caught up in shelling in Chernihiv.
But what’s happened to them since?
File on 4 tries to trace them, to discover how their lives have changed in four months of war.

Reporter: Paul Kenyon
Producer: Hayley Mortimer
Editor: Carl Johnston


SUN 17:40 Profile (m00193md)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m00193s0)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m00193s4)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00193s7)
More Conservative MPs have joined the race to succeed Boris Johnson as Prime Minister. And the defending Wimbledon champion, Novak Djokovic, has won the men's singles final.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m00193s9)
Shari Vahl

A selection of highlights from the past week on BBC radio


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m00193sc)
Pip and Toby discuss Rosie’s imminent start at primary school. Rosie’s looking forward to it, it’s Pip who’ll be in bits. Ben turns up and Pip comments that he’s in a good mood; it must be because Beth’s back on the scene. Ben thinks school will be good for Rosie – she’ll learn how to have a ‘healthy lifestyle’. When Pip questions this, Ben clumsily says that he’s pretty sure that, medically speaking, Rosie’s a bit overweight. Pip and Toby think Ben’s out of order. Furious Pip tells Ben she doesn’t want him babysitting for Rosie again and asks him to leave. But it gets Pip thinking and she worries to Toby about Rosie’s diet and exercise. They eventually agree that Ben’s being over the top.
It’s Brad’s first day of a summer job, haymaking at Grange Farm. When he worries whether he’ll be any good at it, Tracy says it’s got to be better than slaving away in the chicken factory. Eddie shows Brad the ropes, but Brad’s alarmed when he mentions Oliver will be there. Initially distant, Brad warms up when he and Oliver get chatting about family life and Brad admits he’s enjoying the work. Eddie asks Oliver how he’s doing. Oliver says he’s bearing up, explaining to Brad that five years ago today he lost Caroline and will always miss her. When Tracy rings to see how it’s all going, Brad doesn’t mention that he’s working with Oliver and says it’s going fine. Tracy’s proud of him.


SUN 19:15 Alexei Sayle's Strangers on a Train (m00193sf)
Series 1

Cardiff to Portsmouth

Author, actor and comedy icon, Alexei Sayle begins his travels across the country by rail in the first of a new six part series for Radio 4.

Alexei’s mission is to break the golden rule of travelling by train and actually talk to his fellow passengers in a quest for conversations that reveal their lives, hopes, dreams and destinations. There’s humour, sadness and surprise as people talk about what is going on in their lives and, as Alexei passes through familiar towns and cities, he also tells stories and memories from his career and childhood.

Alexei has a lifelong "ticket to ride" in his DNA. His father was a railway guard and the Sayle family benefitted from free travel in the UK and across Europe. As a boy, Alexei and his family roamed far and wide from the family home in Anfield, Liverpool. At a time when most people thought an exciting trip by train was to Brighton or Blackpool, Alexei travelled thousands of miles to mysterious towns with unpronounceable names in far flung corners of the continent.

In each programme in the series, Alexei embarks on a rail journey, taking a chance on who he might meet and inviting them to have a conversation with him. In this first episode, he travels from Cardiff to Portsmouth. Among his many fellow travellers, he meets David who looks after tunnels for a living, Tess who speaks Russian and Ukrainian and has been trained to drive a tank, and technician Megan from the National Oceanography Centre who, while many of us might be daunted by trying to deal with a leaking washing machine, loves fixing things and takes on the maintenance of mass spectrometers as part of the centre’s work on climate change.

Producers Peter Lowe and Nick Symons
A Ride production for Radio 4


SUN 19:45 Accidents and Emergencies (m00193sj)
5: All Who Were Able For It

The final story in Sarah Moss's powerful and heart-rending series, set on one hospital ward over a long weekend. As patients wait to be assessed on the Acute Medical Unit, with the few staff exhausted and spent, stories of their lives and possible futures slowly unfold. These are tales of kindness, love and small acts of humanity in a system at breaking point.

Today: after a death on the ward, an elderly patient waits anxiously for the morning - when her surgery will take place...

Writer: Sarah Moss
Reader: Niamh Cusack
Producer: Justine Willett


SUN 20:00 Feedback (m0018xkm)
Why did Emily Maitlis, the former Newsnight presenter, want to make eight programmes about an American official who died 50 years ago?

Roger Bolton asks her about her Radio 4 series which recounted the career of J Edgar Hoover, the man who made presidents tremble and became probably the most powerful non-elected official in the USA. Was he the ‘deep state’ personified?

Also, Dr Michael Moseley of Radio 4’s Just One Thing answers a critic who says his advice to eat more oily fish could come at a high environmental price.

And in a similar vein, should we be concerned about the future of peat bogs?

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Kate Dixon
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m0018xkk)
Baroness Greengross OBE (pictured), Sonny Barger, Technoblade, Qin Yi

Matthew Bannister on

Baroness Greengross, who championed the rights of older people as Director General of the charity Age Concern.

Sonny Barger, the leading American Hell’s Angel who was arrested 21 times and spent 13 years in prison.

Technoblade, the young Youtuber who amassed millions of followers for his commentaries on the video game Minecraft.

Qin Yi, the leading Chinese film star whose career spanned eight decades.

Producer: Neil George

Interviewed guest: Gail Perry
Interviewed guest: Alexandre Kalache
Interviewed guest: Zhen Zhang
Interviewed guest: Chris Berry
Interviewed guest: Deanne Stillman

Archive clips used: BBC Radio 4, Woman's Hour 07/03/2003; BBC Radio 4, Woman's Hour 03/03/2004; BBC News, News report on Dementia 03/07/2012; BBC Two, Hell's Angels 04/01/2004; BBC Four, Storyville - Gimme Shelter 11/12/2009; KSAN Radio/ Stefan Ponek/ from Storyville - Gimme Shelter, Sonny Barger Interview 11/12/2009; EricSalasProductions/ YouTube Channel, Sonny Barger Exclusive Interview 08/08/2012; Technoblade YouTube Channel, Minecraft Storymode Season 1 Episode 1 07/01/2019; Technoblade YouTube Channel, "so long nerds" 01/07/2022/; Technoblade YouTube Channel, the hypixel skyblock experience 14/06/2019; BBC Radio 4, Glenda Jackson interviews Peter Brook 19/04/2021; Shanghai Film Studio/ Tianma Film Studio, Woman Basketball Player No 5 (1957); Ningxia Film Group/ Shanghai Film Studios, Railway Guerrilla (1956); China Central Television, Under the Roofs of Shanghai (1982); BBC One, Eastenders 26/05/1997.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m00193lm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m00193qt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (m0018wz7)
Beyond the cost of living crisis

The Bank of England says inflation might reach 11 per cent this year. There are warnings that some people will have to choose between heating and eating.

But what does it mean for the whole economy when prices just keep rising? In the 1970s inflation in the UK led to prices and wages spiralling as workers fought for wages that would keep up with prices.

Those years were dominated by waves of strikes and social unrest as inflation became embedded in the economic system. The current situation is being exacerbated by Covid 19, the war in Ukraine and Brexit so is there anything that government can do to stop it? How bad could it get? And are the days of low inflation gone forever?

Reporter Philip Coggan talks to:
Manoj Pradhan consultant at Talking Macroeconomics
Andy Haldane, Chief Executive of the RSA and former Chief Economist at the Bank of England
Jagjit Chadha: Director of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR)
Helen Dickinson, Chief Executive of the British Retail Consortium
Ruth Gregory, Economist at Capital Economics
Kenneth Rogoff, Professor of Economics at Harvard University

Producer: Claire Bowes
Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith
Production co-ordinators: Helena Warwick-Cross and Maria Ogundele
Sound engineer: Neil Churchill


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m00193sl)
Carolyn Quinn is joined by the pensions minister Guy Opperman and shadow attorney general Emily Thornberry. They discuss the race to become the next prime minister, with the Daily Telegraph's political editor Ben Riley-Smith explaining the latest developments and adding his analysis. The programme also includes an interview with Dame Andrea Leadsom - former Cabinet minister, who stood twice for the Tory party leadership.


SUN 23:00 Loose Ends (m00193mb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01k9m9z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 11 JULY 2022

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m00193sp)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Rewinder (m00193lc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m00193mz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00193sr)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00193st)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00193sw)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m00193sy)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00193t0)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sarah Joseph


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m00193t2)
11/07/22 - Milk price; Wild boar; Curlews

Some farmers in Scotland are asking for the Government to implement a cull of wild boar, which are digging up fields, spreading disease, and according to some, attacking sheep. It comes as a deadly disease - African Swine Fever - is spreading West across Europe. It's already led to the loss of more than one million domestic pigs. Wild boar are thought to spread the disease.
All this week we are looking at the UK dairy industry. The price farmers get paid for their milk is at its highest ever level - around 50 pence per litre. But their input costs are also rising fast, and one dairy analyst says if the price they get doesn't keep up, more farmers will leave the industry.
And we hear from farmers and conservationists in Gloucestershire aiming to help the dwindling population of Curlews
The presenter is Caz Graham


MON 05:56 Weather (m00193t4)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tx0s5)
Spotted flycatcher

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the spotted flycatcher.

Spotted flycatchers may be rather plain-looking but they're full of character and they often nest in our gardens. The first sign that one's about may be a pale shape darting out from a tree to pluck a fly in mid-air with an audible snap of its bill.


MON 06:00 Today (m00193t6)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 This Cultural Life (m00161mc)
Aaron Sorkin

As one of the most successful screenwriters of modern times, Aaron Sorkin is renowned for his quickfire, rhythmic dialogue in films and television dramas including The West Wing, A Few Good Men, The Newsroom, Moneyball and The Social Network. More recently he’s directed his own screenplays with films including Molly’s Game, The Trial Of The Chicago 7 and Meet the Ricardos.

Aaron Sorkin tells John Wilson how, at the age of five, his parents took him to see the Broadway musical Man of La Mancha, an experience that sparked his love of theatre. He remembers seeing Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf a few years later and being entranced by the musicality of the dialogue. Debates around the family dinner table, led by his corporate lawyer father, are another source of inspiration for a writer famed for creating adversarial scenarios in courtrooms and the corridors of power. Sorkin pays tribute to his mentor, the Oscar winning screenwriter William Goldman, and explains how Goldman’s screenplay for the classic 1969 movie Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid offers a masterclass in dramatic dialogue. Aaron Sorkin also reflects on his writing process, and how he often gripped by ‘writer’s block’, despite being one of the most prolific screenwriters of his generation.

Producer: Edwina Pitman


MON 09:45 The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith (m00193t8)
Brinkmanship

Martin Sixsmith witnessed the end of the Cold War first hand, reporting for the BBC from Moscow during the presidencies of Gorbachev and Yeltsin. In The War of Nerves he draws on a vast array of sources as well as his own experiences to take us into the minds of those affected by the simmering tensions and paranoia on both sides of the Iron Curtain.

From the end of the Second World War to the dissolution of the USSR in 1991, the psychodrama played out between the Soviet and American superpowers held the world in thrall. The Cold War, both sides declared, was a contest of competing social, economic, political and ethical systems, each of them professing a monopoly on wisdom and the keys to humankind’s future. It was a conflict in which the battleground was, to an unprecedented extent, the human mind - the aim was to control not just territory, resources and power, but loyalties, belief and the nature of reality.

Both sides in the Cold War had the means to destroy the planet. And decades of rumbling international hostility affected individual mental well-being, manifesting in social paranoia, catastrophising, and surges of collective hysteria.

Until earlier this year, we thought all that was over. But now, in Ukraine, we are forced to reconsider the comforting assumptions of the past 30 years. History, in the sense of a settled global preference for liberal democracy, has evidently not ended.

Martin Sixsmith studied Russian at Oxford, Harvard, the Sorbonne and in St Petersburg, and psychology at Birkbeck and London Metropolitan University. He is the author of two novels and several works of non-fiction, including 'Philomena' and 'Russia: A 1,000 Year Chronicle of the Wild East'.

In this first episode Martin explores nuclear brinkmanship and the terrible psychological pressures endured by military personnel on the front line in the Cold War.

Abridged and produced by Jane Greenwood
Read by Jonathan Keeble
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m00193tb)
Angélique Kidjo, Taxing the child free, Recognition for first England footie team

Angélique Kidjo is a 5 time Grammy Award winner from Benin who has been called "Africa's premier diva". Later this month she will be headlining the WOMAD world music and dance festival. She’ll be talking on Woman’s Hour about why she sings in five different languages and how music can be a greater force for change than politics.

A recent article in the Sunday Times asked whether we should tax the childfree. It got a lot of attention and Sarah Harper, Professor of Gerontology at Oxford University joins Emma to discuss, as does Daisy Buchanan, an author and podcast host who has chosen to be child free.

The first international England Women’s football match was in November 1972, England vs Scotland. Neither team were awarded with ‘caps’ which are awarded to players whenever they represent their country in an international match. Nicola Sturgeon awarded the 1972 Scottish Women’s team with their long awaited caps before the Women’s World Cup final last year. The 1972 England Women’s team are still waiting to receive theirs. 50 years on from that first match, we speak to Woman’s Hour listener and a 1972 goalkeeper for the England Women’s football team, Sue Whyatt and the honorary secretary of the Women’s Football Association, Patricia Gregory who co-organised the first international women’s England v Scotland match in November 1972.

Presenter: Emma Barnett
Producer: Emma Pearce


MON 11:00 Ceausescu's Children (m001897q)
Today, the actor Ionica Adriana lives with her family in the North Yorkshire countryside - but her life could have turned out wildly different. Until the age of two-and-a-half, Ionica lived in an orphanage, in Transylvania, north-western Romania.

From 1965-1989, the Communist dictator Nicolae Ceaușescu enforced a strict set of policies to set about vastly increasing the Romanian population. But widespread poverty meant it was impossible for many Romanian parents to look after their newborn children - and so many ended up in state-run institutions, where they received little care and attention, and where they were left in dirty clothes, to feed and fend for themselves.

Ionica returns to Romania to uncover her past and the history of Ceaușescu’s barbaric orphanages. She explores what childcare and protection looks like in Romania today, meets someone who grew up in the state system his entire childhood and has an emotional encounter of her own.

Producer: Sasha Edye-Lindner
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4


MON 11:30 The Bottom Line (m0018x4h)
'Sorry, all our agents are busy right now'

Why does it seem so hard to contact a business these days? It's almost like they deliberately hide their phone numbers from us. When we do manage to ring, they often make us sit through an endless list of 'caller options' before allowing us to speaking to anyone. Are they deliberately trying to dissuade us from getting in touch or are we expecting too much too soon from customer services? Evan Davis speak to the people managing our calls.

Guests:
Leigh Hopwood: Chief Executive of the Call Centre Management Association
Dave Mills: NHS specialist at EVAD
Tim Callington: Director of technology firm Flipside

Producer: Nick Holland
Studio Managers: James Beard & Rod Farquhar
Production Coordinators: Siobhan Reed & Iona Hammond
Editor: Hugh Levinson

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MON 12:00 News Summary (m00193td)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 You and Yours (m00193tg)
Skins Creams, School Energy Bills and Tesco's Price Stand

Tesco has refused to stock some products from Heinz and Mars because it says they are too expensive. It's the third time in five years it has gone public with a spat over price with a multinational supplier. Who will win this trial of strength and what are other supermarkets thinking?

We spend over £3billion on skin care products in the UK. More per capita than almost anywhere else in the world. The hand cream sector , in particular, is growing fastest but are they worth it? Are we fooling ourselves about the benefits- a leading dermatologist thinks so.

