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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 16 APRIL 2022

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m00168sc)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:30 The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer (m00168qv)
Episode 5

The story of the invention of the motion picture and the mysterious man behind it.

In 1888, the French artist and inventor Louis Le Prince recorded the first ever moving image on film using a single lens camera of his own design. It featured members of his family moving about the garden of their home and can still be seen online.

In September 1890 he paid a visit to his brother in Dijon, France, intending after that to join his wife and family in New York where they lived. On 16th September he caught a train to Paris. He never arrived in Paris, and was never seen again.

One month later, Thomas Edison announced his own invention of a camera which could take moving pictures. At a time of fierce competition among inventors to obtain patents for their own products, the mystery of the disappearance of Louis le Prince has never been solved.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Paterson Joseph
Produced by Celia de Wolff
Executive Producer: Caroline Raphael
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00168sf)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00168sh)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00168sk)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m00168sm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0016mb5)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Father Martin Magill


SAT 05:45 Lent Talks (m00168d1)
"I was in prison and you visited me"

Lent Talks is a series of personal reflections inspired by an aspect of the story leading up to Easter. This year’s theme is the power of hospitality, based on Jesus’ encouragement in Matthew’s gospel to feed the hungry, welcome the stranger and look after the sick.

In this episode, the ex-gangster John Pridmore reflects on his troubling past as he considers the words, "I was in prison and you visited me".

Producer: Dan Tierney.

--

If you have been affected by any of the issues raised in the programme, details of organisations that can provide help and support are available here:

Suicide/Emotional distress
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/4WLs5NlwrySXJR2n8Snszdg/information-and-support-suicide-emotional-distress

Victims of crime
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/2MfW34HqH7tTCtnmx7LVfzp/victims-of-crime


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m0016gvf)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (m00168m7)
Mammoth Hunting on the Norfolk Coast

This week's Open Country is a journey along a stretch of familiar coastline, but also back in time, to a far less familiar landscape. Emily Knight explores the Deep History Coast of North Norfolk, where the crumbling shoreline has given up some of the most impressive fossil remains ever discovered. To help her get a sense of the landscape that came before this one, she meets palaeontologist and author of "Otherlands", Dr Thomas Halliday, who explains what this ancient place would have looked like, how it might have felt to walk through it, and who you might have met along the way.

One of our companions on this stroll through time might have been a true giant of the past - four metres tall and weighing in at ten tonnes - the West Runton Mammoth. It's the most complete mammoth skeleton ever found, buried in the shifting sands of the beach for hundreds of thousands of years, before being discovered after a storm in 1990. While we stroll along a sandy beach, the West Runton Mammoth would have strolled instead along a muddy river-bed through a dense forest, surrounded by sights both familiar to us, and extraordinary: seven-foot tall deer, rhinos and hyaenas. Dr Tori Herridge, evolutionary biologist and elephant expert from the Natural History Museum, is on hand to talk about the life and death of this impressive creature, while local fossil-hunter Michelle Smith gives Emily a lesson in safe and sustainable fossil-hunting.

Alongside these extraordinary animals were people too - of a kind. Not quite our ancestors, more like our very distant cousins, Homo Heidelbergensis and Homo Antecessor both made their mark along this stretch of coastline. Dr David Waterhouse from Norfolk Museum explains how we think they might have lived, and what that tells us about our own origins.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m0016gvh)
16/04/22 - Farming Today This Week: TAC report, Scottish land sales, getting in and out of farming

Fears about the impact of the UK’s Free Trade Deal with Australia are 'overblown', according to the chair of the Trade and Agriculture Commission. Farming Unions have warned that the agreement could see food produced to lower standards than allowed here, being imported - and undercutting British farmers. But the TAC concludes that in most cases those sorts of Australian products are unlikely to be imported - and that there are safeguards in the deal to maintain animal welfare and environmental standards.

The proportion of Scottish estates sold behind closed doors, doubled last year - according to a new report released by the Scottish Land Commission. It showed there was also a marked shift in who’s buying the land, with nearly half all estates purchased in Scotland in 2021, sold to corporate bodies, investment funds or charitable trusts – motivated by the potential for carbon offsetting and developing large-scale environmental improvement.

This week, applications opened for the Government's new Lump Sum Exit Scheme - supposed to help farmers in England who want to retire or leave the industry. Meanwhile a pilot New Entrant Support Scheme is also due to start this year. We look at how easy it is to get in and out of farming.

Presented by Charlotte Smith
Produced for BBC Audio Bristol by Heather Simons


SAT 06:57 Weather (m0016gvk)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 07:00 Today (m0016gvm)
Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m0016gvp)
Paul Sinha

Paul Sinha joins Nikki Bedi and Huw Stephens. The former doctor turned stand-up comedian is also a star quizzer on The Chase. He talks about his life, career and recent Parkinson’s diagnosis.

Listener Cheryl Underhill got in touch to tell us about discovering a box of her parents’ wartime love letters soon after her mother died in 2013, and why it took her seven years to look at them.

Hannah Bourne-Taylor let a bronze-winged mannikin finch nest in her hair for 84 days. The process of caring for the rescued baby bird also helped Hannah's mental health.

Milton Jones shares his Inheritance Tracks: London Calling by The Clash and I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For by U2.

Carrie Hope Fletcher is a Grammy nominated singer, actress, author and vlogger. After discovering a love of theatre age 3, she made her professional debut age 5 and is currently starring in Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Cinderella.

Paul Sinha’s Perfect Pub Quiz starts at 18:30 on Thursday 21 April on Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.

The Box of Beautiful Letters by Cheryl Underhill is out now.

Fledgling by Hannah Bourne-Taylor is out now.

Milton Jones' Milton Impossible tour travels around the UK from 17th May. Photo Credit: Aemen Sukkar@Jiksaw

With This Kiss by Carrie Hope Fletcher is out now. Carrie is also currently starring in Cinderella at the Gillian Lynne Theatre in London.

Producer: Tim Bano
Editor: Richard Hooper


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (m0016gvr)
Series 36

Wellcome Collection

Jay Rayner and a panel of culinary experts visit the Wellcome Collection in London. On the panel this week are Tim Hayward, Sophie Wright, Jordan Bourke and Dr Zoe Laughlin.

To celebrate Easter weekend, the panellists reveal the culinary Easter eggs they have hidden in their cooking - anchovies anyone? They also look back to Shrove Tuesday and tell us their favourite way to have pancakes.

Joining the panel this week is Julia Nurse, a Research Development Specialist at Wellcome Collection. Julia digs into the Wellcome archives and uncovers some old and medicinal recipes, including an old ketchup recipe which inspires a debate on condiment dos and don'ts.

Producer - Jemima Rathbone
Assistant Producer - Aniya Das

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 Culture on the Couch (m0015vcc)
Ramaa Sharma thought therapy could help with the onset of her depression and anxiety. Despite being a highly successful British South Asian journalist in a white-dominated profession, she felt isolated both at work and in her own family. Eventually she had cognitive behavioural therapy - a talking therapy which aims to manage issues by changing the mindset and attitude towards them.

Her white therapist at first supported her but when the therapist declared: "We're all the same," Ramaa questioned whether her therapist would ever truly understand her.

The idea of psychological universalism arose from a white, Western model of therapy which frustrated Ramaa because it didn't adequately embrace her distress over conflicts specific to her experience of being of Indian descent and raised in the UK.

In her search for answers Ramaa discovered a Canadian study which described the conflicts which can arise in the South Asian diaspora, and offered tools for therapists to support those struggling with competing individual and community values.

Studies show that people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic backgrounds drop out of talking therapies more quickly than white clients and for those who do persist, the outcomes are poorer. And it's not just a case of matching your therapist's skin tone to your own. Acknowledging the values and beliefs of "collectivist" cultures - those which sometimes require an individual to sacrifice their own wants in favour of wider family values or community cohesion - is central to culturally-appropriate mental health care.

We hear from therapists and psychologists about how mass movements like Black Lives Matter have accelerated the move away from universalism along with the growth of networks of black and Asian therapists and the NHS now promising to deliver more culturally appropriate mental health care.

Social media support groups like Brown Girls Rising on Facebook help to bring thousands of young women together from diaspora communities globally to support each other in the absence of adequate systemic support in the countries they live in.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m0016gvt)
What do Russians think of the war in Ukraine?

What do Russians make of their country’s invasion of Ukraine? It is no easy matter to conduct opinion polls in Russia at the best of times, sampling views from St Petersburg to Siberia. Right now though, Russian people are not free to express their opinions anyway, with a new law in place making it a criminal offence to say anything about the Ukraine conflict which the authorities consider untrue. Jenny Hill is in Moscow, and has been keeping her ear to the ground.

Globalisation, the extraordinary interconnectedness of modern life, means that the events in Ukraine are having profound effects in places far from any battle. Kenya, for example, has already been suffering from drought, but this has now been exacerbated by Russia’s invasion: because Ukrainian farmers have been kept from their fields, global food prices have risen. Ben Henderson recently travelled to Kenya’s far north, and found what looks like a major crisis in the making.

2018 saw South Korea hold a successful Winter Olympics, in which North Korean athletes were also allowed to take part. Later that year, the then US President, Donald Trump met with North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong Un, and attempted to tone down hostilities. Watching these events was the BBC’s newly arrived South Korea correspondent, Laura Bicker. Four years later, she is now leaving her post, at a time when relations between South and North are far worse. Yet Laura insists that she is leaving with some sense of optimism.

Sports figures famously have short careers, with even the biggest stars having to reinvent themselves in mid-life. Few though have managed it quite so successfully as Imran Khan: already one of Pakistan’s greatest ever cricketing heroes, he ended up becoming Prime Minister. However, the world of politics can be as unforgiving as any sport, and this week, Prime Minister Khan was ousted in a Parliamentary vote of no confidence. Secunder Kermani has been following his dramatic fall from favour.

Life has not been much fun for performers during the various phases of Covid lockdown, with actors, dancers and even stand-up comedians facing closed down venues. Musicians had a particularly hard time of it, certainly those accustomed to playing before sweaty crowds keen on dancing, something very much forbidden for much of the time. So when the Belgian rock band, Demisec, were offered a gig, they jumped at the chance. The bassist and BBC cameraman Maarten Lernout did not mind that they were being asked to play in a local prison.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m0016gvw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m0016gsk)
Saving Money but not on Chocolate

Energy bills, the big food shop, the price of filling up the car - everything costs more just now and there’s no sign it’s going to change soon.

Felicity Hannah and guests ask where can you look for cheaper options, to make our money go further, but still have some fun?

She is joined in the studio by expert deal hunters who promise not to suggest cutting back on Easter eggs.

Bukiie Smart, accountant and the creator of the Save Spend Invest.
Claire Walsh, a chartered financial planner.
And journalist & money saver extraordinaire Mike Powell.


Producer Smita Patel
Editor Emma Rippon


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (m00168rv)
Series 60

Episode 6

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by the voices of Jason Forbes and Sharlin Jahan. Sarah Keyworth talks about mental health, and Geoff Norcott looks ahead to the local elections. Music is provided by Jess Robinson.


SAT 12:57 Weather (m0016gvy)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News and Weather (m0016gw0)
The latest national and international news and weather reports from BBC Radio 4


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m00168s1)
Daisy Cooper MP, Gillian Keegan MP, Inaya Folarin Iman, David Lammy MP

Chris Mason presents political debate and discussion from Lambeth Town Hall with the Deputy Leader of the Liberal Democrats Daisy Cooper MP; Health Minister Gillian Keegan MP; the writer, GB News presenter and founder of The Equiano Project Inaya Folarin Iman; and the Shadow Foreign Secretary David Lammy MP.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: Kevan Long


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m0016gw2)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:45 39 Ways to Save the Planet (m000r4vs)
The Legal Fight

Campaign and protest have been the traditional tools of environmental action in the UK. American lawyer, James Thornton, set up Client Earth to defend the planet in a different way- by using the courts. Using local laws to challenge governments and businesses they've had success across Europe and beyond, preventing the construction of coal-fired power stations and challenging the curse of air pollution. As well as enforcing environmental laws they're helping get new laws written.

Tom Heap meets James and discusses the carbon implications of his ideas with climate scientist, Dr Tamsin Edwards.

Producer: Anne-Marie Bullock

Researcher: Sarah Goodman

Produced in association with the Royal Geographical Society. Special thanks for this episode to Professor Pavlos Eleftheriadis from the University of Oxford and Professor Stephen Peake from the Open University.

Photo of James Thornton by Dan Wilton.


SAT 15:00 Drama (m000h295)
The Garrick Year

A new adaptation of Margaret Drabble's 1964 novel set in a very swinging sixties. Dramatised by Robin Brooks.

Emma Evans is forced to sacrifice a job in television when her actor husband, David, insists on dragging his young family off for a season at a new theatre in the provinces. Emma, dogged by a baby, a toddler and an active conscience, observes the goings-on backstage with a detached amusement, until charismatic director Wyndham comes on the scene.

Soon, she finds herself out of her depth in more ways than one

Cast:
Emma Evans ….. Melody Grove
David Evans….. Trystan Gravelle
Wyndham Farrar….. Tom Burke
Sophy Brent ….. Georgina Strawson
Michael Fenwick….. Mark Spalding
Mary Summers..... Phoebe Fildes
Pascal / Young Woman ….. Rose Reade
Jimmy / Henry ..... Karan Gill
Flora ….. Rose Shepherd Lewis
Joseph ….. Louis Mason Dedieu

Additional White Devil Actors ..... Richard Bates and Simon Maier

Director / Producer : Fiona McAlpine
Sound Design : Alisdair McGregor
Broadcast Assistant : Sarah Tombling

An Allegra production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m0016gw4)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Anya Taylor-Joy, Arlene Phillips and Oti Mabuse, Lone Female Ukrainian Refugees

The Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police has met and personally apologised to three victims of grooming gangs in Rochdale for failures in the investigation of the sexual exploitation of children. The apology comes exactly a decade after the 2012 trial that resulted in some members of the gangs being convicted for their crimes. We hear from Maggie Oliver, the former detective who blew the whistle on the police’s failure to tackle these crimes.

Anya Taylor-Joy's decision to leave school at 16 to pursue a career in acting has certainly paid off. In 2020, in the first month of its release – a staggering sixty-two million households watched her play chess prodigy Beth Harmon in the Netflix mini-series 'The Queen’s Gambit'. She discusses her latest film – The Northman - a brutal and bloody viking revenge epic.

In August 2018, Kylie Moore-Gilbert, an Australian-British academic travelled to Iran to attend a seminar and conduct academic research. At Tehran airport on her way back home to Australia, she was arrested by the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps. Accused of espionage, she was imprisoned and later convicted and given a ten year sentence. She was released in November 2020 as part of a prisoner exchange deal negotiated by the Australian government. She’s written about those 804 days, in a new book The Uncaged Sky.

The UK government has been told to stop matching lone female Ukrainian refugees with single men. The UN has intervened following concerns that women and sometimes children are at risk of sexual exploitation. Under the government’s Homes for Ukraine scheme, British hosts must link up with refugees themselves, leaving tens of thousands of people to resort to unregulated social media groups to connect. We hear from Louise Calvey, Head of Services and Safeguarding at Refugee Action and Times reporter, Shayma Bakht.

With over 100 million record sales, an Academy Award, a Grammy, and an award from The Council of Fashion Designers of America, very few artists have a catalogue that matches the iconic Cher. A new musical, touring the UK - “The Cher Show” - tells the story of the Goddess of Pop’s meteoric rise to fame. The director and choreographer behind the show are two Strictly Come Dancing legends - Arlene Phillips and Oti Mabuse.


SAT 17:00 PM (m0016gw6)
Full coverage of the day's news


SAT 17:30 Sliced Bread (m00168lx)
Sustainable Jeans

“Make better. Buy better. Wear it longer.” Lots of fashion brands are including claims like this in their adverts and one item of clothing that’s really getting the stamp of supposed “sustainability” is jeans.

Maddie has asked Greg to look into what “sustainability” actually means when it comes to denim. Is it a term that marks genuine eco-impact, or is it more marketing BS?
And, as adverts claim, do “sustainable” jeans last longer?

Greg speaks to an organisation that rates clothing brands’ sustainability credentials and visits Manchester Metropolitan University to hear the results of their ‘rub test’.
Do you have a suggestion of a ‘wonder-product’ making a bold claim that Greg can investigate next?

Send us your suggestions to sliced.bread@bbc.co.uk or send it to Greg direct on Twitter and Instagram where he’s @gregfoot

PRESENTER: GREG FOOT
PRODUCER: JULIAN PASZKIEWICZ


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0016gw8)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m0016gwb)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0016gwd)
Moscow's attacks look like a shift in focus since the sinking of flagship vessel Moskva. Civil service unions say a plan to send some asylum seekers to Rwanda is inhumane.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m0016gsm)
Jack Davenport, Shaparak Khorsandi, Farah Sharp, Jonzi D, Kae Tempest, Lady Nade, Michelle McManus, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Michelle McManus are joined by Jack Davenport, Shaparak Khorsandi, Farah Sharp, Jonzi D, Kae Tempest and Lady Nade.


SAT 19:00 Profile (m0016gs3)
Marine Le Pen

The far-right politician going head-to-head with Emmanuel Macron in the French presidential elections.

Mark Coles charts Marine Le Pen's life and political career, which began alongside her father Jean-Marie Le Pen - founder of the far right Front National party.

Today she has sought to soften her image by playing down her party's past policies by taking on issues such as the cost of living crisis, as she challenges for the French presidency for a third time.

Producers: Sally Abrahams and Diane Richardson.

Credits: Marine Le Pen ‘Une Intimate Ambition’ interview with Karine Le Marchand, Channel M6.


SAT 19:15 This Cultural Life (m0016gwh)
Neil Tennant

Neil Tennant, singer and songwriter with the Pet Shop Boys, is one half of the most successful British pop duo of all time, having sold 100 million records worldwide. With his musical partner of over 40 years, Chris Lowe, Neil Tennant is known for wry, observational lyrics set to electronic dance beats and bittersweet melodies. They’ve made 14 studio albums, all of them with one word titles - from Please and Actually in the 80s, to Super and Hotspot in recent years.

Neil Tennant tells John Wilson about his most important cultural influences. He joined the Young People’s Theatre in his native Newcastle in the 1960s, the start of a lifelong passion for drama and live performance. He recalls buying an acoustic guitar at the age of 11 and writing his first ever songs. David Bowie was a huge influence on Neil, having seen the legendary Ziggy Stardust show at Newcastle City Hall in in 1972. He later collaborated with his hero when Pet Shop Boy remixed the Bowie track Hallo Spaceboy in 1996. Neil also recalls the social and cultural influence of Heaven nightclub in the early 1980s, the centre of London’s gay scene, where he first heard the work of producer Bobby Orlando and other pioneers of electronic dance music.

Producer: Edwina Pitman


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m0016gwk)
50 Years Without a Clue

I’m Sorry I Haven’t A Clue, recently voted ‘greatest radio comedy show of all time’ in a Radio Times poll, is 50 years old this month. Greg James unearths a bumper selection of clips and quips from half a century of the antidote to panel games, featuring many of the show’s most popular panellists and silliest rounds.

Producer: Jon Naismith
Production Co-ordinator: Sarah Nicholls

A BBC Studios production


SAT 21:00 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b04ykd72)
Series 2

Episode 3

Crime drama based on the characters from the best selling novel by the multi-award winning writer, GF Newman. This second series runs from 1961 to 1970.

Spanning six decades, the saga plots the course of one family against the back-drop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

At the start of the 1960s, Joey Oldman acquires crafty Arnold Goodman as his solicitor, and buys shares in the civil engineering firm owned by the corrupt Minister of Transport, Ernest Marples.

Prospering with the help of venal bankers, and growing more devious, he and his wife Cath join Macmillan's Conservative Party. They strive without success to keep their son Brian free of the influence of Jack Braden (Cath's brother) as he takes their 'firm' from running illicit clubs, where they entertain politicians and judges, to armed robbery. All the while, Jack and Brian struggle to keep free of the police and further entanglements with the law, the Kray twins and the Richardsons.

Episode 3:
Jack goes to prison with a lot of help from Joey and Cath, who plant Brian's gun at his flat.

Cast:
The Narrator...........Ross Kemp
Joey Oldman...........Toby Jones
Cath Oldman...........Denise Gough
Brian Oldman..........Joe Armstrong
Jack Braden............Luke Allen Gale
Leah Cohen............Jasmine Hyde

Written by GF Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:45 The Skewer (m00168dc)
Series 6

Episode 2

Jon Holmes's The Skewer returns to twist itself into current affairs. This week - Hashtag Partygate, Kicking Against The Pickles, You've Got A Friend In Prince Charles, and Boris is (Steven) Toast (of Westminster).

