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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 09 APRIL 2022

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m0016396)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:30 Hybrid Humans by Harry Parker (m001637t)
Ep 5 - Monsters

Harry Parker reads the last episode from is new book where tells the story of how he lost his legs to an IED in Afghanistan and how he grappled with his new identity and disability. Today, he is confronted by disability hate crime. And he also meets Andrew, who tells the story of his amputation and rehabilitation through pole dancing, going on to win the World Pole Sports Championships.

Harry Parker was in his twenties when he stepped on an IED while serving in Afghanistan in 2009 which altered his life in an instant. Here he takes us on his own personal journey as he grapples with an acquired disability and a new identity. At the same time he explores the little known and fascinating history of prosthetics, and the extraordinary advances in medicine and technology designed to ameliorate the effects of disability, illness and injury, from cochlear implants to wearable robotic suits, or exoskeletons. We'll also find out about the multi-billion pound industry involved in rehabilitating the body, and how invention, art and creativity play their part.

Harry Parker is the author of the acclaimed novel, Anatomy of a Soldier. He joined the army when he was twenty-three and served in Iraq in 2007 and Afghanistan in 2009. He is now a writer and artist.

Photo: copyright CC-BY, Steven Pocock / Wellcome Collection

Abridged by Sarah Shaffi.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0016398)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m001639b)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m001639d)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m001639g)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m001639j)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the Rev Neil Gardner of Canongate Kirk, Edinburgh.


SAT 05:45 Lent Talks (m00162ym)
"I was sick and you cared for me"

Lent Talks is a series of personal reflections inspired by an aspect of the story leading up to Easter. This year’s theme is the power of hospitality, based on Jesus’ encouragement in Matthew’s gospel to feed the hungry, welcome the stranger and look after the sick.

In this episode, the retired palliative care physician Dr Kathryn Mannix explores how to be a companion to the dying as she considers the words, "I was sick and you cared for me".

Producer: Dan Tierney.

==

If you have been affected by any of the issues raised in the programme, details of organisations that can provide help and support are available here:

Bereavement
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/4MmhHDSbdDmTpVJhBs2v4Py/information-and-support-bereavement


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m00167rj)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (m00162z9)
Husky Sledding in the Cairngorms

Helen Mark travels to the rolling hills of Aberdeenshire, home of the Cairngorms National Park. Popular with walkers, hikers, nature-lovers and 'munro-baggers' alike, these hills are undoubtedly a beautiful place to visit. But you can ditch your hiking boots for this episode of Open Country, because Helen's exploring in a different way: from the back of a husky-pulled sled!

At the reins is Wattie McDonald, husky-lover, musher, and a veteran of the extraordinary 'Iditarod': the gruelling thousand-mile sled-race across the frozen wastes of Alaska. With his team of sixteen dogs, Wattie navigated treacherous frozen lakes, snow-covered forests, and his own exhaustion to make it across Alaska in one piece: one of very few Scots ever to do so. Back in his home country, the trails are a little shorter and a lot less snowy, but Wattie's up for the challenge nevertheless. As long as his dogs are happy, so is he.

But the real stars of the show are the dogs themselves: Siberian Huskies - a whole kennel-full of them. Krash, Krazy, sweet uncle Kaspar, the veteran one-eyed Keely, and the Pandemic Pups, Kovid and Korona. They're a cuddly bunch, always up for a head-scratch or a tummy-rub, but more than anything these working dogs simply love to run. With their help, Helen speeds through the landscape. Here's hoping the brakes work!

Produced by Emily Knight


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m00167rl)
09/04/22 Farming Today This Week: IPCC report, labour shortages, carbon offsetting, leaving farming

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s latest report came out earlier this week, focusing on the action that needs to be taken globally to mitigate the impact of a warming climate. It says agriculture, land-use and forestry can all help provide large-scale emissions reductions, but cannot completely compensate for any delayed action on reducing emissions in other sectors, such as industry and travel. The report also points out that global greenhouse gas emissions must peak in just three years’ time, and then reduce by 43 percent by 2030. It highlights that methane - a major emission from livestock farming - would need to be reduced by a third during that same timeframe.

Recently there has been a lot of talk about planting trees to offset carbon emissions - which this week, the Welsh Affairs Committee has warned will impact family farms in Wales. The committee says it ‘recognised the importance of woodland to tackle the climate emergency,’ but ‘that companies could be attempting to “game the system” by investing in farming land to offset emissions which is then lost to Welsh agriculture’.

The Environment Food and Rural Affairs Committee has been investigating the impact the lack of staff is having on farms, food processing and distribution, and is critical of what it says is the government’s failure to engage in the labour shortage problem. MPs from the EFRA committee have warned that a failure to tackle labour shortages ‘will permanently shrink the food sector.‘

And all this week on Farming Today we’ve been talking about farmers leaving the industry. We hear from arable farmer Henry DuVal in Hampshire about how he passed the farm onto his son Ed by setting up a bio-gas plant, where instead of growing crops for food, all their fields are producing fuel for anaerobic digestion. Most of the methane they produce goes into the gas grid, some makes electricity.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs


SAT 06:57 Weather (m00167rn)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 07:00 Today (m00167rq)
Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m00167rs)
Al Murray

Nikki Bedi and Richard Coles are joined by Al Murray, best known as The Pub Landlord, he’s also a history buff with a super successful World War II podcast, and he plays the drums.

Alexandra Heminsley found life shifted following a difficult pregnancy, sexual assault and her partner telling her she was going to transition. She joins us.

We also have Saturday Live listener, Doris Remnant, who was seven years old when her family were forced to flee Cairo in 1957 during the Suez conflict. They arrived in France as refugees, with little belongings, to start a new life.

Justin Webb is the longest serving presenter of the Today programme. In his almost 4 decades of journalism he has worked as Europe correspondent, war correspondent and chief correspondent in Washington DC. He reveals his complicated and unconventional childhood.

Patrick Gale chooses his Inheritance Tracks: Kathleen Ferrier singing The Keel Row & Mendelssohn piano trio in C minor.
and your thank you!

Producer Corinna Jones


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (m00167rv)
Series 36

Home Economics: Episode 54

Jay Rayner hosts a culinary panel show packed full of tasty titbits. With him this week are culinary experts Andi Oliver, Tim Anderson, Sophie Wright and Professor Barry Smith.

As we all endure April showers, the panellists look forward to May flowers and tell us the most onerous prep they have done in the kitchen to achieve a delicious silver lining. They also suggest recipes for recreating a lemon puff biscuit, and debate the perfect ice cream sundae - do you stick to one ice cream flavour, or is it the more the merrier?

Producer - Jemima Rathbone
Assistant Producer - Aniya Das

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 The End of Invention (m0015v9g)
Someone born in the late 19th century would have lived through the most rapid period of technological progress in human history. By comparison, people born since the Second World War have seen stagnation and sclerosis. At least, that’s what some people claim - that we are living through “the great stagnation”.

The productivity of scientists and inventors is slowing - and economist Sam Bowman is worried. There are fewer new drugs coming to market, and it takes more and more people to make smaller computer chips. It takes longer for PhD students to finish their studies, and research grants go to ever older scientists.

The balance of research funding has shifted from government to companies, and companies look for profitable inventions rather than necessarily revolutionary ones. It looks as though big new ideas are getting harder to find. Can we fix the system, or are we doomed to permanent slowdown?

Presenter: Sam Bowman
Producer: Jolyon Jenkins
Executive Producer: Katherine Godfrey
Sound Design & Engineering: Rob Speight
A Novel production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m00167rx)
Ukraine: The War in the Countryside

The destruction of Ukrainian cities such as Mariupol has garnered global headlines, but the fighting has also filtered out to the rural towns and villages which surround it. These lack the city’s resources for dealing with the dead, the injured, and the bereaved, and when Wyre Davies reached one of these rural spots, he found even the most day-to-day tasks present significant challenges and risks.

Turkey’s President, Recep Tayyip Erdogan is trying to occupy the middle ground on Ukraine; he remains on good terms with Vladimir Putin, but Turkey is also a member of NATO. This has enabled President Erdogan to take a central role in efforts to reach a peace deal, inviting negotiators to meet in Istanbul. And this is perhaps the ideal city for discussions aimed at healing division. Istanbul marks the point where Europe and Asia meet, with the Bosphorus Strait running between the two. The Bosphorus also occupies a key strategic position in this conflict, which Ellie House found herself reflecting on as she took a boat ride along one of its busier stretches.

A series of setbacks have left Sri Lanka running out of cash, meaning there is now no money to pay for food or fuel. This has resulted in power cuts for up to thirteen hours a day, and prices rising to the point where people are having to skip meals, while hospitals run out of medicine. The protestors who have been out on Sri Lanka’s streets this week knew who to blame, pointing the finger at the government and its economic mismanagement. Rajini Vaidyanathan says that for ordinary Sri Lankan people, the situation remains dire.

Once upon a time, VIktor Orban was seen as a brave campaigner for democracy, demanding Soviet troops leave Hungary during the Cold War. Nowadays, he is a reliable friend of the Kremlin - a matter of some concern to his European Union and NATO allies, but something they will have to continue to live with. This week, Mr Orban won a fourth successive term as Prime Minister. Nick Thorpe has met him many times over the years, and has a few ideas about what lies behind his success.

How can a city and its people recover from war? This is something the people of Mosul in Iraq have had time to consider. It has been fought over at various points in the past two decades, by US troops, the Iraqi national army, Al Qaeda, and then, by Islamic State. IS attempted to destroy much of Mosul's tradition and culture, yet the city is now undergoing something of a renaissance, as Leila Molana-Allen found on a recent night out.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m00167vy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m00167s1)
"A special place in hell for crypto fraudsters"

The Government announced plans this week to impose more regulation on firms where people legally buy and sell bitcoin. One major crypto platform where people do this is called Kraken - which is where 77-year-old Graeme moved more than half a million pounds which thieves then stole. Graeme was robbed of his savings, his car, and his house by thieves who manipulated him to buy cryptoassets. We hear from Curtis Ting, a Managing Director of Kraken.

In an extreme case of council tax arrears, we hear from Robert who has just received his first council tax bill after 24 years living in the same house. The London Borough of Barnet is demanding more than £30,000 in arrears. So what's going on? And does Robert have to - finally - cough up? We hear from barrister Alan Murdie who specialises in council tax, and edits the Council Tax Handbook for the Child Poverty Action Group.

Thinking of claiming a Working From Home tax rebate? Listen to this first. HM Revenue & Customs has told Money Box it will be launching a consultation this year to find new ways to tackle repayment agents who charge people for claiming routine tax rebates which they could claim free themselves. If you go via an agent, it could take half your pay out in fees. Money Box reporter Dan Whitworth investigates, and we also hear from technology journalist David McClelland.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Producer: Paul Waters
Reporter: Dan Whitworth
Researcher: Marianna Brain
Production Coordinator: Janet Staples
Editor: Emma Rippon


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (m001638t)
Series 60

Episode 5

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by the voices of Chiara Goldsmith and Luke Kempner. Laura Smyth details her experience working as a remote teacher, and Chris Thorburn looks into the Grammys. Music is provided by Tim Sutton and Sooz Kempner.


SAT 12:57 Weather (m00167s3)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News and Weather (m00167s5)
The latest national and international news and weather reports from BBC Radio 4


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m001638y)
Minette Batters, David TC Davies MP, Liz Saville Roberts MP, Jo Stevens MP

Chris Mason presents political debate and discussion from St Mary's Church in Ross-on-Wye with a panel which includes President of the National Farmers' Union Minette Batters, Shadow Secretary of State for Wales Jo Stevens, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Wales David TC Davies, and Plaid Cymru's leader in Westminster Liz Saville Roberts.

Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton
Lead broadcast engineer: Jacques Sweeney


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m00167s7)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:45 Drama (b08m8q81)
BACH: The Great Passion

Simon Russell Beale as Johann Sebastian Bach in a drama revealing how the St Mathew Passion was written, composed, rehearsed and performed in the build-up to its first performance in Leipzig on Good Friday 1727.

Entering the final weeks of rehearsals, Bach struggles to complete his Great Passion while he also runs a boarding school of fifty-five pupils (some of whom are hopeless at music) and supports a continuously pregnant wife.