We are being hacked more than ever. Sometimes we aren’t even aware it is happening. What everyone should know and do to protect themselves from cyber-crime.

One-in-two disabled households in the UK have been pushed into debt due to rising costs, with more than a third skipping meals to save money. That's according to a new report from the disability charity Sense.

Rising energy bills are eating into school budgets. Many school will be paying three times more than in the current academic year. Two schools tell us about their fears that children's education could be adversely affected by an energy bill.

PRESENTER: SHARI VAHL

PRODUCER: KEVIN MOUSLEY


MON 12:57 Weather (m00193tj)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m00193tl)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with James Naughtie.


MON 13:45 28ish Days Later (m00193tn)
Day Eight: Hack it to Win it

For years the female body in athletic performance has gone understudied, until recently.

India meets Richard Burden from the English Institute of Sport who is researching the effect of hormones on female performance whilst also building key technology in the field to do onsite hormone testing. India is also joined by GB pentathlon athlete Jess Varley who is part of this research and who has tailored her training around her menstrual cycle to reap extraordinary results.

Credits:
Presented by India Rakusen.
Producer: Jorja McAndrew.
Series Producer: Ellie Sans.
Executive Producer: Suzy Grant.
Original music composed and performed by Rebekah Reid.
Sound design by Charlie Brandon-King.

Special thanks to all contributors and audio diarists.

A Listen production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.


MON 14:00 The Archers (m00193sc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Takeover (m00193tq)
Series 2

Episode 1

High-stake deals and sibling rivalry set in the world of the super wealthy. Meet the Majumdars, a family at war… with itself. Rising from the ashes of defeat, business mogul Ravi Majumdar (Rajit Kapur) will do whatever it takes to claw back control of his global empire.

In Episode 1, a kidnapping, a death threat and a plan that will devastate a community in South Wales…

Cast:
Ravi Majumdar......Rajit Kapur
Ash......Abhin Galeya
Maya......Amrita Acharia
Zara......Ramanique Ahluwalia
Shaan......Danny Ashok
Ian......Finbar Lynch
Venetia......Laurel Lefkow
Jai......Vincent Ebrahim
Seraphina......Jennifer Armour
Guy......Matthew Marsh
Tom...... George Georgiou
Arabella...... Taullah Bond
Bethan......Claire Cage
Perrin......Robert Gwilym

Other parts:
David Holt
Vivek Madan
Mike Sengelow
David Menkin
Nadir Khan &
Ayeesha Menon

Written by Ayeesha Menon and Matthew Solon

Sound Design, Eloise Whitmore
Original music, Sacha Puttnam
Sound recording, Paul Clark, Ashyar Bulsara & Ayush Ahuja
Sound Editor, Andreina Gomez
Script Editor, Mike Walker
Assistant Producer, Eleanor Mein

Producers, Emma Hearn & Nadir Khan
Director and Executive Producer, John Scott Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4


MON 15:00 The 3rd Degree (m00193ts)
Series 12

University of Warwick

A funny, lively and dynamic quiz presented by Steve Punt and recorded on location at a different university each week, pitting three undergraduates against three of their professors.

This week the show comes from the University of Warwick, the specialist subjects are Maths and Statistics, Linguistics and Engineering, and the questions range from Kartvelian Languages and Prismatic Actuators to Yellow Submarines and Vanessa Shanessa Jenkin.

The rounds vary between specialist subjects and general knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students’ knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors’ awareness of television, sport, and pop. And the Head-to-Head rounds, in which students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offer plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

The other universities in this series are University College London, Leeds Beckett, Bangor, Lancaster and Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m00193rb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Sketches: Stories of Art and People (m00193tw)
Soil, Steel & Stone

The materials featured in this episode are ones that really matter to the featured artists. The mycelium in the soil of the Welsh rainforest inspired sound artist Cheryl Beer to create music from the biorhythms of trees. Cheryl was a professional musician until sudden devastating hearing loss meant she could no longer sing or play music. Sound became ugly and distorted and she withdrew from the world until with the help of her hearing aids and the soothing sounds of Nature she was able to find a way back into creating music. She has composed a Rainforest Symphony (Cân y Coed) Song of the Trees) available to listen to by scanning a QR code at the National Botanic Garden of Wales, Senedd Cymru and online at Disability Arts Cymru.

Ex soldier Matt Whitfield struggled with reentry into civilian life after twenty years in the army. Desperately in search of something to add meaning to his life he began drawing scenes of his hometown of Middlesbrough. Matt was struck by the decline of the town after the loss of the Teeside steel industry and began creating art depicting the end of a way of life. His exhibition Ghosts of the Tees is a melancholy reflection of the changes Matt observed after his time away.

We tend to associate stone carving with memorials and monuments, designed to stand the test of time. But on the rocky beach at Bucks Mills in North Devon, sculptor and stone carver Jo Sweeting is creating works of art that are designed to disappear. As part of a collaborative project with seven other women artists called Re-Wilding the Word Hoard she is gathering and celebrating local dialect words for landscape, and carving them into boulders which will one day be carried off by the tides.

Producer: Maggie Ayre


MON 16:30 Don't Log Off (m0016x8h)
Series 13

Blown Away

Alan Dein returns with his globe spanning encounters via the internet with complete strangers & now, often, old acquaintances. It is ten years since Dein began roaming the internet via social media to encounter the lives of others. Anyone, anywhere keen to share their world and their stories. In that time many have befriended the programme from Russia & the Ukraine. Now war has smashed everything apart & Alan hears from those who have seen their lives changed utterly.
Producer-Mark Burman


MON 17:00 PM (m00193ty)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00193v0)
Backbench Conservative MPs are meeting to set the rules for the party leadership contest, with eleven candidates putting themselves forward so far


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (m00193v2)
Series 77

Episode 1

This 50th Anniversary Series of Radio 4's multi award-winning ‘antidote to panel games’ promises yet more quality, desk-based entertainment for all the family. The celebrations begin in London’s Royal Albert Hall where Tony Hawks and Pippa Evans are pitched against Harry Hill and the programme’s creator Graeme Garden, with Jack Dee in the role of reluctant chairman. Regular listeners will know to expect inspired nonsense, pointless revelry and Colin Sell at the piano.

Producer - Jon Naismith
A BBC Studios production


MON 19:00 The Archers (m00193nv)
Lilian sets up generating some interest for the cross-country course which should be finished next month; Justin wants to launch with a bang. Shula and Alice go to see how the course is getting on. Alice can’t wait to try it. Shula comments that Alice has turned a corner these last few months – she seems settled, calm and grounded. Alice agrees – the solicitors just need to work out an amicable financial settlement and then she and Chris can put it all behind them. Alice thanks Shula – she couldn’t have survived the last year without her. Coming to The Stables and talking to Shula was such a help.
George is being a hard taskmaster for Brad and Oliver haymaking at Grange Farm. George teases Brad about wanting to go to college to do his ‘A ’levels – he’s better off getting a trade and earning some money. Oliver gently sticks up for Brad, but George counters that he’s only bantering. When Oliver offers to have a word with George, Brad says he’s used to it; people at school do it too. Oliver discovers Brad’s interested in maths, and says Brad must get it from Tracy, she was always good with numbers. Brad asks gently how Oliver is after Caroline’s anniversary yesterday. Oliver says he’s alright, but he’ll always go on missing her. Later George calls Oliver boring and a soft touch, and Eddie tight. But Brad defends them and suggests they get back on with their work.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m00193v5)
Jack Absolute Flies Again, Joe Stilgoe, Cattelan / Druet

Jack Absolute Flies Again, at the National Theatre, is an adaptation of Sheridan’s comedy of manners The Rivals. Writers Richard Bean (who wrote One Man, Two Guvnors – a big hit) and Oliver Chris keep the original characters – Lydia Languish, Sir Anthony Absolute and the lexically challenged Mrs Malaprop – but move the action from 18th Century Bath to the Battle of Britain. Samira Ahmed talks to director Emily Burns about this, and to Peter Forbes, who plays Sir Anthony, about finding character in the comedy.

Pianist and songwriter Joe Stilgoe on his new album, Theatre - which he describes as a love letter to the theatre - and performs for us live in the studio.

In Paris, conceptual art has found itself in the dock, as rights of authorship over some of the artworks created by artist Maurizio Cattelan - including one of his most famous works,'La Nona Ora' (The Ninth Hour), a wax figure of Pope Jean Paul II struck by a meteor – are at the centre of a legal case brought by the French sculptor Daniel Druet. In the wake of the court’s judgment, lawyer Mark Stephens, discusses the issues the case raises.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Julian May


MON 20:00 Evacuated to Russia (m00193v7)
More than a million refugees from the war in Ukraine have ended up in the arms of the enemy, Russia. Have they been rescued? Or illegally deported in another Kremlin war crime?


MON 20:30 Analysis (m00193v9)
What is childcare for?

Is formal childcare for pre-school children there to provide an early years education? Or to allow parents to go out to work?

Politicians would say both, but many argue the UK’s system is failing to do either.

Charlotte McDonald explores what improvements could be made and ask – do we want a big overhaul of our current system?


MON 21:00 Plant Based Promises (m0018x5c)
Sustainability

In Plant Based Promises, Giles Yeo a foodie and academic at Cambridge University, asks how sustainable are commercial plant based products?
This is a fast growing sector with a potential value of $162 billion by 2030. Giles travels to the Netherlands Food Valley to look at companies developing plant based alternatives and to find out what role they have to play in changing diets.
And Giles designs, his own plant based Yeo Deli range online, but discovers that new markets are already causing shortages of alternative proteins so what will the future look like?

In 2019 the Eat Lancet Commission set up specific targets for a healthy diet and sustainable food production. The aim was to keep global warming to within 1.5 degrees and to be able to feed the world’s 10 billion people by 2050.
The Commission’s recommendations are best visualised as a plate of food, half fruits vegetables and nuts and the other half whole grains, beans, legumes and pulses, plant oils and modest amounts of meat and dairy. Is there room on the plate for Giles Yeo Deli Baloney range


MON 21:30 The Smugglers' Trail (m00154pl)
In the Hands of a Smuggler

This series charts the rise of the smuggling networks and how they operate across the globe. BBC presenter Sue Mitchell and aid worker and former British soldier Rob Lawrie uncover the money that changes hands as migrants cross borders and expose some of those profiting from their desperation.

In programme one Rob Lawrie uses his network of contacts on the French camps to track down a gang leader who admits that he can make up to £100,000 a night from the Channel crossings. The smugger cautiously explains to Rob how things work, from the way that money changes hands and is laundered, through to the scenes that migrants face as they gather on the beaches waiting to make that journey from France to the UK.

This startling interview is given added tension because it takes place in a forest clearing as night sets in. Rob himself is searched before he is given access to the smuggler, who is guarded throughout by five armed men. Producer Sue Mitchell joins them by phone and both she and Rob tackle the smuggler over his role in the deaths of a family of five, who drowned when their boat sank just a few miles out from the French coast.

Produced by Sue Mitchell


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m00193vc)
Conservative leadership candidates feel the heat

In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


MON 22:45 Winchelsea by Alex Preston (m00193vf)
Episode 1

A tale of revenge, identity and smuggling, set in Sussex in the 18th Century.

Winchelsea is a smugglers’ town. Beneath it there runs a network of cellars and caves from under its streets as far as the King’s Cliff. All manner of goods are stored there, safe from the excise men. The Cellarman holds the keys to the cellar gates, a position held in Goody Brown’s family since the founding of the town.

Episode One
A knock on the door in the middle of the night changes Goody Brown’s life forever.

Alex Preston is an author and journalist who lives in Kent. His personal anthology of nature writing, As Kingfishers Catch Fire, was published in 2017. Winchelsea,
published in 2022, is his fourth novel.

Writer: Alex Preston
Reader: Jessica Gunning
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


MON 23:00 Empire-ical Evidence (m0000qm9)
Episode 2

Andy Zaltzman and Anuvab Pal trace the rise and fall of the British Empire by looking at what's been left behind, in a combination of location recording and stand-up comedy.

In this second episode, Andy and Anuvab wander around Kolkata, from the colonial seat of power that is now a library, to the Army garrison that replaced the site of one of the most infamous events of the Raj .

What and who have we chosen to remember, and what have we decided to forget? Andy and Anuvab offer up contrasting perspectives on the shared history between Britain and India.

Andy Zaltzman is a comedian best-known for The Bugle, his weekly satirical podcast. He is a regular performer on Radio 4 both as a guest on programmes like The Now Show or as presenter of his own shows such as My Life As A... .

Anuvab Pal is a comedian who first appeared on Radio 4 on an episode of Just A Minute recorded in Mumbai. In 2018 he made his debut at the Edinburgh Fringe, and appeared on Radio 4's Fresh from The Fringe and BBC Two's Big Asian Stand-Up. He is Andy's regular co-presenter on The Bugle podcast.

Written and performed by Andy Zaltzman and Anuvab Pal.
Produced by Ed Morrish

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m00193vh)
Susan Hulme reports as MPs get hot under the collar over severance pay for recently-resigned ministers.



TUESDAY 12 JULY 2022

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m00193vk)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 00:30 The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith (m00193t8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00193vm)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00193vp)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00193vr)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m00193vt)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00193vw)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sarah Joseph


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m00193vy)
12/07/22 - Dry crops and field fires, low emission slurry, on-farm dairy processor

The heatwave has brought a series of field fires as farmers start to gather in the harvest. The combination of working machinery, high temperatures and very dry crops is something farmers have to be vigilant about.

Scotland’s Rural College has just bought a new piece of kit for their dairy herd, which they claim will practically eliminate methane and ammonia emissions from their slurry production.

All this week we're talking dairy, and one of the big conversations for this sector is prices. Gundenham Dairy in Somerset manages its own processing on-site, allowing them a unique degree of control over the process. But that, we hear, comes with its own challenges.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tw750)
House Martin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the house martin.

House martins are often confused with swallows , but look shorter-tailed and lack the rusty throats. They're compact birds which build their with pellets of mud under our eaves and although they're so familiar to us in summer, we still can't be certain where they spend the winter. Ornithologists believe that they may spend our winter catching insects high over African rainforests.


TUE 06:00 Today (m00193n1)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Long View (m00193n3)
Removing and Replacing Prime Ministers

In this edition of The Long View Jonathan Freedland finds historical comparisons to the current Tory leadership contest, considering moments in history when the Conservative Party has removed a prime minister and sought a new figure for Number 10.

He is first joined by Professor Laura Beers to discuss the removal of David Lloyd George in October 1922. Lloyd George, a Liberal, had led a War Time Coalition consisting of majority Conservative MPs. A charismatic figure, Lloyd George had a reputation as an innovator and a doer, but his time as PM was also plagued by scandal. Unhappy with the PMs economics, his foreign policy and his reputation, Conservative MPs met at the Carlton Club to decide whether to abandon the coalition and oust Lloyd George. Some of the loudest criticisms came from rising star and future PM, Stanley Baldwin who described Lloyd George as a 'dynamic force'.

Fast forward 40 years to 1963 and the Party is once again seeing a change of leader. This time after Harold Macmillan decides to resign on the eve of the Tory Conference, citing ill health. The non-democratic 'soundings' procedure, run by the party elite, settles on Alec Douglas-Home to be leader, refusing to back any of the favourites. The choice causes controversy and will have a lasting impact on how future leaders of the party are selected.