An Unusual production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:00 News (m0016gwm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:15 The Exchange (m00168cx)
Honesty

Two people who share a common experience meet for the first time. Each has a gift for the other - something that unlocks their story. Together with presenter Catherine Carr, they exchange personal experiences, thoughts and beliefs, as well as uncovering the differences between them.

Michael and Dina have both made radical choices about how they interact with the world and everyone in it – choices about honesty and the lies we tell ourselves and each other.

Michael Leviton was a raised in family where honesty was the only policy. Michael’s parents believed that it was important to share what was on your mind at all times, and never conceal something with a lie - not even to protect someone’s feelings. As he got older, however, Michael found that this kind of radical honesty was detrimental to relationships – romantic and platonic - and employment. Following a heartbreak, Michael decided his incessant truth-telling was no longer worth it and, at the age of 29, vowed to be less honest and to start lying in his social interactions.

Dina Kaplan is the opposite. For most of her life, she told little white lies like most of us do. But in 2012, she went on a ten-day silent retreat which required her to sign a series of vows to join the programme. This included a vow of honesty, which didn't seem so intimidating. But at the end of the retreat, Dina was told that these vows now applied to the rest of her life. At that moment, she decided to try an experiment - to live her working and personal life never lying about anything, ever.

Dina had always considered herself a pretty honest person. But now - committed to stopping all lying (except to save the life of someone or to protect their health) - Dina was shocked to discover how often she lied to people about little, inconsequential things. Dina continues to live as honestly as possible.

Dina and Michael exchange gifts which shed light on their own stories and will, they hope, have meaning for the other.

With thanks to Dina Kaplan: https://www.thepath.com/dina and Michael Leviton: http://michaelleviton.com/explanations/

Presented by Catherine Carr
Produced by Jo Rowntree

A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (m0016816)
Programme 3, 2022

(3/12)
If, one night, you encountered Caxton's successor, the current US Secretary of State and Neville John Holder, what might they be about to sail off in? Only in the Round Britain Quiz universe is this a reasonable question to ask anyone, and the regular teams from the North of England and the South of England will be doing their best to answer it coherently.

Stuart Maconie and Adele Geras are the North of England team, and they face Paul Sinha and Marcus Berkmann for the South of England, who opened their scorecard impressively last week. But both teams are recent champions in this quiz and both will be on their mettle.

The programme also includes another selection of the best question suggestions sent in by listeners in recent months.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 The Language Exchange (m0011rn9)
Liz Berry and Buzz Baum

The Language Exchange is a place where poets and scientists meet to share ideas and create new work. In each episode a poet will sit down with a scientist to find out more about a specific piece of research. The poet will then write a brand new poem inspired by their discussion.

Here, poet Liz Berry meets scientist Buzz Baum. Liz Berry's poetry has examined the joy and anguish of motherhood. In this programme, Liz will be thinking about the very beginnings of life as she sits down with Buzz Baum at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology. Buzz studies cell division, the process where one cell becomes two.

Liz Berry won the Forward Prize for Best First Collection in 2014 for her debut collection 'Black Country'. Her latest collection is 'The Republic of Motherhood'

Producer: Jessica Treen



SUNDAY 17 APRIL 2022

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m0016gwp)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:15 Letter from Ukraine (m00168rx)
I always thought I was born after the war, not before

Acclaimed Ukrainian novelist Andrey Kurkov contemplates the troubling realisation that he was born in an interwar period, not 'after the war', as he had previously believed.

Translated by Elizabeth Sharp
Produced by Emma Harding

Production Co-ordinator Eleri McAuliffe
Sound by Nigel Lewis


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m00168rj)
Ghost Writer

Ghost Writer by Tom Vowler.

A writer goes to Tuscany to complete the unfinished novel of a dead author. In Lucca, he considers two failed marriages: one in the novel, the other his own.

Tom Vowler's story collection The Method, won the Scott Prize and the Edge Hill Readers' Prize. His most recent novel, Every Seventh Wave, was published in 2021.

Writer: Tom Vowler
Reader: Blake Ritson
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0016gwr)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0016gwt)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0016gww)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m0016gwy)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m0016gsr)
Canterbury Cathedral

Bells on Sunday comes this Easter from Canterbury Cathedral. Over the course of some six hundred years the two west towers have each had a varying number of ringing and chiming bells cast by various founders. There was a major recasting of the ringing bells in 1981 but we will hear the pre 1981 ring of twelve with a thirty two hundredweight tenor in the note of C, ringing Grandsire Cinques.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m0016gs3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Summary (m0016gqt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01rl0yv)
Rising from the Ashes

This Easter edition of Something Understood examines some of the themes associated with the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, and asks what we can learn from them today.

The forgiveness of sin, overcoming great obstacles and learning to move on are all ideas represented in the story of Easter.

Mark Tully asks whether we can learn from the Easter narrative only on a symbolic level or whether it offers us lessons of a more practical or physical kind. He discusses the art of rediscovering the story of Easter week with Bishop of Bradford, Nick Baines, and a mix of readings and music.

The readers are Monica Dolan and Mark Quartley.

Produced by Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Sunrise Service (m0016gqw)
Ever since 635, when King Oswald gave the Holy Island of Lindisfarne to St Aiden to establish his monastery, the island has been a place of pilgrimage. The sight of the poles stretching across the sand and mud is one of the most iconic views in Northumberland. As the sun rises, Rev Richard Carter makes this journey, in the footsteps of Saints and early Christians, and reflects on what the Easter story means to us today.

Producer: Andrew Earis


SUN 06:57 Weather (m0016gqy)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m0016gr0)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m0016gr2)
The Psalm 23 Garden; Ukrainian singer Jamala; the Archbishop of York

The Psalm 23 Garden made its debut at last year’s Chelsea Flower Show, developed by the landscape designer Sarah Eberle in collaboration with the Bible Society. The multi-award winning garden has moved to its permanent home at the Winchester Hospice. Hazel Southam, from the Bible Society, and Maddy Thomson, consultant nurse palliative care at the Winchester Hospice, talk about what the garden has to offer to those facing the end of their lives and their families.

William Crawley speaks with Susana Alimivna Jamaladinova, known as Jamala, a Ukrainian composer and singer who won the 2016 Eurovision Song Contest with her song 1944, about the forced exile of the Crimean Tartar Muslims in 1944, and whose father was a Crimean Tartar Muslim. Jamala is now in exile with her two children in Tbilisi, Georgia.

The Archbishop of York, Stephen Cottrell shares his message for Easter that Christ’s resurrection shows us that death and suffering, hatred and oppression never have the final word. Love triumphs.

Photo credit: Bible Society/Alex Baker.
Produced by Carmel Lonergan and Jill Collins.
Editor - Tim Pemberton


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m0016gr4)
Orchid

Broadcaster and journalist Jonathan Freedland makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Orchid, the charity for male cancers.

To Give:
- UK Freephone 0800 404 8144
-You can donate online at bbc.co.uk/appeal/radio4
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Orchid ’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘Orchid’.
Please note that Freephone and online donations for this charity close at 23.59 on the Saturday after the Appeal is first broadcast. However the Freepost option can be used at any time.

Registered charity number 1080540


SUN 07:57 Weather (m0016gr6)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m0016gr8)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m0016grb)
Easter Sunday Worship

The Most Rev Justin Welby shares his Easter message of hope and resurrection, in a joyful celebration, live from the stunning setting of Canterbury Cathedral. Members of Canterbury Cathedral Choir, directed by Dr David Newsholme, sing well-loved hymns and anthems. The organ is played by the Assistant Director of Music Jamie Rogers. Producer: Philip Billson
Jesus Christ is risen to-day, Alleluia (Easter Hymn); Gloria, Sanctus, Agnus (Stanford); Acts of the Apostles 10.34-43; Alleluia! Alleluia! Hearts to heaven and voices raise (Lux Eoi); John 20.1-18; This joyful Eastertide (arr. Wood); Lord, enthroned in heavenly splendour (St Helen); Thine be the glory (Maccabaeus)


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03wphhd)
Blackbird (Spring)

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Bill Oddie presents the blackbird. Blackbirds are thrushes and the brown female often has a few speckles on her throat to prove it. Velvety, black and shiny, the males sport an eye-ring as yellow as a spring daffodil and a bill glowing like a buttercup. Happily blackbirds aren't doing too badly. There's so many of them that their territories often overlap so that where one song leaves off, another song begins.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m0016grd)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m0016grg)
Writer, Tim Stimpson
Director, Gwenda Hughes
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Adil Shah ….. Ronny Jhutti
Ben Archer ….. Ben Norris
Beth Casey ….. Rebecca Fuller
David Archer …… Timothy Bentinck
Elizabeth Pargetter ….. Alison Dowling
Freddie Pargetter ….. Toby Laurence
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Jill Archer ….. Patricia Greene
Josh Archer ….. Angus Imrie
Karl …… Robert Glenister
Leonard Berry ….. Paul Copley
Ruairi Donovan ….. Arthur Hughes
Ruth Archer ….. Felicity Finch
Tracy Horrobin ….. Susie Riddell
Vince Casey ….. Tony Turner


SUN 11:00 The Reunion (m0016grj)
The Opening Ceremony of the London Olympics

Four years after the UK awkwardly took the baton from Beijing to host the Olympic Games in a London bus, many in the UK were braced for an embarrassing opening ceremony at London 2012. The media fed public cynicism with speculation of a ‘Teletubbyland’ style event. Meanwhile, the UK was experiencing its wettest summer in 100 years.

Despite this, curiosity was intense - photographers climbed trees around outdoor rehearsals in Dagenham where 15,000 volunteers practised in the rain, and helicopters were sent over the Olympic Park to catch glimpses of the preparations.

Amid the sneers and speculation, there was a dedicated band of creative visionaries, production masterminds, arch negotiators and loyal, passionate volunteers who were committed to making London 2012's opening ceremony a success.

What was to unfold before peoples’ eyes on the evening of Friday 27 July 2012 – both in the stadium and for the millions watching on TV around the world – would turn expectations on their head and inspire the British press to declare it The Greatest Show on Earth.

How was this vision conceived, how was it executed and how did it stay a secret? Kirsty Wark is joined by those at the heart of this landmark event that stunned everyone with its vision of the UK - executive producer Stephen Daldry, designer Suttirat Larlarb, percussionist Dame Evelyn Glennie, production stage manager Sam Hunter, and volunteer Rex Osafo-Asare.

Producer: Ruth Abrahams
Series Producer: David Prest
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 11:45 Letter from Ukraine (m00168rx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:15 today]


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m0016h16)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (m001681l)
Series 28

Episode 2

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Henning Wehn, Zoe Lyons, Sindhu Vee, and Marcus Brigstocke are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as windows, ants, rice and Ancient Egyptians.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m0016grn)
An Easter Special

Dan Saladino hears from cooks in Palermo, Marseille and Kyiv about Easter food traditions.

Produced and presented by Dan Saladino


SUN 12:57 Weather (m0016grq)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m0016grs)
Radio 4's look at the week's big stories from both home and around the world


SUN 13:30 The Listening Project (m0016grv)
Belief & the Wonder of Nature

Fi Glover presents four conversations between strangers.

This week: Hannah and Matthew reflect on when the person you love, doesn’t hold the same faith.
Joanna living with Long COVID and Jay with M.E. share their experiences and the changing public perception of their debilitating conditions.
Paul and Coryn talk about the wild big cats they have spotted in the English countryside.
And Richard shares his joy of bright illuminations at night, with Ant, who is passionate about star gazing - a hobby only possible when all the lights are switched off.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation lasts up to an hour and is then edited to extract the key moments of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in this decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Cathy Moorehead


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0016grx)
GQT at Home: Nettle Brew and Bluebell Dew

Peter Gibbs hosts the horticultural programme featuring a group of gardening experts. Fielding questions from across the country are James Wong, Kirsty Wilson, and Matt Biggs.

This week, the panel investigates the mysterious case of buried eggs in one North London garden, discusses the best conditions for growing sunflowers, and considers the benefits of cultivating moss indoors.

GQT's intrepid explorer Dr Chris Thorogood travels to the Philippines in search of the popular UK house plant, the medinilla magnifica or rose grape, and plant historian Advolly Richmond shares the fascinating folklore of the bluebell.

Producer: Dominic Tyerman
Assistant Producer: Bethany Hocken

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 1922: The Birth of Now (m0013sx1)
Louis Armstrong leaves New Orleans for Chicago

1922: The Birth of Now - Ten programmes in which Matthew Sweet investigates objects and events from 1922, the crucial year for modernism, that have an impact today.

5. Louis Armstrong leaves New Orleans for Chicago in 1922, and works with King Oliver, a move that leads to him forming the Hot Five. Armstrong becomes the major figure as Jazz develops as an art and becomes the foremost cultural expression of African Americans, with profound influence, on the Harlem Renaissance and the poet Langston Hughes. When F. Scott Fitzgerald was searching for the definitive year of the jazz age, he said ‘may one offer in exhibit the year 1922!’ Matthew Sweet talks to jazz journalist Kevin Legendre who likens Armstrong’s journey from New Orleans to Chicago to James Joyce’s from Dublin to Paris. Satchmo hits High Cs and almost splits your ears. There is scat singing, wordless sounds that suggest the breakdown of speech, but also something new, akin to Eliot’s the Waste Land or the work of Edith Sitwell - godmother of rap? Critic Lisa Mullen cites Claude McKay’s book Harlem Shadows,published in 1922, which deals explicitly and powerfully with the shadow-side of modernity, the hard-edged urban modernity which his African American subjects haunt like unquiet spirits or raging ghosts. Can we speak of a distinctly Black Modernism?

Producer: Julian May


SUN 15:00 Drama (m0016grz)
The Le Fanu Ballads

Neil Brand, writer and composer, has bridged the two time periods of Sheridan Le Fanu's 19th Century ghost stories and our world today in his supernatural adaptation. It begins in a basement nightclub in Dublin called Sheridan's. For four of the people who come to this club, a Royal Naval sailor, an au pair, an artist and a judge, this visit will change their lives. They will find themselves trapped in a story sprung from the tortured mind of Le Fanu himself.

The MC.....Paul Chahidi
Lady Justice Horobin/Madam Crowl.....Haydn Gwynne
Lewis/Gordon Starkey.....Jonathan Forbes
Nuala/Laura.....Ruth Everett
James Barton/McCrone.....Matthew Durkan
Pamela/Jeanette/Rosie.....Alexandra Hannant
Grace/Meg Wyvern.....Rebecca Crankshaw
Yelland.....Chris Jack
Gerald Dow /Court Clerk.....Michael Begley
Vanderhausen/Workman/Captain Jenner.....Neil McCaul

Sheridan Le Fanu's ghost stories adapted by Neil Brand
Music composed and played by Neil Brand, with Nuala's Ballad sung by Ruth Everett

Directed by Tracey Neale

Bridging the two time periods of Sheridan Le Fanu's 19th century ghost stories, and our world today in all its everyday bustle, is a basement nightclub in the heart of Dublin called Sheridan's. In its dark brick interior a small stage is surrounded by tables, the MC takes to the stage and a beautiful young woman, Nuala O'Brien - the Siren of the Second Sight - sings her ballad, her eyes scanning the upturned faces in the audience below her, until they fix on a face.

For four of the people who come to Sheridan's, a Royal Naval sailor, an au pair, an artist and a judge, this visit will change their lives. They will find themselves trapped in a story sprung from the tortured mind of Le Fanu himself.

The Sailor (based on The Watcher)
A young naval officer is convinced he is being followed and is forced to revisit his punishment of a young rating who is seeking revenge.

The Au Pair (based on Madame Crowle's Ghost)
Laura gets a job as an Au Pair in an old house in the country, where the elderly Grandmother of her charge remains unseen, secluded in her room. Laura soon realises that all is not right in the room upstairs.

The Artist (based on Schalken the Painter)
A young painter, Gordon Starkey, is in love with the niece of his friend Gerald, but is disturbed to find she has been lured into a clinic by underhand means. He attempts to save her from evil clutches.

The Judge (based on Lord Justice Harbottle)
A female judge, renowned for handing down rough sentences on the flimsiest of evidence, sees her own fate planned out for her by the ghost of one of her victims.

Neil Brand has followed the model of the horror double-bills on BBC2 in the 1980s, such as portmanteau stories like Amicus's Tales from the Crypt, in which separate stories were bookended by a single situation. Neil has invented Sheridan's nightclub, with its jovial yet sinister MC and Nuala, the Siren of the Second Sight. The combination of narration, drama, live-performed song and underscore will take the listener deep into a particularly Celtic mysticism, which breaks though to our very recognisable reality in disturbing and horrifically plausible ways. The Le Fanu Ballads - a potent mix of Irish balladry and stories of supernatural justice.

The Writer
Neil Brand is a composer, writer, radio playwright, presenter and broadcaster specialising in silent film and film music. Neil has been accompanying silent films for nearly 30 years, writes music for theatre, has written two award-winning musicals and ten radio plays including the Sony-nominated Stan (which he subsequently adapted to great acclaim for BBC4 TV), the Tinniswood prize-nominated Getting the Joke and the live-recorded crowd-pleaser The Big Broadcast. Neil has also presented the Radio 2 arts programme and broadcast regularly on Radio 4's The Film Programme.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m0016gs1)
Forbidden love with Douglas Stuart; Oxford’s influence on interwar writers

Elizabeth Day is joined by the author Douglas Stuart, whose debut novel Shuggie Bain became a worldwide hit after winning the 2021 Booker Prize. The book chronicled a brutal family love story set in the heart of the working-class housing estates of Glasgow.

His follow up ‘Young Mungo’, also set in Glasgow, sees the writer in similar territory, but this time exploring a gay relationship across the sectarian divide in a post industrial Glasgow of the early 1990's. It explores the danger of being different in a hyper-masculine world, and the tension created in these often violent surroundings. Written across two different timelines, it is a propulsive and sometimes challenging read but it is also imbued with tenderness, dark humour and highlights the power of community and small kindnesses.

We’re also joined by the writer and classicist Daisy Dunn to discuss the themes in her new book ‘Not Far From Brideshead: Oxford Between The Wars’. She talks about some of the interwar writers like Vera Brittain, Mary Renault and Aldous Huxley, who all passed through the city and were influenced in some way by the university. Their writing invoked a break with writing traditions and helped spearhead some of the most exciting literature of the 20th Century.

And the Book I’d Never Lend is back with Donna Leon, the celebrated crime writer. Author of over 30 books, the stories of her central detective investigator Commissairo Guido Brunetti, now sits in the company of Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot. She explains why a Charles Dickens classic is a book she’ll always return to.

Produced by Belinda Naylor and Robbie Wojciechowski
Edited by Di Speirs
Presented by Elizabeth Day

Book List - Sunday 17 April and Thursday 21 April

Young Mungo by Douglas Stuart
Shuggie Bain by Douglas Stuart
Our Mutual Friend by Charles Dickens
Give Unto Others by Donna Leon
Not Far from Brideshead by Daisy Dunn
Chrome Yellow by Aldous Huxley
Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
The Hobbit by J R R Tolkien
Wigs on the Green by Nancy Mitford
Gaudy Night by Dorothy L Sayers
South Riding by Winifred Holtby
Testament of Youth by Vera Brittain


SUN 16:30 Guide Books (m000x72w)
Lost and Found with Stella Duffy and Cathy Rentzenbrink

A new series about how books might help us navigate everyday life, presented by writer and broadcaster Damian Barr.

Each episode takes a life experience - such as grief - and talks to writers about they handle it through their own reading, writing and lived experience. We explore the fiction, non-fiction, memoir and poetry that might help us better understand our own stories.

In this episode, Damian is joined by Stella Duffy and Cathy Rentzenbrink to talk about the poetry, fiction and non-fiction books that have helped them navigate loss in their own lives, and support others in their grief. From the poetry of Mary Oliver and the fiction of Alice Walker, to the Buddhist teachings of Pema Chodron and the writings of psychotherapist Julia Samuel.

Stella Duffy is a novelist, short story writer and playwright, who has also worked in theatre for many years. She co-founded the UK-wide Fun Palaces campaign for community connection. A qualified yoga teacher, she is currently training in Existential Psychotherapy with a view to combining therapy, bodywork and creative practice.

Cathy Rentzenbrink is the author of The Last Act of Love, A Manual for Heartache and Dear Reader: The Comfort and Joy of Books. Her debut novel – Everyone is Still Alive – will be published in July 2021.

Produced by Mair Bosworth for BBC Audio in Bristol

Details of organisations offering information and support with bereavement are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 08000 158 707.


SUN 17:00 Licence to Kill? (m001687x)
On October 14, 2016, Michael Hoolickin was murdered by a man he had never met. His killer, Tim Deakin had 55 previous offences. His last crime was to bite a man's ear off in a pub fight.