James Runcie's play recreates the vicissitudes and exultations of his gargantuan undertaking, while retaining the intimacy, surprise and profound sympathy which is at the heart of the work.

Arriving in Leipzig in 1727, Bach, the newly appointed Kapellmeister, sets out his plan for the staging of the Passion and the story of the persecuted Christ. He intends that it will be directly personal music, written not in Latin but in German, using the words " We" and "I" for the choruses and arias. In a radical move for the time, he insists on the individual responsibility of every musician in the unfolding drama. The story, he insists, involves us all and saves us all from the terror of death.

An exhausted Bach is increasingly impatient during rehearsals, interrupting and bullying his performers; so much so that his wife Anna Magdalena, though pregnant with her second child, is called on to mediate and prevent a walk-out.

Anna Magdalena is the only one who can bring harmony to the home as well as to the music. But it's a race against time to be ready for the first performance.

Simon Russell Beale is one of the most notable actors of his generation and was himself a chorister at St Paul's Cathedral School in London. Melody Grove, as Anna Magdalena Bach, trained at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama, where she won the James Bridie Gold Medal in 2009. She was nominated for Best Supporting Actress at the Olivier Awards 2016 and won the Clarence Derwent Award 2016 for her performance as the female lead, alongside Mark Rylance, in Farinelli and the King,

The music and choral rehearsals for this production were recorded in Edinburgh's world famous Greyfriars Kirk, with the choir and musicians of the Dunedin Consort under the directorship of John Butt, and with the choristers St Mary's Music School and choirmaster Duncan Ferguson.

John Butt - Director and Organ/Harpsichord

Soloists:
Jacob Slater - Boy Soloist
Joanne Lunn - Soprano
Robert Davies - Bass

Chorus:
Joanne Lunn
Emily Mitchell
Esther Brazil
Rory McLeery
Kenny Reid
David Horton
Robert Davies
Jerome Knox

Children of St Mary's Music School Choir:
Taylor Torkington
Madeleine Gill
Mattea Sacco
Carlo Massimo

Choir Master: Duncan Ferguson

Huw Daniel - Violin
Katy Bircher - Flute
William Hunt - Violone

Produced by Marilyn Imrie
Directed by Eoin O'Callaghan
A Big Fish production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:15 Woman's Hour (m00167s9)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Ellie Simmonds, No-fault divorce, Educating Afghan girls and SMS education

We explore No Fault Divorce. The biggest reform of divorce law for 50 years comes into force- changing a law that dates back to Henry VIII. We hear from listener, Helen, currently going through a divorce.

The Paralympic five time gold medallist Ellie Simmonds was born with achondroplasia, the most common type of dwarfism. A new drug currently being trialled in the NHS and now approved for use in the USA aims to help children with achondroplasia grow taller. In a new BBC documentary: A World without Dwarfism, Ellie raises the question if cutting edge medicine can stop disability in its tracks, should we use it?

There are reports that women in Ukraine have been raped in front of their children, and Russian soldiers have filmed what they're doing. We discuss why rape in war happens, justice and trauma with Dr Jelke Boesten, Professor of Gender and Development at King's College London.

It’s been over two weeks since the Taliban went back on their plans to allow girls in Afghanistan to return to school. Sara Wahedi, a tech entrepreneur explains her new idea of helping Afghan girls access education - through SMS on their phones.

On Thursday, 100 individuals and their families wrote to the Health and Social Care Secretary, Sajid Javid, asking him to appoint Donna Ockenden to conduct an independent review of maternity services at Nottingham University Hospitals Trust. They are members of an online support group for those affected by unsafe maternity services and have shared harrowing accounts of their experiences. Sarah Hawkins talks about the death of their daughter, Harriet, on 17th April 2016 as a result of a mismanaged labour.

Presented by Andrea Catherwood
Producer: Surya Elango
Editor: Louise Corley


SAT 17:00 PM (m00167sc)
Full coverage of the day's news


SAT 17:30 Sliced Bread (m00162yr)
How green is switching to an electric car?

Electric Vehicles: Should you switch?
In the first of this new series Greg runs Julian’s suggested wonder-product through the evidence mill and asks whether electric vehicles (EVs) really are the best thing since sliced bread?
Julian has heard that switching his old petrol-guzzling banger for a shiny new EV will make him greener? But will it?
Electric cars are said to be ‘cleaner’ and ‘cheaper’ to run, but with a higher purchase price than their petrol equivalent - and a greater environmental footprint of manufacture - how many miles would Julian need to drive before his fuel savings off-set these initial costs - both financially and environmentally?
Greg tests one of the most popular cars in the UK and hears from experts including Mike Berners-Lee & Vicky Parrot to conclude whether electric vehicles are worth the hype, and your money.
And he wants YOUR suggestions for what to investigate next!

Is there something you keep seeing on TV - or hearing about on a podcast? Have you spotted something trending on Instagram or TikTok and you want to know if it delivers?

Send us your suggestions to sliced.bread@bbc.co.uk or send it to Greg direct on twitter or instagram where he’s @gregfoot
PRESENTER: GREG FOOT
PRODUCER: JULIAN PASZKIEWICZ


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m00167sf)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m00167sh)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00167sk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m00167sm)
Chris Tarrant, Luke Wright, Lou Sanders, Chloe Duckworth, Mykki Blanco, Father John Misty, George Egg, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and George Egg are joined by Chris Tarrant, Luke Wright, Lou Sanders and Chloe Duckworth for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Mykki Blanco and Father John Misty.


SAT 19:00 Profile (m00167sp)
Christian Smalls

Despite being fired by Amazon early in the pandemic, Chris Smalls continued to campaign for better rights and conditions for Amazon employees, setting up the Amazon Labor Union last year.

Now the Staten Island warehouse where Chris used to be based has made history, becoming the first Amazon workplace in the United States to vote for union representation, a serious defeat for Amazon which has been fighting against unionisation.

Timandra Harkness hears about the man behind this historic vote, speaking to some of the family, friends and team who’ve supported him along the way.

Presenter: Timandra Harkness
Production team: Sally Abrahams, Diane Richardson and Janet Staples
Sound: Rod Farquhar
Editor: Damon Rose


SAT 19:15 This Cultural Life (m00167sr)
Ali Smith

Award-winning novelist, playwright and short story writer Ali Smith is the author of 12 novels, three of which have been nominated for the Booker Prize for Fiction. Her best-selling How To Be Both won the Women’s Prize for Fiction and the Costa Novel of the Year in 2014. Brought up in the Scottish Highlands, she was the youngest of five children in a working class family, studied English at Aberdeen University and began writing fiction whilst studying for a doctorate at Cambridge.

Ali Smith tells John Wilson about the influence of cinema on her fiction, particularly the work of French new wave director Jacques Rivette whose disregard for conventional linear narrative in films including Céline and Julie Go Boating made a big impression. She also recalls how, as an aspiring writer, the work of fellow Scottish novelists and poets, including Liz Lochhead, Alistair Gray, James Kelman and Muriel Spark, helped give her the confidence to write her own fiction. Ali Smith also discusses 1960s pop artist Pauline Boty, a contemporary of Peter Blake and David Hockney, who tragically died at the age of 28 in 1966. Boty’s life and work - overlooked for three decades after she died - became a central aspect of Ali Smith’s 2016 novel Autumn, the first of a quartet of seasonal-themed books written and published over four years.

Producer: Edwina Pitman


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m00167st)
War on Truth

What’s fake, what’s real? Stories from the information war over Ukraine. BBC disinformation reporter Marianna Spring speaks to people caught up in the battle for the truth.
Families and friendships are being torn apart not only by the fighting, but by the radically different versions of reality that Ukrainians and Russians are being presented with, on TV and online.
And social media has become a battleground for competing versions of truth. It's a fight that is taking place in parallel to the military campaign – but one that also has real consequences for the people caught up in it.
Producer: Ant Adeane
Editor: Ed Main


SAT 21:00 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b04yk3d4)
Series 2

Episode 2

Crime drama based on the characters from the best selling novel by the multi-award winning writer, GF Newman. This second series runs from 1961 to 1970.

Spanning six decades, the saga plots the course of one family against the back-drop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

At the start of the 1960s, Joey Oldman acquires crafty Arnold Goodman as his solicitor, and buys shares in the civil engineering firm owned by the corrupt Minister of Transport, Ernest Marples.

Prospering with the help of venal bankers, and growing more devious, he and his wife Cath join Macmillan's Conservative Party. They strive without success to keep their son Brian free of the influence of Jack Braden (Cath's brother) as he takes their 'firm' from running illicit clubs, where they entertain politicians and judges, to armed robbery. All the while, Jack and Brian struggle to keep free of the police and further entanglements with the law, the Kray twins and the Richardsons.

Episode 2:
Joey borrows a lot of money to invest in the Minister of Transport's road-building company.

Cast:
The Narrator...........Ross Kemp
Joey Oldman...........Toby Jones
Cath Oldman...........Denise Gough
Brian Oldman..........Joe Armstrong
Jack Braden............Luke Allen Gale
Leah Cohen............Jasmine Hyde

Written by GF Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:45 The Skewer (m00162z6)
Series 6

Episode 1

Jon Holmes's multi-award-winning The Skewer returns to twist itself into current affairs.

This week - The Skewer: White-warshing, Bob The Qatar Builder, Lad's Army, the musical Westminster Side Story, and what happens when you say Rishi Sunak's name five times into a mirror.

An Unusual production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:00 News (m00167sw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:15 The Exchange (m00162yh)
Elderly Care

Two people who share a common experience meet for the first time. Each has a gift for the other - an object that unlocks their story. With the help of presenter Catherine Carr, they exchange personal experiences, thoughts and beliefs, as well as uncovering the differences between them.

Fran and Rashid both faced difficult decisions when their elderly parents needed care. The choices they made were different, but they grappled with a common experience that is familiar to so many.

Fran was a full-time professional living in Bristol when her mother was diagnosed with terminal cancer and needed care. She decided against a care home and brought her mother to live with her and her family until she died several months later. Fran now makes a two hour round trip every weekend to visit her father, who is in his 90s, has dementia and lives in his own home with support from a carer.

Rashid runs a family business in Bristol. He was a child when he arrived in the UK with his family in the early 1970s, having been expelled from Uganda, along with 50,000 Asians, on the orders of President Idi Amin. When his mother needed care after a fall, she initially went to live with her eldest son in Kenya. But she missed Rashid and her other children who were all in the UK. When she returned, the family realised her complex needs meant she needed nursing care. Rashid says they looked at all the options but, although it was an incredibly hard decision to make, he realised in the end that a nursing home was the best place for his mother to get all the care she needed.

At the heart of their exchange is the desire to do the best thing for their parent. Their conversation lays bare the difficult decisions people often have to make about caring for elderly relatives.

The pair exchange gifts which reveal their own stories and show an insight into each other’s struggles.

Presented by Catherine Carr
Produced by Jo Dwyer
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (m00162ml)
Programme 2, 2022

(2/12)
It's the turn of the pairs from the South of England and Northern Ireland to play their first fixtures of the 2022 series. Paul Sinha and Marcus Berkmann face off against Paddy Duffy and Freya McClements of Northern Ireland, with Kirsty Lang asking the questions and awarding the points. As always, the questions require arcane knowledge from all kinds of fields, as well as the presence of mind to unravel the clues and see the connections. The programme includes a generous helping of questions suggested by Round Britain Quiz listeners over the past year or so.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 The Open Box (m00161rk)
Gail McConnell's father was murdered by the IRA in March 1984, when Gail was three years old. An Assistant Governor at the Maze Prison, William McConnell was setting off for work when he was gunned down in front of Gail and her mum in the driveway of their Belfast home.

Through her poetry, fragments of childhood memory and an archive of public and personal materials gathered in a 'Dad Box’, Gail pieces together her father’s life and death and tries to understand the relationship they once had.

As she continues to deal with the trauma and absence left in its wake, Gail goes to find someone the murder connects her to, and who - like Gail and many others in Northern Ireland - is still living with the legacy of violence.

Producer: Conor Garrett

Editor: Andy Martin



SUNDAY 10 APRIL 2022

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m00167sy)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:15 Letter from Ukraine (m00165wm)
About the war and 'dead' books

Ukrainian novelist Andrey Kurkov gives a personal account of daily life in war-torn Ukraine. This week he considers meter-readings and the reading of Ukrainian literature.