Presented by Jonathan Freedland
Produced by Sam Peach
Readings by David Hounslow


TUE 09:30 New Storytellers (m00193n5)
Breathing Lyrical

Can a poem change how you breathe?

A young woman Taqwa found herself devoid of energy and, at a loss for a pathway to recovery, turned to the power of an ancient Persian poem to help her breathe.

Her journey towards alternative healing for long Covid unfolds through conversations about the power of poetry, rhythm and voice, Islamic mystical conceptions of breath, and the impact of literature on the brain. On her journey down this rabbit-hole, Taqwa meets Pat Edwards from the Poetry Pharmacy, translator Muhammad Ali and academic and publisher Nick Canty.

So, is there a real science behind this ancient art?

New Storytellers presents the work of new radio and audio producers, and this series features the winners of the Charles Parker Prize 2022 for the Best Student Radio Feature. The award is presented every year in memory of the pioneering radio producer Charles Parker who produced the famous series of Radio Ballads with Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger.

Winning producer of Breathing Lyrically, Taqwa Sadiq, is studying at University College London and the judges adored Taqwa's 'beautiful journey of the programme’... A ‘fantastically interesting idea, well made’.

Producer: Taqwa Sadiq
A Soundscape production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 09:45 The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith (m00193n7)
Confirmation Bias

Martin Sixsmith witnessed the end of the Cold War first hand, reporting for the BBC from Moscow during the presidencies of Gorbachev and Yeltsin. In The War of Nerves he draws on a vast array of sources as well as his own experiences to take us into the minds of those affected by the simmering tensions and paranoia on both sides of the Iron Curtain.

From the end of the Second World War to the dissolution of the USSR in 1991, the psychodrama played out between the Soviet and American superpowers held the world in thrall. The Cold War, both sides declared, was a contest of competing social, economic, political and ethical systems, each of them professing a monopoly on wisdom and the keys to humankind’s future. It was a conflict in which the battleground was, to an unprecedented extent, the human mind - the aim was to control not just territory, resources and power, but loyalties, belief and the nature of reality.

Both sides in the Cold War had the means to destroy the planet. And decades of rumbling international hostility affected individual mental well-being, manifesting in social paranoia, catastrophising, and surges of collective hysteria.

Until earlier this year, we thought all that was over. But now, in Ukraine, we are forced to reconsider the comforting assumptions of the past 30 years. History, in the sense of a settled global preference for liberal democracy, has evidently not ended.

Martin Sixsmith studied Russian at Oxford, Harvard, the Sorbonne and in St Petersburg, and psychology at Birkbeck and London Metropolitan University. He is the author of two novels and several works of non-fiction, including Philomena and Russia: A 1,000 Year Chronicle of the Wild East.

In this second episode, Martin explores the dangers of confirmation bias - the tendency to select only that information which confirms our own beliefs - and how the mutual incomprehension of the Cold War is once again fuelling dangerous international tensions.

Abridged and produced by Jane Greenwood
Read by Jonathan Keeble
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m00193nb)
Misogyny on social media, How we choose MPs; Am I Normal with Sarah Chaney; Matriarchs - Zoe's nan

The online platform TikTok has become one of the most popular social media apps in the world, with more than one billion monthly active users. Young people in particular love watching and creating videos and the content is often funny and upbeat. But author and content creator Tova Leigh contacted us to say she has noticed more and more disturbing content on the site that encourages violence against women and girls.

Following the slew of sleaze and misconduct allegations against MPs at Westminster is there an argument for a change in the way our parliamentarians are selected? Would greater scrutiny of individual applicants at an early stage avoid some of the issues encountered over the last few years and could it lead to greater female representation? Emma Barnett talks to the political journalist Michael Crick who has recently founded the twitter thread Tomorrow’s MPs which monitors political party selection processes, and to the former Deputy Chief Whip of the Conservative party who served as MP for Guildford for many years, Anne Milton.

A few weeks ago we asked listeners about the matriarchs in their lives, the redoubtable women whose stories deserved to be told. We got so many great stories that we decided to hear some of them on air. Today, listener Zoe from the Peak District on her nan May Mythen. She had 15 children, refused to send her learning disabled son to an institution as was common in the 1940's and inspired her grand-daughter Zoe to be brave and try stand-up comedy.

Normal is a term we bandy about all the time, but have you ever stopped to think about what it actually means, and whether it’s helpful as a concept? Sarah Chaney is the author of Am I Normal? The 200 Year Search For Normal People (And Why They Don’t Exist). She joins Emma to explain why she believes that women in particular have been hard done by in the history of the so-called norm.


TUE 11:00 Plant Based Promises (m00193nd)
Plant-based diets and health

Giles Yeo learns how to make a Thai green curry with Meera Sodha. This is a recipe without meat or prawns but with tofu and lots of vegetables. If we need to eat less meat and dairy to help prevent global warming- what difference will altering our diets make to our health. For a long time now people have been urged to cut down on red meat and processed foods but if you have been eating them all your life it takes an effort to develop new habits. Plant based products that can replace for example dairy milks, cheeses, sausages, burgers and meat based dishes such as lasagne can be helpful in making this transition but are they healthier?


TUE 11:30 The Hidden History of the Front Door (m00180ld)
Join Rachel Hurdley as she opens the front door to step into a story of security, sociability, style and even the supernatural.
The front door may seem to be just a simple way of coming in and out of a house, but it almost always reveals more about the householder than they might expect. The style of door, its colour, the letter box, doorbell, even perhaps the house name, are all chosen to present an image to the outside world. In this programme, Rachel reveals how to interpret a front door and how developments in their design and use over the centuries reflect social changes.
Rachel starts at Chepstow Castle, where she admires what’s thought to be the oldest castle door in Europe and finds out why it was built to provide a strong deterrent to intruders; at the moated manor house of Baddesley Clinton she discovers how Medieval and Tudor home owners used their doors to ward off evil spirits; in Bath she goes back to the time of Jane Austen to hear about the social etiquette of paying a visit; moving forward to the 19th century she learns why the Victorians loved to put a house name on their front door; and finally she visits the Becontree Estate in East London and sees how the building boom of the 1920s and 30s meant many families had their own front door for the first time.

Interviewees:
* Sonia Solicari, Director of The Museum of the Home https://www.museumofthehome.org.uk/
* Jonathan Glancey, Architectural Writer and Historian
* Will Davies, Inspector of Ancient Monuments for Cadw, spoke at Chepstow Castle https://cadw.gov.wales/visit/places-to-visit/chepstow-castle
* James Wright, Buildings Archaeologist, spoke at Baddesley Clinton https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/baddesley-clinton
* Elaine Chalus, Professor of British History at the University of Liverpool, spoke at No. 1 Royal Crescent https://no1royalcrescent.org.uk/
* Laura Wright, Professor of English Language at the University of Cambridge and author of ‘Sunnyside: A History of British House Names’
* Bill Jennings, former resident and Housing Manager, spoke on the Becontree Estate

Presenter: Rachel Hurdley
Producer: Louise Adamson
Executive Producer: Samir Shah


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m00193nj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 You and Yours (m00193nl)
Call You and Yours - Recycling

On Call You and Yours we're talking rubbish - or more importantly how you recycle it.

Almost 100,000 households across the UK counted their plastic packaging waste for a week in May. The results show nearly 6.5 million pieces of plastic packaging were thrown away in a week - that's around 96 billion pieces of plastic packaging waste a year.

So we're asking are you sure you are recycling properly?

How easy do you find recycling?

Are you committed to separating your waste or do you question just what difference it makes?

Email us at youandyours@bbc.co.uk and leave your phone number so we can call you back.

Presenter:
Felicity Hannah
Producer:
Catherine Earlam


TUE 12:57 Weather (m00193nn)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m00193nq)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


TUE 13:45 28ish Days Later (m00193ns)
Day Nine: Finding Power

This episode is all about the experiences across life that can shape how we view our cycle - particularly our first bleed. India is joined by author and creatrix Lisa Lister who tells a story of empowerment.

Along the way India chats to a tropical island resident called Nirai and a refugee named Marie who is struggling with period poverty.

Credits:
Presented by India Rakusen.
Producer: Ellie Sans.
Assistant Producer:Jorja McAndrew.
Executive Producer: Suzy Grant.
Original music composed and performed by Rebekah Reid.
Sound design by Olga Reed.

Special thanks to all contributors and audio diarists.

A Listen production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m00193nv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Takeover (m00193nx)
Series 2

Episode 2

High-stake deals and sibling rivalry set in the world of the super wealthy. Meet the Majumdars, a family at war… with itself. Rising from the ashes of defeat, business mogul Ravi Majumdar (Rajit Kapur) will do whatever it takes to claw back control of his global empire.

In Episode 2, a parliamentary inquiry, a traitor returns, a marriage proposal…

Cast:
Ravi Majumdar......Rajit Kapur
Ash......Abhin Galeya
Maya......Amrita Acharia
Zara......Ramanique Ahluwalia
Shaan......Danny Ashok
Ian......Finbar Lynch
Venetia......Laurel Lefkow
Seraphina......Jennifer Armour
Amit......Tavish Bhattacharyya
Guy......Matthew Marsh
Arabella...... Taullah Bond
Chantal......Gianna Kiehl

Other parts:
David Holt
George Georgiou
David Menkin
Matthew Solon
Claire Cage
Nadir Khan
Mike Sengelow
Ayeesha Menon
Robert Gwilym

Written by Ayeesha Menon and Matthew Solon

Sound Design, Eloise Whitmore
Original music, Sacha Puttnam
Sound recordin, Paul Clark, Ashyar Bulsara & Ayush Ahuja
Sound Editor, Andreina Gomez
Script Editor, Mike Walker
Assistant Producer, Eleanor Mein

Producers, Emma Hearn & Nadir Khan
Director and Executive Producer, John Scott Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (m00193p0)
Series 31

New Forms

A therapeutic technique sits at the heart of an interview and the protagonist of a novel speaks back to its writer - Josie Long presents short documentaries and audio adventures which experiment with form.

Everything is Fine Forecast
Originally produced for the podcast Randomly Generated Thought
Written and performed by Ewan Cameron.
Music and sound design by Ewan Cameron

Life Partners
Produced by Christina Hardinge

Afterword
Written and read by Bongani Kona
Sound design by Catherine Boulle

Curated by Axel Kacoutié, Eleanor McDowall and Andrea Rangecroft
Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:30 A Thorough Examination with Drs Chris and Xand (p0c98s7r)
Series 1: Addicted to Food

7. One Year On

It’s been a year since Chris van Tulleken set his twin brother, Xand, a challenge to help him quit his addiction to junk food. Xand had to eat an 80% ultra-processed food (UPF) diet while learning about its health impact. It worked and by the end Xand rejected all those foods he’d previously adored, including his beloved Chinese dumplings. The experiment had an aversion effect, just as Chris had hoped.

But something else happened during the experiment, Chris also had a conversion experience. A podcast about food addiction transformed into a podcast about the twins’ relationship and how best to help someone you love.

In this episode, the twins reflect on their conversion experiences – are they eating better and more importantly, are they getting on better?

Chris speaks to obesity expert Professor Rachel Batterham who tells him how the scientific discourse about UPF has developed since the end of series 1. And the twins go to see philosopher Barry Smith whose professional life has been affected by the twins’ experiment and he tells them why he’s now refusing to work with major food companies as a sensory consultant.

When Xand pops round for tea one evening, Chris’s five-year-old daughter shares some home truths about her dad and uncle’s relationship and it prompts the twins to consider what else they need to improve in their lives.

Presented by Drs Chris and Xand Van Tulleken
Production team: Alexandra Quinn, Jo Rowntree, Hester Cant, Dan King and Maia Miller-Lewis

A Loftus Media and van Tulleken Brothers Ltd production for BBC Radio 4.

With thanks to Voltage TV for use of their archive.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (m00193p3)
My Stammer Story

Michael Rosen asks William Laven about how he has learnt to embrace language and life with a stammer.

For the first 10 years of his life, William Laven went to speech therapy with a stammer that was so severe he could not form a full sentence. Fast forward to today, William is now a 23-year-old podcast founder, Tedx speaker, stammer advocate, awareness raiser and campaigner. He is devoted to improving expectations for those with speech impediments, to challenge the stigma surrounding stammers, and to encourage children with stammers to believe in themselves.

When it comes to his own stammer, he now believes it’s his superpower!

Produced for BBC Audio Bristol by Becky Ripley


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (m00193p5)
Sophie Hannah and Viv Groskop

Sophie Hannah and Viv Groskop join Harriett Gilbert to talk about books they love.

Sophie, an Agatha Christie expert and superfan, recommends The Rose and the Yew Tree, a book – misleadingly billed as a romance, she says – that Christie wrote under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott. She claims it can rival any detective novel for suspense and intrigue. Will Harriett and Viv agree?

Harriett champions Dame Eileen Atkin’s recent memoir Will She Do? which charts the first 30 years of the actor's life, including her time as a child soubrette, performing in working men’s clubs as ‘Baby Eileen’.

Writer, podcaster and stand-up Viv Groskop recalls her time living in Russia in the 1990s and explains why she thinks The Heart of a Dog by Mikhail Bulgakov, a 1920s satire about science gone very wrong, will become increasingly relevant in the months and years ahead.

Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Sarah Goodman.


TUE 17:00 PM (m00193p7)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00193p9)
Eight Conservative MPs are through to the first round of voting in the party's leadership election as Sajid Javid withdraws


TUE 18:30 Damned Andrew (m00193pc)
Series 1

The Best Day of Their Lives

The transdimensional portal in Andrew and Gabriella's front room is misbehaving and messing up their flat - mostly by depositing a trivia obsessed sentient mould in their bedroom. When Andrew makes a desperate attempt to solve the problem, they wind up trapped in a mysterious and deadly nostalgia labyrinth with Gabriella and Pad, reliving the best days of their lives while some massive Doctor Who monsters try to kill them. Meanwhile, Siobhan is busy helping Phil LeTramp break the curse on him, so he can finally go back inside...

With Andrew O'Neill, Toby Hadoke, Jen Brister, Phil Nichol, Sanjeev Kohli, Lucy Pearman, Carly Smallman, Sami Abu Wardeh, Joel Trill, Will Hodgson and Ellie Dobing. Narrated by Alan Moore.

Written by Andrew O'Neill and Tom De Ville
Produced by Alison Vernon-Smith
A Yada-Yada Audio Production.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m00193pf)
Helen tells Susan that she and Tom have been making plans to boost online cheese sales. As a result Tom’s been overhauling their website and social media with a more personal touch. They’re going to include postcards with every order, with a picture of the Monteys drawn by Henry and signed by everyone on the back. They’re also going to put staff photos and biogs online. Later whilst Susan almost has too much to say about herself for the biog, Clarrie struggles to know what to write. But Susan gives her some tips and Clarrie’s writer’s block lifts. They’re interrupted by Helen saying that some customers have complained that their cheese has arrived ruined. Susan unhelpfully points out that she did warn Helen that the packaging needed careful consideration.
Later, based on her past postmistress experience, Susan comes up with a packaging solution and Helen calls her a genius. Susan says she might pop that in her biog.
Clarrie drops off some of Poppy’s old school clothes for Rosie. But when Clarrie unwittingly says Rosie looks like she’s made of strong stuff, Pip wonders what she means.
Things are awkward between Pip and Ben until Pip mentions an incident with Rosie after Clarrie left – Rosie couldn’t fit into any of Poppy’s hand-me-downs. Pip admits that Ben was right; Rosie has gained weight even though her diet is balanced. When Ben comforts her saying it will be ok, Pip counters that it feels like she’s taken her eye off the ball and let Rosie down, badly.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m00193ph)
Hildur Guðnadóttir, National Plan for Music Education, Kurt Vonnegut: Unstuck in Time

Oscar winning Joker composer Hildur Guðnadóttir talks about her new commission for the BBC Proms, inspired by political division, and the difference between writing for films and games, ahead of the first BBC Prom devoted to gaming music.