Deakin was a high risk and prolific offender who had been freed early - "on Probation Service Licence" - to serve what was left of his sentence in the community. Deakin was later jailed for 27 years.

At Michael's Inquest, the family discovered Deakin had been stopped following a car chase just a few days earlier, with no insurance and carrying drugs.

The Coroner outlined serious failures by the people who were supposed to be monitoring Deakin that meant he stayed out of prison and remained free - on license - to kill, and she made recommendations for change.

Radio 4 discover the true extent of crimes, many of them violent committed by people who have been released on license, including those where the advice was they were still a danger to the public

At the heart of this is Garry and Leslie and the torment over their sons death and how that's drives them to uncover the reasons his murderer wasn't in prison on that night. We follow them as they meet another Mother and Father still missing their son after his life was taken in the same circumstances

Producer: Matt O'Donoghue


SUN 17:40 Profile (m0016gs3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0016gs5)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m0016gs7)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0016gs9)
Justin Welby says sending refugees to Rwanda would be "the opposite of the nature of God". Ukraine says its soldiers, resisting Russian forces in Mariupol, will fight to the end.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m0016gsc)
Rajan Datar

Common thread this week is resilience, from the determination of the defendants in the McLibel trail to the Homo Erectus surviving nearly 2 million years. We hear heated discussions on Partygate and look back on the last seven years of British politics. We'll get tips to help us save money due to the rising cost of living and gain insight into polyamorous relationships.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Emmie Hume
Production Coordinator: Elodie Chatelain
Studio Manager: Chris Hardman


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m0016gsf)
Adil quizzes Ian about his ingredients in the Grey Gables kitchen but to Ian’s annoyance declines to stay for lunch. Roy adds to Ian’s displeasure by reporting that the oven cooking the lamb isn’t working. Ian refuses to take the dish off the menu even though it means more work for an already busy kitchen. Later, Roy applauds Ian’s determination. Going by the customer feedback Roy shares it paid off and Roy is hopeful for Grey Gables’ future.
Elizabeth is pleased with the surge in ticket sales for Freddie’s Easter activities. Freddie admits he invited the Borsetshire Bunny to start the egg-rolling but people have misinterpreted it as confirmation that the Bunny will be there. Adil holds up stressed Freddie by asking about the rules for the egg-rolling event. Freddie is about to announce the Borsetshire Bunny won’t be appearing when Elizabeth rushes up to him to say the bunny has in fact arrived!
Vince is impressed how Josh has used the Lower Loxley Easter events to market his eggs. Freddie remains hopeful that Vince is going to help him with his DJ-ing business. Freddie introduces Vince to Adil who despite getting mud on his suit enjoyed the egg-rolling. Meanwhile, inside Lower Loxley, Elizabeth thanks the bunny for turning up. Elizabeth worked out its true identity by looking closely at a photo posted online. Freddie rushes in just as the person inside the costume takes off the head – it’s Kathy Perks!


SUN 19:15 Desolation Jests (b086s7jt)
Episode 4

David Jason stars in the final episode of David Renwick's post-apocalyptic comedy alongside John Bird, Jan Ravens and Rory Bremner.

Each week J P Doom interviews an iconic cultural behemoth about the comic moments they would most like by their side as they face their own mortality. This week Sydney Pynchlink, the innovative director behind some of the country's most admired weather forecasts chooses the laughs that would comfort them most during the extinction of all life on the planet; including a joke too dangerous for parliament, a horse with three legs, and a lobster with a rather crucial piece of evidence.

Cast:
David Jason
John Bird
Jan Ravens
Rory Bremner
Adie Allen
James Lailey
Nick Underwood

Produced by Gareth Edwards

Production Coordinator: Sophie Richardson
It was a BBC Studios Production.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2017.


SUN 19:45 Spring Stories (m0016gsh)
Wales

"Driving up Caerphilly Mountain, Gareth's father instructs Gareth to open the glove compartment, where he finds two tickets, sacred and shiny: his first real football match at a real football stadium. The evenings are stretching, the days are warming, and Gareth, you can feel the change already, can’t you?"

An original short story for radio, written and performed by Thomas Morris. Produced and directed by Becky Ripley.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (m00168rn)
What can the BBC’s latest news podcast Ukrainecast offer listeners which its news programmes cannot? Roger Bolton puts that question to the podcast’s Producer Jonathan Aspinwall, and also asks him if his podcast is one-sided.

The Producer of Radio 4’s Lent Talks Dan Tierney explains why we need to talk about dying and, 40 years after the Falkland’s War, what do the Out of Your Comfort Zone listeners already know about a war they can’t remember?

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Kate Dixon
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m00168rl)
Jordan Mooney (pictured), Jack Higgins, Robert Ashe, David McKee

John Wilson remembers the lives of those who have recently died including Jordan Mooney the punk icon known as ‘the original Sex Pistol’ who ended up as a veterinary nurse.

Jack Higgins, the thriller writer who hit the jackpot with The Eagle Has Landed, and sold more than 250 million books.

Robert Ashe, an aid worker who spent most of his working life supporting refugees all over the world.

And David McKee - author and illustrator who created timeless childhood favourites including Mr Benn and Elmer the multi-coloured elephant.

Producer: Neil George

Archive Clips Used: BBC 6Music, Three Minute Epiphany - The Essence of Punk and Defiance 05/06/2019; BBC TWO, The Culture Show - Jordan Mooney interview 01/07/2014; Megalovision/ Whaley-Malin Productions, Jubilee - trailer (1978); BBC Radio 2, The John Dunn Show 01/07/1992; Audible Audiobook/Harper Collins Publishers Ltd, The Savage Day by Jack Higgins 2019; BBC Radio 4, Desert Island Discs - Jack Higgins 12/12/1981; Associated General Films/ ITC Entertainment, The Eagle Has Landed - trailer (1976); BBC Radio 4, Profile - Jack Higgins 27/04/1984; ThamesTV/ Freemantle, The Killing Fields - Cambodia VT50536 18/01/1990; BBC News, 29/06/1980; BBC News, 23/10/1999; BBC Breakfast News, interview with David McKee 25/05/2019; BookTrust, David McKee reads Elmer 25/05/2022; Books Alive! YouTube Channel, Not Now Bernard by David McKee 08/11/2017; BBC TWO, Mr Benn - Pirate 31/03/1972; Made in Me - YouTube Channel, Me Books - David McKee interview 10/01/2013.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m0016gsk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m0016gr4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 The Digital Human (m000nv5t)
Series 21

Nocturne

There's a perception that it’s always daytime on the internet. What that misses is that it’s not always the case for us when we go there. We gravitate to different parts of the digital world during the night. We slow down without the bombardment of emails updates and notifications.

We become explorers of soundscapes on meditation apps, we listen to soft, soothing mumblings on podcasts lulling us to sleep. For those digital night owls, it’s an Alice like experience falling through a labyrinth of interconnected internet rabbit holes discovering subjects you wouldn’t even have thought about when the sun is up.

In this episode Aleks celebrates 'noctunality' on the internet whether for those seeking sleep or those for whom this is the time to wake up.

Producer: Peter McManus


SUN 22:00 Archive on 4 (m0015kqr)
Lines of Duty

The extraordinary untold story of a very British hero. A man called Reg, who risked his life and liberty to save Britain’s railways. The secret document he leaked became known as Britain’s Pentagon Papers - and what started out as an attempt to expose the truth soon became a fight for the freedom of the press.

Fifty years on, Lines of Duty tells the incredible story using the whistleblower’s own unpublished account, brought to life by actor Toby Jones, alongside interviews with many of those involved.

Presented by railway historian and broadcaster Tim Dunn, this remarkable tale lifts the lid on the world of Government secrets, espionage and an undercover fightback by a group of railway enthusiasts.

Presented by Tim Dunn
Produced by Phil Higginson
Original music by Brollyman

With contributions from Chris Dawson, Ian Yearsley, Chris Bushell, Leslie Huckfield, Colin Hope, Diane Drummond and Lord Faulkner of Worcester.

A Yellow Barrels / Terrier Production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 23:00 Loose Ends (m0016gsm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01rl0yv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 18 APRIL 2022

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m0016gsp)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (m00168c0)
Strongmen

Strongmen – what accounts for the global rise of authoritarian leaders? Laurie Taylor talks to Ruth Ben-Ghiat, Professor of History and Italian Studies at New York University, and analyst of the blueprint which autocratic demagogues, from Mussolini to Putin, have followed over the past 100 years. What lessons might be learned to prevent disastrous rule in the future? They're joined by Christophe Jaffrelot, Professor of Indian Politics and Sociology at King's College, London, whose recent study of Narendra Modi, Prime Minister of India, examines how a popularly elected leader has pursued Hindu nationalist policies, steering the world's largest democracy towards further ethnic strife and intolerance, according to many observers.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m0016gsr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0016gst)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0016gsw)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0016gsy)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m0016gt0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0016mts)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Father Martin Magill


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m0016gt4)
The Fife farm building a local food network

Some of Scotland's finest food is produced in Fife - but locals rarely get a look-in, as it's usually transported away to be processed, packaged and eaten elsewhere.

However, Balcaskie Estate in the region's East Neuk is working hard to change that, by bringing together small-scale food businesses including a butcher, a miller and a brewer at a hub on-site, where they process some of the organic raw ingredients produced on the land.

Nancy Nicolson visits the estate on its monthly market day, when the doors of the Bowhouse centre are thrown open to consumers and other traders, and hears from the farm manager and some of the others involved in the business about the ethos and objectives of the centre and the wider estate.

Presented and Produced by Nancy Nicolson.


MON 05:56 Weather (m0016gt6)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09d43wk)
Gary Moore on the Skylark

Wildlife sound recordist Gary Moore hears a skylark at the site of the Battle of the Somme and imagines soldiers over a century ago finding comfort in that familiar British sound.

Producer: Tom Bonnett
Photograph: _pauls.


MON 06:00 Today (m0016gyr)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m0016gyt)
NoViolet Bulawayo on Glory

The new novel, Glory, by prize winning writing NoViolet Bulawayo is a postcolonial tale of power and tyranny – an African Animal Farm. It’s set in the fictional Jidada, that resembles Zimbabwe during the overthrow of Robert Mugabe, and is populated by a vivid cast of animals – from the vicious dog-soldiers to the powerful Old Horse leader himself. She tells Adam Rutherford how her chorus of animal voices help reveal the human world more clearly.

The journalist Dipo Faloyin wants to push against harmful stereotypes of modern Africa. In his latest book, Africa Is Not A Country, he argues that a continent of over 1.4 billion people, 54 countries and more than 2,000 languages has been reduced to a simplistic story. He looks at how politics, culture and community have emerged in different ways across Africa.

Julia Gallagher is Professor of African Politics at SOAS, University of London. Her research explores the architecture of state buildings in different African countries – from the re-purposed colonial structures to the new palatial palaces of post-independence – and how citizens respond to them. Also as the African Union celebrates twenty years since it was founded – housed in a new compound built by the Chinese in Addis Ababa – she looks at the position of the AU in the 21st century.

Producer: Katy Hickman

Image: photograph of NoViolet Bulawayo - copyright Nye' Lyn Tho


MON 09:45 Preventable by Devi Sridhar (m0016h08)
Episode 1

How a Pandemic Changed the World & How to Stop the Next One

The World Health Organisation hears about 3000 potential pathogen outbreaks each month. It follows up on 300 of them - and investigates 30. It only took the right one to turn everything upside down. Devi remembers the early days of the pandemic as news trickled out from Wuhan, and focuses on Senegal's surprising response to COVID-19.

Professor Devi Sridhar, Chair of Global Public Health at Edinburgh University, has risen to prominence as one of Britain’s most trusted commentators on COVID-19. Fresh from advising the Scottish and UK Governments, the WHO and UNICEF, the academic uses the timeline of the pandemic to shine a light on how science, politics, ethics and economics affect our health.

Written and read by Devi Sridhar
Abridged by Rosemary Goring
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0016gyy)
The Female Con Artist

Today we're looking at the female con artist.

Have you watched Inventing Anna, the series about Anna Sorokin who duped New York's banks, hotels and high society into believing she was a multi-millionaire heiress?

Or The Dropout, about Silicon Valley entrepreneur Elizabeth Holmes who claimed she had invented a technology that could test for diseases with just a pinprick of blood?

Their cases have inspired countless TV series, movies, podcasts, books and even plays. But why are they so popular and what does it say about us as consumers of these tales?

We explore what role their gender played in achieving their deceit and the coverage they've received. We'll also discuss the history, psychology and cultural depictions of the female con artist, and hear from a woman who Anna Sorokin left with a bill for $62,000.

We're joined by Sara O'Brien, senior technology reporter at CNN Business; Vicky Baker, BBC journalist; Kathryn Claire Higgins, media scholar at LSE; Dr Nicola Harding, criminologist at Lancaster University; Maria Konnikova, author of The Confidence Game; Alice Porter, journalist; Tori Telfar, author of Confident Women; and Rachel deLoache Williams, author of My Friend Anna.

Presenter: Emma Barnett
Producer: Lucy Wai
Editor: Beverley Purcell


MON 11:00 The Untold (m0016npv)
The Rescue

The children were finally rescued, on Sunday March 13th: they were dazed, cold and hungry as they were led out of the shelter. Over the next few days their lives begin to change and the rescue team feel the relief as the orphans bed down on a sea of mattresses in a gym in Lviv. The children finally let the tension seep from them as they giggle and read to each other. But this is only the first stage in a long road to recovery, as BBC reporter, Sue Mitchell, discovers.

Anastasia Ovsyanik, who before the war had been living in Kiev with her family, was involved in the rescue effort and stays alongside the children as plans are made for where they should go longer term. We hear her answering difficult questions as the youngsters try and make sense of what's happened. Some of them are too traumatised to speak about what they've been through and like seven-year-old Larysa, they go at their own pace as they gradually start to play and relax.

Anastasia is helping redesign these makeshift buildings: in this case a gym in an old residential school, with chipped paint and crumbling walls. It's cold and neglected and volunteers quickly fill it with metal beds and other basics; the warmth and love flows from them as they set their own lives aside to help the children. They bring pictures, outdoor play equipment, toys, books, sofas and lots of donated blankets and clothes.

This focus on making these places feel special is reinforced by the support mechanisms put in place by psychologists like Sherri McClurg, who says the work to help youngsters recover will be slow and difficult: “We’re not talking children that are born and raised in the comfort of their own home; we're talking kids who have been separated from that home. So, these are kids who already have a baseline of trauma.

“Now we've got this going on, and they don't they have any control. So, these kids are probably a lot of them are almost numb, they're just moving with the system. But internally, everything's getting a little bit more heightened and a little bit more heightened and a little bit more heightened. You see it on the news, you see the surface damage, you see the buildings destroyed, you see all of that, what is really the thing that concerns me more, and the real damage is what's going on in the insides of these kids’ hearts and their minds."

Reporter: Sue Mitchell


MON 11:30 The Tim Vine Chat Show (m00168mk)
Easter Special 2022

Tim Vine tells some jokes and chats to the Great British Public. This Easter Special includes a guessing game about eggs and some questions for the Easter Bunny.

Producer: Richard Morris
Production Coordinator: Sarah Nicholls

A BBC Studios Production


MON 12:00 News Summary (m0016hc9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 You and Yours (m0016gz4)
Global food prices; Cakeage; Social internet tariffs

GLOBAL FOOD PRICES
Food prices are at the highest since records began 60 years ago. The war in Ukraine is affecting production costs of a range of everyday items - mostly notably wheat. Sam Page, from sandwich maker Simply Lunch, and Boubaker Ben Belhassen, from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, explain how and why it’s affecting the price of your lunchtime sandwich.

SOCIAL INTERNET
More than 4 million households in the UK are eligible for discounted broadband deals known as Social Tariffs - but Ofcom say just 50,000 homes have signed up.

CAKEAGE
Is it right for a restaurant to charge cakeage - expecting you to pay to bring your own cake? Screenwriter Ivor Baddiel on how a restaurant wanted to charge him £10 a head to bring a cake to his son's 18th birthday meal.

BLACK ORNAMENTS
A business selling Christmas decorations featuring people of colour has won a £50,000 investment on Dragons’ Den. Natalie Duvall and Alison Burton explain how their children inspired the idea and how they plan to grow their company.

VOICE NOTES
Seven billion WhatsApp voice notes are sent every day but are they an effective means of communication? Cristina Criddle, tech reporter for the Financial Times and Bernie Hogan, senior research fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute, discuss.


MON 12:57 Weather (m0016gz6)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m0016gz8)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Jonny Dymond.


MON 13:45 The Museums That Make Us (m0016gzb)
The National Museum of Scotland

Neil MacGregor presents a new series for BBC Radio Four celebrating the role and ambition of museums the length and breadth of the country, and in the process he'll be finding answers to the question ‘What are Museums For in 2022’.

In this, the final week of programmes, Neil visits national museums in Wales, Northern Ireland and today, Scotland, As in previous episodes, the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh has chosen an object that they feel gets to the heart of the relationship they have with visitors from across the nation. In fact there are two objects hanging opposite each other. One is a battered Saltire, the other the King's colour standard, flags that were seen on opposing sides at the Battle of Culloden in 1746, the final event in the Jacobite rising. Neil is joined by fellow Scot and former soldier JJ Chalmers to hear the story behind the survival of the two flags, and the complex histories that make simple national identity in Scotland so fraught, even today.

Museums have always been telescopes trained on the past to help locate a sense of place in the present. Neil believes that role is an active one, responding to changes in the people museums serve and the shifting social and cultural landscape they inhabit. After spending much of his life at the centre of our national Museum life in London, Neil is taking to the road to discover more about the extraordinary work being done in Museums outside the capital, from Stornoway to Stowmarket, and Belfast to Birmingham.

In each episode he visits a single museum, inviting them to choose an object from their collections which they feel best illustrates their civic role, and the way they relate and want to relate to their local audience. Very rarely have they chosen a crown jewel from their often priceless collections. More often it's an object with a particular local resonance, or which helps tackle episodes from the past which are being viewed very differently by citizens in the 21st century.

He’ll be visiting the great national museums of Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland, as well as major city institutions in Birmingham, Leeds, Liverpool and elsewhere. And in spite of the challenges of the last two years, everywhere he meets passionate teams who are dedicated to providing a unique experience for both local audiences and visitors from further afield.

Neil writes: “What’s going on in our museums is at once challenging and exciting and it can only really be understood by visiting as many as possible and finding out how they have approached what is a vital role in providing a sense of local, regional and national identity.”

Producer - Tom Alban
Original Music by Phil Channell


MON 14:00 The Archers (m0016gsf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (m000n5f3)
The Tenderness of Boys

By Oliver Emanuel

It’s a Monday morning. A writer walks into a supermarket and sees his mother. It’s an entirely ordinary scene. Except his mother’s been dead for 15 years.

A playfully surreal and moving drama about the bond between mothers and their sons.

Cast:
Writer … Robert Jack
His Mother … Shauna Macdonald
Boy … Daniel Smith

Directed by Kirsty Williams


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (m0016gzd)
Programme 4, 2022

(4/12)
Scotland take on Wales in this week's contest. Will they have a clue why a Scottish Tractor Boy, a film in which a fly causes a wrongful arrest, and Bertholletia excelsia, might find themselves surprisingly close to France? If not, Kirsty Lang is on hand to provide helpful hints - but the more help she gives them the fewer points they'll get for their efforts. Val McDermid and Alan McCredie appear for Scotland, and Myfanwy Alexander and David Edwards for Wales.

The programme includes the usual generous scattering of question ideas received from listeners over the past year or so.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m0016grn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Invisible Man: A Parable for Our Times? (m00168lq)
April 2022 marks the 70th anniversary of Ralph Ellison's blistering and impassioned first novel, Invisible Man, which tells the extraordinary story of a man who is invisible “simply because people refuse to see me”. The invisibility of Ellison’s protagonist - a black man caught in the discord of 20th century racism - is, above all, about what it means to be black. In the wake of Black Lives Matter, the idea of invisibility for young black men, and women, exists perhaps not merely as a metaphor, but has become a matter of necessity. Seventy years on, how does Ellison's story speak about the black experience today? Four notable black artists define, or redefine, what his novel can say now about being a black body in the public space.

Producer: Cecile Wright
Contributors: Adjoa Andoh, Jacob Sam La Rose, Rommi Smith, Tyler Mitchell
Novel Extracts read by Chris Jack


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (m0016gzh)
Resurrection

On Easter Sunday, as children hunt for chocolate eggs, the words 'Christ is Risen. Alleluia!' are proclaimed from every church pulpit. The day of Jesus Christ's Resurrection is the most joyous day of the Christian calendar. A message of death defeated, salvation secured, is the cornerstone of the faith of nearly one third of the world's population. But how do the faithful understand this extraordinary story? Do you have to believe Jesus physically rose from the dead for the story to have meaning? And what is it's resonance today, for those of faith, or without?