Translated by Elizabeth Sharp
Produced by Emma Harding

Production co-ordinator Eleri McAuliffe
Sound by Catherine Robinson

An Audio Drama Wales production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m001638h)
Oestrogen City

An original short story specially commissioned by BBC Radio 4 from the writer Rosemary Jenkinson. As read by Séainín Brennan.

Rosemary Jenkinson is a playwright and short story writer from Belfast. She has published several short story collections and her work for radio includes 'Castlereagh to Kandahar' (BBC Radio 3) and 'Lives in Transit' (BBC Radio 4).

Writer: Rosemary Jenkinson
Reader: Séainín Brennan
Producer: Michael Shannon

A BBC Northern Ireland production.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00167t0)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00167t2)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00167t4)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m00167t6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m00167t8)
The church of St Mary the Virgin, Ilminster in Somerset.

Bells on Sunday comes from the church of St Mary the Virgin, Ilminster in Somerset. There have been five bells in the tower from medieval times which were augmented to six bells in 1861 and eventually to eight bells in 1907 by John Taylor of Loughborough. The tenor weighs twenty two and three quarter hundredweight and is in the note of C sharp. We hear them ringing Grandsire Triples.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m00167sp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Summary (m00168f0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01d23tn)
Reason and Desire

Mark Tully considers the eternal human conflict between our Reason and our Desires. To what extent should the first regulate the second? And how do we achieve the right balance between the two.

With readings from Aristotle, Fernando Pessoa and Kim Addonizio, and a diverse range of music, from The Rolling Stones to Wagner, Mark compares secular thoughts on the subject with the teachings of various religions.

The programme features an interview with Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad, Professor of Comparative Religion and Philosophy at Lancaster University who makes it clear that there is no one single attitude towards reason and desire in Christianity or in religions of Indian origin.

But whether bound by secular or religious thoughts on the matter, Mark sees a clear need for our desires of all sorts to be controlled to some extent, however difficult it is to find a balance between desire and reason.

The readers are Peter Guinness and Samantha Bond.

Producer: Adam Fowler
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 Natural Histories (b05w9b5n)
Nightshades

It is hard to think of a more diverse and wonderful group of plants. They enchant us, poison us, make us feel sexy, give us hallucinations, heal us and feed us. The screaming mandrakes in Harry Potter and the shamanistic dreams of tribal elders eating giant trumpet flowers testify to the magical powers of this group. Its culinary properties enhance the ever intricate flavours of modern cuisine while its fatal attractions have been used by murderers.

This is the group that contains mandrake, potatoes, chillies, aubergines, deadly nightshade and tomatoes. These are the plants that have entered our culture through food and medicine, drugs and love.

Fearing anything that looked like nightshade the first plants that were brought here from the New World were regarded with suspicion, yet quickly we adopted them, so much so that it is impossible to conceive of Italian food without tomatoes or Friday night fish and chips, yet they are aliens in a strange land. We have a lot to thank this group for.

It soothed us before anaesthetics, sent our imaginations flying and tempted us with alluring flavours – and they are still pushing the frontiers of both medicine and food today.

First Broadcast in a longer form : 14th July 2015
Original Producer : Sarah Pitt
Archive Producer for BBC Audio : Andrew Dawes


SUN 06:57 Weather (m00168f3)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m00168f5)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m00168f7)
Sikh scripture rescue, Patriarch Kirill profile, Muslim footballers during Ramadan

Following last week’s dramatic tale of how some sacred Sikh scriptures were rescued from a gurdwara in Ukraine, Emily Buchanan went to see them in their new home at the National Sikh Museum in Derby.

Patriarch Kirill is the head of the Russian Orthodox Church who is backing President Putin and supporting the war in Ukraine. He reportedly has historic KGB links and a liking for expensive watches, but what do we really know about him?

There are an estimated 180 Muslim footballers in the Premier League. How are football clubs catering for Muslim players who are fasting during the month of Ramadan?

Presenter: Emily Buchanan
Producers: Dan Tierney and Julia Paul
Editor: Helen Grady.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m00168f9)
Rainforest Foundation UK

Actor and broadcaster Stephen Fry makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Rainforest Foundation UK.

To Give:
- UK Freephone 0800 404 8144
-You can donate online at bbc.co.uk/appeal/radio4
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Rainforest Foundation UK’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘Rainforest Foundation UK’.
Please note that Freephone and online donations for this charity close at 23.59 on the Saturday after the Appeal is first broadcast. However the Freepost option can be used at any time.

Registered charity 1138287


SUN 07:57 Weather (m00168fc)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m00168ff)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m00168fh)
A Passion for Hospitality - Palm Sunday

A Passion for Hospitality: What you didn’t do for the least of these you didn’t do for me.

During Lent Sunday Worship is considering how, as the nation emerges from a long period of isolation, we can better reach out both to neighbour and stranger, and especially to the most marginalised and disadvantaged.

On Palm Sunday, Alice Treacher, leads a service from Kings Community Church, Southampton, looking at the fickleness of hospitality. The crowds make a big fuss of Jesus when he makes his triumphal entry into Jerusalem, but abandon him less than a week later.

Readings: Matthew 21: 1-11 and Revelation 7:9-12

Preacher: Andy Johnston

Music: Crown Him with Many Crowns, I See The King of Glory, All Hail King Jesus, In Christ Alone, Be Thou My Vision.

Producer: Alexa Good


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m0016390)
A View From Russia: All I Have To Say

The everyday repression of life in Russia, as experienced by an anonymous dissident playwright.

In this essay, she reflects on the war in Ukraine and asks what role she and her fellow Russians might have played in it, what they might have done to stop it - and what Ukrainians must think of them now.

In turn, she explains how the Russian state is actively controlling the narrative about the war - and reveals the harsh consequences for those who dare veer from the approved 'truth'.

"They arrest protestors for carrying blank sheets of paper. It doesn’t matter what’s written on it, only that you are carrying it. If you are suspected of opposing the government, then you must be guilty."

Reflecting on Russia's history, she weighs up how life today both mirrors and is profoundly different to the harshest days of Stalinist rule, while pointing out the numerous violations of the country's constitution.

The essay is translated and read by poet and translator Sasha Dugdale.

Producer: Sheila Cook
Sound: Peter Bosher
Production Coordinator: Gemma Ashman
Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zqzsv)
Curlew (Spring)

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the curlew. The haunting song of the curlew instantly summons the spirit of wild places. By April, most curlews have left their winter refuge on estuaries and marshes and have returned to their territories on moorland or upland pastures. Wherever they breed you'll hear the male birds singing and displaying. It's often called the bubbling song.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m00168fk)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m00168fm)
Writer, Liz John
Director, Peter Leslie Wild
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Adil Shah ….. Ronny Jhutti
Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Brian Aldridge ….. Charles Collingwood
Chris Carter ….. Wilf Scolding
Clarrie Grundy ….. Heather Bell
Elizabeth Pargetter ….. Alison Dowling
Freddie Pargetter ….. Toby Laurence
Ian Craig ….. Stephen Kennedy
Josh Archer ….. Angus Imrie
Pat Archer ….. Patricia Gallimore
Roisin ….. Cherylee Houston
Roy Tucker ….. Ian Pepperell
Ruairi Donovan ….. Arthur Hughes
Ruth Archer ….. Felicity Finch
Stella Pryor ….. Lucy Speed
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Tracy Horrobin ….. Susie Riddell
Vince Casey ….. Tony Turner


SUN 11:00 The Reunion (m00168fp)
The McLibel Trial

It was in 1994 that McDonald’s began a libel case against a postman and gardener from London. It took a decade for the case to be resolved, making it the longest-running libel case in English legal history.

In the late 1980s, Helen Steel and Dave Morris were active campaigners for a group called London Greenpeace and had distributed a leaflet that questioned the fast-food giants’ claims that their burgers were both healthy and good for the environment.

McDonald’s took offence and began a case against these, and other claims, made in the leaflet. The pair were unable to get legal aid and so faced the prospect of having to represent themselves in court. Keir Starmer was a young lawyer at the time and was keen to help - offering his advice for free.

The initial ruling in the High Court went in part against Steel and Morris and they were told to pay £40,000 damages. But by 2005 the pair had won their appeal to the European Court for Human Rights - and McDonald’s faced a PR disaster.

Joining Kirsty Wark are the “McLibel Two”, Helen Steel and Dave Morris, along with Timothy Atkinson who was part of McDonald’s legal team, and film maker Franny Armstrong who spent a decade following the case.

Excerpts from "McLibel", courtesy of Spanner Films.

Presenter: Kirsty Wark
Producer: Howard Shannon
Series Producer: David Prest
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 11:45 Lent Talks (m00162ym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 on Saturday]


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m00168fr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (m00162mw)
Series 28

Episode 1

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Lucy Porter, Holly Walsh, Tony Hawks and Alan Davies are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as Advertising, Essex, Candles, and Water.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m0016818)
Ukraine: The Food Dimension Part 2

Dan Saladino speaks to food suppliers and farmers in Ukraine about the impact of war.

Produced and presented by Dan Saladino.


SUN 12:57 Weather (m00168fv)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m00168fx)
Radio 4's look at the week's big stories from both home and around the world


SUN 13:30 The Listening Project (m00168fz)
Living Costs

Fi Glover presents three conversations between strangers.

This week: Caroline and Pedro reflect on the financial hardships they are facing due to the increase in the cost of living. Patrick and Peter share two very different experiences of trying to keep a home warm through the winter. And Rosemary and Martin exchange opposing views on the environmental impact of windfarms.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation lasts up to an hour and is then edited to extract the key moments of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in this decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m001638f)
GQT from the Archive: 75th Celebration

Kathy Clugston hosts the horticultural programme featuring a group of gardening experts. This week, Kathy, Ashley Edwards, Pippa Greenwood and James Wong unite to celebrate 75 years of Gardeners' Question Time.

Through the mists of time and a smoky room in Ashton-under-Lyne, the team hear a snippet from GQT's first broadcast, reflecting on changing attitudes, and looking toward exciting horticultural developments.

From the archive, Eric Robson talks to veterans at the walled allotments in Ayrshire.

Producer: Daniel Cocker
Assistant Producer: Bethany Hocken

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 1922: The Birth of Now (m0013rnm)
Bertolt Brecht's play Drums in the Night

1922: The Birth of Now - Ten programmes in which Matthew Sweet investigates objects and events from 1922, the crucial year for modernism, that have an impact today.

4. Drums in the Night. When a culture finds itself in ruins, as Europe's did after the First World War, it faces, too, the possibility of new beginnings. Bertolt Brecht's play, first performed in 1922, introduced the concept of a very new kind of emotional alienation in theatre, something contemporary dramatists make powerful use of today. Brecht also looked back to theatre’s Greek roots. Matthew Sweet and guests including the scholar of German literature and culture Karen Leeder, and the author Frances Stonor Saunders, explore Modernism’s rejection of Victorian sentimentality and often its rejection of emotion altogether. Germany opened a Museum of Hygiene, and in Britain, the National Council for Mental Hygiene was formed in this key year, 1922. What did Modernists find unhygienic, how did they go about attempting to clean it up and how does this continue now?

Producer: Eliane Glaser


SUN 15:00 Rossum's Universal Robots (m00168g1)
Episode 2

Music and Lyrics by Susannah Pearse
Book by Robert Hudson

Karel Čapek's ultra-prescient, retro-futurist 1921 comedy is reimagined with a massive dose of character-driven and song-centred heart.

In Capek's world, robots did all the work and their human overseers cared only about enriching themselves and little about the costs to the planet. But now a new breed of robots has been grown and everything has changed.

These new robots, with built-in emotion and free will, reasoned that the planet was being destroyed by intelligent life so they intervened by saving the world. The final part of their plan was to destroy themselves thus nullifying the damage they might cause to the planet. However, when push comes to shove, they can't bring themselves to do it. Instead, they must come to terms with what it means to be robot.