To discuss the government's National Plan for Music Education for schools in England, Tom is joined by Catherine Barker from United Learning, Colin Stuart from the Incorporated Society of Musicians, and Jimmy Rotheram, a music teacher at Feversham Primary Academy in Bradford.

Curb Your Enthusiasm director Robert Weide on his decades long friendship with the American novelist Kurt Vonnegut, which has resulted in his new feature documentary film, Kurt Vonnegut: Unstuck in Time.

Presenter: Tom Sutcliffe
Producer: Timothy Prosser


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (m00193pk)
Assaulted by my massage therapist

The massage industry has bounced back since covid, but File on 4 investigates the darker side of this industry. Hannah Price speaks to women who were sexually assaulted by massage therapists. In some cases, the therapist went on to assault other women even after they’d been arrested.

The programme reveals how the industry is largely unregulated - with no licensing of practitioners. It means anyone, even without qualifications or with a criminal conviction, could practice as a massage therapist.

Sexual assault victims and professional bodies in the sector are calling for more regulation to be introduced to protect both clients and therapists from sexual violence and harm.

Reporter: Hannah Price
Producers: Paul Grant and Eleanor Layhe
Editor: Carl Johnston


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m00193pm)
Equality Act Amendments; Smart Lipstick

The Taxis and Private Hire Vehicles (Disabled Persons) Act 2022, is a new piece of legislation that has amended the Equality Act 2010. It will place duties on taxi drivers and PHV drivers and operators, so that any disabled person has specific rights and protections to be transported and receive assistance without being charged extra. This will also ensure that visually impaired passengers will be assisted by drivers to help them identify or find the vehicle. The act was introduced by Jeremy Wright MP and he provides insight into how this act may impact you.

Blanche Shackleton is from the charity Guide Dogs and she tells us about their new app, which will enable guide dog owners to report any access issues. This is inclusive of taxis, indoor establishments and other places. And we hear about a new kind of AI technology, that is currently in development, which could provide make-up wearers with assurance and confidence.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Fern Lulham
Production Coordinator: William Wolstenholme

Website image description: a visually impaired man is holding his smart phone up to his ear, presumably to hear the voice over function. He is wearing a white T-shirt, he has dark hair and beard and appears to be closing his eyes.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (m00193pp)
Medical language, chemo brain & heatwaves

Does medicine have a language problem? We speak to Rachel who was made to feel like a 'naughty schoolgirl' by the terminology used around the birth of her child. We’ll find out how deep-seated blaming and belittling language in healthcare is, and why. We get sticky and sweaty discussing the dangers of heatwaves to the human body. And we take the confusion out of 'chemo brain' or cancer-related cognitive impairment, and explore why we rarely talk about it and how this is now changing.

Presenter: James Gallagher
Producer: Beth Eastwood


TUE 21:30 The Long View (m00193n3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m00193pr)
Nominations close in Tory leadership contest

In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 Winchelsea by Alex Preston (m00193pt)
Episode 2

A tale of revenge, identity and smuggling, set in Sussex in the 18th Century.

Winchelsea is a smugglers’ town. Beneath it there runs a network of cellars and caves from under its streets as far as the King’s Cliff. All manner of goods are stored there, safe from the excise men. The Cellarman holds the keys to the cellar gates, a position held in Goody Brown’s family since the founding of the town.

Episode Two
With Ezekiel dead and their mother with her tongue cut out, Goody and her brother Francis plan their revenge on the Mayfield Gang.

Alex Preston is an author and journalist who lives in Kent. His personal anthology of nature writing, As Kingfishers Catch Fire, was published in 2017. Winchelsea,
published in 2022, is his fourth novel.

Writer: Alex Preston
Reader: Jessica Gunning
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 23:00 Fortunately... with Fi and Jane (m00193px)
241. Substitute Spectacles and Elocution Lessons, with Nikki Fox

This week on the Fortunately podcast, Fi and Jane chat to Nikki Fox, BBC Disability Correspondent, recorded at the beginning of the week. Nikki speaks to Fi and Jane about Access All, the podcast she hosts with Emma Tracey looking into disability, mental health and much more. Nikki also shares her experiences on celebrity quiz shows, how Jane taught her to interview and her love for a certain Babooshka singer. Before Nikki's arrival Fi wants to know the location of her colleague's bathing machine and Jane has a special outfit planned for graduation.

Get in touch: fortunately.podcast@bbc.co.uk


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m00193pz)
All the news from today's sitting at Westminster.



WEDNESDAY 13 JULY 2022

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m00193q1)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


WED 00:30 The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith (m00193n7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00193q3)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00193q5)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00193q7)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m00193q9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00193qc)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sarah Joseph


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m00193qf)
13/07/22 - EU/NZ trade deal, Biodiversity crisis report, Raw milk dairy

Will British farmers lose out, because the European Union has struck a better trade deal for their farmers with New Zealand? Anna Hill asks an international trade expert.

A doom-laden report has been published by the Environment Agency outlining the effect of human life on the global natural environment and the current threat of climate change. We ask what part farmers can play in nature recovery.

All week we're taking a closer look at the dairy industry. Today it’s raw milk, which hasn’t been heat-treated to pasteurise it.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02ttqwv)
Turtle Dove

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the turtle dove. The soft purring song of the turtle Doves are mentioned in the Song of Solomon in the Bible: " The voice of the turtle is heard in our land". They are migrants from sub-Saharan Africa and are now a treat to see here in the UK where they breed in farmland and scrub where they can find weed seeds for their growing young.


WED 06:00 Today (m0019451)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Sideways (m0019455)
25. A Nuclear Awakening

It’s a little girl’s eighth birthday. She wakes to a sight that looks like the end of the world. A radioactive mushroom cloud rises 130,000 feet in the air. And the world wakes up to the devastating fallout of nuclear weapons.

In this new mini series from Sideways, writer and Times columnist Matthew Syed is calling for a nuclear awakening. Since the end of the Cold War, when relations between two of the world’s nuclear superpowers - the former USSR and the USA - seemed more rosy, Matthew argues that many of us have slipped into a kind of comfortable amnesia about the presence of these destroyers of worlds.

The wake up call came when President Vladimir Putin launched the invasion of Ukraine in February accompanied by veiled nuclear threats. It was a reminder of the mind bending fact that there are weapons in existence that are capable of eradicating our species.

Over four episodes, Matthew explores the intellectual and strategic frameworks birthed by the bomb and the tensions of the Cold War, which sought to contain the ultimate destructive force. From deterrence to disarmament and non-proliferation, these ideas all aim at one goal - protection from catastrophic nuclear use. Understanding their origins and complexities is urgently needed, Matthew argues.

Ultimately, Matthew will be asking if the actions of Putin in Ukraine call for a new intellectual framework to help make our world safe.

Presenter: Matthew Syed
Producer and Series Editor: Katherine Godfrey
Researcher: Nadia Mehdi
Sound Designer: Rob Speight
Special thanks to Jessica A Schwartz for her recordings of Lijon Eknilang which form part of the material for her book Radiation Sounds. Also to Ali Raj and Susanne Rust, whose reporting for the LA Times informed this episode.

Contributors:
Evelyn Ralpho Jeadrik, daughter of Lijon Eknilang, Marshallese singer, composer and anti-nuclear activist.
Ariana Tibon, Commissioner, Royal Marshall Islands National Nuclear Commission
Alex Wellerstein, historian of science and nuclear weapons and a professor at the Stevens Institute of Technology.
David Holloway, Raymond A. Spruance Professor of International History and author of Stalin and the Bomb: The Soviet Union and Atomic Energy, 1939-1956


A Novel production for BBC Radio 4


WED 09:30 Four Thought (m0019457)
Making Time

Watchmaker Rebecca Struthers shares her passion for the art and science of horology. She warns that this traditional skill and its allied trades to make and restore watches, are endangered in Britain unless we make it easier for the next generation to be trained in them.

"When well-made objects are cared for, it's a cycle of relationships that can span centuries. The oldest family watch I've worked on was five generations and 250 years old. When working on an object that symbolises the passing of time itself, I'm acutely aware of the fact that I've become a moment in the history of this watch, a moment in time for an object that was made centuries before my birth and will live on centuries after I'm gone."

Presenter: Olly Mann
Producer: Sheila Cook
Production Coordinator: Janet Staples
Editor: Penny Murphy


WED 09:45 The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith (m001946x)
Duck and Cover

Martin Sixsmith witnessed the end of the Cold War first hand, reporting for the BBC from Moscow during the presidencies of Gorbachev and Yeltsin. In The War of Nerves he draws on a vast array of sources as well as his own experiences to take us into the minds of those affected by the simmering tensions and paranoia on both sides of the Iron Curtain.

From the end of the Second World War to the dissolution of the USSR in 1991, the psychodrama played out between the Soviet and American superpowers held the world in thrall. The Cold War, both sides declared, was a contest of competing social, economic, political and ethical systems, each of them professing a monopoly on wisdom and the keys to humankind’s future. It was a conflict in which the battleground was, to an unprecedented extent, the human mind - the aim was to control not just territory, resources and power, but loyalties, belief and the nature of reality.

Both sides in the Cold War had the means to destroy the planet. And decades of rumbling international hostility affected individual mental well-being, manifesting in social paranoia, catastrophising, and surges of collective hysteria.

Until earlier this year, we thought all that was over. But now, in Ukraine, we are forced to reconsider the comforting assumptions of the past 30 years. History, in the sense of a settled global preference for liberal democracy, has evidently not ended.

Martin Sixsmith studied Russian at Oxford, Harvard, the Sorbonne and in St Petersburg, and psychology at Birkbeck and London Metropolitan University. He is the author of two novels and several works of non-fiction, including Philomena and Russia: A 1,000 Year Chronicle of the Wild East.

In this third episode, Martin explores the psychological damage done to ordinary people on both sides of the Iron Curtain who lived for decades with the fear of nuclear war.

Abridged and produced by Jane Greenwood
Read by Jonathan Keeble
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m001945c)
Poet- Lady Unchained. The Conservative leadership. Covid. Telford. Abortion memories

Conservative MPs start voting in the first round ballot to see who will take over from Boris Johnson as Conservative Party leader and Prime Minister - 4 women and 4 men ,after the candidates were reduced to eight contenders. Some of the policy areas being debated are familiar: tax, immigration and our relationship with the EU. Some are less so and quite new to the political battlefield as defining issues for the candidates, such as what do each of them think constitutes being a woman. It is also striking that the political ghost of one woman is being invoked left, right and centre - Margaret Thatcher. Emma talks to Mrs Thatcher's former private secretary, Caroline Slocock. We also talk to Ella Robertson McKay the National Chair of the Conservative Young Women - which is made up of women under the age of 35. She reveals the results of a poll of their membership which asked who they want to be Prime Minister.

Cases of Covid have been rising rapidly in the UK in recent weeks and new data in a report out today from the Parliamentary Public Accounts Committee shows that by the end of May 2022 nearly three million adults in England are unvaccinated. While overall uptake has been high, it has been low with particular groups - including pregnant women and some ethnic minorities. We talk to Marian Knight, Professor of Maternal and Child Population Health at Oxford University.

Obvious evidence of child sex crimes in Telford was ignored for generations leading to more than 1,000 girls being abused, an inquiry has found. Agencies blamed children for the abuse they suffered, not the perpetrators, and exploitation was not investigated because of "nervousness about race". Chairman Tom Crowther QC said the abuse had thrived unchecked for decades. His report makes 47 recommendations for improvement by agencies involved. West Mercia Police has apologised "unequivocally" for past events as has Telford & Wrekin Council. Emma talks to Richard Scorer, a solicitor with Slater and Gordon who has represented many victims and survivors of child sexual abuse.

In 2019 we asked our listeners ‘Have you had an abortion? How did you feel about it then and how do you feel about it now?’ 5 women told us about their personal experience of having an abortion. Today, a woman we are calling Clare remembers getting on the bus in her school uniform to access an abortion more than 30 years ago.

When ‘Lady Unchained’ was 21, she was sentenced to two and a half years in prison following a fight in a club when trying to protect her sister. Picking up the pen to survive in prison, she began to write and perform poetry. Since her release, Lady Unchained has made it her mission to become an advocate for life after prison - a poet, performer, award winning broadcaster. She is the Founder and Creative Director of Unchained Poetry, an artistic platform for artists with lived experience of the criminal justice system, and runs poetry workshops in prisons and in Women Centres. We speak to her as she releases her debut poetry book: ‘Behind Bars: On punishment, prison & release’, a culmination of her work during and after prison.


WED 11:00 Evacuated to Russia (m00193v7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Music Made in the Middle (m001945f)
Music Made in the Middle Part 1

Singer Jamelia, who was born and grew up in the Handsworth district of Birmingham, explores music made in the West MIdlands - asking if it has a distinct identity.

People from the city and the conurbation have made a huge contribution to music all over the world, but Birmingham rarely seems to get the recognition given to other cities like Liverpool, Manchester, Sheffield or London.

In this two-part series, Jamelia looks at the unique and eclectic musical identity of explores the city and the wider West Midlands, and discovers that its reputation for championing the individual or the underdog may lie in the area's rich history.

She hears from experts about Birmingham's musical contribution as far back at the MIdlands Enlightenment in the 18th Century as well as the work of composers like Edward Elgar in the late 19th and 20th Century. She also talks to musicians from different genres, hears how they cut their teeth in the pubs and clubs of the West MIdlands and explores whether there is a collective Birmingham sound - or at least a special Birmingham approach to music.

Birmingham's musical heritage includes heavy metal and Bhangra, and it's an area where all genres thrive. In the 1950s and 60s, the so-called Brum Beat emerged with the NME saying it included over 500 local bands.

Is Birmingham Britain's original diverse city when it comes to music and culture more generally? That's one of the questions Jamelia will look to answer as she hears from West Midlands experts and stars including ELO drummer Bev Bevan, Reggae singer Pato Banton, Duran Duran original Stephen Duffy and Apache Indian.

Jamelia has a few surprises along the way as she comes face to face with real Birmingham music heritage at a studio where the soundtrack to the legendary Thunderbirds TV series was produced. Grosvenor Road Studios has played host to just about everyone who is anyone in MIdlands music since 1945.

A Made In Manchester production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:00 News Summary (m001947h)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 You and Yours (m001945l)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


WED 12:57 Weather (m001945n)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m001945q)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


WED 13:45 28ish Days Later (m001945s)
Day Ten: Tracking

The world of tracking apps has grown in the last decade, but where does all that data go? India speaks to the Chief Medical Officer of Clue, Dr Lynae Brayboy about the importance of tracking periods, and the link between tracking apps and research.

Later, India is joined by Eva Blum-Dumontet, a Senior Policy Advisor on Artificial Intelligence at Royal Society who formerly carried out key research into data and tracking apps. Eva offers a word of warning over the type of data these apps ask for.