Ernie Rea is joined by scholars Professor Helen Bond, Dr Andrew Boakye, and the Chief Executive of the London Institute for Contemporary Christianity, Paul Woolley, to discuss the evidence for and understanding of the Resurrection. Plus film critic and host of the 'Girls on Film' podcast, Anna Smith, discusses how the story and themes of the resurrection have appeared in popular cinema throughout the decades.

Producer: Rebecca Maxted
Editor: Tim Pemberton

This programme contains short excepts from the following films:
The Greatest Story Ever Told (Dir: George Stevens, 1965)
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe (Dir: Andrew Adamson, 2005)


MON 17:00 PM (m0016gzk)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0016gzp)
Russia further expands its air-strikes across Ukraine.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (m0016gzr)
Series 28

Episode 3

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Lou Sanders, Ria Lina, Milton Jones and Chris McCausland are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as magazines, the human body, golf and computers.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


MON 19:00 The Archers (m0016gzt)
Freddie covers when Roy asks him about how he worked out that the Borsetshire Bunny was Kathy. Roy complains how full on Vince is being with the preparations for a surprise birthday party for Elizabeth at Grey Gables. Then Freddie informs Roy of Ruairi’s party – neighbour Roy is going to need his earplugs.

As Ruairi unpacks alcohol for his party at Willow Cottage, Ben questions his arrangement with Julianne. Ruairi is defensive and rude in his replies. With the party in full swing Ben tries to persuade Ruairi to slow down on the drinking but he won’t listen. When Roy bangs on the front door complaining about the loud music, Ben answers and apologises. Ruairi joins them and invites Roy in, but when he learns Roy wants the music turned down he slams the door closed.

Freddie is enthralled by Ruairi’s tales of clubbing in London. Ruairi reckons Freddie will soon be DJ-ing in top venues with money on its way from Vince. Freddie clarifies the cash isn’t definite. When Ben suggests that Ruairi explains who pays for his nights out in London, they descend into a drunken fight. Freddie tries to break them up and then Alice arrives, having been called by Roy. She puts Ruairi to bed and asks Ben to end the party. Alice remains calm in the face of Ruairi’s drunken insults. When she returns downstairs she asks Ben what’s going on with Ruairi; she’s noticed he’s different. Ben doesn’t let on what he knows and puts it all down to too much alcohol.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m0016gzw)
Abdulrazak Gurnah and the Big Jubilee Read from the Library of Birmingham

The Big Jubilee Read is a reading for pleasure campaign by the Reading Agency and the BBC highlighting 70 books from across the Commonwealth published during the decades of the Queen's reign. To mark the launch, Front Row comes from the Studio Theatre at the Library of Birmingham with an audience. Nobel Laureate Abdulrazak Gurnah talks to Samira about his novel Paradise from 1994 which has been chosen as a Big Jubilee Read. Emma d'Costa from the Commonwealth Foundation explains how the books were chosen. Local author Kit de Waal comments and we hear from Birmingham's Poet Laureate, Casey Bailey, whose play GrimeBoy has just opened at the Birmingham Rep. He performs poems celebrating his city. And how are libraries faring ten years on from the first austerity cuts and two years after the pandemic? Briony Birdi of the University of Sheffield explains.

The full list of books is available from Monday 18 April at BBC Arts https://www.bbc.co.uk/arts

Photo credit: Tricia Yourkevich for the BBC

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Sarah Johnson


MON 20:00 Missing Mother (m0016gzy)
The Mother-Daughter relationship is a special one - but what happens to little girls who lose their mums early? Missing Mother is an intimate window into the life of women who have experienced arguably the most significant loss - the loss of a mother.

Jacqueline Shepherd, broadcaster and presenter, who lost her mum at the age of 10 explores whether there is an unspoken or unrealised academic, relational and mental connection between their loss as a girl and the women they later go on to become.

Produced by Tobi Olujinmi
A Hill 5.14 Media production for BBC Radio 4


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (m00168ln)
Russia's Unwelcome New Exiles

Hundreds of thousands of Russians – mainly young and well-educated - have fled abroad since their country invaded Ukraine. It’s the biggest brain drain in a short period of time in Russian history. Some fear a political crackdown. They worry they could be arrested for expressing opposition to the war, and young men might be drafted into the army. Others are escaping economic sanctions, trying to keep their businesses afloat now it’s become hard to transfer money into or out of Russia.

Tim Whewell travels to Russia’s southern neighbour, Georgia, to meet some of the 25,000 Russians who’ve fled there. Some are strong opponents of Vladimir Putin, who are now showing their support for Ukraine by volunteering for a new project by Russian exiles, ‘Helping to Leave’, that organizes evacuations of Ukrainian civilians from the war zone. Others are business people – often in IT, who try to steer clear of politics, but hope they can help Georgia’s economy by creating a new ‘silicon valley’ there.

But Georgia, itself invaded by the Kremlin’s forces in 2008, has a tense relationship with Russia. Georgia’s a hospitable country – but the new arrivals are not universally welcome. Georgians worry that the exiles – often wealthier than local people – will force them out of the property market. And they fear the Russian influx may include spies and provocateurs who might provide Putin with a pretext to intervene there again. The new exiles may sympathise with Ukraine – but do they understand Georgia’s long struggle with Russia?

Reporter: Tim Whewell
Produced by Tim Whewell and Rayhan Dmytrie.

(Image: Russian exile, Katya Lapsha Credit: Lago Gogilashvili /BBC)


MON 21:00 Three Pounds in My Pocket (m00168qz)
Series 5

Episode 2

British South Asians and the noughties: too British or not British enough? For almost a decade Kavita Puri has been charting the social history of these communities in post-war Britain. Many of the pioneers arrived with as little as £3 due to strict currency controls.

Kavita hears stories of strike action from a group of Indian women that brought Heathrow to a standstill and about how life changed for British South Asians after the 7/7 terrorist attacks in London. She looks at the latter years of Blair's premiership and how questions about Britishness became very public as the rhetoric around multiculturalism soured. And she explores lesser-known - but no less significant - stories of quiet rebellion and accommodation, as the second generation came to terms with life in Britain in the 21st century.

Producer: Ant Adeane
Editor: Hugh Levinson

Historical consultants:
Dr Florian Stadtler, University of Bristol
Dr Edward Anderson, Northumbria University
Professor Gurharpal Singh, School or Oriental and African Studies


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m0016gyt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m0016h01)
The second phase of Ukraine war begins

In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 These Days by Lucy Caldwell (m0016h03)
Episode 1

Two sisters, four nights, one city.

April, 1941. Belfast has escaped the worst of the war – so far. Over the next two months, it’s going to be destroyed from above, so that people will say, in horror, My God, Belfast is finished.
Many won’t make it through, and no one who does will remain unchanged.
Following the lives of sisters Emma and Audrey – one engaged to be married, the other in a secret relationship with another woman – as they try to survive the horrors of the four nights of bombing which were the Belfast Blitz, 'These Days' is a timeless and heart-breaking novel about living under duress, about family, and about how we try to stay true to ourselves.

Lucy Caldwell is the author of four novels, several stage plays and radio dramas, and two collections of short stories: Multitudes and Intimacies. She won the BBC National Short Story Award in 2021 for ‘All the People Were Mean and Bad.’

Author: Lucy Caldwell
Reader: Lisa Dwyer Hogg
Abridger: Rowan Routh
Producer: Gemma McMullan
Executive Editor: Andy Martin
A BBC Northern Ireland Production.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (m001687j)
3 Ways to Speak English

Dr Jamila Lyiscott describes to Michael Rosen the 3 ways in which she speaks English according to whether she's at home, at school or with friends. Her TED talk on the subject is one of the most-viewed language performances on the internet and is used in education. She self-describes as a trilingual orator and asks: who decides who is articulate?
https://www.ted.com/talks/jamila_lyiscott_3_ways_to_speak_english?language=en

Produced by Beth O'Dea for BBC Audio Bristol


MON 23:30 Women in Stitches: The Making of the Bayeux Tapestry (m001327r)
The Bayeux Tapestry is coming to Britain in the near future. It’s among the world’s most famous works of art, but it's also a mystery: no one knows who made it. The stitching, though, is full of clues. Abigail Youngman seeks to reveal the truth about the lives of the women who stitched it, to unpick the secrets they left in plain sight, in the margins of the tapestry.

The Bayeux Tapestry records great historical events but its humanity is in the details: the little boy holding his mother's hand tightly as they flee their burning home; scenes of sexual violence; bawdy jokes at the Normans' expense. Scholarly opinion is divided, but some think it was stitched by Anglo-Saxon women who had experienced war and occupation first-hand.

The main panels were probably designed by an Important Man (hence the focus on battles, on big sexy horses – surely the BMWs of their day – and political propaganda). But the margins of the tapestry may have been left to the imagination of the stitchers themselves: probably English women. This 'freehand' marginalia tell a different story, sometimes undercutting the message of the Norman conquerors in surprising ways. We can imagine the camaraderie and humour of the women sewing it, talking, about their personal tragedies, the terror they survived, the soldiers who were husbands and sons.

Read this way, the Tapestry becomes a tantalising portrait of a group of women who are largely unrepresented in history, speaking to us vividly from a thousand years ago.

Abigail Youngman uncovers fascinating and intimate details of these women's lives with the help of Dr Alexandra Makin, Dr Daisy Black, Dr Christopher Monk, Professor Gail Owen-Crocker and Dr Michael Lewis.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery



TUESDAY 19 APRIL 2022

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m0016h06)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 00:30 Preventable by Devi Sridhar (m0016h08)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0016h0c)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0016h0f)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0016h0h)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m0016h0k)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0016mzd)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Father Martin Magill


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m0016h0p)
19/4/22 - Pig industry, glasshouses, SFI payments and farm diversification

The pig industry has seen a backlog of animals stuck on farm because of a shortage of butchers in processing plants, but this is starting to ease, and pig prices are going up. After months of talking about the crisis in the pig industry, this should be good news - but farmers worry that with increased costs of feed, they’re still losing money on every pig.

DEFRA, along with Pasture for Life and Landworkers' Alliance, has funded a "Your Farming Future" programme, which is running a series of farm visits, offering farmers a chance to see how schemes can help them adapt and become more sustainable - both economically and environmentally.

The new Sustainable Farming Incentive - which is replacing subsidy payments in England - has been analysed by the levy body AHDB, which says for many farmers the scheme will only offer a small financial benefit.

And this week on Farming Today we're looking at growing crops undercover. We speak to Martin Emmett, the newly appointed Chair of the National Farmers' Union's horticulture and potatoes board, about the current state of the growing industry and what the impact of rising gas prices is.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b096j56j)
Stephen Moss on the Coot

In a recollection about his encounters with birds, writer and wildlife programme-maker Stephen Moss explains how a chance encounter with a coot when he was just three years old, inspired a lifelong passion for birds and bird-watching.

Producer: Sarah Blunt
Photograph: Martyn Illes.


TUE 06:00 Today (m0016h2r)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 Positive Thinking (m0016h2t)
Levelling the Playing Field

Sangita Myska goes in search of the innovators with big solutions to some of our most intractable problems.

Existing inequalities have been exacerbated by the pandemic, so how can we level the playing field so that all children have an equal chance? According to Professor Darrick Hamilton, the answer is Baby Bonds, a means tested lump sum of up to $60,000 which all children are entitled to when they reach adulthood.

In the US the idea is gaining traction and some states are exploring implementing their own versions of Baby Bonds. But could the idea make a difference here?

Our expert panel:

Dr Zubaida Haque, Executive Director of The Equality Trust
Tunde Banjoko, founder of charity Making the Leap and The Social Mobility Awards
Dr Rajiv Prabhakar, Senior Lecturer in Personal Finance at the Open University, and expert on financial inclusion

Producer: Ellie Bury


TUE 09:30 One Direction (m0016h2w)
Disorientation

Author Jerry Brotton presents a five-part series exploring each of the four cardinal directions in turn – north, east, south and west – and the possibility that, in the age of digital mapping, we are being left disoriented.

Throughout history the cardinal directions have been crucial to virtually all societies in understanding themselves in relation to the wider world. More than points on a compass, they are ideas in their own right – creating their own political, moral and cultural meanings. They’ve shaped how we divide the world geopolitically into East and West (Orient and Occident) while contrasting the ‘Global South’ with the industrialised ‘Global North’ drives much current development policy, especially around climate change.

So why is north at the top of most world maps? The four cardinal points on a compass are defined by the physical realities of the magnetic North Pole (north-south) and the rising and setting of the sun (east-west) but there is no reason why north is at the top of maps, any other cardinal point would do just as well. The convention was developed by the western world. So why not put west at the top? Well, early societies refused to privilege the west because it was the direction of the sunset, where darkness and death reigned. For medieval Christianity, east was at the top, because that was the direction of the Garden of Eden, shown on many mappae-mundi. On early Islamic maps south was at the top, while Chinese maps used north because the emperor looked 'down' southwards and everyone else looked 'up', north.

Part 1 begins today with our apparent lack of any significant orientation. On a digital globe, and on Google maps, it seems cardinal points no longer matter - we place ourselves at the centre of the map. The result is an egocentric mapping whose only orientation is immediate gratification. We are left, quite literally, disoriented.

Series contributors include Google spatial technologist Ed Parsons, historian Sujit Sivasundaram, neuroscientist Hugo Spiers, author Rana Kabbani, journalist and editor for Bloomberg City Maps Laura Bliss, former head of maps at the British library Peter Barber, barrister and specialist in equality law Ulele Burnham, historian Felipe Fernandez-Armesto, author Irna Qureshi, geographer Alistair Bonnett, wayfinder and science writer Michael Bond, curator Rosemary Firman and historian of Islamic maps Yossef Rappaport.

Presenter: Jerry Brotton
Producer: Simon Hollis

A Brook Lapping production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 09:45 Preventable by Devi Sridhar (m0016h2z)
Episode 2

How a Pandemic Changed the World & How to Stop the Next One

Professor Devi Sridhar traces the story of Covid-19 from her unique vantage point, remembering the moment when tensions emerged across the nations of the United Kingdom.

Devi Sridhar, Chair of Global Public Health at Edinburgh University, has risen to prominence as one of Britain’s most trusted commentators on COVID-19. Fresh from advising the Scottish and UK Governments, the WHO and UNICEF, the academic uses the timeline of the pandemic to shine a light on how science, politics, ethics and economics affect our health.

Written and read by Devi Sridhar
Abridged by Rosemary Goring
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0016h31)
Fiona Hill, Baby loss, Why do we lie?

As the Ukraine conflict rages on, questions have arisen over what the endgame is for Russian President Vladimir Putin. There have been continued reports of rape and violence being used against Ukrainian civilians by Russian soldiers. Durham-born Fiona Hill, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, has been a foreign policy adviser for three United States Presidents. Seen as one of the foremost experts on Russia, she joins Krupa live in the studio to talk about the invasion and what happens next.

The footballer Cristiano Ronaldo and his partner Georgina Rodriguez have announced the death of their baby boy at birth. The couple were expecting twins. Their baby girl survived. Clea Harmer is CEO of the charity Sands, she joined Krupa alongside Katie Harris, who lost one of her twin daughters, Abikara, during pregnancy.

Women live longer than men in the UK but new analysis shows that life expectancy for women living in the poorest 10 percent of areas in England is lower than overall life expectancy in any OECD country except Mexico. Figures from 2019 show that millions of women living in the most deprived areas of England can expect to live 78.7 years compared to 86.4 in England’s wealthiest areas. Jo Bibby is from The Health Foundation and Alice Wiseman is the Director of Public Health in Gateshead.

Why do we lie? Do men and women lie differently? In her new book The Social Superpower, Kathleen Wyatt looks at lies from many perspectives and reveals her own history of lying.

The latest in our series Threads about the emotional resonance of old clothes. Listener Helen tells the story of the skirt she made from bits of curtain and old dresses to go to the Reading Festival in 1973.

Presenter: Krupa Padhy
Producer: Emma Pearce


TUE 11:00 Putin (p0by9k7g)
6. The Believer

Playing cat and mouse games with the world and using so-called little green men for masked warfare – what Russia's annexation of part of Ukraine in 2014 tells us about Vladimir Putin.

“Like tsars through the centuries, Putin sees himself as the rightful heir and the guardian of one true Christian faith,” says Lucy Ash, who has seen first-hand how the Russian leader has used religion to justify war and bolster his image.

To make sense of the man everyone is trying to figure out, Jonny Dymond is joined by:

Lucy Ash, BBC reporter and author of the upcoming book “The Baton and the Cross” about the Russian Orthodox Church under Putin
Steven Lee Myers, New York Times correspondent and former Moscow bureau chief
Dr Gulnaz Sharafutdinova, professor of Russian politics at Kings College London and author of “Red Mirror: Putin's Leadership and Russia's Insecure Identity

Production coordinators: Sophie Hill and Siobhan Reed

Sound engineer: Rod Farquhar
Producers: Caroline Bayley, Sandra Kanthal, Joe Kent
Series Editor: Emma Rippon
Commissioning Editor: Richard Knight


TUE 11:30 The Caretakers (m0016h34)
Episode 3: Relive

In every museum and gallery, behind the scenes teams look after our national collections. They have an intimate knowledge of the buildings and collections they look after, yet their opinions are rarely sought.

Artist Eloise Moody has been working closely with nine people across the United Kingdom tasked with keeping their respective museums, galleries and collections clean. Every sound you hear in this programme - from brushes sweeping to each word and sigh - was collected and recorded by the Caretakers themselves. This series offers a rare chance to perch invisibly on the shoulders of these exceptional guides, noticing what they stop to consider as they go about their work.

Keeping Titanic Belfast shipshape is Jackie, a native of the city. Whilst cleaning the cabins, she considers extraordinary moments in the life of the ship – and the city that created it.

Andy was a traffic warden who found a new life working in outdoor maintenance at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. In between cleaning the sculptures, mowing the lawns, and emptying the bins, he finds quiet moments to reflect on the previous lives of the park.

June, is a cleaner at the Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art (MIMA). Whilst buffing the floors, she takes a closer look at a series of photographs that transport her back to her teenage self.

Producer: Eloise Moody
Producer and Editor: Emma Barnaby
Executive Producer: Anishka Sharma

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m0016h36)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 You and Yours (m0016h38)
Call You & Yours Are you struglling to Rent or Buy?

Are you struggling to rent or buy a home. We'd like to hear from you about the difficulties you may be have finding somewhere to live. Tenants are paying more of their income on rent than ever and house moves have been sluggish now for years.
Are you being priced out of a home to rent. How is that impacting on your life? Home sales are down a fifth compared to this time last year – that means more people trapped in transaction chains. we’d like to hear about that. Are you struggling to rent or buy ?


TUE 12:57 Weather (m0016h3b)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m0016h3d)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


TUE 13:45 The Museums That Make Us (m0016h3g)
The National Museum of NI, Belfast

Neil MacGregor presents a new series for BBC Radio Four celebrating the role and ambition of museums the length and breadth of the country, and in the process he'll be finding answers to the question ‘What are Museums For in 2022’.

Today he's in Northern Ireland, where the National Museum have chosen an object that illustrates both the country's resurgent film and television industry and the way wit and comedy can undercut division. It's a blackboard from the Channel 4 comedy series Derry Girls. The board was used in an episode in which the eponymous girls were attending a 'peace camp' with boys from a nearby Protestant School. When invited to fill two blackboards, one with similarities and the other with differences between Protestants and Catholics, the similarities board remains almost entirely empty. But the differences board, now in the Museum, is completely covered with ideas ranging from the quietly perceptive to the utterly ludicrous. Do Protestants really keep their toasters in the cupboard? The BBC's former Northern Ireland correspondent Denis Murray is on hand to guide Neil through the comedy and tragedy.

Museums have always been telescopes trained on the past to help locate a sense of place in the present. Neil believes that role is an active one, responding to changes in the people museums serve and the shifting social and cultural landscape they inhabit. After spending much of his life at the centre of our national Museum life in London, Neil is taking to the road to discover more about the extraordinary work being done in Museums outside the capital, from Stornoway to Stowmarket, and Belfast to Birmingham.

In each episode he visits a single museum, inviting them to choose an object from their collections which they feel best illustrates their civic role, and the way they relate and want to relate to their local audience. Very rarely have they chosen a crown jewel from their often priceless collections. More often it's an object with a particular local resonance, or which helps tackle episodes from the past which are being viewed very differently by citizens in the 21st century.