Alpha . . . . . Anneika Rose
Radius . . . . . Paul Hilton
Helen 2 . . . . . Clare Foster
Brown Owl . . . . . Neil McCaul
Alquist . . . . . Matthew Durkan
Benoit . . . . . Chris Jack

Arrangements and Musical Direction: Harry Sever
Production co-ordinator: Luke MacGregor
Sound: Peter Ringrose
Director: Sasha Yevtushenko


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m00168g3)
Belfast in the Blitz

Chris Power talks with novelists Lucy Caldwell and Louise Kennedy about their new novels, both set in Belfast at intense moments of 20th century history, both treatments of women's lives at a time of war and conflict: Lucy Caldwell's These Days is the story of sisters Emma and Audrey during the terrifying Belfast Blitz of 1941, while Louise Kennedy's Trespasses is about a relationship between an older Protestant man and a younger Catholic woman during the Troubles.

Journalist Emma John discusses how the role and depiction of unmarried women or "spinsters" has changed in fiction.

As the war in Ukraine continues, Sasha Dugdale, a distinguished translator of Russian literature, talks with Chris about the difficult role of dissident Russian writers under Putin's regime.

Producer: Beaty Rubens

Book List – Sunday 10 April and Thursday 14 April

These Days by Lucy Caldwell
Trespasses by Louise Kennedy
Self-Contained: Scenes from a Single Life by Emma John
In Memory of Memory by Maria Stepanova: Translated by Sasha Dugdale
War of the Beasts and the Animals by Maria Stepanova: Translated by Sasha Dugdale
Second Hand Time by Svetlana Alexievich


SUN 16:30 Guide Books (m000wyzj)
The Body with Sinéad Gleeson and Sarah Perry

A new series about how books might help us navigate everyday life, presented by writer and broadcaster Damian Barr.

Each episode takes a life experience - such as grief - and talks to writers about they handle it through their own reading, writing and lived experience. We explore the fiction, non-fiction, memoir and poetry that might help us better understand our own stories.

In today's episode we explore books that help us understand our relationship with our bodies, especially in this moment - as many of us are faced with transitioning back into public space after a year lived on screens and physically separated from one another. And in a time when many are dealing with anxieties around sickness or are living with its effects.

Damian's guests are Sarah Perry (The Essex Serpent; Melmoth; Essex Girls) and Sinéad Gleeson (Constellations: Reflections from Life). They discuss books by Maggie Nelson, Lucy Grealy, Sean Hewitt, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Anne Carson and Edwin Morgan.

Produced by Mair Bosworth for BBC Audio in Bristol

(Damian Barr Portrait by Andrew Hasson)


SUN 17:00 The Falklands Now (m00162vk)
In the last forty years, the Falkland Islands in the South Atlantic have gone from being an impoverished overseas British territory to a rich one, with a per capita income comparable to Norway or Qatar, and from an isolated community of mostly British settlers to a cosmopolitan population of many different nationalities from all over the world.

Before the war, the Falklands were a distant outpost of Britain, more British than Britain. But these rocky, rural islands were also in decline, losing so many people to emigration life on the Falklands seemed barely viable. Now the islands are unrecognisable, their politics, economy and infrastructure transformed by lucrative sales of fishing licences to foreign fleets, tourism and the prospect of rich offshore oil deposits. This new prosperity has also attracted newcomers from all over the world – from the Philippines, Chile, Zimbabwe and beyond. People born in the Falkland islands are now a minority. In a referendum held in 2013, all but three voters elected to remain a self-governing British territory, but inevitably the Falklands are now no longer as British as they once were.

What does this mutating identity and new-found economic confidence mean for the Falklands’ future? On the 40th anniversary of the war, Mike Wooldridge revisits the islands to report on the extraordinary transformation that has taken place in the last four decades and the challenges that remain, with neighbouring Argentina continuing to claim sovereignty over the islands.

A Ruth Evans Production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 17:40 Profile (m00167sp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m00168g5)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m00168g8)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00168gd)
Close contest between President Macron and Marine Le Pen is expected in first round.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m00168gj)
Kofi Smiles

Presenter: Kofi Smiles
Producer: Emmie Hume
Production Coordinator: Elodie Chatelian
Studio Manager: Simon Highfield


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m0016812)
Beth helps Ruth in the yard as Ruth tells her about the plans to upgrade Brookfield’s winter housing and slurry storage. Ben mock-teases Ruth for boring Beth with slurry talk. Ben unknowingly hits a nerve, and Ruth leaves them to it but Beth is embarrassed that Ben was so rude. Beth learns Ben and Ruairi are covertly planning a house party next week with Brian and Jennifer away. Ruairi’s phone rings and Beth sees the caller ID: Julianne. Ruairi’s tetchy; it’s a uni friend and he’ll call them back. Ben and Beth suspect she’s more than a friend. Ruairi teases Ben for being awkward about inviting an old school friend because they are dating Ben’s ex, Evie. Beth agrees it’s not a big deal, and asks if Ruairi is inviting his uni friends? Ruairi tells them they’ve all gone home for Easter, none are local. Not even Julianne, persists Beth. Ruairi tells Beth to stop going on about her.
A put out Ruth asks Josh if she really goes on about slurry? Josh is sympathetic and tells her to ignore Ben. Josh wants to talk about solar panels. He thinks they should roll them out across the farm roofs. With energy prices about to soar and their consumption increasing it makes sense – the panels would pay for themselves eventually. Ruth tells him in an ideal world they’d jump at it, but they’re already borrowing so much money for the dairy expansion, there’s too much risk. Josh protests but Ruth is adamant; it’s a definite no.


SUN 19:15 Desolation Jests (b085wjb8)
Episode 3

David Jason stars with Jan Ravens, Rory Bremner and John Bird in David Renwick's dark and original comedy.

Interviewer JP Doom asks cultural icons of our times what sketches would bring a smile to their faces with oblivion just around the corner.

Lucian Bile, aka Rot Caries, Britain's first and only punk dentist chooses his favourite moments from a not-altogether-accurate history of comedy, including most of an announcement from the Ministry of Unfinished Business, a clock shop with a Rabbi in the window, and a sinister case from the files of Offcom Squad.

With:

David Jason
John Bird
Jan Ravens
Rory Bremner

Producer: Gareth Edwards

A BBC Studios production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in December 2016.


SUN 19:45 Spring Stories (m00168gn)
Field Notes

"I stand where he stood, so many times before, and I look out at the fields. I look out to where the orange aura of day disappears into the horizon, to the view he saw every evening for his many years here, and then I close my eyes to become him..."

An original short story for radio, written and performed by Malaika Kegode. Produced and directed by Becky Ripley.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (m001638m)
The BBC has just published its Annual Plan in which it talks ominously of reducing its so called “audience offer”. In Feedback this week, Roger Bolton asks a member of the Corporation’s Executive board, Rhodri Talfan Davies, what that means for radio listeners.

Also, Simon Mayo explains why he's leaving the BBC after 40 years, and what he will and won’t miss.

And rugby fans attending a Premiership match say what they think of 5 Live’s sports coverage.

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Kate Dixon
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m001638k)
Derek Mack (pictured), June Brown, Doris Derby, Dave Sales

Matthew Bannister on

Derek Mack, the rocket engineer who helped Britain enter the space age

June Brown, the actor best known as Dot Cotton in Eastenders

Dr Doris A. Derby, the American civil rights activist and photographer who took historic pictures of the struggle for equality

Dave Sales, the Dorset fisherman who fought a 23 year campaign to protect the sea bed in Lyme Bay.

Producer: Neil George

Interviewed guest: Dion Mack
Interviewed guest: Ken MacTaggart
Interviewed guest: Bob Banks
Interviewed guest: Hannah Collins
Interviewed guest: Gill Sales

Archive clips used: British Pathé, The Black Knight Rocket 1958; BBC One, The One Show - The Rocket Men 25/01/2019; BBC TV Archive, Black Arrow Project - 24 Hours 27/10/1971; BBC One, Eastenders, 1985-2020; BBC Radio 4, Desert Island Discs - June Brown 17/02/2017; British Movietone, V E Day in London 1945; Granada TV, Coronation Street, 19/08/1970; Library of Congress, Southern Oral History Program in North Carolina - Doris Derby Interview 2011; Storylines, Guardians of the Reef Project - Interview with David Sales 27/07/2017.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m00167s1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m00168f9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 The Digital Human (m000k7jk)
Series 20

Five Minutes

Aleks Krotoski explores how the mechanics of the digital environment allow misinformation to swamp digital platforms.

YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, they are all swamped with cheery, colourful ‘life hack’ and crafting videos, but if you watch for more than a few minutes you’ll see that actually trying to follow along would prove difficult, if not impossible. Much of the content isn’t even possible to do. And yet, it’s extraordinarily popular, and profitable content.

Clickbait isn’t new, but this is potentially dangerous eye candy, and when you look beneath the surface, it’s possible to see that the same infrastructure and techniques have made life hacks go viral, can, in the wrong hands, be exploited for deliberately malicious ends.

It only takes a few minutes to set up a system that can swamp the internet. Be it with unintentionally dangerous DIY suggestions aimed at children, or deliberate political machinations targeted at adults.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m00168gs)
Lewis Goodall is joined by former minister Matt Warman; Shadow Immigration Minister Stephen Kinnock; the Financial Times Whitehall editor Sebastian Payne and the economics editor of The Spectator, Kate Andrews. They discuss the Chancellor Rishi Sunak's future in the light of the row over his family's financial affairs, and the outcome of the first round of the French presidential election. The programme also includes a report on the government's Online Safety Bill, due to be debated in the Commons in the coming weeks.


SUN 23:00 Loose Ends (m00167sm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01d23tn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 11 APRIL 2022

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m00168gz)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (m00162xp)
The Underclass

The ‘Underclass’: Laurie Taylor explored a vexed concept which has engaged social scientists, philanthropists, journalists, policy makers and politicians. He’s joined by Loic Wacquant, Professor of Sociology at the University of California Berkeley, and author of a magisterial study which traces the rise and fall of a scarecrow category which, he argues, had a lemming effect on a generation of scholars of race and poverty, obscuring more than it illuminated. They're joined by Baroness Ruth Lister, Emeritus Professor of Social Policy at Loughborough University, who charts the way in which the notion of an underclass travelled to the UK, via the New Right sociologist, Charles Murray. She describes its impact on the debate about 'welfare' dependency, across the political spectrum, and argues for a 'politics of renaming' one which accords respect and recognition to people who experience poverty.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m00167t8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00168h3)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00168h7)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00168h9)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m00168hc)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00168hf)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the Rev Neil Gardner of Canongate Kirk, Edinburgh.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m00168hh)
11/04/22 - Women in ag, flytipping and new entrants

The Liverpool Agricultural Discussion Society - also known as LADS - was formed in 1928 and women are not allowed to be members or to attend meetings as guests, though they can attend as invited speakers. Last week these rules were challenged by some members but the majority decided to retain the men only status.

Fly tipping costs councils £392 million a year in England. The Government is announcing a ‘crackdown’ including £450,000 for council grants for ‘trial projects’ like installing CCTV in hotspot areas and a change in the rules so households don’t pay to dispose of DIY waste. But the CLA says it's not enough.

Presented by Charlotte Smith
Produced for BBC Audio Bristol by Heather Simons


MON 05:56 Weather (m00168hk)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03k5c26)
Ptarmigan

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the ptarmigan. Few birds are tough enough to brave winter on the highest of Scottish mountains but Ptarmigan are well adapted to extreme conditions. They're the only British bird that turns white in winter and Ptarmigan have feathers that cover their toes, feet and nostrils to minimise heat loss.


MON 06:00 Today (m001680f)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m001680h)
Love poetry; love books

"Stand still, and I will read to thee / A lecture, love, in love's philosophy." John Donne is one of the greatest love poets in the history of the English language. In a new biography, Super-Infinite, Katherine Rundell reveals the many transformations in his life – from scholar to sea adventurer to priest. She also tells Kirsty Wark of his extraordinary ability to transform language into something new.

Copies of his Metaphysical Poems will be well-thumbed by students around the country. But what of the power of books in general? In Portable Magic: A History of Books and their Readers, Emma Smith presents an iconoclastic and revisionist story of our love affair with books.

Megan Walsh meanwhile has been looking at contemporary Chinese literature. The Subplot: What China is Reading and Why it Matters, reveals the huge appetite for books and the wonderful diversity of Chinese writing – from migrant-worker poetry movements and homoerotic romances to surreal stories and sci-fi.