Credits:
Presented by India Rakusen.
Producer: Ellie Sans.
Assistant Producer:Jorja McAndrew.
Executive Producer: Suzy Grant.
Original music composed and performed by Rebekah Reid.
Sound design by Olga Reed.

Special thanks to all contributors and audio diarists.

A Listen production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.


WED 14:00 The Archers (m00193pf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Takeover (m001945v)
Series 2

Episode 3

High-stake deals and sibling rivalry set in the world of the super wealthy. Meet the Majumdars, a family at war… with itself. Rising from the ashes of defeat, business mogul Ravi Majumdar (Rajit Kapur) will do whatever it takes to claw back control of his global empire.

In Episode 3, the optics are all wrong, the wedding planner, a sting operation…

Cast:
Ravi Majumdar......Rajit Kapur
Ash......Abhin Galeya
Maya......Amrita Acharia
Zara......Ramanique Ahluwalia
Shaan......Danny Ashok
Ian......Finbar Lynch
Venetia......Laurel Lefkow
Seraphina......Jennifer Armour
Amit......Tavish Bhattacharyya
Guy......Matthew Marsh
Scott Hawkins......Mike Sengelow
Arabella......Taullah Bond
Celia......Lourdes Faberes
Bethan......Claire Cage
Chantal......Gianna Kiehl
Jeet…. Raj Ghatak
Perrin......Robert Gwilym
Ranya......Ayeesha Menon

Other parts:
David Holt
Nadir Khan
Robert Gwilym
Claire Cage

Written by Ayeesha Menon and Matthew Solon

Sound Design, Eloise Whitmore
Original music, Sacha Puttnam
Sound recording, Paul Clark, Ashyar Bulsara & Ayush Ahuja
Sound Editor, Andreina Gomez
Script Editor, Mike Walker
Assistant Producer, Eleanor Mein

Producer, Emma Hearn & Nadir Khan
Director and Executive Producer, John Scott Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4


WED 15:00 Money Box (m001945x)
Holidays

After two years of Covid restrictions, much of the world has now opened back up and plenty of us are planning to take full advantage this summer.

But what if it all goes wrong? What are you entitled to? What kind of insurance cover should you get? And how can you make sure you have a happy holiday?

Felicity Hannah, along with a panel of experts, are here to give you the answers on all things travel.

Panel:

Simon Calder - travel journalist

Lisa Minot - travel editor - The Sun

Producer: Drew Hyndman and Di Richardson

Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith


WED 15:30 Inside Health (m00193pp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Sideways (m0019455)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m001945z)
The Race for the Tory Crown

What role does the press play in choosing the next Conservative leader? How do you cover an election campaign that most of the public doesn’t have a say in? And what might all of this mean for Channel 4’s planned privatisation – next week’s Media Bill, which would have included details of the sale, has now been delayed.

Guests: Fraser Nelson, Editor, The Spectator, Paul Mason, journalist and campaigner, Rosamund Urwin, Media Editor, The Sunday Times , Hardeep Matharu, Editor, Byline Times and Chris Hopkins, Political Research Director, Savanta ComRes

Presenter: Katie Razzall

Producer: Helen Fitzhenry


WED 17:00 PM (m0019461)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0019465)
Nadhim Zahawi and Jeremy Hunt are eliminated from the Conservative leadership contest


WED 18:30 Ken Cheng: Chinese Comedian (m0019467)
Series 3

Episode 2

Radio 4 favourite Ken Cheng concludes the third series of his brilliant show Chinese Comedian. In this episode, titled "Chinese Boyfriend", Ken talks about romantic endeavours and finding love in lockdown.

Written by Ken Cheng
Produced by Rajiv Karia
A BBC Studios Production.


WED 19:00 The Archers (m0019469)
Susan, Clarrie and Adam check out their biogs on the Bridge Farm website, but Susan’s shocked when she sees “Bridge Farm Needs You” on the front page. She wonders what Tom was thinking. Later Helen says the website traffic’s increased. She wasn’t sure about Tom’s strategy but it seems to be hitting the mark. He’s worked really hard to do all this before the babies come next week.
Clarrie cautions that Adam and Ian may have to steel themselves for opposition from the WI for their planned pizza van launch at the village fete. Jean Harvey and Pat Fletcher are going to formally object about it to the fete committee. Adam wonders about launching somewhere else, but Susan says they’re not backing down. Later she comes up with the idea of offering the WI an exclusive pizza tasing session. Once the WI have tasted them, they’re sure to fold.
Brad enjoys listening to Oliver’s tales of childhood haymaking and admits he’s doing it to pay for a place at a Maths summer school. Brad’s nervous about going because he finds it hard making friends. But Oliver says that Brad didn’t know him until recently – now they get on like a house on fire. However when Oliver admires Brad’s self-funding the course, Brad says it’s because Tracy is broke; she was sacked from a job she loved. He walks off, but later apologises – his temper got the better of him. It’s the only way he takes after his mum. Oliver says he’s got a good heart too. Same as Tracy.


WED 19:15 Front Row (m001946c)
Shakespeare North Playhouse, Tŷ Pawb in Wrexham, The Railway Children Return

In the late 16th century, the Merseyside town of Prescot had the only purpose-built, indoor theatre outside London. Now the Shakespeare North Playhouse, a £38 million architectural representation of a Shakespearean stage, opens there this weekend. Samira Ahmed is joined by Laura Collier, the theatre’s creative director and the writer and performer Ashleigh Nugent who have co-curated Open Up, the opening festival.

Front Row is hearing from the five museums nominated to be this year’s Museum of the Year and tonight it’s the turn of Tŷ Pawb in Wrexham. Reporter Adam Walton takes a tour of the museum and finds why the museum is at the heart of the local community.

Danny Brocklehurst is the Bafta-award winning writer behind Shameless, Clocking Off and Brassic. He joins Samira to discuss turning to more family friendly fare in The Railway Children Return. In his sequel, set 50 years after the classic 1970 film, Jenny Agutter’s Bobbie is a grandmother and former Suffragette, and the titular children are evacuees from Manchester.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Olivia Skinner

Image: Shakespeare North Playhouse, Prescot


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m001946f)
The Right to Abortion

The Right to Abortion

This weekend thousands of people marched on the White House in support of a woman’s right to choose an abortion. That constitutional principle, established nearly 50 years ago in the case of “Roe v Wade” has just been overturned by the US Supreme Court and already many Republican states have banned abortions. As President Biden moves to try to protect abortion rights, campaigners in the UK have been stirred to action. There have been ‘Pro Life’ demonstrations outside clinics in Northern Ireland and ‘Pro Choice’ protests outside the US Embassy in London.

The number of abortions in England and Wales last year, more than 214,000, was the highest recorded since 1967, when a new law allowed, in most cases, terminations up to the 24th week of pregnancy. This also applied to Scotland but was only extended to Northern Ireland two years ago. Public opinion is clear: 85% of people in Britain think women should have the right to abortion. But should rights also be afforded to the unborn, and if so, at what stage of pregnancy? Has anyone the moral right to dictate whether a woman can have an abortion? For many women, “my body – my choice” is a fundamental principle. With Madeline Page, Professor Ellie Lee, Professor John Milbank and Kerry Abel.

Producers: Jonathan Hallewell and Peter Everett
Presenter: Michael Buerk


WED 20:45 Four Thought (m0019457)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 A Thorough Examination with Drs Chris and Xand (p0c98s7r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 The Media Show (m001945z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m001946h)
Sri Lanka in chaos

In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 Winchelsea by Alex Preston (m001946k)
Episode 3

A tale of revenge, identity and smuggling, set in Sussex in the 18th Century.

Winchelsea is a smugglers’ town. Beneath it there runs a network of cellars and caves from under its streets as far as the King’s Cliff. All manner of goods are stored there, safe from the excise men. The Cellarman holds the keys to the cellar gates, a position held in Goody Brown’s family since the founding of the town.

Episode Three
Goody and Francis make a deal with Arthur Gray and the Hawkhurst Gang.

Alex Preston is an author and journalist who lives in Kent. His personal anthology of nature writing, As Kingfishers Catch Fire, was published in 2017. Winchelsea,
published in 2022, is his fourth novel.

Writer: Alex Preston
Reader: Jessica Gunning
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:00 Tom Mayhew Is Benefit Scum (m001946m)
Series 2

Cheap and Cheerful

In the first of the new series, Tom Mayhew takes issue with the term “staycation” as he’s never been abroad in his life. Tom’s stand-up explores how the working class Holiday has always been closer to home.

Tom Mayhew Is Benefit Scum is an autobiographical stand-up series in which the comedian shares stories about his life growing up working class and his time on benefits. The show takes a wry, sideways look at the prejudices that people have towards benefits claimants and turns those assumptions on their head.

Recorded in front of a live audience at the Frog and Bucket in Manchester

Written and Performed by Tom Mayhew
Featuring Chris Cantrill
Additional Material – Olivia Phipps
Production Coordinator – Katie Baum
Producer – Benjamin Sutton
A BBC Studios Production.


WED 23:15 Welcome to the Neighbourhood (m001946q)
Ep 3: Sarah Keyworth

Jayde Adams and guest Helen Bauer dive into the feisty world of community apps and messageboards, sifting through the angry neighbourhood bins to find disgruntled comedy gold.

From biggest beefs to weirdest news, Jayde discovers a hotbed of (largely unintentional) hilarity with graffiti-daubed wheelie bins, stray cats, e-scooters and more.

Jayde and the production team would like to hear about what's riling up the neighbours around Britain. Are your groups kicking off? Listeners can submit screenshots of the funniest and freakiest posts and threads to welcometotheneighbourhood@bbc.co.uk.

Presenter: Jayde Adams
Producer: Cornelius Mendez

An unusual production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m001946s)
Susan Hulme reports on a heated Prime Minister's Questions - with a dramatic opening twist



THURSDAY 14 JULY 2022

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m001946v)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


THU 00:30 The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith (m001946x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m001946z)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0019471)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0019473)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m0019475)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0019477)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sarah Joseph


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m0019479)
14/07/22 - Heatwave's impact on rivers, mental health in rural areas, milk float dairy

Low rainfall in parts of England and Wales followed by hot weather is causing water levels in rivers to drop, endangering fish. Along the Wye and Usk rivers in mid and south Wales, hugely popular with anglers, the local rivers' trust has suspended all salmon and trout fishing, saying low river flows and high water temperatures are causing stress to the fish, and even killing them in some places.

Over the past six months, Parliament's Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Select Committee has been taking evidence about the difficulties faced by people living in rural areas when it comes to accessing mental health services. This week the MPs held their final session, grilling health and environment ministers and officials.

All this week we're taking a closer look at all aspects of the dairy industry. Making a small dairy herd profitable is tough, but adding value to the product can be one way of making it work. At Berkeley Farm near Swindon farmer Ed Gosling has acquired a fleet of six electric milk floats to deliver his milk to around three thousand homes nearby.

Presented by Steffan Messenger and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tvnnw)
Sandwich Tern

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the sandwich tern. Sandwich terns are the UK's largest breeding terns and have shaggy black crests and a black bill with a yellow tip. They live in colonies on shingle or sandy beaches and were first described from birds seen in Sandwich in the 1780s by William Boys, a Kentish surgeon.


THU 06:00 Today (m00194fs)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 Can the Police Keep Us Safe? (m00194fv)
Expectations

Helena Kennedy QC with Police Assistant Commissioner Rob Beckley explore our expectations of policing today and changing ideas of safety - in public, in private and online.

Can the police keep us safe? It’s argued policing has never been good at dealing with crime after the event and struggles now under the weight of increasing expectations. As Helena and Rob discover, definitions of harm have widened hugely in recent years and with this, more complicated ideas of what safety means to communities.

As harm is magnified by social media, mental health problems proliferate and cause harm in the community, drugs become mainstreamed, violence proliferates - the expectation is on the police to do something. Officers point out that policing can only deal with symptoms, and that social problems need solving rather than policing. This is coupled with an exponential increase in the complexity of what policing is asked to deal with, from expertise in mental health and social work to online safety and internet enabled harm.

With public trust in the police shaken by a series of high-profile scandals, the 2021 murder of Sarah Everard by a serving police officer and forces such as the Metropolitan Police and Greater Manchester Police now in special measures, is the social contract between police and public corroding? Did it ever exist for some sections of the public? Robert Peel once wrote ‘the police are the public, and the public are the police’– a formula at the heart of policing by consent. But the UK has different publics, multiple communities, which are policed differently. Certainly some communities feel safer around the police than others.

Talking to all ranks of the police across the UK, to criminologists and critics, Helena and Rob consider what we expect from the police now - is it too much, can they really deliver? - and what is the primary purpose of the police today? Over the course of the series they will ask if this is the moment for a new kind of social contract between public and police, where other institutions, both public and private - as well as citizens themselves, all of us – take more responsibility for safety and care in our communities, independent of policing.

Contributors this episode include: Director of the Police Foundation Rick Muir; founder of the Metropolitan Black Police Association and former Superintendent Paul Wilson; criminologist and author of The End of Policing Alex Vitale; former Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary Zoe Billingham; Professor of Global City Policing at UCL Ben Bradford; PC Dunn and PC Howe; response officers from Avon Somerset Police and Kate West, dog handler for Kent Police; and Director of the Gypsy Roma Traveller Police Association.

Presented by Helena Kennedy QC with Police Assistant Rob Beckley
Produced by Simon Hollis

A Brook Lapping Production for BBC Radio 4

This series is dedicated to the late Roger Graef, criminologist and documentary maker.


THU 09:30 The Climate Tipping Points (m00180cb)
1. The Arctic

Justin Rowlatt discovers how global warming may trigger irreversible changes to our planet. In this first of five episodes, he asks why the Arctic is warming so much faster than anywhere else, and what the impact will be on weather systems in the Northern hemisphere.

Producer: Laurence Knight


THU 09:45 The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith (m00194fy)
Disinformation

Martin Sixsmith witnessed the end of the Cold War first hand, reporting for the BBC from Moscow during the presidencies of Gorbachev and Yeltsin. In The War of Nerves he draws on a vast array of sources as well as his own experiences to take us into the minds of those affected by the simmering tensions and paranoia on both sides of the Iron Curtain.

From the end of the Second World War to the dissolution of the USSR in 1991, the psychodrama played out between the Soviet and American superpowers held the world in thrall. The Cold War, both sides declared, was a contest of competing social, economic, political and ethical systems, each of them professing a monopoly on wisdom and the keys to humankind’s future. It was a conflict in which the battleground was, to an unprecedented extent, the human mind - the aim was to control not just territory, resources and power, but loyalties, belief and the nature of reality.

Both sides in the Cold War had the means to destroy the planet. And decades of rumbling international hostility affected individual mental well-being, manifesting in social paranoia, catastrophising, and surges of collective hysteria.

Until earlier this year, we thought all that was over. But now, in Ukraine, we are forced to reconsider the comforting assumptions of the past 30 years. History, in the sense of a settled global preference for liberal democracy, has evidently not ended.

Martin Sixsmith studied Russian at Oxford, Harvard, the Sorbonne and in St Petersburg, and psychology at Birkbeck and London Metropolitan University. He is the author of two novels and several works of non-fiction, including Philomena and Russia: A 1,000 Year Chronicle of the Wild East.

In this fourth episode, Martin explores how disinformation and fake news shaped the psychology of the Cold War and continue to feed paranoia and distrust in relations between Russia and the West today.