He’ll be visiting the great national museums of Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland, as well as major city institutions in Birmingham, Leeds, Liverpool and elsewhere. And in spite of the challenges of the last two years, everywhere he meets passionate teams who are dedicated to providing a unique experience for both local audiences and visitors from further afield.

Neil writes: “What’s going on in our museums is at once challenging and exciting and it can only really be understood by visiting as many as possible and finding out how they have approached what is a vital role in providing a sense of local, regional and national identity.”


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m0016gzt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (m000gn6j)
The Blackrock Girl (Part 2)

The Blackrock Girl is Lucy Gannon’s two part drama about Finn, who appears in a quiet rural village in Ireland, bringing with her the assumed (the locals assume) glamour of the big city. She comes from Blackrock but sometimes she doesn’t sound as if she does. But, she explains, she spent a few years as a child over the border in Omagh and so her accent has become a bit strangled and anyway, after a lifetime nursing overseas, in Africa and India, devoting herself to the poor and needy, it’s not surprising her accent is slightly off kilter sometimes. Exhausted she returns to Ireland deciding to start a new life and this is how she finds herself in this charming friendly Irish rural village of Bridesway. Approaching life with an air of entitlement and yet warmth she is, very definitely, likeable. She has charisma, and makes friends easily. She’s interested in people, tolerant, helpful. She’s just plain NICE.

But Finn is broke. She’s never nursed a single person in her whole life, although she has often held the hands of the dying. Her name used to be Moira, then Eileen, then Mary, Frances and now Theresa. She’s wanted in England, Scotland and Cyprus, for fraud, theft and extortion.

Episode Two
Local OAP has been lured by Theresa Finn and he is now a changed man. He is clean and tidy and he is happy with his relationship with Finn. The Postmistress Evie Bourne is growing slightly concerned however that Charles has withdrawn a large amount of cash recently but puts it down to the fact that he is happy with Finn and she is sprucing up. Retired Policeman Martin, still unsettled by the fact that Finn has not yet paid anyone for the works done on the Manse house or for the catering and arrangements for the Garden Party she decided to hold to get to celebrate both old and new friends (the old never turned up!), Martin gets in touch with a former colleague to do a bit of enquiring…

Finn is beginning to get restless and decides she needs to go away for a few days to Dublin on her own and whilst she is gone The Manse catches fire…….
Was it deliberate, was it arson………. Martin finds out the truth.

Martin eventually convinces Evie that Finn is a bad ‘un and she in turn convinces the rest of the village. They together defend Charles (against his will) and thwart Finn, but she makes a last desperate attempt to get Charles’ money, and Evie and Martin link arms to destroy her plan and to run her out.

Finn has never nursed a single person in her whole life, although she has often held the hands of the dying. Her name used to be Moira, then Eileen, then Mary, Frances and now Theresa. She’s wanted in England, Scotland and Cyprus, for fraud, theft and extortion.
Charles is left broken hearted.

Evie and Martin fall in love and Bridesway is back to how it should be.

Finn is played by Fenella Woolgar
Ellen ….. Marion O’Dwyer
Evie ….. Pauline McLynn
Martin ….. Des McAleer
Charles ….. Jonathan coy
Dave ….. Jamie Beamish
Beth ….. Ell Potter

Produced by Celia DeWolff for BBC Northern Ireland


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (m0016gvr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (m0016h3j)
The World's Toughest Conservationists

It's not easy fighting for nature in many of the former Soviet states. Antonia Bolingbroke-Kent reports from Tajikistan, on the trail of the snow leopard and the extraordinary people who protect them.

This high corner of Central Asia is home to the world's biggest species of wild sheep and goats, prey of arguably the most beautiful of the big cats- the extravagantly furred snow leopard. After the fall of the Soviet Union a vicious civil war killed 100,000 people and saw many more displaced and starving. Kalashnikovs and hungry people are never good news for wildlife and, sure enough, the wildlife of the mountains was decimated.

In the last few years local conservationists have taken it on themselves to declare reserves and persuade their neighbours to reduce their hunting. With minimal funding from the government and international agencies these conservationists have had to find their own ways to pay for the protection of the reserves. Most of the money to employ rangers has come from selling licences to hunt small numbers of Marco Polo sheep, Ibex and Markhor wild goats. It's a controversial approach but, in sheer numbers of endangered species, it seems to be working. Can the improvements continue as climate change brings ever harsher winters and drier summers and regional instability keeps the wildlife tourists away?

Antonia meets the conservationists trying their best to protect their wildlife in the face of enormous odds.

Producer: Alasdair Cross


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (m0016h3l)
The language we use about children in care

Adoptive parent Margaret Reynolds talks about the language used around children in care. From the unthinking people asking about 'real parents' to the clinical language used to describe children's lives.

Producer for BBC Audio in Bristol, Sally Heaven


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (m0016h3n)
Janet Ellis on Puffin editor Kaye Webb

Writer, broadcaster and Blue Peter presenter Janet Ellis champions the life of Kaye Webb, who burst on to the children's publishing scene in 1961 and changed the industry forever.

With no publishing experience whatsoever, Kaye persuaded renowned authors like Roald Dahl and Nina Bawden to publish their hardback bestsellers as pocket-sized paperbacks that children could buy themselves. Hundreds of thousands flocked to join her Puffin Club with its riotous exhibitions, trips and competitions. Janet shares her memories of growing up abroad with her "portable kingdom" of Puffin books, and explains why Puffin and Blue Peter have a lot in common.

Janet is joined in the studio by Kaye's biographer, the writer Valerie Grove. They talk about Kaye's three marriages, especially the last, to cartoonist Ronald Searle, then one of the most famous men in the country. We also hear personal memories of Kaye from Clare Morpurgo, daughter of Penguin founder, Sir Allen Lane.

With thanks to Puffin Club expert Sherief Hassan, Philippa Dickinson and Emma Thompson.
Photo courtesy of Seven Stories - The National Centre for Children's Books in Newcastle upon Tyne.

Presented by Matthew Parris.
Produced by Sarah Goodman for BBC Audio Bristol.


TUE 17:00 PM (m0016h3q)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0016h3s)
MPs to decide if Boris Johnson should be investigated over lockdown party statements


TUE 18:30 Teatime (m000fx1w)
Episode 3

Comedy by Katherine Jakeways about a chaotic but loving family. Starring Philip Glenister, Samantha Spiro, Aimee-Ffion Edwards, Prasanna Puwanarajah, Katie Redford and Steven Brandon.

In an attempt to prove to Donna - and to himself - that he’s got his life back on track, Joe (Glenister) starts a new business venture, working from home as a Wellness Coach. Two problems: one, he knows nothing about wellness. And two, the home he’s decided to work from is Vicky and Rav’s. Despite their misgivings, Vicky and Rav (Edwards and Puwanarajah), Donna (Spiro) and the rest of the family can’t help but be sucked in by Joe’s enthusiasm.

Meanwhile Lisa (Redford) is suffering from an acute bout of selective deafness, and Uncle Bob (Brandon) makes a spirited attempt at the world record for number of marshmallows in mouth. 44 to beat.

Teatime was produced by Sam Ward, and is a BBC Studios production.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m0016h3v)
With no sign of Adil, whose check-out is overdue, Roy and Kathy try to track down Oliver. Tracy arrives for work and congratulates Kathy on her fundraising as the Borsetshire Bunny. When Kathy learns they don’t have Adil’s card details she heads straight for his room. Adil opens the door and explains that he was in an important meeting. Oliver appears and asks Kathy to gather the staff in the ballroom. Tracy speculates about what’s going on. She reckons Oliver is going to announce filming is going to take place at Grey Gables.
To everyone’s surprise, Oliver announces that he’s sold a 60% share of Grey Gables and that he’ll be stepping down from the day-to-day running of the hotel. Adil Shah, the new owner’s representative, will replace him. The staff’s shock is compounded when Oliver says the hotel will be closing imminently and everyone will be made redundant. Afterwards, Adil tries to placate Oliver who feels bad for what he’s just done. He decides to show his face rather than hide away in Adil’s room.
Roy and Kathy try to absorb the news. Although they are all reeling there is still a hotel to run. Teary Tracy returns and thanks Roy for covering the reception desk for her. She’s worried about how she’ll cope without her Grey Gables job. On Oliver’s arrival, Tracy departs again. Roy scoffs when Oliver say he is also upset. He tries to explain he had to do something to protect Caroline’s legacy. Roy replies that Oliver’s destroying it rather than protecting it.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m0016h3x)
Robert Eggers on The Northman, Oliver Jeffers, the late Sir Harrison Birtwistle

Director Robert Eggers discusses his new film The Northman, set in Iceland at the turn of the 10th century. A Nordic prince sets out on a mission of revenge after his father is murdered. The plot, which is an old Nordic story, is allegedly the basis for the plot of Hamlet. The film stars Alexander Skarsgård, Anya Taylor-Joy, Björk, Willem Dafoe and Ethan Hawke.

The Olivier Awards recently returned to The Royal Albert Hall for a glittering ceremony, following a pandemic hiatus. They’re widely regarded as honouring a who’s who of great British theatre but critic David Benedict believes they aren’t truly representative. He joins Samira to make the case for shaking up the Oliviers.

Artist and writer Oliver Jeffers discusses Our Place in Space, a 10km sculpture trail representing the solar system which is part of Unboxed, a celebration of creativity, taking place across England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales and online from March to October.

We remember Sir Harrison Birtwistle, one of the most significant British composers of the last century, whose death at the age of 87 was announced yesterday.

Presenter Samira Ahmed
Producer Jerome Weatherald


TUE 20:00 Today (m0016rvz)
Ukraine: Where’s the Line?

Eight weeks ago it still seemed almost unthinkable that Russia would mount a full-scale invasion of Ukraine. Since then the reality of the war - and the way it has been waged - has shocked and appalled the world. Mishal Husain and a panel of expert guests ask what it would take for NATO to confront Russia directly over Ukraine.

Guests:
General Sir Richard Shirreff who served in the Gulf War, Kosovo and Iraq while in the British Army, before becoming NATO’s Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Europe between 2011 and 2014.
Orysia Lutsevych, head of the Ukraine Forum at Chatham House.
BBC Middle East Editor Jeremy Bowen, who has been reporting from Ukraine for weeks.
And we're joined from Washington by Douglas Lute, former US Ambassador to NATO.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m0016h41)
Ukrainian Stories from Poland

We revisit the topic of how the ongoing Russian invasion of Ukraine is impacting its visually impaired citizens. We speak to married couple Denys and Olga Petrov who evacuated to Poland soon after the war began. They tell us about how they got across the border with a small child, a pregnancy and... seven animals.

A few weeks ago, we spoke to Olga Mahler about how she travelled nearly 10,000 miles across the world from Australia to help visually impaired refugees with food and accommodation once they have crossed the border into Poland. Olga attended a boarding school for the blind in the Ukrainian city of Kharkiv. We caught up with her to see how her blind parents, who refused to leave their home in Ukraine, are getting along and how her aid efforts have developed.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Beth Hemmings
Production Coordinator: Liz Poole

Website image description: pictured is two young women; one is guiding a visually impaired woman with a white cane across the border from Ukraine into Poland. Photograph taken at the Medyka border crossing in eastern Poland, on March 9, 2022. They are both wearing winter coats, hats and scarves and small snowflakes are falling around them.


TUE 21:00 Fungi: The New Frontier (m0013j9v)
Us and them

It all started with rumours of an 800-meter underground organism hidden under the streets of Cambridge and a plate of mushrooms on toast. With cream. In this three-part series, Tim Hayward falls down a rabbit hole into kingdom (or as some call it queendom) Fungi. Along the way he starts to question pretty much everything he thought he knew about the world, discovering scientists doing pioneering research that’s changing how we understand life on Earth and offering solutions to some of our biggest challenges.

In this final episode, Tim tries to grow a lion’s mane mushroom. He then finds out about a “body snatcher” fungus that hijacks ants and manipulates their behaviour - which makes him wonder about what the complex chemical compounds produced by fungi might do to humans. He investigates the new wave of research interest around psilocybin, an alkaloid found in many species of fungi - and the significant promise these compounds are showing as potential treatments for addiction, PTSD, anxiety and even dementia - and then gets a look at a cutting-edge research lab growing medicinal mushrooms in the forests of Finland.

Featuring:
Charissa de Bekker, Assistant Professor studying fungi that manipulate behaviour
Zoe Cormier, journalist and writer
Albert Garcia-Romeu, Assistant Professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Thomas Hartle, the first person to undergo psilocybin treatment legally in Canada
Eric Puro, CEO of KÄÄPÄ Biotech
Joette Crosier, Lab manager at KÄÄPÄ Biotech

Presenter: Tim Hayward
Producer and Sound Designer: Richard Ward
Executive Producer: Miranda Hinkley
Image courtesy of Carolina Magnasco
A Loftus Media production for Radio 4


TUE 21:30 Positive Thinking (m0016h2t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m0016h43)
Boris Johnson to face Commons vote on “Partygate”

In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 These Days by Lucy Caldwell (m0016h45)
Episode 2

Two sisters, four nights, one city.

April, 1941. Belfast has escaped the worst of the war – so far. Over the next two months, it’s going to be destroyed from above, so that people will say, in horror, My God, Belfast is finished.
Many won’t make it through, and no one who does will remain unchanged.
Following the lives of sisters Emma and Audrey – one engaged to be married, the other in a secret relationship with another woman – as they try to survive the horrors of the four nights of bombing which were the Belfast Blitz, 'These Days' is a timeless and heart-breaking novel about living under duress, about family, and about how we try to stay true to ourselves.

Lucy Caldwell is the author of four novels, several stage plays and radio dramas, and two collections of short stories: Multitudes and Intimacies. She won the BBC National Short Story Award in 2021 for ‘All the People Were Mean and Bad.’

Author: Lucy Caldwell
Reader: Lisa Dwyer Hogg
Abridger: Rowan Routh
Producer: Gemma McMullan
Executive Editor: Andy Martin
A BBC Northern Ireland Production.


TUE 23:00 Jayde Adams: Hometown Glory (m0011lfk)
Episode 2

After over a decade in London, comedian Jayde Adams is returning to her hometown of Bristol. Why? It’s cheaper. But also because of reasons that are much deeper than that, and which she told Radio 4 would probably take two half-hour episodes to explain.

Over the course of this mini series, Jayde is going to be asking what ‘feeling at home’ really means; why we leave home; and why some of us, at least, feel the draw to go back.

Not that Jayde’s story isn’t interesting enough on its own - girl lives in same house for eighteen years, moves to London, moves back again - Jayde’s also spoken to Dawn French, Victoria Scone, Keala Settle and Sophie Willan about their own experiences of home; where they’ve made home; and how it’s made them.

Performed by Jayde Adams
Script editor: Simon Alcock
Producer: Hayley Sterling
Production Coordinator: Sarah Nicholls
Sound Design: Chris Maclean

A BBC Studios Production


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0016h47)
Boris Johnson faces MPs for the first time since he was fined for breaking Covid regulations. Sean Curran presents.



WEDNESDAY 20 APRIL 2022

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m0016h49)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


WED 00:30 Preventable by Devi Sridhar (m0016h2z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0016h4c)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0016h4f)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0016h4h)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m0016h4k)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0016mvf)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Father Martin Magill


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m0016h4p)
20/04/22 - Free range egg producers, glasshouses and the National Food Strategy

The impact of the war in Ukraine is being felt throughout the food industry. The British Free Range Egg Producers Association says its' recent survey of members found 51% of those who answered, are considering coming out of egg production. They say supermarkets need to charge 40p more per dozen eggs, to reflect higher costs.

Leaders in food policy are meeting to discuss the National Food Strategy; a White Paper which was due to be signed off but has been recently delayed because of the crisis in Ukraine.

All this week on Farming Today, we're exploring growing under glass - from ornamental flowers to salad crops and trees. We hear how glasshouses are also a major resource in plant research, and are responsible for providing more than half a million plants every year for research into insect food, nutrition, plant growth and genetic techniques.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Caitlin Hobbs


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tt1kv)
Yellowhammer

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the yellowhammer. The yellowhammer is a member of the bunting family and its name comes from "ammer" the German for bunting. It's one of the few British birds to have its song transcribed into words and seems to be saying ..a little bit of bread and no cheese".


WED 06:00 Today (m0016h93)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Life Changing (m0016h97)
A free lunch

From the age of two up to 16 Sinéad Browne is in and out of children’s homes and foster care. Her one constant is school. She’s regularly told she will amount to nothing but against expectations and as an act of defiance Sinéad just studies harder. At times she is hungry and ashamed to ask for help. Years of a complicated relationship with food develop into a serious eating disorder but in spite of all this Sinéad gets herself three A’s at A level and then a law degree and a job as a solicitor. So many life experiences for a young woman but in the end it is a very simple thing, a meal, that forces a major turning point in her life. She tells Jane Garvey her remarkable story.

Please be aware this edition talks about suicide and eating disorders.

You can find details of organisations offering information and support with both these subjects:
Eating disorders: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/2DRkg4JC7SLT3B7hlrn6DKN/information-and-support-eating-disorders
Suicide / Emotional distress: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/4WLs5NlwrySXJR2n8Snszdg/information-and-support-suicide-emotional-distress


WED 09:30 Ingenious (m000y1fv)
The Eyeball Gene

Is there more than meets the eye when it comes to the similarities between the compound eyeballs of a fly and your own peepers? What's so special about starfish feet? And what can some of nature’s oddest eyes tell us about our connection with life, the universe and everything?

Dr Kat Arney find out with the help of fruitfly-troubler Dr Patrick Callaerts and eyeball-building expert Professor Veronica Van Heyningen.

Presenter: Kat Arney
Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton
Sound Mix: James Beard
Editor: Penny Murphy


WED 09:45 Preventable by Devi Sridhar (m0016hbs)
Episode 3

How a Pandemic Changed the World & How to Stop the Next One

Professor Devi Sridhar traces the story of Covid-19 from her unique vantage point, remembering the early days of the pandemic when evidence begins to emerge about the effects of the virus on children.

Devi Sridhar, Chair of Global Public Health at Edinburgh University, has risen to prominence as one of Britain’s most trusted commentators on COVID-19. Fresh from advising the Scottish and UK Governments, the WHO and UNICEF, the academic uses the timeline of the pandemic to shine a light on how science, politics, ethics and economics affect our health.

Written and read by Devi Sridhar
Abridged by Rosemary Goring
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0016h9c)
Catherine Allen, Carol Vorderman, Jo Moseley, Mark D’Arcy, Sophia Smith Galer, Mary Portas

Stand up Paddleboarding or SUP is fast becoming one of the most popular water-sports in the UK. Jo Moseley was 51 when she started the sport and she tells us why we should all get on a board and start paddling.

We’ll be joined by Mary Queen of Shops – that’s Mary Portas – who’s one of the UK's leading voices on retail and brand communication. She is in parliament today calling on the government to amend a law governing how companies are run to better reflect their social and environmental responsibilities.

Sticking with parliament, we hear about the government's plan to help regulate content and tech companies with the On Line Safety Bill. The BBC’s parliamentary correspondent sets out what is and isn’t going to be included in the legislation and we hear from Carol Vorderman and Catherine Allen from the Institute of Engineering and technology about their concerns surrounding the safeguarding of young people in the metaverse.

And the author and journalist Sophia Smith Galer tells us about her new book: ‘Losing It: Sex Education for the 21st Century’ which delves into the sex myths that impact the lives of young people and why we should be taking sex education more seriously.

Presenter: Jessica Creighton
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson
Studio Manager: Tim Heffer
Photo Credit: Linn Van De Zandern


WED 11:00 Missing Mother (m0016gzy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Oti Mabuse's Dancing Legends (m0016h9f)
Musical theatre dancer Gwen Verdon

Oti Mabuse, twice winner of Strictly Come Dancing, continues her journey looking at the dancers and choreographers who have made a huge impact on dance. In this episode, actress and entertainer Bonnie Langford joins Oti to talk about her career and who she’s been inspired by.

Bonnie has had a long and varied fifty year career which has included stage roles in productions of Guys and Dolls and Chicago. And Bonnie wants to champion the Emmy and Bafta nominated performer Gwen Verdon as being a huge inspiration on her career.

Verdon was the winner of four Tony Awards and she originated the role of Roxie Hart in the Broadway production of Chicago.

Bonnie and Oti explore the life and spectacular career of this show stopping dancer with archive clips and the expert help of film historian John Kenrick.

Oti also goes to the dance studio to learn a dance routine in the style of Gwen Verdon with teacher Sophie Hirst from Dakoda's Dance Academy.