Producer: Katy Hickman


MON 09:45 The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer (m0016824)
Episode 1

The story of the invention of the motion picture and the mysterious man behind it.

In 1888, the French artist and inventor Louis Le Prince recorded the first ever moving image on film using a single lens camera of his own design. It featured members of his family moving about the garden of their home and can still be seen online.

In September 1890 he paid a visit to his brother in Dijon, France, intending after that to join his wife and family in New York where they lived. On 16th September he caught a train to Paris. He never arrived in Paris, and was never seen again.

One month later, Thomas Edison announced his own invention of a camera which could take moving pictures. At a time of fierce competition among inventors to obtain patents for their own products, the mystery of the disappearance of Louis le Prince has never been solved.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Paterson Joseph
Produced by Celia de Wolff
Executive Producer: Caroline Raphael
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m001680m)
The Cher Show with Oti Mabuse and Arlene Phillips, Kylie Moore-Gilbert

With over 100 million record sales, an Academy Award, an Emmy, a Grammy, three Golden Globes and an award from The Council of Fashion Designers of America, very few artists have a catalogue that matches the iconic Cher. A new musical, touring the UK - “The Cher Show” - tells the story of the Goddess of Pop’s meteoric rise to fame. The director and choreographer behind the show are two Strictly Come Dancing legends - Arlene Phillips and Oti Mabuse. They both join Emma to discuss the new show and their own careers.

In August 2018, Kylie Moore-Gilbert, an Australian-British academic travelled to Iran to attend a seminar and conduct academic research. It was her first visit to the country. At Tehran airport on her way back home to Australia, she was arrested by the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps. Accused of espionage, she was imprisoned and later convicted and given a ten year sentence. She spent over two years in prison, half of it in solitary confinement. She was released in November 2020 as part of a prisoner exchange deal negotiated by the Australian government. She’s written about those 804 days, in a new book The Uncaged Sky, and speaks to Emma from Melbourne.

The Chancellor Rishi Sunak, his wife Akshata Murty and their finances have been in the headlines for several days now. Emma gets the latest from the woman behind the story, Economics Editor for the Independent, Anna Isaac. Anna broke the news that Ms Murty was a 'non-domicile' resident - meaning she doesn't have to pay tax to the UK authorities on any income that she earns outside Britain, something that is entirely legal. 48 hours after the story broke last Wednesday, Ms Murty announced that she would pay UK taxes on her worldwide income.

The actor Sienna Miller has said she took the step of freezing some eggs at 40, following the pressure she felt to have more children. Professor Imogen Goold has been looking into how women make decisions to delay fertility including in this way – and she questions the assumption often made in the media and in medicine that women are not properly informed, and make poor decisions about how long they can wait to have children. Imogen joins Emma to discuss, ahead of a lecture she is giving at Gresham College called Freezing Eggs and Delaying Fertility: Law, Ethics and Society, at 1pm on Monday 11 April. It can be viewed online for free. Professor Imogen Goold is Visiting Professor of Medical Law at Gresham College, and Professor of Medical Law at Oxford University.


MON 11:00 The Invention of... (m001680p)
Poland

Stalin on one side, Hitler from the left

Misha Glenny on the extraordinary history of Poland - includes the Miracle on the Vistula in 1920, the 1944 Warsaw Uprising, and how Solidarity set in motion the Soviet Union's collapse.

Recorded on location in Warsaw, Krakow and Zamosc, with contributions from Professor Norman Davies and Olesya Khromechuk of the Ukrainian Instititute. The image shows the Warsaw Uprising Monument.

The producer for BBC audio in Bristol is Miles Warde


MON 11:30 Homework (b0b1q5n5)
Shaparak Khorsandi's schooling fell short in what she hoped for and, in the second of this two part series, she continues her witty and personal look at the state of the UK education system.

Comedian Shaparak takes a look at the challenges and pitfalls that parents currently go through as they decide what sort of school is best for their beloved children. She talks to some of the mum-chums she met during her own children's schooling and they share their frustrations and hopes as they make this pivotal decision. Shaparak also talks to teachers, journalists, writers and fellow comedians - including Michael Rosen Mark Steel and George Monbiot - to try and ascertain what's best for her as she makes a similar life changing decision on how to educate her own children.

She also interrogates her own ten year old son, hoping to get to the root of what it's like for children at school now. But he's not quite as revealing as she'd hoped!

An Open Mike production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 News Summary (m001683s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 You and Yours (m001680t)
Hundreds of people turned away as soaring demand hits a chain of food clubs.

Food Charity The Bread and Butter thing says it's having to turn away hundreds of people every week across the North of England as the cost of living crisis starts to bite. The project collects excess food from supermarkets and other sources and sells them to customers at a much reduced price. It says it's now seeing unprecedented demand for its services. Winifred speaks to chief executive of the charity Mark Game and you'll hear from people using the service in Stalybridge.

A prepaid funeral plan company which has collapsed told its customers "there's nothing to worry about" if it ever went out of business. We've been looking at how the company - called 'Safe Hands' - reassured its 46,000 customers in its brochures and on its website. But now the company's gone into administration, it's emerged there's not enough money to cover all of their funerals.

It looks like the automatic carwash is making a comeback because of the decline of places where it's done by hand. There were up to 20,000 hand car washes in the UK in 2018, now there are around 8,000. The pandemic and Brexit are two big reasons behind this, along with greater scrutiny of the way hand car washes are run.

We're talking about the psychology of consumer pricing after the PR guru Lynne Franks spotted a new trend at M&S. They have hundreds of items priced at 39.50 which she thinks might be the 'sweet spot' that suggests quality and affordability in the current climate. But what is it about ending with a .50, a .99 or a round number that makes us want to buy? We'll hear from Professor of Consumer Psychology Gareth Harvey.

PRESENTER: WINIFRED ROBINSON

PRODUCER: CATHERINE MURRAY


MON 12:57 Weather (m001680w)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m001680y)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


MON 13:45 The Museums That Make Us (m0016810)
Leicester Museum and Art Gallery

Neil MacGregor presents a new series for BBC Radio Four celebrating the role and ambition of museums the length and breadth of the country, and in the process he'll be finding answers to the question ‘What are Museums For in 2022’.

At a time of an appalling refugee crisis in Europe, a visit to Leicester museum is timely. All this week he'll be going to Museums in cities that have seen demographic changes. Sometimes that change is gradual, sometimes sudden and . That was certainly been the case in Leicester, which saw a huge influx of refugees at the time of Idi Amin's ejection of Ugandan Asians in 1972. But it also saw German refugees in the run up to the second world war, and it's fragments of a painting by one of those figures, the artist Johannes Koelz, which the museum have chosen to illustrate the way they see themselves responding to the particular situation of Leicester both historically and in the present. And with grim irony, given that the object was chosen for the series before Russia's barbaric invasion of Ukraine, the painting is called 'Thou Shalt Not Kill'.

Museums have always been telescopes trained on the past to help locate a sense of place in the present. Neil believes that role is an active one, responding to changes in the people museums serve and the shifting social and cultural landscape they inhabit. After spending much of his life at the centre of our national Museum life in London, Neil is taking to the road to discover more about the extraordinary work being done in Museums outside the capital, from Stornoway to Stowmarket, and Belfast to Birmingham.

In each episode he visits a single museum, inviting them to choose an object from their collections which they feel best illustrates their civic role, and the way they relate and want to relate to their local audience. Very rarely have they chosen a crown jewel from their often priceless collections. More often it's an object with a particular local resonance, or which helps tackle episodes from the past which are being viewed very differently by citizens in the 21st century.

He’ll be visiting the great national museums of Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland, as well as major city institutions in Birmingham, Leeds, Liverpool and elsewhere. And in spite of the challenges of the last two years, everywhere he meets passionate teams who are dedicated to providing a unique experience for both local audiences and visitors from further afield.

Neil writes: “What’s going on in our museums is at once challenging and exciting and it can only really be understood by visiting as many as possible and finding out how they have approached what is a vital role in providing a sense of local, regional and national identity.”

Producer - Tom Alban
Original music composed by Phil Channell


MON 14:00 The Archers (m0016812)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (m0016814)
Smoking Guns

Climate scientist Dr Ben Santer proved global warming was due to CO2 back in 1995. The true story of how he was vilified to prevent the world reducing emissions, starring Shaun Evans

Ben Santer is American, but was educated in a British Army school on the Rhine and his ground breaking work "fingerprinting" global warming began at University of East Anglia in the mid 80s, (with US funding). He then worked with 2021 Nobel Prize Winner Klaus Hasselmann at the Max Planck Institute in Hamburg, before moving back to the States. A mountaineer and Anglophile, he became a pawn in a bigger game of climate change denial.

Based on original documentation and testimony, and featuring Dr Santer as himself.

Ben had to fight to try to salvage his reputation as the misinformation spread even among his peers. A quiet and measured scientist, an expert in the computer code of climate models, he became the subject of major articles in The Wall Street Journal, the Washington Times and TV and radio across America. Ben says now, “You spend years defending the 'discernible human influence' conclusion. You encounter valid scientific criticism. You also encounter non-scientific criticism from powerful forces of unreason.”

Ben Santer was the Convening Lead Author of Chapter 8 of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 1996. In its conclusion he wrote, “The balance of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climate.” That one sentence changed his life. He became the hate figure of the energy industry and they came after him through their attack dogs of lobbyists, politicians and the media.

When the report was published, powerful forces led by Cold War hawks Fred Singer and Fred Seitz, set out to discredit Santer. His attackers were backed by the oil and gas industry and had contacts right at the top of government. The impact of their campaign changed the debate not just in America but across the world.

Singer and Seitz used the same tactics they had pioneered in other science based issues that threatened the industrial status quo. They had fought against bans on smoking in public places, and against stopping ozone depleting CFC emissions.

Before the attacks on Santer and the IPCC report, President Clinton’s State Department were briefing that climate change was man made and had been minded to put significant resources into a low carbon future. Seitz and Singer helped stop that, and decades were lost in the fight to stop climate change.

Writer/ Producer, David Morley is a Sony Gold winner and recent Aria award winner, who The Stage described as "unrivalled in turning true events into radio dramas".
As a writer, he specialises in contemporary stories, often based on primary research. These include the Civil Rights struggle in the Deep South of the USA, the shooting down of flight MH17, the creation of Tony Blair’s Iraq WMD Dossier, and how Boris Johnson and Michael Gove fell out after winning the 2016 Referendum.
The Independent on Sunday described him as "a perceptive journalist and a fine writer" in their review of his book "Gorgeous George: The life and adventures of George Galloway".

Cast
Dr Tom Wigley: Nicholas Boulton
Sir John Houghton: Philip Franks
Donald Pearlman: William Hope
Jennifer Santer: Laurel Lefkow
Young Ben Santer: James Morley
Al-Saban: Nayef Rashad
Ned Crabbe and the German Delegate: Wilf Scolding
Fred Singer: Kerry Shale
The Kenyan Delegate: Nathaniel Christian

Writer and Director: David Morley
Sound Design: Tom Maggs
Original Music: Chris O'Shaughnessy

A Perfectly Normal production for BBC Radio 4


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (m0016816)
Programme 3, 2022

(3/12)
If, one night, you encountered Caxton's successor, the current US Secretary of State and Neville John Holder, what might they be about to sail off in? Only in the Round Britain Quiz universe is this a reasonable question to ask anyone, and the regular teams from the North of England and the South of England will be doing their best to answer it coherently.

Stuart Maconie and Adele Geras are the North of England team, and they face Paul Sinha and Marcus Berkmann for the South of England, who opened their scorecard impressively last week. But both teams are recent champions in this quiz and both will be on their mettle.

The programme also includes another selection of the best question suggestions sent in by listeners in recent months.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m0016818)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Lost Worlds (m0014fyd)
Escape the 21st century to eavesdrop on the 12th, as Paterson Joseph narrates a journey back to the lost world of Anglo-Norman England.

On the night of November 25th, 1120 William Adelin drowned in the English Channel - the teenage heir to the English throne, his body never recovered,

"Instead of wearing a crown of gold, his head was broken open by the rocks of the sea," Henry of Huntingdon lamented. "Instead of gaining the heights of kingly rule, he was buried in the bellies of fish at the bottom of the ocean."