Abridged and produced by Jane Greenwood
Read by Jonathan Keeble
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m00194g0)
Global Abortion Rights, Do women worry more?, Bees, Matriarchs

Since the overturning of Roe vs Wade in the United States here on Woman’s Hour we’ve looked at what this will mean for women in America, and also what the status of abortion is here in the UK. But what right do women around the world have to an abortion and could the overturning of Roe vs Wade in America lead other countries to follow suit? Macarena Saez is from the NGO Human Rights Watch and joins Emma.

A new study shows women are now twice as likely as men to be extremely worried about their lives and those around them, after the pandemic. Journalist Eleanor Morgan and Charlotte Faircloth from UCL join Emma to discuss.

The latest in our series about matriarchs, the redoubtable women in your lives. Today listener Alexandra on her fabulous Auntie Lilla who bred miniature Shetland ponies was 6'3" and a bit terrifying.

Jersey has elected its first ever female Chief Minister – the equivalent of the island’s Prime Minister. Politics on the island has been largely male, white and middle class for years. But in elections last month, more women won seats in Jersey’s States Assembly - the equivalent of Jersey’s Parliament - than ever before. Emma Barnett catches up with Kristina Moore, a former journalist and TV presenter, to find out how her first few weeks in office are going.

Bees and other essential insects that we rely on to pollinate our crops are threatened by harmful pesticides according to a group of women campaigners who have launched a petition this week. We hear from Anabel Kindersley who is the co-owner of Neal’s Yard Remedies and the leader behind the #StandByBees campaign and Ben Woodcock, a scientist from UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology.

Presenter: Emma Barnett
Producer: Emma Pearce


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (m00194g2)
A Shooting in Soweto

South Africa saw a spate of violent shootings over the last week triggering conspiracy theories and suspicion. South Africa has been simmering since last Summer, when the country saw some of the worst outbreaks of violence in decades. Andrew Harding says there is a jittery mood in the country.

The authorities in Uzbekistan - a former Soviet republic - have declared a state of emergency and a night-time curfew in the region of Karakalpakstan, following protests about moves to restrict its autonomy. Although the planned constitutional changes have now been withdrawn, Uzbek authorities have imposed a security clampdown and an information black-out. Joanna Lillis was there.

The recent US Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v Wade had an immediate impact in red states like Arkansas. The ruling has effectively given states the right to determine their own abortion laws, and in the case of Arkansas the state’s Attorney-General implemented an almost complete ban. Sophie Long was at an abortion clinic in Little Rock when the news broke.

The Fuego volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in Central America, and an eruption four years ago devastated the surrounding region, killing at least 200 hundred people. Several thousand more were displaced, but many have since returned both to live and to farm the mineral rich land in the surrounding area. Isabelle Stanley set up camp on a nearby peak.

The annual Dolomites Marathon in the Italian Alps is one of the major events for hardcore cycling enthusiasts. Some 86 miles in length it weaves its way through spectacular mountain passes. Dominic Casciani decided to take on the challenge once more, after a twelve-year reprieve.

Presenter: Kate Adie
Producer: Serena Tarling
Production Coordinator: Gemma Ashman
Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith


THU 11:30 Fairy Meadow (p0bk5s2b)
6. The Walk Through

Frank has left the police but can't let go of Cheryl's story.
Jon Kay continues to investigate what happened to 3 year old Cheryl Grimmer, who vanished from a beach New South Wales, Australia more than 50 years ago.

Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Chris Ledgard
Music: Elizabeth Purnell
Studio engineer: Jacques Sweeney
Editor: James Cook


THU 12:00 News Summary (m00194g5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 You and Yours (m00194g7)
Gap Finders: Duke Andoh

We talk to Duke Andoh - also known as DKcutz.

He's known as the barber to the stars. There are very few top English footballers who don't use his services for a fresh trim.

We hear how the murder of his best friend gave him the drive to stop midway through his architecture degree to become a barber - and how social media hackers threatened his reputation

PRESENTER - SHARI VAHL

PRODUCER - LINDA WALKER


THU 12:32 Sliced Bread (m00194g9)
Sunglasses

Do more expensive pairs better protect your eyes?
Whether you’re hoping to catch some rays here in the UK or heading abroad for summer sun, you’ll want to think about protecting your eyes from the harmful UV in those rays. But how much do you need to spend on sunglasses to keep you safe?

Listener Wayne got in touch wanting to know the answer. He also wondered whether darker tints better protect his eyes, and asked what the term ‘polarised’ means, and whether he should ensure any new pair are exactly that?

Greg Foot sets out to investigate, testing sunglasses ranging in price from £2.50 to over a hundred pounds - do they deliver on their UV protection? The results are surprising...

This series, we’re testing your suggested wonder-products. If you’ve seen an ad, trend or fad and wonder if there's any evidence to back up a claim drop us an email to sliced.bread@bbc.co.uk or you can send us a voice note to our new WhatsApp number: 07543 306807

PRESENTER: Greg Foot
PRODUCER: Simon Hoban


THU 12:57 Weather (m00194gc)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m00194gf)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


THU 13:45 28ish Days Later (m00194gh)
Day Eleven: The Gap

India meets Emily Jacobs, an Associate Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at University of California Santa Barbara, to discuss sex bias within medical science. Emily shares with India her extensive research into hormones and the brain.

Credits:
Presented by India Rakusen.
Producer: Ellie Sans.
Assistant Producer:Jorja McAndrew.
Executive Producer: Suzy Grant.
Original music composed and performed by Rebekah Reid.
Sound design by Olga Reed.

Special thanks to all contributors and audio diarists.

A Listen production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.


THU 14:00 The Archers (m0019469)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Takeover (m00194gk)
Series 2

Episode 4

High-stake deals and sibling rivalry set in the world of the super wealthy. Meet the Majumdars, a family at war… with itself. Rising from the ashes of defeat, business mogul Ravi Majumdar (Rajit Kapur) will do whatever it takes to claw back control of his global empire.

In Episode 4, the wedding of the year, a bomb threat, a very public confession…

Cast:
Ravi Majumdar......Rajit Kapur
Ash......Abhin Galeya,
Maya......Amrita Acharia
Zara......Ramanique Ahluwalia
Shaan......Danny Ashok
Ian......Finbar Lynch
Venetia......Laurel Lefkow
Seraphina......Jennifer Armour
Amit......Tavish Bhattacharyya
Guy......Matthew Marsh
Arabella......Taullah Bond
Celia......Lourdes Faberes
Alex......David Menkin
Director...... Claire Cage
Chantal......Gianna Kiehl
Bobby......Vivek Madan
Jeet….. Raj Ghatak
Baraclough......David Holt

Other parts:
Nadir Khan
Robert Gwilym
Claire Cage

Sound Design, Eloise Whitmore
Original music, Sacha Puttnam
Sound recording, Paul Clark, Ashyar Bulsara & Ayush Ahuja
Sound Editor, Andreina Gomez
Script Editor, Mike Walker
Assistant Producer, Eleanor Mein

Producers, Emma Hearn & Nadir Khan
Director and Executive Producer, John Scott Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4


THU 15:00 Open Country (m00194gm)
Aberystwyth Inspiration

Writer Niellah Arboine returns to her university town of Aberystwyth, to remember the landscape which inspired her writing so much. She recalls how shocking it was to arrive in a place so different from her South London home. Niellah meets three other creatives working in Cardigan Bay, and explores their connections with place, art and the natural world.

Produced by Beatrice Fenton


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m00193qt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m00193rr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (m00193mg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:15 on Saturday]


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m00194gq)
Deep Space and the Deep Sea - 40 years of the International Whaling Moratorium.

The James Webb Space Telescope is finally in business - what further treasures will it find? Also, the origins of the International Moratorium on Whaling, 40 years old this month.

This week NASA invited President Joe Biden to help them publish the first of five images of full scientific value from the newest super telescope now operating a million miles away from us. It is capable of gazing as far deep into the sky as humans have ever gazed. That first image, an upgrade of one of the Hubble Telescope's "Deep Field" shots from some years ago, shows some of the oldest matter ever seen, including light distorted into smudges and whorls by the gravitational field of galaxies in line of sight from us, much nearer and younger than the light being bent around them.

The other images show even more of what the telescope is capable of seeing. Dr. Stefanie Millam of Nasa's Goddard Space Flight Centre in Maryland, US and BBC Science correspondent Jonathan Amos talk to Gaia about this new, exciting phase in astronomy.

This month marks 40 years since the International Whaling Commission decided to pursue a moratorium on commercial whaling. Many whales are still struggling, but scientists have seen several species recover since then. The moratorium followed campaigning in the 1970s by such groups as Greenpeace, and even the commercial success of audio recordings of humpback whales, released by Drs. Roger and Katy Payne. Greenpeace co-founder Rex Weyler describes to Gaia the motivations behind the original Save the Whale campaign, and some of his memories of intercepting a Russian whaling ship in 1975.

Since 1982, cetacean science has come a long way, and scientists know far more about whale's behaviour, vulnerabilities and interaction with ocean climate and ecosystems than we did back then. Dr. Asha De Vos of the University of Western Australia describes the science, including some recent findings on the continued perils of anthropogenic noise to these giants of the deep.

Presenter Gaia Vince
Assistant Producer Joleen Goffin
Produced by Alex Mansfield


THU 17:00 PM (m00194gs)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00194gv)
Five candidates remain in the race to become the next PM. The Attorney General Suella Braverman is the latest to be eliminated from the contest.


THU 18:30 Gyles's Joke Box (m00194gx)
Gyles Brandreth asks his special guests to pick their favourite audio comedy moments of all time. Do they deserve a place in his Joke Box?

It's been 100 years since the BBC was founded in 1922, and in this brand new programme Gyles will be asking, What made us laugh back then? What makes us laugh now? What made us laugh in between and what makes us laugh the most?

A Great Scott Media production for BBC Radio 4


THU 19:00 The Archers (m00194c2)
Oliver surprises Eddie and Clarrie by hiring a telehandler for their haymaking – it’ll speed things up. When they say it’s too much, Oliver says it’s a selfish gesture really; it’ll save his back. Later Eddie checks that George didn’t put the idea into Oliver’s head, but George denies it, saying Oliver has a heart of gold.

When Pip returns Poppy’s school clothes to Clarrie, Clarrie senses that Pip’s upset. Pip admits she’s checked, and Rosie is overweight, but she can’t understand why when she eats so healthily. Clarrie says it will even out as she gets older and mentions that she kept giving Poppy treats after Nic died and in the end Poppy needed fillings. Will gave her a right talking to. Pip’s thoughtful and thanks Clarrie for being reassuring.

When Chelsea questions why Oliver’s at the haymaking at all, Brad says it’s George who’s the pain. Oliver’s a laugh. Chelsea calls Brad a traitor for having fun with the man who gave Tracy the sack. Tracy’s grateful that Chelsea has her back, but says Brad’s got no choice who he works with. When Tracy tentatively asks how Oliver is, Brad plays it down, saying he’s a boring old duffer. Later Chelsea warns Brad that family is family – if you cross one of them, then you cross them all. Oliver Sterling’s the reason they’re in this mess. Brad’s defensive: Oliver really cares about Tracy and all of them. But Chelsea’s having none of it – Brad had better work out which side he’s on.


THU 19:15 Front Row (m00194gz)
Persuasion & Patriots reviewed, Durham Brass Festival, Museum of the Year winner

The new film Persuasion based on Jane Austen’s novel starring Dakota Johnson and directed by Carrie Cracknell has already attracted a lot of attention for its blend of 21st century millennial dialogue and Austen’s own words. And Peter Morgan, writer of The Crown, returns to the stage for his new play Patriots which looks at the rise of the oligarchs in Russia, in particular Boris Berezovsky, played by Tom Hollander, helping to secure the rise of Putin, played by Will Keen. Guardian foreign correspondent Luke Harding and film critic Hanna Flint join Shahidha to review both.

Durham’s International Brass festival, which has been going for more than 20 years, is showcasing bands from as far afield as Cuba, Italy and Ghana. Among this year’s high profile artists taking part are Mercury Prize and Brit Award nominees, a MOBO-winning CBBC star, and an avant garde rock band fronted by the Poet Laureate. The BBC’s Sharuna Sagar went to Durham to see how this traditional style of music is being embraced by new generation of musicians and collaborators.

We hear who has been named Art Fund Museum of the Year, and speak to the winner just minutes after it is announced.

Presenter: Shahidha Bari
Producer: Sarah Johnson

Photo credit: Nick Wall/Netflix © 2022


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (m00194h1)
Covid - how worried should we be this time?

More than two years after the emergence of Covid, infection levels are high once again. The Office for National Statistics estimates that 2.7 million people, or 1 in 25 of us, have got Coronavirus.

There’s concern too about new Omicron variants BA.4 and BA.5 – mutations which help the virus re-infect our bodies.

But how worried should we actually be this time? Are the mutations normal or an alarming new development? And how much of a threat does Coronavirus still face to the NHS?

Joining David Aaronovitch in The Briefing Room are:

James Gallagher, BBC Health and Science Correspondent
Gideon Skinner, Head of Politics Research in Public Affairs at Ipsos
Miriam Deakin, Director of Policy and Stategy of NHS Providers
Meaghan Kall, Epidemiologist at the UK Health Security Agency
Neil Ferguson, Head of the MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis at Imperial College, London.

Producers: Tim Mansel, Kirsteen Knight and Simon Watts. Editor: Richard Vadon. Studio Manager: Rod Farquhar Production co-ordinators: Siobhan Reed & Helena Warwick-Cross


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (m00194h3)
Woke or Broke?

From Disney to the Halifax bank, companies are increasingly willing to take a stance on everything. But what is driving this trend and will it continue? Ultimately isn't it the job of a business to make money for its shareholders and not get involved in politics and contentious social issues? Evan Davis and guests discuss.

GUESTS

Nina Bhatia, Executive Director, Strategy and Commercial Development, John Lewis Partnership

Ian Leslie, Journalist and Author of 'Conflicted'

Becky Willan, CEO and Co-founder, Given Agency

Nicola Kilner, CEO and Co-founder of Deciem

Producer: Julie Ball
Sound: James Beard
Editor: Jon Bithrey
Production Co-Ordinators: Siobhan Reed and Helena Warwick-Cross


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m00194gq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 How Covid Changed Science (m0018xjx)
Episode 1

The global Covid pandemic was a wake up call for the scientific community. With remarkable speed and agility a massive global effort was soon underway – to turn existing science to tackle the immediate threat of the pandemic and invent new science with a longer term aim of protecting the global population from the new pathogen.

The old ways of ‘doing science’ changed but was that entirely for the better and is such change permanent ?

Until 2020 developing a new drug took at least 15 years. Scientists by and large competed with each other, were somewhat secretive about their research and only shared their data once publication was secured. And the public and the press had no interest in the various early phases of clinical trials. An incremental scientific step possibly on the road to somewhere was simply not newsworthy. Face masks were the preserves of hypochondriacs in the Far East, with no scientific evidence base for their use.
Now the findings of research are published as soon as they are ready, often before they have been peer reviewed they are being openly discussed in social media.
This series documents the key changes in science which the Covid-19 pandemic has brought about.
The speed of research, collaboration between science and industry, and public perception of science are areas that have undergone incredible and likely permanent change. Devi Sridhar asks which of these changes increase or decrease the public’s trust in science. And what the direction should be now for a more joined up global response to infectious disease.
Devi Sridhar, Professor of Global Health at Edinburgh University hears from scientists in a variety of fields, whose working lives and practices have been affected, in some cases revolutionised by the pandemic.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m00194h5)
Sri Lankan president resigns

In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 Winchelsea by Alex Preston (m00194h9)
Episode 4

A tale of revenge, identity and smuggling, set in Sussex in the 18th Century.
Winchelsea is a smugglers’ town. Beneath it there runs a network of cellars and caves from under its streets as far as the King’s Cliff. All manner of goods are stored there, safe from the excise men. The Cellarman holds the keys to the cellar gates, a position held in Goody Brown’s family since the founding of the town.