Presenter: Oti Mabuse
Producer: Candace Wilson
Production Team: Emily Knight and Rema Mukena
Editors: Kirsten Lass and Chris Ledgard
A BBC Audio Bristol production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:00 News Summary (m0016hc7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 You and Yours (m0016h9k)
Student Loans; Social Housing; Flapjacks

Students and graduates who started University after 2012 in England could pay up to 12% interest on their loans from this autumn, because of rising inflation. We hear how it'll affect graduates, and how the student loan system is being reformed next year to increase the amount of loan money that gets repaid.

Yesterday MPs on the Levelling Up, Housing and Communities Committee continued their inquiry into the state of social housing in England. The inquiry is in part down to the work of 23 year old Kwajo Tweneboa, who's been raising awareness about the poor condition of social housing in South London and in particular on the estate of Eastfields. We'll hear the latest from Kwajo about his campaign.

And, following a HMRC ruling that flapjacks made by a company in Birmingham were more like cereal bars than cakes, and were therefore no longer exempt from VAT, we're asking when a flapjack is not a flapjack? Let us know what you think - youandyours@bbc.co.uk

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Miriam Williamson


WED 12:57 Weather (m0016h9m)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m0016h9p)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


WED 13:45 The Museums That Make Us (m0016h9r)
The National Museums of Wales, Cardiff

Neil MacGregor presents a new series for BBC Radio Four celebrating the role and ambition of museums the length and breadth of the country, and in the process he'll be finding answers to the question ‘What are Museums For in 2022’.

Today Neil is the guest of the National Museum of Wales, and more particularly the St Fagans museum, where the Oral Archive is housed. Neil gets to hear a range of examples from early Welsh language speakers to choirs and the more recent recordings of senior figures from the country's Windrush generation. He talks to Mrs Vernesta Cyril OBE, a celebrated midwife, who explains the sense of belonging that arises from being a part of the Oral archive.

Museums have always been telescopes trained on the past to help locate a sense of place in the present. Neil believes that role is an active one, responding to changes in the people museums serve and the shifting social and cultural landscape they inhabit. After spending much of his life at the centre of our national Museum life in London, Neil is taking to the road to discover more about the extraordinary work being done in Museums outside the capital, from Stornoway to Stowmarket, and Belfast to Birmingham.

In each episode he visits a single museum, inviting them to choose an object from their collections which they feel best illustrates their civic role, and the way they relate and want to relate to their local audience. Very rarely have they chosen a crown jewel from their often priceless collections. More often it's an object with a particular local resonance, or which helps tackle episodes from the past which are being viewed very differently by citizens in the 21st century.

He’ll be visiting the great national museums of Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland, as well as major city institutions in Birmingham, Leeds, Liverpool and elsewhere. And in spite of the challenges of the last two years, everywhere he meets passionate teams who are dedicated to providing a unique experience for both local audiences and visitors from further afield.

Neil writes: “What’s going on in our museums is at once challenging and exciting and it can only really be understood by visiting as many as possible and finding out how they have approached what is a vital role in providing a sense of local, regional and national identity.”


WED 14:00 The Archers (m0016h3v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (m000lv6z)
Luxembourg Gardens

For the last five years of her short life, Katherine Mansfield struggled to find a cure for her pulmonary tuberculosis. Very ill, and sometimes hallucinatory, she spends her last day in Paris before resolving to stop writing while she finds a cure. A Mansfieldesque play about Katherine Mansfield.

Cast
Hattie Morahan ..... Katherine Mansfield
Clare Corbett ..... Ida
Olivia Ross ..... Waitress
Charlotte East ..... Laura
Luke Nunn ..... Bill
Carl Prekopp ..... Lawrence
Ian Dunnett Jr ..... Gardener
Sue Rivers ..... Grandmother
Eliza Pearce ..... Girl
Orla Pearce ..... Boy

Written by Katie Hims
Sound by Peter Ringrose
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole


WED 15:00 Money Box (m0016h9t)
Cost of Bereavement

The emotional toil of losing a partner, family member or friend is often compounded by the financial impact. With funerals costing more than £4000 and probate taking around a year on average, Charmaine Cozier hears from Tom, Laura and Annette about their experiences and an expert panel gives their tips.

Guests:

Deborah Smith – Spokesperson – National Association of Funeral Directors

Poppy Mardall – Founder & Chair – Poppy’s Funeral Directors

Nick Hill - Money Expert - Money and Pensions Service


WED 15:30 Eider Island (m001549h)
An intimate tale of bird-human interdependence.

Eider ducks probably nested on Æðey - a small island in the Icelandic Westfjords - long before the first settlers arrived. And when the settlers arrived, the birds continued to nest there.

There is one house on the island and, with spring, an extended family of eider farmers gathers from all over Iceland for an annual ritual. The farmers tend to the eider ducks, offering them protection in exchange for a harvest of precious feathers. Acclaimed Danish feature-maker Rikke Houd captures a day - and a centuries old tradition - on Æðey.

Presented and produced by Rikke Houd
With specially composed music by Sóley Stefánsdóttir
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (m0016h9w)
Footwear

Footwear - the ‘magic’ & the material reality. Laurie Taylor talks to Claudio Benzecry, Associate Professor of Communication Studies and Sociology at Northwestern University, about the people and places involved in the global manufacture of women’s shoes. They’re joined by Elizabeth Ezra, Professor of Cinema and Culture at the University of Stirling, and author of a study about magic shoes, from Wizard of Oz to Cinderella, which finds that 'the perfect fit' relates to more than size and that our culture invests footwear with symbolic meanings beyond their status as mere commodities.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m0016h9y)
Piers Morgan Returns

Piers Morgan is the star signing for Rupert Murdoch's new TalkTV channel in the UK. His show, "Piers Morgan Uncensored", will also be streamed on Fox Nation in the US and air on Sky News Australia. It represents a significant bet on one man's ability to transfix a global audience. But is it money well spent? Piers Morgan discusses his departure from Good Morning Britain, "cancel culture" and the limits of free speech, his record on holding Donald Trump to account, and changing business models in the media.

Producer: Dan Hardoon

Presenter: Ros Atkins

Editor: Richard Hooper


WED 17:00 PM (m0016hb0)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0016hb4)
A Ukrainian commander in Mariupol said forces there were facing their final days. And all Russian and Belorussian tennis players have been banned from this year's Wimbledon.


WED 18:30 The Confessional (m000vgfs)
Series 1

The Confession of Dr Phil Hammond

Actor, comedian and broadcaster Stephen Mangan presents a new comedy chat show about shame and guilt.

Each week, Stephen invites a different guest into his virtual confessional box to make three confessions - with remarkable storytelling and surprising insights.

We’re used to hearing celebrity interviews where stars are persuaded to show off about their achievements. Stephen's not interested in that. He doesn’t want to know about his guests' proudest moments, he wants to know what they’re ashamed of. That’s surely the way to find out what really makes a person tick.

Stephen and his guest reflect with empathy and humour on why we get embarrassed, where our shame thresholds should be, and the value of guilt.

Series guests include Marian Keyes, Cariad Lloyd, Joan Bakewell, Suzi Ruffell, Clarke Peters and many more.

This week, Phil Hammond, doctor, journalist and the medical correspondent for Private Eye, delivers some eye watering accounts of youthful mistakes, dubious diagnoses and Twitter storms.

Written and presented by Stephen Mangan
With extra material by Nick Doody
Produced by Dave Anderson and Frank Stirling
A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4


WED 19:00 The Archers (m0016hb6)
The village absorbs the news that Grey Gables is closing and everyone is being made redundant. Brian can’t believe Oliver didn’t give Peggy a heads up. Meanwhile Vince wants to be sure that the news about the hotel won’t affect the party he has planned there for Elizabeth’s birthday. On his way in to work, Freddie takes Vince’s list of requests to Oliver for the party. Oliver interrupts him to say with staff leaving for other work it’s not feasible to host the party. Vince is livid when Oliver relays the party’s cancellation to him. Freddie interrupts them to say he’s persuaded enough people to help so that the party can go ahead. In fact he hopes to make it the best party his mum’s ever had.

Brian and Jennifer enjoyed their stay in Bath which Ruairi arranged. When Brian asks Alice what’s happened while they’ve been away, it gets awkward and Ruairi makes a swift exit to pack to return to London. Alice follows him and asks if Ruairi has spoken to Ben since the party. Ruairi doesn’t want to listen but Alice presses on saying she is there if he ever wants to talk. For a moment Ruairi looks like he’s about to open up but then says he can’t trust Alice with his secrets which puzzles Alice. After dropping Ruairi at the train station, Brian calls in on Alice. He feels like there’s something she’s not telling him. She tells him that Chris has requested Home Farm to be valued so that Alice’s share can be assessed for their divorce. Brian isn’t surprised.


WED 19:15 Front Row (m0016hb8)
Sarah Solemani on TV's Chivalry; male soprano Samuel Marino performs; Bradford's bid for UK City of Culture

Chivalry, the new Channel 4 comedy which looks at the making of a Hollywood movie in a post MeToo world, has been co-created by its co-stars – Sarah Solemani, and Steve Coogan. Sarah joins Elle Osili-Wood on Front Row to discuss why MeToo has provided new grounds for comedy.

Venezuelan singer Samuel Mariño originally trained as a ballet dancer before embracing his rare vocal range as a male soprano and promoting gender and genre-fluid performance. He sings live in the studio, ahead of his debut London recital and the release of his new album, Sopranista, featuring arias recorded by a male soprano voice for the first time.

Four cities are in the running to be the UK’s next City of Culture and Front Row is hearing from the places on the final shortlist. Tonight it’s the turn of Bradford as reporter Aisha Iqbal hears about what the UK’s youngest city has to offer.

Presenter: Elle Osili-Wood
Producer: Simon Richardson

Image: Steve Coogan and Sarah Solemani in Channel 4's Chivalry


WED 20:00 The Exchange (m0016hbb)
Flooding

Catherine Carr brings together two people whose homes have been flooded. After years of battling, one decided to leave, while the other decided to stay. They share their stories and exchange gifts. Their presents unlock each of their decisions, and tell something deeper about what they’ve been through.

Lynne Jones and Selena Whitehead have a stressful experience in common. Both their homes – on opposite sides of the country – have flooded multiple times. They lost countless possessions, most heart-breaking for both were photographs of their children when they were small and presents given by relatives.

They both talk about the emotion of seeing the sanctuary of your home turned into a dank, dusty, dirty shell and they speak of how hard it is to turn that shell back into a place of comfort and belonging again.

The idea of home is complex and emotional but, ultimately, is the building that you call home worth the risk of living next to a river that floods?

Presented by Catherine Carr
Produced by Charlotte Pritchard

A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


WED 20:45 One to One (m000yyq5)
Escapes: Anna Freeman talks to Miranda Allen

In this episode of One to One, writer Anna Freeman speaks to escape artist Miranda Allen. Together they explore their mutual love of escapes as a concept, and the delicate balance of peril and catharsis that makes Miranda's work so compelling.

Producer for BBC Audio in Bristol: Caitlin Hobbs


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (m0016h3j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 The Media Show (m0016h9y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m0016hbd)
French election TV debate

In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 These Days by Lucy Caldwell (m0016hbg)
Episode 3

Two sisters, four nights, one city.

April, 1941. Belfast has escaped the worst of the war – so far. Over the next two months, it’s going to be destroyed from above, so that people will say, in horror, My God, Belfast is finished.
Many won’t make it through, and no one who does will remain unchanged.
Following the lives of sisters Emma and Audrey – one engaged to be married, the other in a secret relationship with another woman – as they try to survive the horrors of the four nights of bombing which were the Belfast Blitz, 'These Days' is a timeless and heart-breaking novel about living under duress, about family, and about how we try to stay true to ourselves.

Lucy Caldwell is the author of four novels, several stage plays and radio dramas, and two collections of short stories: Multitudes and Intimacies. She won the BBC National Short Story Award in 2021 for ‘All the People Were Mean and Bad.’

Author: Lucy Caldwell
Reader: Lisa Dwyer Hogg
Abridger: Rowan Routh
Producer: Gemma McMullan
Executive Editor: Andy Martin
A BBC Northern Ireland Production.


WED 23:00 Little Lifetimes by Jenny Eclair (m0016hbj)
Series 7

The Fundraiser

Written by Jenny Eclair
Read by Victoria Hamilton.

Producer ..... Sally Avens

The annual school quiz is the highlight of the year for one particularly competitive mother, but knowing the flags of every nation is of no use at all at this year's event when a completely different kind of knowledge is called for.

Victoria Hamilton is an award winning actress on stage and screen. She has most recently been seen as The Queen Mother in the first series of The Crown and the Sky Series Cobra.


WED 23:15 The Skewer (m0016hbl)
Series 6

Episode 3

Jon Holmes remixes the news. This week - a bit like Uncle Vernon in Harry Potter, Boris's letterbox is besieged by owls bearing police FPNs, we Escape To The War Torn Country, and ask 'What Is A Woman?'

An Unusual production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0016hbn)
Susan Hulme reports on a fractious Prime Minister's Question Time dominated by partygate.



THURSDAY 21 APRIL 2022

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m0016hbq)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


THU 00:30 Preventable by Devi Sridhar (m0016hbs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0016hbv)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0016hbx)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0016hbz)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m0016hc1)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0016n3t)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Father Martin Magill


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m0016hc5)
21/04/22 - Tree health, glasshouses, egg prices, fishing and conservation

The government is introducing new rules on sourcing trees - which could place more importance on growing in the UK, in line with the country’s tree planting targets. From June anyone getting a grant can only get trees from approved suppliers, in an effort to improve tree health and prevent pests.

Plus, all this week we’re looking at glasshouse production, which typically might make you think of salad leaves, peppers, and tomatoes; but there are some unlikely crops being cultivated under glass too - such as trees!

The Wash in East Anglia, which runs just south of Skegness to Hunstanton, supports around 60 boats fishing cockles, mussels and brown shrimp for generations. It’s also an important overwintering site for hundreds of thousands of migratory birds. There’s always been tension between fishing and wildlife, managed by an agreement, but it expires this year. Helen Mark visits for this week's Open Country.

And free-range egg producers say that because of the rising costs they face, retailers should add 40p to the price of half a dozen eggs. We've had listeners get in touch to say they'd be happy to pay more, but how much can consumers really impact supermarket pricing?

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrc4v)
Swallow (Spring)

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the swallow. A flash of blue across farmland or a stableyard and a burst of twittering can only mean one thing, the swallows are back after their long migration from South Africa. No matter how grey the April weather, the sight and sound of a swallow dispels the winter blues at a stroke. These agile migrants arrive as the insect population is beginning to increase, and they are a delight to watch as they hawk for flies in the spring sunshine.


THU 06:00 Today (m0016hdd)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (m0016hdj)
Olympe de Gouges

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the French playwright who, in 1791, wrote The Declaration of the Rights of Woman and of the Female Citizen. This was Olympe de Gouges (1748-93) and she was responding to The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen from 1789, the start of the French Revolution which, by excluding women from these rights, had fallen far short of its apparent goals. Where the latter declared ‘men are born equal’, she asserted ‘women are born equal to men,’ adding, ‘since women are allowed to mount the scaffold, they should also be allowed to stand in parliament and defend their rights’. Two years later this playwright, novelist, activist and woman of letters did herself mount the scaffold, two weeks after Marie Antoinette, for the crime of being open to the idea of a constitutional monarchy and, for two hundred years, her reputation died with her, only to be revived with great vigour in the last 40 years.

With

Catriona Seth
Marshal Foch Professor of French Literature at the University of Oxford

Katherine Astbury
Professor of French Studies at the University of Warwick

And

Sanja Perovic
Reader in 18th century French studies at King’s College London

Producer: Simon Tillotson


THU 09:45 Preventable by Devi Sridhar (m0016hg8)
Episode 4

How a Pandemic Changed the World & How to Stop the Next One

As her insider's history of Covid-19 continues, Professor Sridhar remembers the global race to find a vaccine.

Devi Sridhar, Chair of Global Public Health at Edinburgh University, has risen to prominence as one of Britain’s most trusted commentators on COVID-19. Fresh from advising the Scottish and UK Governments, the WHO and UNICEF, the academic uses the timeline of the pandemic to shine a light on how science, politics, ethics and economics affect our health.

Written and read by Devi Sridhar
Abridged by Rosemary Goring
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0016hdn)
Bonnie Langford celebrates 50 years of performing, Frances Fricker, Divorce - a male perspective, Lipoedema treatment

Presenter: Krupa Padhy
Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Interviewed Guest: Bonnie Langford
Interviewed Guest: Frances Fricker
Reporter: Henrietta Harrison
Interviewed Guest: Sharie Fetzer

Bonnie Langford was just seven years old when she performed as Bonnie Butler at Theatre Royal Drury Lane in Gone With The Wind. She has since appeared in everything from Gypsy to Cats and Chicago. In more recent years she has played Dorothy Brock in 42nd Street at London’s Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, and brought her unique portrayal of Roz in Dolly Parton’s 9 to 5, The Musical. Bonnie joins Krupa to discuss her career spanning 50 years on stage and her current role as Evangeline Harcourt in Anything Goes.

A professional woman who was continually called "good girl" by her boss has won an employment tribunal. Frances Fricker was told by her boss which photo to put on her work profile because HE thought it was the most attractive. The judge in the tribunal found that Frances, an accounts executive with a consultancy company called Gartner, had been sexually harassed at work, and because she fought against the harassment by taking a grievance, she was treated even worse. He also described the culture where she worked as laddish and toxic.

In the latest in our series about Life after Divorce we hear a male perspective - Ryan, not his real name,  is 34 and has two young children. He met his wife in his early twenties and married in 2015  but their relationship began to deteriorate after kids came along and they began the divorce process in November 2020. His own parents divorced when he was young. More than 40% of marriages end in divorce – and most of us will have been affected by one  - whether it be our own, our parents’ or our children’s. Yet we don’t speak easily about the process or the fallout.  In Life After Divorce our reporter Henrietta Harrison, who has recently been through a divorce herself, is speaking to listeners at different stages of the process.  

It’s estimated that Lipoedema effects up to 1 in 10 women in the UK. It’s the build up of fat cells in the bottom, legs and sometimes the arms. Until recently the most common type of treatment was liposuction – which permanently removes fat cells – but as of last month the regulator NICE has said liposuction can no longer be used as a treatment in the UK – deeming it unsafe and ineffective. We hear from Sharie Fetzer from Lipoedema UK and a patient who was halfway through her liposuction treatment when the rules changed.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (m0016hdq)
Myanmar: fighting the might of the junta

Myanmar is now in a state of civil war. What started in February 2021 as a mass protest movement against the military coup is now a nationwide armed uprising. The junta is under attack across the country from a network of civilian militias called the People’s Defence Forces who are fighting to restore democracy. The BBC gained rare access to the jungle training camps where young protests are being turned into soldiers. We follow a single mother and a student who have sacrificed everything to join the fight. They're up against a well-trained military that’s willing to use brutal tactics to stay in power. As the death toll mounts and the world looks away, can they restore democracy?

Reporter, Rebecca Henschke.
Produced with Kelvin Brown, Ko Ko Aung and Banyar Kong Janoi.


THU 11:30 Life, Death and the Foghorn (m000l8p1)
What happened to the foghorn, those beloved giants of our coastal landscape and soundscape? There used to be more than 100 foghorns proudly stationed around the British Isles. Now, due to maritime GPS and automation, there are fewer than 20, with the figure falling steadily.

The sound of the foghorn has always induced a melancholic feeling, and perhaps the absence of it only increases that sensation. Music journalist and broadcaster Jennifer Lucy Allan has long been obsessed with the question of what memories and experiences are lost once the foghorn engines are switched off for good. She is a foghorn obsessive, having completed a PhD on their social and cultural history.

Inspired by the Foghorn Requiem, a 2013 art performance by Lise Autogena and Joshua Portway, this programme is a eulogy for the foghorn. Those sharing their lyrical memories and tributes include a sea captain, a recorder player, and a renegade engineer who restores horns in secret.

There is also foghorn-inspired poetry by Ian C Smith and WS Merwin, and original music from Laura Cannell and Femi Oriogun-Williams.

Produced by Jack Howson.
A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:00 News Summary (m0016hkm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 You and Yours (m0016hdv)
Gap Finders - A special investigation: Instagram Fraud

Gap Finders- A special investigation: Instagram Fraud

We ask why one of the worlds most valuable companies appears to be allowing fraud on a massive scale, affecting thousands of people who use its services.

Users of the social media platform META, which owns Instagram, Facebook and Whatsapp, say the company comprehensively ignores them when they report that criminals have taken over their accounts, and then use them to attack their friends and families.

An initial investigation from our Senior Reporter Shari Vahl found that It took nearly three months and her intervention before Meta, acted to recover 19-year-old Alex Bosley’s account after it had been hijacked by scammers.