In Lost Worlds, the focus is on the fish and not the boy, the world around Adelin rather than his world of courts and kings.

On the northern shore of the Channel, nobody yet knows that William is dead. As we track through a swathe of southern England, we listen in to the medieval world and its inhabitants.

In the estuaries of southern England, eel traps are being set. On the wooded uplands of the Chilterns, pigs are pannaged, bells toll and rain falls on winter-sown fields. And at the far end of the Ridgeway, a runaway bride is hiding in a hermit's cell.

Combining soundscape with recent historical research, our consultants are Professor Carl Watkins of the University of Cambridge, author of The Undiscovered Country and Dr Stephen Mileson of the University of Oxford, author with Stuart Brookes of Peasant Perceptions of Landscape.

With additional help from David Crowther of Swyncombe parish and from Dr Adam Chapman and Professor Catherine Clarke of the Institute of Historical Research, University of London.

Written and produced by Julia Johnson
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (m001681b)
Religion IRL

In the past two years faith communities have lived through an unprecedented experiment. With places of worships closed for long periods, they've been forced to adapt digitally. Not everyone could do so fulsomely, with some acts of worship prohibited by religious teachings.

As restrictions have lifted many are finding that the faithful are not rushing back, although there are exceptions. How did it feel to take communion or attend Friday prayers together again in real life? Has the pandemic permanently changed the practice of faith as a congregation or community? And why, for faith leaders and theologians, is it so important we return to the church, synagogue or mosque?

To discuss why physical presence has been so important in faith and religion across millennia, Ernie Rea is joined by Dr Mansur Ali, a lecturer in Islamic studies at the University of Cardiff who advised his local mosque on the theology of online prayer during Covid. He's also joined by Dr Sara Parvis, a senior lecturer in Early Christian History at the University of Edinburgh and a practicing Catholic, and Dr Samuel Landau, an Orthodox Rabbi at the Barnet United Synagogue and a Clinical Psychologist.

Plus Rev. Sean Steele, the vicar of St Isidore Episcopal Church in Texas, explains how he is exploring physical presence in worship through virtual reality services in the metaverse.

Producer: Rebecca Maxted
Editor: Helen Grady


MON 17:00 PM (m001681d)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m001681j)
The man who killed the Conservative MP, Sir David Amess, has been convicted of murder. And Ukraine's president says tens of thousands of people may have died in Mariupol.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (m001681l)
Series 28

Episode 2

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Henning Wehn, Zoe Lyons, Sindhu Vee, and Marcus Brigstocke are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as windows, ants, rice and Ancient Egyptians.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


MON 19:00 The Archers (m001681n)
Freddie tells Tracy Adil is overstaying his welcome in Ian’s kitchen, and Kathy is equally annoyed Adil’s electric car is blocking her parking space. Who does he think he is? Adil appears, and Tracy recommends he go to Freddie’s Easter Sunday event at Lower Loxley, but Freddie is dismissive. Tracy sets Adil up so he can work in his suite. Later Freddie tells Tracy the Easter Bunny has been spotted in Hollerton, but Freddie’s put out at seeing how well Adil and Tracy are getting on. Determined to prove himself, Freddie decides he needs to get the Easter Bunny to the Lower Loxley event.
Elizabeth is delighted Freddie’s drawing up a proper business plan for his DJ’ing; Vince’s talk clearly did the trick. Vince calls in on David to check about Elizabeth’s surprise birthday party. He isn’t sure what to get her and wondered if David or Ruth had any ideas. Vince is shocked to hear David and Ruth aren’t going ahead with the solar panels. David protests solar just doesn’t make the cut against everything else they need to invest in. Vince offers to lend them the money, but David is uncomfortable. Vince tells him to think about it. Back at Lower Loxley Elizabeth tells Vince Freddie reminds her of Nigel, but she wishes he had more of his business sense. That’s why she’s so grateful to Vince for taking Freddie under his wing. Vince isn’t convinced, but Elizabeth thinks Freddie will learn what he needs to from Vince.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m001681q)
Richard Cadell and The Sooty Show; The Handmaid’s Tale opera; actor Liz Carr; gender neutral dance calling

70 years after Sooty first appeared with Harry Corbett on the BBC’s Talent Night, presenter and current owner of The Sooty Show Richard Cadell talks to Samira about Sooty’s enduring appeal, as Sooty’s Magic Show embarks on a new tour and a theme park opens at the end of May.

Annilese Miskimmon, Artistic Director of English National Opera, discusses her directorial debut at the ENO. The Handmaid’s Tale, the opera written by Poul Ruders and Paul Bentley, is based on Margaret Atwood’s dystopian novel about a repressive totalitarian state where women are stripped of their identities and their rights.

The winner of Best Supporting Actress at last night's Olivier Awards was Liz Carr of Silent Witness fame, for her role in the National Theatre’s revival of The Normal Heart. She tells Samira why she made a plea, after the ceremony, for more Covid-safe theatre performances for vulnerable audiences.

As the season for folk festivals approaches, we consider how the times they are a-changing in the world of folk dance. Lisa Heywood, pioneer of gender-free dance calling, and Gareth Kiddier, who organises the dancing at Sidmouth Folk Festival, talk to Samira Ahmed about why gender-free calling matters, how they do it, and how it goes down on the dance floor.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Jerome Weatherald

Image: Presenter Samira Ahmed with Richard Cadell and Sooty


MON 20:00 Tax Me, I’m a Millionaire (m001681s)
The world’s ten richest men doubled their fortunes during the first two years of the Covid pandemic, while Britain is entering a cost of living crisis not seen since the 1970s. We’re not living in a fairy tale but sometimes it seems like it would take magic to fix wealth inequality in the UK.

Abigail Disney disagrees. Multimillionaire and founder member of campaign group the Patriotic Millionaires, she inherited a fortune on her 21st birthday. Shares in the ubiquitous company founded by her grandfather Roy and her uncle Walt rocketed in the 1990s. But Abigail has turned away from her father’s private 737 jet and a life of unreflecting luxury to try to work out what to do about her wealth. And other people’s.

For her and other super-wealthy members of the US group the Patriotic Millionaires the answer starts with demanding fair and equitable tax. The tax system must be reformed to more effectively target wealth, not just income.

Now the movement is growing in the UK and Abigail introduces us to two of its members, retired city trader turned full-time inequality campaigner Gary Stevenson and Gemma McGough whose first company made her a millionaire in her 30s.

But can the solution to Britain’s inequality problem really be as simple as reforming a few taxes?

Crossing the country and the political spectrum we meet a range of supportive and critical voices including ex-Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond, Institute for Fiscal Studies Deputy Director Helen Miller, Private Eye Magazine investigative journalist Richard Brooks, Guardian economics commentator Adiya Chakrabortty and, in Chancellor Rishi Sunak’s North Yorkshire constituency, independent Councillor Angie Dale and Food Share volunteers Jo Eastwood and Lottie Cookson.

What do they make of the plans of these brave new millionaires?

Presenter: Abigail Disney
Producer: Michael Umney
Executive Producer: Ned Carter Miles
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (m00162yd)
Dying to hunt in France

Just before Christmas, 2021, Joel Vilard was driving his cousin home on a dual carriageway just south of Rennes in Brittany. Suddenly, a bullet flew through the window and hit the pensioner in the neck. He later died in hospital of injuries accidentally inflicted by a hunter firing a rifle from a few hundred metres away. A year earlier Morgan Keane, was shot dead in his garden, while out chopping wood. The hunter says that he mistook the 25 year old man for a wild boar.

Mila Sanchez was so shocked by her friend Morgan’s death that she collected hundreds of thousands of signatures to change the hunting laws. She gave evidence to the French Senate and put the topic on the political agenda. The Green Party is now calling for a ban on hunting on Sundays and Wednesdays. But the Federation National des Chasseurs, which licenses the 1.3 million active hunters across France, is fighting back. It argues hunting is a vital part of rural life and brings the community together. Its members were delighted when President Macron recently halved the cost of annual hunting permits.

Yet public opinion, concerned about safety and animal rights, is hardening against hunting and the battle for la France Profonde is on. On the eve of presidential elections, Lucy Ash looks at a country riven with divisions and asks if new laws are needed to ensure ramblers, families, residents and hunters can share the countryside in harmony.

Presenter, Lucy Ash. Producer, Phoebe Keane. Editor, Bridget Harney


MON 21:00 Three Pounds in My Pocket (m001637y)
Series 5

Episode 1

Kavita Puri hears stories from British South Asians about life in the early noughties. For almost a decade Kavita has been charting the social history of these communities in post-war Britain. Many of the pioneers arrived with as little as £3, due to strict currency controls.

The fifth series picks up where the last one ended: the aftermath of 9/11. The world was changing fast. The revolution in communication technology meant the Indian subcontinent felt closer than ever. The £3 generation and their descendants could now call family on the Indian subcontinent whenever they wanted - rather than just a few times a year. And 24-hour global TV news meant that events on the Indian subcontinent, like the Gujarat riots of 2002, could be beamed into living rooms in Britain.

However, the pull to Britain was getting deeper as the pioneer generation were entering retirement, and their children were having their own children. The British South Asian community, complex in its voices and experiences, was telling its own stories its own way, including the pioneering Silver Street, the first daily Asian soap opera. But violent clashes by a minority of protesters over the play Behzti, resulted in the cancellation of the run. It made national headlines and would become “the Sikhs' Rushdie moment,” raising difficult questions about Britain’s commitment to free speech and about offence to religious minorities.

Producer: Ant Adeane
Editor: Hugh Levinson

Historical consultants:
Dr Florian Stadtler, University of Bristol
Dr Edward Anderson, Northumbria University
Professor Gurharpal Singh, School of Oriental and African Studies


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m001680h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m001681w)
Zelensky: Mariupol “burnt to ashes”

In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 The Promise by Damon Galgut (m001681y)
6: 'Shut up, just listen.'

2021's Booker Prize-winning novel charts the crash and burn of the Swarts, a white South African family, living on a farm outside Pretoria. Told over four decades and four funerals, it is the story of family, land and a promise, set against a changing South Africa.

Today: a confession, and a shocking ending for Astrid...

Reader: Jack Klaff
Writer: Damon Galgut
Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Producer: Justine Willett


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (m00162v4)
The Language of Sci-Fi

Are you a lover of SF and all things fantasy, or merely a fan?

Jesse Sheidlower formerly of the Oxford English Dictionary began compiling a dictionary of sci-fi 20 years ago and has been updating it ever since. He brings Michael Rosen up to speed with current parlance in the SF world (true fans prefer this term rather than sci-fi) and explores the origins of words and sayings to do with robotics, extraterrestrial life and space exploration.
It's surprising how many examples of what was once the language of fiction have become our everyday reality. Robots of course are the obvious example but a few decades ago Space Station would have sounded like the stuff of fantasy.

Producer: Maggie Ayre


MON 23:30 Parish Is Burning (m0016820)
Surreal, silly vibrations from the flatlining, radio desert somewhere near the Irish Border.

First picked up by lorry drivers trying to find a signal in the flatlining radio desert of the Irish border, Parish Is Burning is a wild, silly and surreal sketch show. A genuine metaphysical anomaly, a mysterious broadcast from an alternative universe (near Omagh) with that uniquely warped, unpredictable, big-hearted, Northern Irish whiff and featuring new comedy talent from all over Ireland.

In this pilot episode, visit Mo Farragh’s Ostrich Farm, eavesdrop on the parish helpline, find out if Sergeant Gerry Rafferty can crack the case of the man beaten to death with his own kettle, experience Rural Fury at the Parish youth club and catch up on Belfast soap opera Van Dad.

Parish Is Burning is created by Michael McCullagh and Phil Taggart, and stars Michael Fry, Ciara Knight, Michael Stranney, Hannah Mamalis, Mary Flanigan and Peter McGann.

Producer: Keith Martin
Executive Producer: Victoria Lloyd

A Fabel production for BBC Radio 4



TUESDAY 12 APRIL 2022

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m0016822)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 00:30 The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer (m0016824)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0016827)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0016829)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m001682c)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m001682f)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m001682h)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the Rev Neil Gardner of Canongate Kirk, Edinburgh.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m001682k)
12/04/22 - Queues at Dover, Lump Sum Exit Scheme, new entrants to farming

Operation Brock in Kent is still holding lorries on the M20, A20 and A2, while delays at the port of Dover affect commercial traffic. Pleas from the British Meat Processors Association, to allow vehicles with perishable food to jump the queue, have fallen on deaf ears, and the group is warning that the hold-ups could affect longer-term trade with the EU.