Episode Four
With the trap set, Goody, Francis, Gray and the Hawkhurst Gang await the return of the Mayfield Gang from a run.

Alex Preston is an author and journalist who lives in Kent. His personal anthology of nature writing, As Kingfishers Catch Fire, was published in 2017. Winchelsea,
published in 2022, is his fourth novel.

Writer: Alex Preston
Reader: Jessica Gunning
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:00 Robin Ince's Reality Tunnel (m00194hf)
Inside Robin Ince

Escaping the confines of The Infinite Monkey Cage, comedian Robin Ince takes us on a journey through his Reality Tunnel in this two-part stand-up show, recorded specially for Radio 4.

Performing in front of a live audience in Manchester, Robin examines the brain’s relationship with reality and over the two episode series, he looks at the difference between the inner and the outer self and considers how we put together our picture of the world.

Written and performed by Robin Ince
Produced by Carl Cooper

Sound Manager - Jerry Peal
Sound Editor - Joshan Chana
Production Coordinator - Katie Baum
Picture by Steve Best

This was a BBC Studios production


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m00194hn)
All the news from today's sitting at Westminster.



FRIDAY 15 JULY 2022

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m00194hs)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 00:30 The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith (m00194fy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00194hx)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00194j1)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00194j5)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m00194j9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00194jd)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sarah Joseph


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m00194jj)
Defra has launched a UK-wide consultation into the pig industry supply chain - from farm, to processor to retailer. It comes after a difficult few years, with labour and processor shortages, leading to pigs backed up on farm. The cost of production is also currently higher than the price farmers are being paid.
We meet a Shropshire farmer where robots are now being used to weed between flowers. It comes as Defra urges farmers to use automation as part of a solution to labour shortages.
And a look at one of the organisations that tests the UK's milk for quality and safety. The National Milk Laboratories also offers milk tests to find out if a cow is pregnant - vital knowledge in the production of milk.
The presenter is Steffan Messenger.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tw3ns)
Corncrake

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the corncrake.

The rasping repeated call of the corncrake was once a familiar sound of hay meadows throughout the UK. However these birds were no match for mechanical mowers which destroyed their nests and they're now mainly found in the north and west where conservation efforts are bringing them back to lush meadows and crofts.


FRI 06:00 Today (m00194bf)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m00193r6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith (m00194bh)
The Misuses of Memory

Martin Sixsmith witnessed the end of the Cold War first hand, reporting for the BBC from Moscow during the presidencies of Gorbachev and Yeltsin. In The War of Nerves he draws on a vast array of sources as well as his own experiences to take us into the minds of those affected by the simmering tensions and paranoia on both sides of the Iron Curtain.

From the end of the Second World War to the dissolution of the USSR in 1991, the psychodrama played out between the Soviet and American superpowers held the world in thrall. The Cold War, both sides declared, was a contest of competing social, economic, political and ethical systems, each of them professing a monopoly on wisdom and the keys to humankind’s future. It was a conflict in which the battleground was, to an unprecedented extent, the human mind - the aim was to control not just territory, resources and power, but loyalties, belief and the nature of reality.

Both sides in the Cold War had the means to destroy the planet. And decades of rumbling international hostility affected individual mental well-being, manifesting in social paranoia, catastrophising, and surges of collective hysteria.

Until earlier this year, we thought all that was over. But now, in Ukraine, we are forced to reconsider the comforting assumptions of the past 30 years. History, in the sense of a settled global preference for liberal democracy, has evidently not ended.

Martin Sixsmith studied Russian at Oxford, Harvard, the Sorbonne and in St Petersburg, and psychology at Birkbeck and London Metropolitan University. He is the author of two novels and several works of non-fiction, including Philomena and Russia: A 1,000 Year Chronicle of the Wild East.

In this final episode, Martin explores how a failure to understand the psychology of Russia allowed the West to squander the possibility of a peaceful world after the fall of the Iron Curtain, and how Cold War memories are coming back to haunt us in Ukraine.

Abridged and produced by Jane Greenwood
Read by Jonathan Keeble
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m00194bk)
Artist, Elsa James; Forced adoption and unmarried mothers; Ukrainian refugees; Chef, Fatmata Binta

A formal apology should be issued by the government to the thousands of unmarried mothers in England and Wales who had their babies taken for adoption in the 50s, 60s, 70s. In a report published today, the Joint Committee on Human Rights says the Government bears ultimate responsibility for the pain and suffering caused by public institutions and state employees that railroaded mothers into those unwanted adoptions. Harriet Harman MP is Chair of the Joint Committee on Human Rights.

Fulani chef Fatmata Binta has won the world's most prestigious gastronomy prize, the 2022 Basque Culinary World Prize, an international achievement award for chefs who improve society through food. Fatmata is the first African to receive the award, and won for her work celebrating nomadic food culture and exploring west African cuisine through her Dine on a Mat pop-up restaurant.

What shape does a life take after fleeing a war? It's nearly five months since Russia invaded Ukraine and families across the UK are trying to redefine their 'normal' after being displaced. Many will be housed in temporary accommodation; others will be living with host families. While safety and the promise of a new home will bring comfort and relief, sharing a domestic space with strangers can bring its own set of challenges. Anastasia Skelton is an Ukrainian living in the UK who is currently volunteering as a coordinator in Canterbury, helping to match refugees with host families. And Kate Daniels is a family therapist and senior lecturer in clinical psychology at Christchurch University. She has set up a project to equip host families with the emotional skills necessary to make the transition as easy as possible for the people displaced by war.

The artist and feminist activist Elsa James tells us about exploring her identity as a black woman living in Essex in her latest exhibition 'Othered in a Region that has Been Historically Othered'. She has lived in the county for more than 20 years but asks ‘Is being in Essex diluting my black identity’? She also examines the lives of historical black female figures as well the women who came over as nurses as part of Windrush and who made their homes in Essex.

Presenter: Anita Rani
Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Interviewed Guest: Harriet Harman
Interviewed Guest: Veronica Smith
Interviewed Guest: Fatmata Binta
Interviewed Guest: Anastasia Skelton
Interviewed Guest: Kate Daniels
Interviewed Guest: Elsa James
Film Still: Andy Delaney


FRI 11:00 How Covid Changed Science (m00194bm)
Episode 2

In the Second of our series How Covid Changed Science, Devi Sridhar Professor of Global Health at Edinburgh University looks at the scientific messaging. Just how do you explain to both politicians and the public that a growing global pandemic is likely to kill many people, and unprecedented measures such as a nationwide lockdown are needed to prevent even more deaths. What information should be imparted and how?

Similarly how to address the clamour for information on the development of vaccines and other potential treatments when there often wasn’t clarity? And with the rise of misinformation how did individual scientists who became the subject of conspiracy theories cope with being targeted?

In this programme we hear from scientists and politicians directly involved with the pandemic response. For some the experience of explaining their often highly technical research to the general public was a daunting experience. For others it became a mission to answer the publics concerns and fears.


FRI 11:30 The Break (m00194bp)
Series 4

Some Like It Hut

As an early Christmas treat for Andy (Tom Palmer), Jeff (Philip Jackson) has rented a beach hut.

Their day of rest and relaxation is interrupted by visits from Beach Warden Marcia (Shobna Gulati), deck chair attendant Meg (Alison Steadman), nosy pensioner Mr Truepenny (Rasmus Hardiker), and human foghorn, town crier Peter Humfriss (Mark Benton).

Along the way, they disrupt a birthday party, Andy gets some good news and Jeff inexplicably buys a snooker table.

Starring:
Philip Jackson
Tom Palmer
Alison Steadman
Mark Benton
Shobna Gulati
Rasmus Hardiker

Created and Written by Ian Brown and James Hendrie
Studio Engineered and Edited by Leon Chambers
Production Manager Sarah Tombling
Produced and Directed by Gordon Kennedy

Recorded at The Soundhouse Studios, London

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m00194br)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 AntiSocial (m00194bt)
Free speech and online harm

Hopefuls for the Conservative Party leadership have been talking about the Online Safety Bill. One candidate said the planned attempt to make tech companies do something about content that is legal but harmful amounts to ‘legislating for hurt feelings’. And social media had a lot to say. A comedian and an academic discuss.

Presenter: Adam Fleming
Producers: Chloe Hadjimatheou & Lucy Proctor
Researchers: Ellie House & Octavia Woodward
Production Coordinator: Brenda Brown
Studio Manager: Chris Murphy
Music: Oskar Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon


FRI 12:57 Weather (m00194bw)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m00194by)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Edward Stourton.


FRI 13:45 28ish Days Later (m00194c0)
Day Twelve: Hysteria

Professor Richard Legro, Chair of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, at Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, Pennsylvania, tells his story of attempting to test the effectiveness of sildenafil (aka Viagra) to treat period pain. Ultimately unsuccessful - but not because it didn't work - but rather the people with the money didn't think it was important enough.

India is also joined by Dr Elinor Cleghorn, author of Unwell Women: A Journey Through Medicine and Myth in a Manmade World. She tells her story of being diagnosed with the chronic illness Lupus. The pair discuss the origins of hysteria, with a particular focus on the myth that black females have a greater insensitivity to pain.

Credits:
Presented by India Rakusen.
Producer: Ellie Sans.
Assistant Producer:Jorja McAndrew.
Executive Producer: Suzy Grant.
Original music composed and performed by Rebekah Reid.
Sound design by Olga Reed.

Special thanks to all contributors and audio diarists.

A Listen production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m00194c2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Limelight (m001955r)
English Rose

English Rose - Episode 1: The Call of the Wild

by Helen Cross.

Eighteen-year-old Rose travels from Whitby to New York to work as nanny to a glittering but secretive family. It’s a culture shock and Rose seems unprepared for the mostly male attention she elicits. But it turns out she is quite capable of looking after herself: bloody revenge is her speciality.

She's not like the other girls. And Gulliver is no ordinary baby. This is a world not just of champagne, but shadows, where all is definitely not as it seems.

Stylish and surprising fantasy horror with a comic twist, starring Alexandra Mardell (Coronation Street) and Demetri Goritsas (Ten Percent). With music by Dana Margolin and Sam Yardley of Mercury-nominated band, Porridge Radio.

Helen Cross wrote ‘My Summer of Love’ which won a Betty Trask award and was made into a Bafta-winning film with Emily Blunt (recently rated her best film in The Guardian top ten Emily Blunt films). Mary Ward-Lowery won Best Director in 2020 Audio Drama Awards.

Rose ... Alexandra Mardell
Maya ... Miranda Braun
Austin ... Demetri Goritsas
Siobhan ... Deirdre Mullins
Delphine ... Yasemin Özdemir
Randy ... Michael Begley
Art Guy ... Mathew Durkan
Beatrice ... Alexandra Hannant
Newsreader ...Tayla Kovacevic-Ebong
Jason ... Joseph Tweedale
Mam ... Jane Thornton

Including the voices of Jo Makel, Paul Murphy, James Hoggarth, Freya Pollaidh, Augusta Chapman, Becky Ripley and Ben Casswell.
Original music written and performed by Dana Margolin and Sam Yardley of Porridge Radio, and produced, mixed and engineered by Sam Yardley.

Sound design by Ilse Lademann
Producer Mary Ward-Lowery


FRI 14:45 Living with the Gods (b09d43wm)
Festivals

Neil MacGregor continues his series on the expression of shared beliefs in communities around the world and across time, and focuses on festivals, and their role in shaping a communal identity.

Producer Paul Kobrak

Produced in partnership with the British Museum
Photograph (c) The Trustees of the British Museum.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m00194c4)
Narberth

Horticultural programme featuring a group of gardening experts. Kathy Clugston is joined by Pippa Greenwood, Anne Swithinbank and Chris Beardshaw. Together, they answer your gardening queries.

The panellists are in Narberth, Wales, where they explain what to do when lupins stop flowering, and what they really think about weed-control fabrics. They also diagnose a poorly clematis, and suggest some interesting types of Phlomis to grow.

Away from the questions, Anne heads over to The National Botanic Garden of Wales and speaks to Elle James and Matt Smith about their boulder garden.

Producer: Daniel Cocker
Assistant Producer: Aniya Das

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 From Fact to Fiction (m00194c6)
Small Door, Big Man

As Downing Street experiences yet another upheaval, decorator Amina wonders whether she will have a job after being associated with some infamous wallpaper. She reflects on her career and the legacy left in different halls of power.

Written by Yassmin Abdel-Magied
Read by Sirine Saba
Produced by Naomi Walmsley

Yassmin Abdel-Magied is the Sudanese Australian author of the essay collection, Talking About a Revolution. Her previous books include the award-winning teen novel, Listen, Layla, which she is now adapting for television. A regular columnist with The New Arab, Yassmin’s writing also appears in the Guardian, TIME, TLS and more.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m00194c8)
Shinzo Abe (pictured), Mona Hammond OBE, Lorna de Smidt, Monty Norman

Kirsty Lang on

Shinzo Abe - Japan’s longest-serving prime minister who sought to end a wartime legacy of defeat and occupation and to tackle the economy through ‘Abenomics’.

Actor Mona Hammond is best known for her TV role in Eastenders.

Lorna de Smidt, the anti-apartheid and anti-racist activist who cut her political teeth in the Black Consciousness Movement in South Africa in the late 1960s.

And Monty Norman - Composer and singer who wrote the James Bond main theme and a string of successful musicals as well.

Producer: Neil George

Interviewed guest: Nakano Koichi
Interviewed guest: Dr Kristin Surak
Interviewed guest: Michael Buffong
Interviewed guest: Graham de Smidt
Interviewed guest: Matthew Sweet

Archive clips used: BBC News, Report on death of Shinzo Abe, 08/07/2022; BBC Radio 4, The World This Weekend, Votes counted for Japanese election, 29/07/2007; BBC One, Eastenders 25/10/2010; Humphrey Barclay Productions for Channel 4, Desmond's S01E04 26/01/1989; BBC Radio 4, The Archers 28/12/2003; BBC Two, Storm Damage (1989), 23/01/2000; Paramount Pictures/ Albert S. Ruddy Productions/ Alfran Productions, The Godfather Part 1 (1972); BBC Radio 4, News Bulletin19/03/2001; BBC Two Omnibus - Monty Norman interview 17/10/1982.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (m00194cb)
Are BBC journalists enjoying the Conservative party leadership crisis a little too much? Even delighting in the demise of Boris Johnson? That is the suspicion of some Feedback listeners. Roger Bolton puts this accusation to the Today Programme’s Justin Webb, who also discusses impartiality and what it is like to be in the middle of a political maelstrom.

Roger Mosey the former Editorial Director of the BBC gives his thoughts on the proposed move of Radio 4 Extra to online only.

And why remake T S Eliot’s The Waste Land as a drama, 100 years on?

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Alun Beach
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 17:00 PM (m00194cd)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00194cg)
A national emergency is declared as the Met Office issues an extreme heat alert


FRI 18:30 Dead Ringers (m00194cj)
Series 22

Episode 5

Penny Mordaunt has come from nowhere to be in the top five Tory leaderships hopefuls, but much more importantly, she makes her debut appearance on Dead Ringers.