By that time, dozens of his followers had been duped into the same money flip scam, handing over funds and surrendering access to their Instagram accounts as part of a con that promised rapid returns on cryptocurrency.

Alex, who is a professional cyclist from Oxfordshire, said one friend lost a £16,000 inheritance; another surrendered £19,000 he had saved from after-school work at a café. Between them the group was defrauded of more than £100,000.

Since then Shari has uncovered more victims of various scams operating on the platform with people losing money and important connections for their businesses.

As part of this special programme, we explore the gap the criminals are exploiting to do this, the impact, and how users are planning to fight back.

We'll be joined by Ax Sharma, a Security Researcher, and Technology Reporter to look at the scale of the problem.

Presenter: Nicola Beckford
Senior Reporter: Shari Vahl
Producer: Linda Walker


THU 12:32 Sliced Bread (m0016hdx)
Wagyu Beef

For many beef connoisseurs, a wagyu steak is the tenderest meat money can buy. They say it literally melts in the mouth. But Pete wants to know, if a Wagyu steak can set you back £100, how can supermarkets sell Wagyu burgers for around £3.50 a pair? How much of what makes wagyu beef so prized trickles down into a burger?

Greg speaks to meat scientist, Martin Anderson, visits a Wagyu farm in Yorkshire, and sets up a blind taste test. All to find out if Wagyu burgers are the best thing between sliced bread.

Do you have a suggestion of a ‘wonder-product’ making a bold claim that Greg can investigate next?

Send us your suggestions to sliced.bread@bbc.co.uk or send it to Greg direct on Twitter or Instagram where he’s @gregfoot
PRESENTER: GREG FOOT
PRODUCERS: JULIAN PASZKIEWICZ & KEVIN CORE


THU 12:57 Weather (m0016hdz)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m0016hf1)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


THU 13:45 The Museums That Make Us (m0016hf3)
The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Neil MacGregor presents a new series for BBC Radio Four celebrating the role and ambition of museums the length and breadth of the country, and in the process he'll be finding answers to the question ‘What are Museums For in 2022’.

In a week visiting the National Museums of the United Kingdom, Neil faces the challenge of finding a representative for England. In the event he plumps for the oldest of them all, the Ashmolean in Oxford. But rather than the Alfred Jewel, an item that seems to represent something essential in the English psyche, the museum have opted for a far older object from Northern Syria. Acquired by Oxford's own T.E.Lawrence, this small model clay wagon, possibly a child's toy, provides an opportunity to demonstrate how the museum can provide for a huge breadth of local people from all over the world.

Museums have always been telescopes trained on the past to help locate a sense of place in the present. Neil believes that role is an active one, responding to changes in the people museums serve and the shifting social and cultural landscape they inhabit. After spending much of his life at the centre of our national Museum life in London, Neil is taking to the road to discover more about the extraordinary work being done in Museums outside the capital, from Stornoway to Stowmarket, and Belfast to Birmingham.

In each episode he visits a single museum, inviting them to choose an object from their collections which they feel best illustrates their civic role, and the way they relate and want to relate to their local audience. Very rarely have they chosen a crown jewel from their often priceless collections. More often it's an object with a particular local resonance, or which helps tackle episodes from the past which are being viewed very differently by citizens in the 21st century.

He’ll be visiting the great national museums of Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland, as well as major city institutions in Birmingham, Leeds, Liverpool and elsewhere. And in spite of the challenges of the last two years, everywhere he meets passionate teams who are dedicated to providing a unique experience for both local audiences and visitors from further afield.

Neil writes: “What’s going on in our museums is at once challenging and exciting and it can only really be understood by visiting as many as possible and finding out how they have approached what is a vital role in providing a sense of local, regional and national identity.”


THU 14:00 The Archers (m0016hb6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 McLevy (m0016hf5)
McLevy in the New World

Part 1: Shake Hands With The Devil

Part 1: Shake Hands With The Devil

Brian Cox returns as Inspector James McLevy in a new two-part adventure by David Ashton.

At the end of the last series, Jean and the Inspector fled from Leith on a steamer bound for San Francisco. McLevy was accused of killing two suspects, assaulting his chief constable, and indirectly causing the death of Lieutenant Roach. Faced with career-ending disgrace he opts to scarper – and Jean, gallantly but perhaps rashly, decides to go with him. They arrive in San Francisco at the height of the Gold Rush in 1849 like two innocents in a shark pool. Well, maybe not quite so innocent…

McLevy ..... BRIAN COX
Jean Brash ..... SIOBHAN REDMOND
Forbes ..... MATTHEW MARSH
Templeton ..... .JOSEPH BALDERRAMA
Brennan ..... DES McALEER
George Taylor ..... GUNNAR CAUTHERY
Flaxman ..... JASON BARNETT
Cathleen/ Maria ..... ELLIE MEJIA
Other parts played by the cast

Producer/director: Bruce Young


THU 15:00 Open Country (m0016hf8)
The Wash

Helen Mark visits the Wash, a vast bay in East Anglia, where the interests of fishing and conservation are finely balanced.

The Wash has been fished for centuries for cockles, mussels and brown shrimp, but it's also visited by thousands of migratory birds, as they crisscross the globe.

Fishing in the bay has been sustainably managed for the last 30 years, but next year things are changing, causing uncertainty and concern for the Wash fishing fleet.

Produced by Beatrice Fenton.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m0016gr4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m0016gs1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 Epiphanies (m000y6jd)
Sara Collins, Bobby Gillespie, Lisa Dwan

John Wilson explores the intimate moments of creative inspiration that have been experienced by some of our best known artists.

The actress Lisa Dwan recalls the unforgettable impact of seeing her first Beckett play on television, and then, as a young actress, receiving the script for “Not I” and realising that this was a man who was writing for ‘the voices in my head’.

Bobby Gillespie of Primal Scream talks about writing poetry as child in a tough Glaswegian comprehensive school and the breakthrough moment during the writing of the band’s hit ‘I’m Losing More Than I’ll Ever Have’ when he realised you didn’t have to use metaphor or symbolism, but instead could channel raw, honest emotion.

Novelist Sara Collins remembers fleeing Jamaica with her family at the age of four, after her father was forced into exile during the political turmoil of the mid-1970s. As the feelings of displacement and loss of identity overwhelmed her, she found solace in the world of Hans Christian Andersen’s Little Match Girl.

Produced by John Wilson
Executive Producer: David Prest
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m0016hfb)
Building Better Engagement

Victoria Gill and guests ask why does scientific communication matters in society and how it might be done better, with Sam Illingworth, Berry Billingsley and Ozmala Ismail.

The climate crisis and Covid-19 have shown over the recent years the importance of reliable, relatable, transparent and trusted science communication. But just like science itself, it comes in different forms and takes different approaches. Always keen to keep you up to date, BBC Inside Science takes a moment to discuss good practice and how it might be done better.

Dr Oz Ismail is a dementia researcher who also finds time to do stand-up, public engagement and a podcast called Why Aren’t You A Doctor Yet?

Sam Illingworth is an Associate Professor at Edinburgh Napier University who investigates science and communication between disciplines. He is also a poet and writer, and has a podcast called The Poetry of Science.

And Berry Billingsley is Professor in Science Education at Canterbury Christchurch University. Erstwhile science broadcaster, she looks at ways science education could be enhanced through building what her team call Epistemic Insight - transforming the nature of science education in society's younger members.

Presented by Victoria Gill

Produced by Alex Mansfield and Samara Linton


THU 17:00 PM (m0016hfd)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0016hfj)
Boris Johnson is to face a Parliamentary committee inquiry into claims that he misled the House of Commons after MPs approved the move this afternoon.


THU 18:30 Paul Sinha's Perfect Pub Quiz (m0016hfl)
Series 1

Round one: Literature

The problem with quizzes is that the same questions keep coming up, like “What’s the name of the only member of ZZ Top without a beard?”*. So the more quizzes you do, the more predictable they get.

Luckily, here comes quizzer, comedian and Rose d’Or winner Paul Sinha with his new series, Paul Sinha’s Perfect Pub Quiz. In each episode he invites the audience to tell him their favourite quiz questions, before offering up not just different and surprising questions, but also the fascinating stories behind the answers.

It’s facts, jokes, stories and puns – just the way you like them.

This week's show is full of questions for the Literature Round of the quiz. Paul asks about the first work of sci-fi to depict a flight to the moon, an author's curiously-labelled filing cabinet and the best-selling British writer still alive at the time of recording. The audience, meanwhile, contribute questions about unusual verbs, literary hotels, and the works of Eric Morecambe.

Written and performed by Paul Sinha
Additional material: Oliver Levy
Additional questions: The Audience

Original music: Tim Sutton

Sound engineer: Jerry Peal

Producer: Ed Morrish

A Lead Mojo production for BBC Radio 4

*Frank Beard, as you well know.


THU 19:00 The Archers (m0016hfq)
Freddie directs the volunteers he’s drafted in to staff his mum’s surprise birthday party. Roy is impressed with what Freddie’s managed to pull off. Roy then explains they might be able to challenge Adil and Oliver’s decision to fire everyone at a tribunal.

Elizabeth is stunned by the surprise and Vince credits Freddie for making the party happen. Elizabeth shows off the platinum bracelet Vince had bought her. Then, Vince says he has something for Freddie as a way of thanks. Freddie struggles to hide his disappointment when Vince hands him a CD of classic 1980s music.

Behind the bar Jolene tries to chat with Kathy about village news. Adil approaches and recognises Jolene. He asks if Jolene and Kenton took over The Bull from Kathy. The two women awkwardly explain their relationship histories with Sid and Kenton. Lynda interrupts to ask if they’ve seen Freddie. Adil is keen to make her acquaintance but Lynda is set on finding Freddie. She finds him in the Grey Gables kitchen, the place that Freddie rescued her from in March 2020. Freddie feels low after not securing investment from Vince for his DJ business. Lynda tells him to have faith in himself.

Roy loses his cool with Adil and tells him that the Grey Gables staff will be taking him to a tribunal. Adil says he and Oliver plan to give everyone an extra bonus plus eventually there will be jobs at Grey Gables again. Roy says he’ll be lucky if anyone ever sets foot in there again.


THU 19:15 Front Row (m0016hfs)
Atlantis and The Young Pretender reviewed, Martin Green, Venice Biennale

Atlantis (2019) was the Ukrainian entry for that year's Oscars. It now seems incredibly prescient in its depiction of a Ukraine set post-war in 2025. Film critic Laruskha Ivan-Zadeh and historian Kathryn Hughes join Front Row to review it. They'll also be talking about Michael Arditti's novel The Young Pretender. It imagines the life of the real-life child star Master Betty as a young adult attempting to re-enter the flamboyant world of Georgian theatre.

The Venice Biennale, one of the art world’s most prestigious events, opens to the public this weekend. Art critic Hettie Judah is currently in Venice and shares her thoughts about what’s on show at the vast international exhibition.

Ivor Novello winning composer Martin Green has immersed himself in the world of brass bands to prepare a new composition premiering this weekend at the Coventry Music Biennale. He tells Tom about writing his piece, Split the Air, and the people that create the incredible music they produce.

Presenter: Tom Sutcliffe
Producer: Sarah Johnson


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (m0016hfv)
Will the Rwanda plan work?

The Home Secretary, Priti Patel, has unveiled a plan to stop small boat crossings in the English Channel by sending asylum seekers to Rwanda. But will it work?

Joining David Aaronovitch in the briefing room are:

Mark Easton, BBC's Home Editor
Alexander Betts, Professor of Forced Migration and International Affairs at the Refugees Studies Centre
Nicolas Rollason, partner and head of Business Immigration at Kingsley Napley
Madeleine Sumption, Director of The Migration Observatory

Producers: Rosamund Jones, Ben Carter and Kirsteen Knight
Production Co-ordinators: Sophie Hill and Siobhan Reed
Studio Manager: Rod Farquhar
Editor: Richard Vadon


THU 20:30 Life Changing (m0016h97)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 on Wednesday]


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m0016hfb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (m0016hdj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m0016hfy)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 These Days by Lucy Caldwell (m0016hg0)
Episode 4

Two sisters, four nights, one city.

April, 1941. Belfast has escaped the worst of the war – so far. Over the next two months, it’s going to be destroyed from above, so that people will say, in horror, My God, Belfast is finished.
Many won’t make it through, and no one who does will remain unchanged.
Following the lives of sisters Emma and Audrey – one engaged to be married, the other in a secret relationship with another woman – as they try to survive the horrors of the four nights of bombing which were the Belfast Blitz, 'These Days' is a timeless and heart-breaking novel about living under duress, about family, and about how we try to stay true to ourselves.

Lucy Caldwell is the author of four novels, several stage plays and radio dramas, and two collections of short stories: Multitudes and Intimacies. She won the BBC National Short Story Award in 2021 for ‘All the People Were Mean and Bad.’

Author: Lucy Caldwell
Reader: Lisa Dwyer Hogg
Abridger: Rowan Routh
Producer: Gemma McMullan
Executive Editor: Andy Martin
A BBC Northern Ireland Production.


THU 23:00 The Likely Dads (m0016hg2)
Series 2

Past and Future

Host Tim Vincent and regular panellists Mick Ferry and Russell Kane discuss what they think the future holds for their children and how things used to be when they were growing up.

What occupations will they have? What sort of grip does technology hold over our children? Was it easier being a parent 20 or 30 years ago? And if they could resurrect parenting practices from the past, what would they be?

As always, the two regular Likely Dads square off against each other to see how they would handle hypothetical parenting scenarios using their fathering experience in Mick and Russell's Dad Off. Meanwhile, the panel is asked to deduce the source of some anonymous facts from within the group. This week, our panellists must uncover whose experience buying a pram resulted in a panic attack.

Joining Tim, Mick and Russell this week - comedian Emmanuel Sonubi and writer and comedian Sanjeev Kohli.

Producers: Kurt Brookes and Ashley Byrne
A Made In Manchester production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0016hg4)
All the news from Westminster with Sean Curran where MPs vote on a motion to refer Boris Johnson to the Privileges Committee.



FRIDAY 22 APRIL 2022

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m0016hg6)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 00:30 Preventable by Devi Sridhar (m0016hg8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0016hgb)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0016hgd)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0016hgg)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m0016hgj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0016n5d)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Father Martin Magill


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m0016hgn)
22/04/22 - Unprecedented inflation for farmers

A report from Anglia Farmers - one of the UK’s biggest farming cooperatives - suggests the cost of farming inputs has increased by 23.28% in just six months to the end of March 2022. And that’s on top of a 22% increase in the previous six months. No sector in farming has escaped the price rises.

One impact of the increased price of gas is that people growing salad crops in heated glasshouses have greatly reduced their production. We visit one grower who says the future of his business is in the balance.

Presented by Caz Graham
Produced in Bristol by Heather Simons


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09h6b4d)
Tara Robinson on the Cuckoo

The simple call of the cuckoo in spring has inspired theatre director Tara Robinson to create a play all about bird migration.

Producer Andrew Dawes
Photograph Mark Pirie.


FRI 06:00 Today (m0016hgq)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (m0016grj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Preventable by Devi Sridhar (m0016hgs)
Episode 5

How a Pandemic Changed the World & How to Stop the Next One

Professor Sridhar lays out the terrible inequalities that have been laid bare by the pandemic - but finds room for some hope for the future.

Devi Sridhar, Chair of Global Public Health at Edinburgh University, has risen to prominence as one of Britain’s most trusted commentators on Covid-19. Fresh from advising the Scottish and UK Governments, the WHO and UNICEF, the academic uses the timeline of the pandemic to shine a light on how science, politics, ethics and economics affect our health.

Written and read by Devi Sridhar
Abridged by Rosemary Goring
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0016hgv)
Wet Leg's Rhian, HRT shortage, Women and boxing

The indie band Wet Leg went straight to number 1 last week with their debut album. Their songs are witty: all about love, sex, parties and breakups. We speak to one of the band members, Rhian Teasdale.

When it comes to losing weight why is the word “diet” used less and less these days? The diet industry is worth billions, but lots of people think the word itself is unhelpful. We talk to Dr Saira Hameed, an NHS Consultant who specialises in obesity medicine at Imperial College London. She's also the author of The Full Diet. And we also have Rhiannon Lambert, who's a Nutritionist.

Can boxing transform lives? The actor Idris Elba thinks it might and he's got a series called Fight School which is currently on BBC 2. He’s recruited a group of eight young men and women, giving them an intensive boxing course with the aim of improving confidence and resilience. There's another goal which is to compete in an amateur fight. Chanika is one of the young women taking part, and Rachel Bower is one of the boxing coaches on the show. Rachel is also a former National Boxing champion and a Metropolitan police sergeant. They come into the Woman's Hour studio to speak to Anita.

When it comes to getting HRT, MPs have been accused, once more, of betraying millions of menopausal women by failing to improve access to it as they promised. In October ministers announced a 'menopause revolution' but the plan to cut the cost of HRT doesn't come about until next April and now tens of thousands of women are suffering because of a nationwide shortage. But what's the impact of not having your gel or patch? Anita is joined by Dr Nighat Arif, a GP, plus author and documentary maker Kate Muir.


FRI 11:00 Three Pounds in My Pocket (m0016hgx)
Series 5

Episode 3

Kavita Puri looks at how where you come from and what you come with can affect outcomes for generations. For almost a decade Kavita has been charting the social history of British South Asians in post-war Britain. Many of the pioneers arrived with as little as £3 due to strict currency controls. In the final episode of this series, Kavita explores a sensitive subject - but one that keeps coming up while making these series. She tries to understand a bit more about how origins on the Indian subcontinent, your background and where you settled may affect your life chances after migration. She hears stories about how different groups are perceived and accepted. These are personal reflections rarely told of what you give up to survive - and thrive - in Britain.

Producer: Ant Adeane
Editor: Hugh Levinson

Historical consultants:
Professor Tariq Modood, University of Bristol
Dr Florian Stadtler, University of Bristol
Dr Edward Anderson, Northumbria University
Professor Gurharpal Singh, School of Oriental and African Studies


FRI 11:30 Whatever Happened to Baby Jane Austen? (m0016hgz)
Series 1

Episode 3

Dawn French and Jennifer Saunders star as respected novelist Florence and movie star Selina, in a sparkling comedy series about two sisters at war, by Veep writer David Quantick.

Selina’s close personal ex-husband Andrew has died and – much to Florence’s rage and fury - left her a small Picasso. Meanwhile the murky waters of daughter Lucy’s parentage are stirred as Florence’s PA Mrs Ragnarrok has a mysterious meeting with Jonathan, who happens to be Lucy’s father. Unaware of any of this, Lucy continues to plan the round-the-world yacht voyage that everyone has completely forgotten she is about to undertake.

Critical reaction to the first episode, originally broadcast in December 2020:
“The leads’ natural chemistry, plus David Quantick’s witty script… make for an enjoyable comedy with series potential” The Observer

“It’s as slick, dark and funny as one would expect – but surely this cannot be a one-off? The ending alone leaves us begging for a series” Radio Times

“French and Saunders sparkle with a magic that is so rarely heard in new radio comedies that I’d almost forgotten it was possible” Daily Telegraph

Cast:
Florence - Dawn French
Selina - Jennifer Saunders
Mrs Ragnarrok – Rebecca Front
Lucy - Lisa McGrillis
All the men - Alistair McGowan

Written by David Quantick
Producer: Liz Anstee

A CPL production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m0016hh1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Archive on 4 (m0016gwk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


FRI 12:57 Weather (m0016hh4)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m0016hh6)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Jonny Dymond.


FRI 13:45 The Museums That Make Us (m0016hh8)
What are museums for?

Neil MacGregor presents a new series for BBC Radio Four celebrating the role and ambition of museums the length and breadth of the country, and in the process he'll be finding answers to the question ‘What are Museums For in 2022’.

In this, the final programme in the series Neil looks for his own local museum, and finds himself beguiled by an extraordinary Tapestry that tells the story of his native Scotland, but told by a wonderfully democratic array of designers, stitchers and the historian Alistair Moffet. Neil joins Alistair in Galashiels to work the length of the Great Tapestry of Scotland and see his own life, and that of his nation mapped out with needle and thread wonderful artistry. And Neil also reaches conclusions about his travels through the series, and what they've demonstrated about museums, the people that run them and the visitors who are being inspired by them every day.

Museums have always been telescopes trained on the past to help locate a sense of place in the present. Neil believes that role is an active one, responding to changes in the people museums serve and the shifting social and cultural landscape they inhabit. After spending much of his life at the centre of our national Museum life in London, Neil is taking to the road to discover more about the extraordinary work being done in Museums outside the capital, from Stornoway to Stowmarket, and Belfast to Birmingham.