The latest figures from land agents Strutt and Parker say the average price of arable land is now £9,500 an acre, and for pasture it's £7,5000 an acre. The price and availability of land is often a barrier to new entrants wanting to join the industry. We hear from one couple who have been trying to buy a farm for 7 years, and from another, who have started farming with no land at all, by grazing livestock on other people's land.

Presented by Anna Hill
Produced for BBC Audio Bristol by Heather Simons


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zbtzz)
Black Grouse

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the story of the black grouse. A black grouse lek is one of Nature's spectacles. Charged with testosterone, the males, known as 'black cocks', compete on 'jousting lawns' for the females or grey hens. Fanning their lyre-shaped tails and displaying a flurry of white undertail feathers, the males rush towards their rivals with harsh scouring sneezes and bubbling cries, known as 'roo-kooing'.


TUE 06:00 Today (m001686r)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 Positive Thinking (m001686t)
The Case for Polyamory

For many Millennials and much of Gen Z, polyamory is becoming more common. With all of us living longer than ever, Sangita Myska asks: is polyamory an alternative relationship model fit for the 21 Century?

There’s even an app for it. Ana Kirova, CEO of Feeld, is using tech to help challenge the idea that we should follow the formula we've all been taught: meet one person, settle down and live happily ever after.

Our expert panel:
Dr Pam Spurr, Psychologist and relationship expert.
Anita Cassidy who, when she was 38 and married with two children, embraced a polyamorous lifestyle.  She's a life coach and founder of the relationship website Alethya.
Andrew G. Marshall , author and leading marital therapist and host of the Meaningful Life podcast.

Producer: Sarah Shebbeare


TUE 09:30 Witness (b036tqps)
The Soviet Gulag

Millions of people were sent to brutal labour camps in the Soviet Union during Stalin's rule. Political prisoners and criminals worked alongside each other as slave labourers. Many died of disease, starvation, or exhaustion. Leonid Finkelstein spent more than 5 years in the Gulag. Hear his story.


TUE 09:45 The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer (m001686w)
Episode 2

The story of the invention of the motion picture and the mysterious man behind it.

In 1888, the French artist and inventor Louis Le Prince recorded the first ever moving image on film using a single lens camera of his own design. It featured members of his family moving about the garden of their home and can still be seen online.

In September 1890 he paid a visit to his brother in Dijon, France, intending after that to join his wife and family in New York where they lived. On 16th September he caught a train to Paris. He never arrived in Paris, and was never seen again.

One month later, Thomas Edison announced his own invention of a camera which could take moving pictures. At a time of fierce competition among inventors to obtain patents for their own products, the mystery of the disappearance of Louis le Prince has never been solved.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Paterson Joseph
Produced by Celia de Wolff
Executive Producer: Caroline Raphael
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m001686y)
Actor Anya Taylor-Joy, Rosie Duffield MP, Amber Heard and Johnny Depp, Celia Paul and Gwen John

The debate over sex and gender filters through to many areas of our lives today whether its about women-only spaces, trans athletes competing in sporting events or our use of language to define what a woman is. It’s now being put centre stage of the local elections next month by a new campaign called "Respect my Sex if you want my X”. The campaign run by Women Uniting UK is urging voters – both men and women - to quiz prospective candidates canvassing on the doorstep with questions like “What is a woman?” or “What is more important, sex or gender?” The Labour MP Rosie Duffield talks about her support for the group and why she believes the issue could have an impact next month as well as on the wider political landscape.

The sequel to Johnny Depp and ex-wife Amber Heard's bitter legal battle is coming to America. - Virginia to be more precise. After losing the first round - a libel trial set in the UK - Depp, is suing Heard, for $50m (£38m) over a piece she wrote in The Washington Post in which she claimed to be a victim of domestic abuse. She is suing back, with a $100m counterclaim against him. His legal team successfully argued that the trial should be held in Virginia - home to two Washington Post offices and where the paper is physically published. It's expected to last up to seven weeks and will in many ways be a rerun of the London trial, exposing lurid details about their relationship, with accusations of abuse aimed at both sides. BBC Media and Arts Correspondent, David Sillito joins Woman's Hour standing outside Fairfax County Circuit Court in Virginia.

Anya Taylor-Joy's decision to leave school at 16 to pursue a career in acting has certainly paid off. In 2020, in the first month of its release – a staggering sixty-two million households watched her play chess prodigy Beth Harmon in the Netflix mini-series 'The Queen’s Gambit'. More recently, you may have seen her play Gina Gray in the final series of 'Peaky Blinders'. She discusses her latest film – The Northman - a brutal and bloody viking revenge epic.

The artist Celia Paul currently has an exhibition at the Victoria Miro Gallery in London, called Memory and Desire, and her latest book is called “Letters to Gwen John”. Gwen John was a Welsh artist who worked in France for most of her career. Her brother Augustus John was more famous during her lifetime, but her beautiful paintings, mainly of female sitters, often reading in domestic settings, have gained wider attention since her death. Celia Paul shares much in common with Gwen John: both studied at the Slade, and both were models and lovers of older artists - Gwen had a relationship with Auguste Rodin and Celia with Lucian Freud. Celia joins Emma.



Presenter: Emma Barnett
Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Interviewed Guest: Rosie Duffield
Interviewed Guest: David Sillito
Interviewed Guest: Anya Taylor-Joy
Interviewed Guest: Celia Paul


TUE 11:00 Putin (m0016870)
5. An Indispensable Tsar

Bare-chested photo ops and the invasion of Georgia - what Vladimir Putin did as prime minister. Then, he returns to the presidency vowing to save Russia from the west.

To make sense of his carefully crafted image and how his attitudes to both Ukraine and the West have defined his rule, Jonny Dymond is joined by:

Catherine Belton, author of ‘Putin’s People: How the KGB took back Russia and took on the West'

Andrei Soldatov, a Russian investigative journalist and author of ‘The New Nobility: The Restoration of Russia's Security State and the Enduring Legacy of the KGB’

Mark Galeotti, University College London lecturer and director of Mayak Intelligence.

Production coordinators: Sophie Hill and Siobhan Reed
Sound engineer: James Beard
Producers: Caroline Bayley, Sandra Kanthal, Joe Kent
Series Editor: Emma Rippon
Commissioning Editor: Richard Knight


TUE 11:30 The Caretakers (m0016872)
Episode 2: Rebuild

In every museum and gallery, behind the scenes teams look after our national collections. They have an intimate knowledge of the buildings and collections they look after, yet their opinions are rarely sought.

Artist Eloise Moody has been working closely with nine people across the United Kingdom tasked with keeping their respective museums, galleries and collections clean. Every sound you hear in this programme - from brushes sweeping to each word and sigh - was collected and recorded by the Caretakers themselves. This series offers a rare chance to perch invisibly on the shoulders of these exceptional guides, noticing what they stop to consider as they go about their work.

In renowned sculptor Barbara Hepworth’s former house and garden in St Ives, now cared for and run by Tate, we join Deborah Cane, Conservation Manager. Having dedicated herself to the restoration of Hepworth's summer house, she reflects on the balance between representing and preserving what was once a home and workshop.

Working as a cleaner at the William Morris Gallery- a museum dedicated to the Arts and Crafts designer and socialist - we meet Liliana. Having rebuilt her life in London after fleeing Columbia twenty years ago, she finds her mind traveling back to her native country as she considers the artefacts that surround her. Haunted by a past exhibit, she considers what makes a home.

Lisa cleans at St.Fagans, a living museum in Wales where historical buildings are relocated and re-constructed brick by brick. As she goes about her shift, she shares some of the more unusual tasks that connect her to past generations.

Producer: Eloise Moody
Producer and Editor: Emma Barnaby
Executive Producer: Anishka Sharma

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m0016874)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 You and Yours (m0016876)
Call You and Yours: Is the travel chaos affecting your holiday plans?

Call You and Yours: Is the travel chaos affecting your holiday plans this Easter?

Official figures show holiday bookings are up, for the UK and overseas, with travel agencies and tour operators seeing a rise of 30 percent. Hotels and campsites are also reporting that bookings are up. But with long delays at airports and ferry ports, will people be put off?

Heathrow Airport has recorded its busiest month since the start of the pandemic. The airport was used by 4.2 million passengers in March - almost eight times the total during the same month last year. But while the figures suggest that the travel industry is recovering after a terrible two years -- it comes as passengers have faced disruption and delays because of staff absences.

Meanwhile, P&O Ferries has resumed its sailings between Larne and Cairnryan, with the ship being staffed by agency workers but say services from Dover to Calais will remain suspended until at least Good Friday. On the roads, The RAC has warned that this weekend's Easter getaway is likely to be the busiest on the UK's roads for at least eight years.

Let us know about your plans and if you've made any changes. Are you planning a trip abroad, or staying closer to home.

Email us, and leave your contact number: youandyours@bbc.co.uk

Or after 11 on Tuesday call us on 03700 100 444

PRESENTER: WINIFRED ROBINSON

PRODUCER: LINDA WALKER


TUE 12:57 Weather (m0016878)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m001687b)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


TUE 13:45 The Museums That Make Us (m001687d)
Bristol's M Shed museum

Neil MacGregor presents a new series for BBC Radio Four celebrating the role and ambition of museums the length and breadth of the country, and in the process he'll be finding answers to the question ‘What are Museums For in 2022’.

With the toppling of the statue of the slave trader Edward Colston in 2020, in the wake of the worldwide protests over the murder of George Floyd, Bristol became a centre of debate about the way we talk about colonial history, and what we do with objects that describe recall it. The statue, now on its side and still covered in paint, is in Bristol's M Shed museum, but that's not the object that the museum have chosen to tell the story of their museum's relationship with the city today. Instead Neil is shown around one of the city's old Lodekka Buses, which is used to tell the story of the Bristol Bus boycott of 1963. It arose from the refusal of the Bristol Omnibus Company to employ black or Asian bus crews in the city. In common with other cities, there was widespread racial discrimination in housing and employment at that time. But the boycott, led by youth worker Paul Stephenson and the West Indian Development Council, worked. Soon after, the restrictions were dropped and it was considered to have been influential in the movement that lead to the passing of the Race Relations Act of 1965.

Museums have always been telescopes trained on the past to help locate a sense of place in the present. Neil believes that role is an active one, responding to changes in the people museums serve and the shifting social and cultural landscape they inhabit. After spending much of his life at the centre of our national Museum life in London, Neil is taking to the road to discover more about the extraordinary work being done in Museums outside the capital, from Stornoway to Stowmarket, and Belfast to Birmingham.

In each episode he visits a single museum, inviting them to choose an object from their collections which they feel best illustrates their civic role, and the way they relate and want to relate to their local audience. Very rarely have they chosen a crown jewel from their often priceless collections. More often it's an object with a particular local resonance, or which helps tackle episodes from the past which are being viewed very differently by citizens in the 21st century.

He’ll be visiting the great national museums of Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland, as well as major city institutions in Birmingham, Leeds, Liverpool and elsewhere. And in spite of the challenges of the last two years, everywhere he meets passionate teams who are dedicated to providing a unique experience for both local audiences and visitors from further afield.

Neil writes: “What’s going on in our museums is at once challenging and exciting and it can only really be understood by visiting as many as possible and finding out how they have approached what is a vital role in providing a sense of local, regional and national identity.”

Producer - Tom Alban
Original music composed by Phil Channell


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m001681n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (m000glnk)
The Blackrock Girl (Part 1)

The Blackrock Girl is Lucy Gannon’s two part drama about Finn, who appears in a quiet rural village in Ireland, bringing with her the assumed (the locals assume) glamour of the big city. She comes from Blackrock but sometimes she doesn’t sound as if she does. But, she explains, she spent a few years as a child over the border in Omagh and so her accent has become a bit strangled and anyway, after a lifetime nursing overseas, in Africa and India, devoting herself to the poor and needy, it’s not surprising her accent is slightly off kilter sometimes. Exhausted she returns to Ireland deciding to start a new life and this is how she finds herself in this charming friendly rural Irish village of Bridesway. Approaching life with an air of entitlement and yet warmth she is, very definitely, likeable. She has charisma, and makes friends easily. She’s interested in people, tolerant, helpful. She’s just plain NICE.