The leadership election is analysed in depth, the women’s Euros gets a new presenter, and Scooby Doo gets involved in British politics.

Performed by Jon Culshaw, Lewis Macleod, Jan Ravens, Debra Stephenson and Duncan Wisbey.

This episode was written by: Nev Fountain & Tom Jamieson, Laurence Howarth, Ed Amsden & Tom Coles, James Bugg, Edward Tew, Robert Darke, Rachel E. Thorn, Sophie Dickson and Sarah Campbell

Produced and created by Bill Dare
Production Co-ordinator: Caroline Barlow


FRI 19:00 The Archers (m00194cl)
Writer, Sarah McDonald Hughes
Director and Editor, Jeremy Howe

Ben Archer ….. Ben Norris
Helen Archer ….. Louiza Patikas
Pip Archer ….. Daisy Badger
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Justin Elliott ….. Simon Williams
Toby Fairbrother ….. Rhys Bevan
Clarrie Grundy ….. Heather Bell
Eddie Grundy ….. Trevor Harrison
George Grundy …… Angus Stobie
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Brad Horrobin ….. Taylor Uttley
Chelsea Horrobin ….. Madeleine Leslay
Tracy Horrobin ….. Susie Riddell
Adam Macy ….. Andrew Wincott
Oliver Sterling ….. Michael Cochrane


FRI 19:15 Add to Playlist (m00194cn)
Nitin Sawhney and Gabriella Swallow take to the skies

Composer and musician Nitin Sawhney and cellist Gabriella Swallow head towards the sun as they help add five more tracks to the playlist.

Cerys Matthews and Jeffrey Boakye are also joined by Hinako Omori as they fly high with the lark.

Presenters Cerys Matthews and Jeffrey Boakye
Producer Jerome Weatherald

The five tracks in this week's playlist:

You Ain’t the Problem by Michael Kiwanuka
I Am the Black Gold of the Sun by Nuyorican Soul (4 Hero remix)
The Lark Ascending by Ralph Vaughan Williams
Sonata Representativa - The Cat - by Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber
Wuthering Heights by Kate Bush

Other music in this episode:

Goldberg_Variations, Variatio 5 by J.S._Bach, played by Lang_Lang
She’s a Lady by Tom Jones
I am the Black Gold of the Sun by Rotary Connection
Conversations with a Lark by Hinako Omori - Listen to the Radio 3 broadcast https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0017lqw
Sonata violino solo representativa (In A Major) - Allemande by Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber
Violin Sonata in A major : IV Der Fresch (The Frog)


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m00194cq)
Jake Berry MP, Layla Moran MP, Lisa Nandy MP, Ali Miraj

Anita Anand presents political debate and discussion from the Plaza Community Cinema in Liverpool. On this week's panel: Conservative MP Jake Berry, Liberal Democrat MP and Foreign Affairs Spokesperson at Westminster Layla Moran, Labour MP and Shadow Levelling Up Secretary Lisa Nandy, and columnist and financier Ali Miraj.

Producer: Emma Campbell
Lead broadcast engineer: John Benton


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m00194cs)
Chance and Opportunity

As the Tory leadership election highlights questions of social mobility, David Goodhart looks at why some people seem to have more luck than others. To what extent can we create our own opportunities, regardless of background? What role does personality play? And is it really possible to engineer and cultivate our own luck by being open to chance encounters?

Producer: Adele Armstrong
Sound: Peter Bosher
Production coordinator: Gemma Ashman
Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith


FRI 21:00 Archive on 4 (m0018wsy)
Fifty Years of Pride

It’s 50 years since first ever Gay Pride march in July 1972. The event in London went on to inspire marches not only across all four nations of the UK - albeit decades later - but around the world. Damian Barr examines the impact of Pride on society over the past half century.

Gay rights were slow to be granted. From the 1954 Wolfenden Report through to the 1968 Stonewall Riots in the US and the partial decriminalisation of homosexuality in the UK in 1967, change has been incremental. In 1972, the Gay Liberation Front staged the world’s first ever Gay Pride march in London.

Interviewees include people who took part in that first demonstration. We also hear from Stonewall, the Queer Museum, and those who helped create Black Pride, as well as Gay’s The Word bookshop, which was used as a meeting place by those who organised Pride in its early years.

The 1980s saw Margaret Thatcher’s Section 28 law and the AIDS crisis with Pride growing in size.

In the 1990s, Pride came of age as LGBT equality groups began to mobilise against the injustices of the 1967 Act. Yet the event also entered a new commercial phase with the pink pound dominating.

In the 2000, campaigners began to see restrictive laws repealed - equal age of consent and a lifting of the ban on gay people in the armed services, civil partnerships and ultimately marriage.

The programme ends by asking where we are now and what the future holds.

Is there still a need for Pride? And, if so, what are the issues it should be pushing? Should it perhaps return to its original non-commercial protesting roots? And what does Pride mean to people today?

Presenter: Damian Barr
Producer: Howard Shannon
Series Producer: David Prest
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m00194cv)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 Winchelsea by Alex Preston (m00194cx)
Episode 5

A tale of revenge, identity and smuggling, set in Sussex in the 18th Century.

Winchelsea is a smugglers’ town. Beneath it there runs a network of cellars and caves from under its streets as far as the King’s Cliff. All manner of goods are stored there, safe from the excise men. The Cellarman holds the keys to the cellar gates, a position held in Goody Brown’s family since the founding of the town.

Episode Five
At the Greyfriars ball, Goody meets Lily St. Leger, before sailing to Antwerp on the guinea run.

Alex Preston is an author and journalist who lives in Kent. His personal anthology of nature writing, As Kingfishers Catch Fire, was published in 2017. Winchelsea, published in 2022, is his fourth novel.

Writer: Alex Preston
Reader: Jessica Gunning
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (m00193p5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m00194d0)
All the news from today's sitting at Westminster.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

28ish Days Later 14:45 SAT (m00193lw)

28ish Days Later 14:45 SUN (m00193rl)

28ish Days Later 13:45 MON (m00193tn)

28ish Days Later 13:45 TUE (m00193ns)

28ish Days Later 13:45 WED (m001945s)

28ish Days Later 13:45 THU (m00194gh)

28ish Days Later 13:45 FRI (m00194c0)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (m00193p5)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (m00193p5)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m0018xl2)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m00194cs)

A Thorough Examination with Drs Chris and Xand 15:30 TUE (p0c98s7r)

A Thorough Examination with Drs Chris and Xand 21:00 WED (p0c98s7r)

Accidents and Emergencies 19:45 SUN (m00193sj)

Add to Playlist 19:15 FRI (m00194cn)

Alexei Sayle's Strangers on a Train 19:15 SUN (m00193sf)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (m0018wz7)

Analysis 20:30 MON (m00193v9)

AntiSocial 12:04 FRI (m00194bt)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m00193lt)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m0018xl0)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m00194cq)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m00193mj)

Archive on 4 21:00 FRI (m0018wsy)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m00194gq)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m00194gq)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m00193mz)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m00193mz)

Boris 17:30 SAT (m0019kxh)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m00193r2)

Can the Police Keep Us Safe? 09:00 THU (m00194fv)

Ceausescu's Children 11:00 MON (m001897q)

DH Lawrence: Tainted Love 15:00 SAT (m000x6cx)

Damned Andrew 18:30 TUE (m00193pc)

Dead Ringers 12:30 SAT (m0018xkt)

Dead Ringers 18:30 FRI (m00194cj)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (m00193r6)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m00193r6)

Don't Log Off 16:30 MON (m0016x8h)

Drama 15:00 SUN (m00193rn)

Empire-ical Evidence 23:00 MON (m0000qm9)

Evacuated to Russia 20:00 MON (m00193v7)

Evacuated to Russia 11:00 WED (m00193v7)

Fairy Meadow 11:30 THU (p0bk5s2b)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m00193l3)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m00193t2)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m00193vy)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m00193qf)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m0019479)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m00194jj)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (m0018xkm)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (m00194cb)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (m0018x1h)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (m00193pk)

Fortunately... with Fi and Jane 23:00 TUE (m00193px)

Four Thought 05:45 SAT (m0018xfg)

Four Thought 09:30 WED (m0019457)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (m0019457)

From Fact to Fiction 00:30 SUN (m0018xkh)

From Fact to Fiction 15:45 FRI (m00194c6)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m00193lh)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (m00194g2)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m00193v5)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m00193ph)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m001946c)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m00194gz)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m0018xkf)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m00194c4)

Gyles's Joke Box 18:30 THU (m00194gx)

How Covid Changed Science 21:30 THU (m0018xjx)

How Covid Changed Science 11:00 FRI (m00194bm)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (m00193v2)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m00193pm)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (m00193pp)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (m00193pp)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (m0018wyz)

Ken Cheng: Chinese Comedian 18:30 WED (m0019467)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m0018xkk)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m00194c8)

Limelight 14:15 FRI (m001955r)

Living with the Gods 14:45 FRI (b09d43wm)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m00193mb)

Loose Ends 23:00 SUN (m00193mb)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m0018xlb)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m00193mn)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m00193sp)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m00193vk)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m00193q1)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m001946v)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m00194hs)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m00193lm)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m00193lm)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m001945x)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (m0018xfd)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (m001946f)

Music Made in the Middle 11:30 WED (m001945f)

New Storytellers 09:30 TUE (m00193n5)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m0018xll)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m00193mx)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m00193sy)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m00193vt)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m00193q9)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m0019475)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m00194j9)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m00193lk)

News Summary 06:00 SUN (m00193qh)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m00193r8)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m00193td)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m00193nj)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m001947h)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m00194g5)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m00194br)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m00193l1)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m00193qp)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m00193qy)

News and Weather 13:00 SAT (m00193lr)

News 22:00 SAT (m00193ml)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (m00193qk)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m00193rr)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m00193rr)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (m0018x3y)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m00194gm)

PM 17:00 SAT (m00193m0)

PM 17:00 MON (m00193ty)

PM 17:00 TUE (m00193p7)

PM 17:00 WED (m0019461)

PM 17:00 THU (m00194gs)

PM 17:00 FRI (m00194cd)

Past Forward: A Century of Sound 00:15 SUN (m0015vlp)

Percy Shelley, Reformer and Radical 23:30 SAT (m0018wy2)

Percy Shelley, Reformer and Radical 16:30 SUN (m00193rw)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m00193s9)

Plant Based Promises 21:00 MON (m0018x5c)

Plant Based Promises 11:00 TUE (m00193nd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m0018xln)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m00193t0)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m00193vw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m00193qc)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m0019477)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m00194jd)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m00193md)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m00193md)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m00193md)

Rabbit at Rest 21:45 SAT (m0002bb4)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m00193qt)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m00193qt)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m00193qt)

Rewinder 10:30 SAT (m00193lc)

Rewinder 00:15 MON (m00193lc)

Robin Ince's Reality Tunnel 23:00 THU (m00194hf)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m00193l9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m0018xlg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m00193ms)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m00193st)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m00193vp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m00193q5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m0019471)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m00194j1)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m0018xld)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m0018xlj)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m00193m4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m00193mq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m00193mv)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m00193s0)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m00193sr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m00193sw)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m00193vm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m00193vr)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m00193q3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m00193q7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m001946z)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m0019473)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m00194hx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m00194j5)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (m00193p0)

Sideways 09:00 WED (m0019455)

Sideways 16:00 WED (m0019455)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m00193m8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m00193s7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m00193v0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m00193p9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m0019465)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m00194gv)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m00194cg)

Sketches: Stories of Art and People 16:00 MON (m00193tw)

Sliced Bread 12:32 THU (m00194g9)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01k9m9z)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01k9m9z)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m00193r0)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m00193qr)

Takeover 14:15 MON (m00193tq)

Takeover 14:15 TUE (m00193nx)

Takeover 14:15 WED (m001945v)

Takeover 14:15 THU (m00194gk)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (m0018x0f)

The 3rd Degree 15:00 MON (m00193ts)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m00193r4)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m00193sc)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m00193sc)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m00193nv)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m00193nv)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m00193pf)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m00193pf)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m0019469)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m0019469)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m00194c2)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m00194c2)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (m00194cl)

The Bottom Line 11:30 MON (m0018x4h)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (m00194h3)

The Break 11:30 FRI (m00194bp)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (m00194h1)

The Climate Tipping Points 09:30 THU (m00180cb)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m00193rb)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m00193rb)

The Hidden History of the Front Door 11:30 TUE (m00180ld)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 19:15 SAT (m00193mg)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:00 THU (m00193mg)

The Last Days of Roger Federer by Geoff Dyer 00:30 SAT (m0018xjs)

The Listening Project 13:30 SUN (m00193rj)

The Long View 09:00 TUE (m00193n3)

The Long View 21:30 TUE (m00193n3)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m001945z)

The Media Show 21:30 WED (m001945z)

The Smugglers' Trail 21:30 MON (m00154pl)

The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith 09:45 MON (m00193t8)

The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith 00:30 TUE (m00193t8)

The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith 09:45 TUE (m00193n7)

The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith 00:30 WED (m00193n7)

The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith 09:45 WED (m001946x)

The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith 00:30 THU (m001946x)

The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith 09:45 THU (m00194fy)

The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith 00:30 FRI (m00194fy)

The War of Nerves by Martin Sixsmith 09:45 FRI (m00194bh)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (m00193lf)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m00193rg)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m00193vc)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m00193pr)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m001946h)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m00194h5)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m00194cv)

This Cultural Life 09:00 MON (m00161mc)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (m00193vh)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (m00193pz)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (m001946s)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (m00194hn)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (m00194d0)

Today 07:00 SAT (m00193l7)

Today 06:00 MON (m00193t6)

Today 06:00 TUE (m00193n1)

Today 06:00 WED (m0019451)

Today 06:00 THU (m00194fs)

Today 06:00 FRI (m00194bf)

Tom Mayhew Is Benefit Scum 23:00 WED (m001946m)

Tumanbay 21:00 SAT (m000k7jc)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b02tvryl)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b02tx0s5)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b02tw750)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b02ttqwv)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b02tvnnw)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b02tw3ns)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m00193l5)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m00193lp)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m00193m6)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m00193qm)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m00193qw)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m00193rd)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m00193s4)

Weather 05:56 MON (m00193t4)

Weather 12:57 MON (m00193tj)

Weather 12:57 TUE (m00193nn)

Weather 12:57 WED (m001945n)

Weather 12:57 THU (m00194gc)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m00194bw)

Welcome to the Neighbourhood 23:15 WED (m001946q)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m00193sl)

Winchelsea by Alex Preston 22:45 MON (m00193vf)

Winchelsea by Alex Preston 22:45 TUE (m00193pt)

Winchelsea by Alex Preston 22:45 WED (m001946k)

Winchelsea by Alex Preston 22:45 THU (m00194h9)

Winchelsea by Alex Preston 22:45 FRI (m00194cx)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m00193ly)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m00193tb)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m00193nb)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m001945c)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m00194g0)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m00194bk)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (m00193p3)

World at One 13:00 MON (m00193tl)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m00193nq)

World at One 13:00 WED (m001945q)

World at One 13:00 THU (m00194gf)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m00194by)

You and Yours 12:04 MON (m00193tg)

You and Yours 12:04 TUE (m00193nl)

You and Yours 12:04 WED (m001945l)

You and Yours 12:04 THU (m00194g7)