In each episode he visits a single museum, inviting them to choose an object from their collections which they feel best illustrates their civic role, and the way they relate and want to relate to their local audience. Very rarely have they chosen a crown jewel from their often priceless collections. More often it's an object with a particular local resonance, or which helps tackle episodes from the past which are being viewed very differently by citizens in the 21st century.

He’ll be visiting the great national museums of Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland, as well as major city institutions in Birmingham, Leeds, Liverpool and elsewhere. And in spite of the challenges of the last two years, everywhere he meets passionate teams who are dedicated to providing a unique experience for both local audiences and visitors from further afield.

Neil writes: “What’s going on in our museums is at once challenging and exciting and it can only really be understood by visiting as many as possible and finding out how they have approached what is a vital role in providing a sense of local, regional and national identity.”

Produced by Tom Alban
Original Music By Phil Channell


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m0016hfq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Limelight (m0016hhb)
Dead Hand

Dead Hand – Episode 4: 97

A contemporary thriller set in Northern Ireland written by Stuart Drennan.

Greg is the host of a true crime podcast dedicated to uncovering the identity of a serial killer, last active over twenty years ago, known only as Dead Hand. A killer named after a mysterious radio transmission which has been broadcasting an indecipherable code in the years since Dead Hand vanished. A code told in the voices of Dead Hand’s victims; including Greg’s missing father. However, when a new voice is added to the code, Greg realises that Dead Hand is active again. With time already running out, can he finally crack the code and catch the killer?

Cast:
Greg ... Paul Mallon
DS Murray … Michelle Fairley
Kate … Roísín Gallagher
Lucy … Hannah Eggleton
Stacey … Eimear Fearon
Thomas … Patrick Fitzsymons
Assistant Jo … Nicky Harley
All other roles played by members of the cast.

Writer … Stuart Drennan
Script Editor … Philip Palmer
Producer … Michael Shannon
Executive Editor … Andy Martin

A BBC Northern Ireland production for Radio 4.


FRI 14:45 Living with the Gods (b09bfn8y)
Water of Life and Death

Neil MacGregor continues his series on the expression of shared beliefs in communities around the world and across time, and focuses on water, including a visit to the Ganges at Varanasi, India.

In Islam, Christianity and Judaism, water is an essential part of religious practice. But for no faith does water - and one particular kind of water - play such a significant role as for Hindus. To bathe in the river Ganges is not just to prepare to meet the divine, but already to be embraced by it. The river Ganges is the goddess Ganga, and the waters of this river, which govern life and death, have not only determined many aspects of Hinduism, but in considerable measure shaped the identity of the modern state of India.

Producer Paul Kobrak

The series is produced in partnership with the British Museum.
Photograph: (c) The Trustees of the British Museum.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0016hhd)
Wickham Bishops, Essex

Peter Gibbs and the panel are in Wickham Bishops, Essex. Christine Walkden, Bob Flowerdew and James Wong answer the horticultural questions.

This week, the team talk pruning - when is the best time and how? They also tackle the tough subject of black spot and have some tips to leave your gardens brimming with biodiversity.

Beyond the questions, Dr Chris Thorogood, lead by botanist Pat Malabrigo, goes in search of the pungent rafflesia banoana plant in the high elevation rainforests of the northern Philippines.

Producer: Jemima Rathbone
Assistant Producer: Bethany Hocken

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 Short Works (m0016hhg)
Natural Wonders

Every year, on one day in June, mayflies live, dance, mate and die above the Tisa River. A married couple go to Serbia to witness the natural wonder.

The writer Vesna Goldsworthy comes from Belgrade. Her books include a memoir, Chernobyl Strawberries, and the London-based novels Gorsky and Monsieur Ka. Her latest novel, Iron Curtain, was published in 2022.

Writer: Vesna Goldsworthy
Reader: Brana Bajic
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m0016hhj)
Mimi Reinhardt, Sir Harrison Birtwistle (pictured), Sylvia Lancaster OBE, Letizia Battaglia

John Wilson on

Mimi Reinhardt, the Holocaust survivor who typed Oskar Schindler’s famous list and later turned down an offer from Steven Spielberg.

Sir Harrison Birtwistle, the uncompromising British composer of contemporary classical music who once caused panic at the Proms.

Sylvia Lancaster, the mother of Sophie Lancaster who was brutally murdered in 2007, Sylvia set up a foundation with the aim of promoting tolerance and inclusivity among young people...

And Letizia Battaglia, who defied the Mafia with her graphic photographs of their crimes.

Producer: Neil George


FRI 16:30 Feedback (m0016hhl)
After almost 40,000 questions over 75 years, is Gardeners’ Question Time in danger of running out of new questions? The programme's presenter Kathy Clugston gives an answer to that, and a range of other listener comments.

And what do Radio 4 listeners make of the station’s science programmes?

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Kate Dixon
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 17:00 PM (m0016hhn)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0016hhq)
Britain could send tanks to Poland to replace equipment Warsaw is giving to Ukraine


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (m0016hhs)
Series 108

Episode 1

Series 108 of the topical quiz where Andy Zaltzman grabs the week’s headlines and hurls them at four of the nation’s best comedians and journalists.

This week Andy is joined by Hugo Rifkind, Felicity Ward, Daliso Chaponda and Eleanor Tiernan.

Producer: Richard Morris
Production co-ordinator: Katie Baum
A BBC Studios Production


FRI 19:00 Letter from Ukraine (m0016hhw)
A Tale of Rooster Tosha and the War

Acclaimed Ukrainian novelist, Andrey Kurkov, reflects on roosters, refugees, Genghis Khan and national identity in the final letter in this series.

Written and read by Andrey Kurkov
Translated by Elizabeth Sharp
Produced by Emma Harding

Production Co-ordinator Eleri McAuliffe
Sound by Nigel Lewis

A BBC Audio Cardiff production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 19:15 Screenshot (m0016hhy)
The Wire and David Simon

Ellen E Jones and Mark Kermode explore the influence of David Simon and The Wire, as the Baltimore-set opus celebrates its 20th anniversary this year.

Beginning his career as a police reporter for the much respected Baltimore Sun, David Simon eventually became disillusioned with changes being made at the paper and spent a year embedded with the Baltimore Police Department’s Homicide Unit. That resulted in the book Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets, which became the basis for the TV show Homicide: Life On The Street.

Simon followed that with another book, The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood, which was adapted for TV as The Corner, and then created The Wire, which changed television forever.

Simon has since been behind the shows Generation Kill, Treme, The Deuce and The Plot Against America. His latest project We Own This City sees him return to Baltimore, this time to tell the true story of the rise and fall of the Baltimore Police Department’s Gun Trace Task Force and the corruption surrounding it.

Ellen looks at the influence of David Simon’s work with a focus on unconventional casting - Simon repeatedly casts non-actors, and people with first hand experience of the subjects he explores. She speaks with casting director Pat Moran, who has worked alongside Simon on several projects. She also talks to Ronan Bennett and Gerry Jackson. Ronan is the creator and writer of Top Boy and Gerry is the series’ story consultant. Gerry is a fitness trainer but his knowledge of Hackney and connection to the local community helped Ronan to write Top Boy, and to find local talent to feature in the show, in an echo of The Wire.

And Mark goes back 20 years to speak to someone who was there when The Wire began. Actor Clarke Peters was on the show for all five seasons, playing fan favourite Detective Lester Freamon and delivering some of the show’s greatest lines. Mark also talks to Professor Liam Kennedy, editor of The Wire: Race, Class, and Genre - a series of essays exploring the show's portrayals of race, drug war policing, deindustrialisation, and the inadequacies of America’s civic, educational, and political institutions.

Also, Top Boy star Ashley Walters shares what he’s been watching.

Screenshot is Radio 4’s guide through the ever-expanding universe of the moving image. Every episode, Ellen E Jones and Mark Kermode journey through the main streets and back roads connecting film, television and streaming over the last hundred years.
 
Producer: Tom Whalley
A Prospect Street production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m0016hj0)
Sir Geoffrey Clifton-Brown MP, Dame Meg Hillier MP, Adrian Ramsay, Richard Thomson MP

Anita Anand presents political debate and discussion from St Peter's Church in Sheringham, Norfolk. On the panel: Conservative MP Sir Geoffrey Clifton-Brown, Labour MP and Chair of Public Accounts Committee Dame Meg Hillier MP, Co-leader of the Green Party of England and Wales Adrian Ramsay, and Scottish National Party spokesperson for Wales and Northern Ireland at Westminster Richard Thomson MP.

Producer: Emma Campbell
Lead broadcast engineer: Kevan Long


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m0016hj2)
The Unlistened-to Story

"It is a terrible thing to be in possession of a truth that people don't want to hear," writes Howard Jacobson.

By way of Primo Levi, the great chronicler of the Holocaust, Coleridge's 'The Ancient Mariner' and stories emerging today from Ukraine, Howard argues that stories of truth must be listened to, no matter how uncomfortable or challenging we find them.

"No deceit is ever so perfected," he says, "that it doesn't require the connivance of the deceived".

Producer: Adele Armstrong
Sound: Peter Bosher
Production coordinator: Gemma Ashman
Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith


FRI 21:00 The Museums That Make Us (m0016hj5)
Week 4 Omnibus

Neil MacGregor presents a new series for BBC Radio Four celebrating the role and ambition of museums the length and breadth of the country, and in the process he'll be finding answers to the question ‘What are Museums For in 2022’.

In this final week of programmes Neil visits National Museums in Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales, as well as the Ashmolean in Oxford.

Museums have always been telescopes trained on the past to help locate a sense of place in the present. Neil believes that role is an active one, responding to changes in the people museums serve and the shifting social and cultural landscape they inhabit. After spending much of his life at the centre of our national Museum life in London, Neil is taking to the road to discover more about the extraordinary work being done in Museums outside the capital, from Stornoway to Stowmarket, and Belfast to Birmingham.

In each episode he visits a single museum, inviting them to choose an object from their collections which they feel best illustrates their civic role, and the way they relate and want to relate to their local audience. Very rarely have they chosen a crown jewel from their often priceless collections. More often it's an object with a particular local resonance, or which helps tackle episodes from the past which are being viewed very differently by citizens in the 21st century.

He’ll be visiting the great national museums of Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland, as well as major city institutions in Birmingham, Leeds, Liverpool and elsewhere. And in spite of the challenges of the last two years, everywhere he meets passionate teams who are dedicated to providing a unique experience for both local audiences and visitors from further afield.

Neil writes: “What’s going on in our museums is at once challenging and exciting and it can only really be understood by visiting as many as possible and finding out how they have approached what is a vital role in providing a sense of local, regional and national identity.”

Producer - Tom Alban
Original Music by Phil Channell


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m0016hj9)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 These Days by Lucy Caldwell (m0016hjf)
Episode 5

Two sisters, four nights, one city.

April, 1941. Belfast has escaped the worst of the war – so far. Over the next two months, it’s going to be destroyed from above, so that people will say, in horror, My God, Belfast is finished.
Many won’t make it through, and no one who does will remain unchanged.
Following the lives of sisters Emma and Audrey – one engaged to be married, the other in a secret relationship with another woman – as they try to survive the horrors of the four nights of bombing which were the Belfast Blitz, 'These Days' is a timeless and heart-breaking novel about living under duress, about family, and about how we try to stay true to ourselves.

Lucy Caldwell is the author of four novels, several stage plays and radio dramas, and two collections of short stories: Multitudes and Intimacies. She won the BBC National Short Story Award in 2021 for ‘All the People Were Mean and Bad.’

Author: Lucy Caldwell
Reader: Lisa Dwyer Hogg
Abridger: Rowan Routh
Producer: Gemma McMullan
Executive Editor: Andy Martin
A BBC Northern Ireland Production.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (m0016h3n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0016hjj)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

1922: The Birth of Now 14:45 SUN (m0013sx1)

39 Ways to Save the Planet 14:45 SAT (m000r4vs)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m0016hj2)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m0016gw2)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m00168s1)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m0016hj0)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m0016gwk)

Archive on 4 22:00 SUN (m0015kqr)

Archive on 4 12:04 FRI (m0016gwk)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m0016hfb)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m0016hfb)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m0016gsr)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m0016gsr)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (m0016gzh)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m0016grd)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (m0016h3j)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (m0016h3j)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (m00168ln)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (m0016hdq)

Culture on the Couch 11:00 SAT (m0015vcc)

Desolation Jests 19:15 SUN (b086s7jt)

Drama 15:00 SAT (m000h295)

Drama 15:00 SUN (m0016grz)

Drama 14:15 MON (m000n5f3)

Drama 14:15 TUE (m000gn6j)

Drama 14:15 WED (m000lv6z)

Eider Island 15:30 WED (m001549h)

Epiphanies 16:00 THU (m000y6jd)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m0016gvh)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m0016gt4)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m0016h0p)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m0016h4p)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m0016hc5)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m0016hgn)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (m00168rn)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (m0016hhl)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m0016gvt)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m0016gzw)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m0016h3x)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m0016hb8)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m0016hfs)

Fungi: The New Frontier 21:00 TUE (m0013j9v)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 21:00 SAT (b04ykd72)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m0016grx)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m0016hhd)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (m0016h3n)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (m0016h3n)

Guide Books 16:30 SUN (m000x72w)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (m0016hdj)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (m0016hdj)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m0016h41)

Ingenious 09:30 WED (m000y1fv)

Invisible Man: A Parable for Our Times? 16:00 MON (m00168lq)

Jayde Adams: Hometown Glory 23:00 TUE (m0011lfk)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m00168rl)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m0016hhj)

Lent Talks 05:45 SAT (m00168d1)

Letter from Ukraine 00:15 SUN (m00168rx)

Letter from Ukraine 11:45 SUN (m00168rx)

Letter from Ukraine 19:00 FRI (m0016hhw)

Licence to Kill? 17:00 SUN (m001687x)

Life Changing 09:00 WED (m0016h97)

Life Changing 20:30 THU (m0016h97)

Life, Death and the Foghorn 11:30 THU (m000l8p1)

Limelight 14:15 FRI (m0016hhb)

Little Lifetimes by Jenny Eclair 23:00 WED (m0016hbj)

Living with the Gods 14:45 FRI (b09bfn8y)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m0016gsm)

Loose Ends 23:00 SUN (m0016gsm)

McLevy 14:15 THU (m0016hf5)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m00168sc)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m0016gwp)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m0016gsp)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m0016h06)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m0016h49)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m0016hbq)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m0016hg6)

Missing Mother 20:00 MON (m0016gzy)

Missing Mother 11:00 WED (m0016gzy)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m0016gsk)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m0016gsk)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m0016h9t)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m00168sm)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m0016gwy)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m0016gt0)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m0016h0k)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m0016h4k)

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News Summary 12:00 SAT (m0016gvw)

News Summary 06:00 SUN (m0016gqt)

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News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m0016gvf)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m0016gr0)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m0016gr8)

News and Weather 13:00 SAT (m0016gw0)

News 22:00 SAT (m0016gwm)

One Direction 09:30 TUE (m0016h2w)

One to One 20:45 WED (m000yyq5)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m0016gs1)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m0016gs1)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (m00168m7)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m0016hf8)

Oti Mabuse's Dancing Legends 11:30 WED (m0016h9f)

PM 17:00 SAT (m0016gw6)

PM 17:00 MON (m0016gzk)

PM 17:00 TUE (m0016h3q)

PM 17:00 WED (m0016hb0)

PM 17:00 THU (m0016hfd)

PM 17:00 FRI (m0016hhn)

Paul Sinha's Perfect Pub Quiz 18:30 THU (m0016hfl)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m0016gsc)

Positive Thinking 09:00 TUE (m0016h2t)

Positive Thinking 21:30 TUE (m0016h2t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m0016mb5)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m0016mts)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m0016mzd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m0016mvf)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m0016n3t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m0016n5d)

Preventable by Devi Sridhar 09:45 MON (m0016h08)

Preventable by Devi Sridhar 00:30 TUE (m0016h08)

Preventable by Devi Sridhar 09:45 TUE (m0016h2z)

Preventable by Devi Sridhar 00:30 WED (m0016h2z)

Preventable by Devi Sridhar 09:45 WED (m0016hbs)

Preventable by Devi Sridhar 00:30 THU (m0016hbs)

Preventable by Devi Sridhar 09:45 THU (m0016hg8)

Preventable by Devi Sridhar 00:30 FRI (m0016hg8)

Preventable by Devi Sridhar 09:45 FRI (m0016hgs)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m0016gs3)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m0016gs3)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m0016gs3)

Putin 11:00 TUE (p0by9k7g)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m0016gr4)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m0016gr4)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m0016gr4)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (m0016816)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (m0016gzd)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m0016gvp)

Screenshot 19:15 FRI (m0016hhy)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m00168sh)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m0016gwt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m0016gsw)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m0016h0f)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m0016h4f)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m0016hbx)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m0016hgd)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m00168sf)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m00168sk)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m0016gw8)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m0016gwr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m0016gww)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m0016gs5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m0016gst)

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Short Works 00:30 SUN (m00168rj)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (m0016hhg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m0016gwd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m0016gs9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m0016gzp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m0016h3s)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m0016hb4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m0016hfj)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m0016hhq)

Sliced Bread 17:30 SAT (m00168lx)

Sliced Bread 12:32 THU (m0016hdx)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01rl0yv)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01rl0yv)

Spring Stories 19:45 SUN (m0016gsh)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (m0016gyt)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (m0016gyt)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m0016grb)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m0016gr2)

Sunrise Service 06:35 SUN (m0016gqw)

Teatime 18:30 TUE (m000fx1w)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m0016grg)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m0016gsf)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m0016gsf)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m0016gzt)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m0016gzt)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m0016h3v)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m0016h3v)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m0016hb6)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m0016hb6)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m0016hfq)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m0016hfq)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (m0016hfv)

The Caretakers 11:30 TUE (m0016h34)

The Confessional 18:30 WED (m000vgfs)

The Digital Human 21:30 SUN (m000nv5t)

The Exchange 22:15 SAT (m00168cx)

The Exchange 20:00 WED (m0016hbb)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m0016grn)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m0016grn)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (m0016gvr)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (m0016gvr)

The Language Exchange 23:30 SAT (m0011rn9)

The Likely Dads 23:00 THU (m0016hg2)

The Listening Project 13:30 SUN (m0016grv)

The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer 00:30 SAT (m00168qv)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m0016h9y)

The Media Show 21:30 WED (m0016h9y)

The Museums That Make Us 13:45 MON (m0016gzb)

The Museums That Make Us 13:45 TUE (m0016h3g)

The Museums That Make Us 13:45 WED (m0016h9r)

The Museums That Make Us 13:45 THU (m0016hf3)

The Museums That Make Us 13:45 FRI (m0016hh8)

The Museums That Make Us 21:00 FRI (m0016hj5)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (m0016hhs)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (m00168rv)

The Reunion 11:00 SUN (m0016grj)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (m0016grj)

The Skewer 21:45 SAT (m00168dc)

The Skewer 23:15 WED (m0016hbl)

The Tim Vine Chat Show 11:30 MON (m00168mk)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (m001681l)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (m0016gzr)

The Untold 11:00 MON (m0016npv)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m0016grs)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m0016h01)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m0016h43)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m0016hbd)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m0016hfy)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m0016hj9)

These Days by Lucy Caldwell 22:45 MON (m0016h03)

These Days by Lucy Caldwell 22:45 TUE (m0016h45)

These Days by Lucy Caldwell 22:45 WED (m0016hbg)

These Days by Lucy Caldwell 22:45 THU (m0016hg0)

These Days by Lucy Caldwell 22:45 FRI (m0016hjf)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (m00168c0)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (m0016h9w)

This Cultural Life 19:15 SAT (m0016gwh)

Three Pounds in My Pocket 21:00 MON (m00168qz)

Three Pounds in My Pocket 11:00 FRI (m0016hgx)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (m0016h47)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (m0016hbn)

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Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (m0016hjj)

Today 07:00 SAT (m0016gvm)

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Today 20:00 TUE (m0016rvz)

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Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03wphhd)

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Whatever Happened to Baby Jane Austen? 11:30 FRI (m0016hgz)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m0016gw4)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m0016gyy)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m0016h31)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m0016h9c)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m0016hdn)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m0016hgv)

Women in Stitches: The Making of the Bayeux Tapestry 23:30 MON (m001327r)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (m001687j)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (m0016h3l)

World at One 13:00 MON (m0016gz8)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m0016h3d)

World at One 13:00 WED (m0016h9p)

World at One 13:00 THU (m0016hf1)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m0016hh6)

You and Yours 12:04 MON (m0016gz4)

You and Yours 12:04 TUE (m0016h38)

You and Yours 12:04 WED (m0016h9k)

You and Yours 12:04 THU (m0016hdv)