But Finn is broke. She’s never nursed a single person in her whole life, although she has often held the hands of the dying. Her name used to be Moira, then Eileen, then Mary, Frances and now Theresa. She’s wanted in England, Scotland and Cyprus, for fraud, theft and extortion.

Episode One
Theresa Finn (The Blackrock Girl) arrives in the small rural village of Bridesway moving into the dilapidated Manse House with a view to doing it up and starting a new life. She befriends the whole village, effortlessly and quickly gets Evie Bourne, the local post mistress on her side. She particularly forges a friendship with the wealthy OAP Charles and appears to be doing him the world of good. Only the retired policeman Martin is suspicious of her. She arranges a tea party to celebrate her old and new friends (Her old friends don’t turn up) and in order to do this she relies on the locals to do all the work, promising to pay them handsomely after the event……

Finn is played by Fenella Woolgar
Ellen ….. Marion O’Dwyer
Evie ….. Pauline McLynn
Martin ….. Des McAleer
Charles ….. Jonathan Coy
Dave ….. Jamie Beamish

Produced by Celia DeWolff for BBC Northern Ireland


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (m00167rv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (m001687g)
Government Energy Strategy

The government announced its new energy strategy last week, outlining plans to tackle energy supply over the coming decades. In this edition of Costing the Earth, Tom Heap chairs a panel discussion which looks into the detail of the strategy, and asks what it will mean for both net zero targets and household bills. He is joined by a panel of experts: Roz Bulleid, Deputy Policy Director at the independent think tank Green Alliance; Chief Political Commentator at the i-newspaper, Paul Waugh; and environmental journalist, author and campaigner Mark Lynas.

Produced for BBC Audio Bristol by Emma Campbell


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (m001687j)
3 Ways to Speak English

Dr Jamila Lyiscott describes to Michael Rosen the 3 ways in which she speaks English according to whether she's at home, at school or with friends. Her TED talk on the subject is one of the most-viewed language performances on the internet and is used in education. She self-describes as a trilingual orator and asks: who decides who is articulate?
https://www.ted.com/talks/jamila_lyiscott_3_ways_to_speak_english?language=en

Produced by Beth O'Dea for BBC Audio Bristol


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (m001687l)
Tom Hopkinson, editor of Picture Post

What does it take to be a great news editor? Tom Hopkinson was sacked by the proprietor of Picture Post for trying to run a true story during the 1950 Korean War. Later he also sent a photographer - Ian Berry - to cover the Sharpeville Massacre in South Africa for Drum .... in time he fell out with the proprietor of that magazine as well. "To affect the world you've got to get into a position to affect it," he said, "and that means you've got to be very patient and fight your way in."

Nominating Tom Hopkinson is Donald Macintyre, former correspondent in the Middle East and one of the very first students on the Cardiff journalism course Tom Hopkinson set up. Also in studio is his daughter, Professor Amanda Hopkinson.

The presenter is Matthew Parris and the producer is Miles Warde


TUE 17:00 PM (m001687n)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m001687q)
Boris Johnson is fined for attending a lockdown party in breach of his own rules.


TUE 18:30 Teatime (m000fq41)
Episode 2

Comedy by Katherine Jakeways about a chaotic but loving family. Starring Philip Glenister, Samantha Spiro, Aimee-Ffion Edwards, Prasanna Puwanarajah, Katie Redford and Steven Brandon.

Sensing he might be in with a chance to win her back, Joe (Glenister) decides to ambush his ex-wife Donna (Spiro) with an impromptu date night. Donna isn’t sure what to think, and neither are Vicky and Rav (Edwards and Puwanarajah) – Joe’s decided to stage this ambush in their kitchen.

Meanwhile, Vicky’s sister Lisa (Redford) is #livingherbestlife as a single lady about town. Now that she’s got nothing to look forward to except a lifetime of married routine, is Vicky just a little jealous? And Uncle Bob (Brandon) has some excellent advice for Rav.

Teatime was produced by Sam Ward, and is a BBC Studios production.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m001687s)
Excited Beth’s looking forward to thrashing Ben at the race track. Distracted Ben seems nervous to Jill but plays it down. In the car with the instructor Ben makes a start but soon pulls into the pit lane. Beth checks on him but he insists he’s ok, just out of breath.
Beth talks about race cars, and Leonard gets nostalgic. Beth compliments him on his motoring knowledge. She suggests to Ben that she donates one of her drives to him, but Ben jumps in and offers his own. Leonard’s overjoyed and can’t believe he gets to drive. Jill comments on the generosity of Ruairi’s gift.
Jill lets slip to Beth she was aware of Ben’s nerves. Beth insists to Jill that Ben had no need to act brave for her; he’s so courageous in other areas. Jill suggests she share some of that praise with him.
Beth confronts Ben about pretending not to be scared – she tells him all she wants is for him to be honest. Ben admits that David and Ruth’s accident affected his confidence. They become closer and end up saying “I love you” – before wondering who’s in the car instead of Beth.
Jill’s taken her chance to try a bit of racing herself – in the passenger seat with the instructor. As they speed along, thrilled Jill is up for one more lap! The instructor compliments Leonard’s skills too. Inspired, Leonard offers to whizz Jill around the Hassett Hills. But for now, sensible Ben insists he’s driving them home.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m001687v)
Photographer Edward Burtynsky; Turner Prize shortlist; Novelist Patrick McCabe; Staying well on stage discussion

After being announced as the recipient of the Outstanding Contribution to Photography award at the Sony World Photography Awards 2022, the Canadian photographer and artist Edward Burtynsky talks to Tom about his 40-year career as a landscape photographer.

This year’s Turner Prize is returning to Liverpool for the first time in 15 years. Laura Robertson, a writer, critic and editor based in the city gives us a rundown of the shortlisted artists announced today at Tate Liverpool: Heather Phillipson, Ingrid Pollard, Veronica Ryan and Sin Wai Kin.

Award-winning and twice Booker shorted listed author of The Butcher Boy Patrick McCabe talks to Tom Sutcliffe about his new novel Poguemahone. Described as this century’s Ulysses, the novel takes the form of a free verse monologue set in Margate in the mind and memories of Dan Fogarty and his sister Una.

Rafaella Covino, the founder and director of Applause for Thought, which offers free and low cost mental health assistance for people working in theatre, and Wabriya King, Associate Drama Therapist at the Bush Theatre, join Tom to discuss the growing need for wellbeing support across the theatre industry.

Presenter: Tom Sutcliffe
Producer: Nicki Paxman


TUE 20:00 Licence to Kill? (m001687x)
On October 14, 2016, Michael Hoolickin was murdered by a man he had never met. His killer, Tim Deakin had 55 previous offences. His last crime was to bite a man's ear off in a pub fight.

Deakin was a high risk and prolific offender who had been freed early - "on Probation Service Licence" - to serve what was left of his sentence in the community. Deakin was later jailed for 27 years.

At Michael's Inquest, the family discovered Deakin had been stopped following a car chase just a few days earlier, with no insurance and carrying drugs.

The Coroner outlined serious failures by the people who were supposed to be monitoring Deakin that meant he stayed out of prison and remained free - on license - to kill, and she made recommendations for change.

Radio 4 discover the true extent of crimes, many of them violent committed by people who have been released on license, including those where the advice was they were still a danger to the public

At the heart of this is Garry and Leslie and the torment over their sons death and how that's drives them to uncover the reasons his murderer wasn't in prison on that night. We follow them as they meet another Mother and Father still missing their son after his life was taken in the same circumstances

Producer: Matt O'Donoghue


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m001687z)
Wellness

Breathe in...and out. Namaste. With the global mental wellness market reaching around $120 billion in recent years, here lies the truth that in the West, many are finding the daily incorporation of mindfulness techniques highly beneficial to reduce stress and to become more present in daily life. With its ever growing popularity, we wanted to hear from visually impaired people who are making a living within this industry. We speak to yoga instructor, Claire Miller, we put Peter into the healing hands of Nick Mulryan who performs a reiki session on him and we speak to Marc Norton who demonstrates his work in the area of sound healing. We also explore how viable the wellness industry is as a career for people with visual impairments.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Beth Hemmings
Production Coordinator: Liz Poole

Website image description: pictured is Peter (on the left) and Nick Mulryan (on the right) in Nick's office at The No.1 Pain Relief Clinic in Buxton. Nick is holding an A4 piece of paper that details the 7 major chakras of the body. On the wall behind Peter to the left, hangs two images of the human skeleton with various labels branching off. Behind the pair are two shelves with towels and various boxes on. To the right of Nick there is a desk and a small shelf with two medical models of the human foot, which show the bones and muscles inside.


TUE 21:00 Fungi: The New Frontier (m001394q)
The biggest show on Earth

It all started with rumours of an 800-meter underground organism hidden under the streets of Cambridge and a plate of mushrooms on toast. With cream. In this three-part series, Tim Hayward falls down a rabbit hole into kingdom (or as some call it queendom) Fungi. Along the way he starts to question pretty much everything he thought he knew about the world, discovering scientists doing pioneering research that’s changing how we understand life on Earth and offering solutions to some of our biggest challenges.

In this second episode Tim heads to the Kew Fungarium - the biggest collection of dried fungal specimens in the world, tries to get his head around fungal sex and peers into a world of zombies and snakes in the form of microscopic fungi. He gets a kind of vertigo as he learns more about the fungal world underneath our feet, in our own guts, and, basically - everywhere. He then learns a word that could help to save fungal biodiversity - and why this matters more than he ever could have realised... and finally there’s the possibility of fungal intelligence.

Features:
Giuliana Furci, founder of the Fungi Foundation
Merlin Sheldrake, biologist and writer
Justin Stewart, researcher into microbial networks
Kristin Aleklett Kadish, microbial ecologist
Lee Davies, curator at the Kew Fungarium.

Presenter: Tim Hayward
Producer and Sound Designer: Richard Ward
Executive Producer: Miranda Hinkley
Image courtesy of Carolina Magnasco
A Loftus Media production for Radio 4


TUE 21:30 Positive Thinking (m001686t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m0016881)
PM and Chancellor facing calls to resign

In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 The Promise by Damon Galgut (m0016883)
7: 'Have you seen a dead body before?'

2021's Booker Prize-winning novel charts the crash and burn of the Swarts, a white South African family, living on a farm outside Pretoria. Told over four decades and four funerals, it is the story of family, land and a promise, set against a changing South Africa.

Today: both Astrid's brother and husband struggle after her shocking murder...

Reader: Jack Klaff
Writer: Damon Galgut
Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Producer: Justine Willett


TUE 23:00 Jayde Adams: Hometown Glory (m0011cqq)
Episode 1

After over a decade in London, comedian Jayde Adams is returning to her hometown of Bristol. Why? It’s cheaper. But also because of reasons that are much deeper than that, and which she told Radio 4 would probably take two half-hour episodes to explain.

Over the course of this mini series, Jayde is going to be asking what ‘feeling at home’ really means; why we leave home; and why some of us, at least, feel the draw to go back.

Not that Jayde’s story isn’t interesting enough on its own - girl lives in same house for eighteen years, moves to London, moves back again - Jayde’s also spoken to Dawn French, Victoria Scone, Keala Settle and Sophie Willan about their own experiences of home; where they’ve made home; and how it’s made them.

Performed by Jayde Adams
Script editor: Simon Alcock
Producer: Hayley Sterling
Production Coordinator: Sarah Nicholls
Sound Design: Chris Maclean

A BBC Studios Production


TUE 23:30 BBC Radio Fjord (m0016885)
Following a much-publicised split, legendary Norwegian dance music icons Lars Larsson and Ulrik Untersson have reunited on the airwaves. Accompanied by producer Pete Santini, they’re taking up their roles as BBC Radio Four’s Heads of Electronic Music. But can they put their differences aside and come together to host a banger of a show? No. No they cannot.

A brand new sitcom created and written by Barney Fishwick and Will Hislop. Starring Barney Fishwick, Will Hislop, Arnab Chanda, Emma Sidi, Rob Carter and Sophie Bentinck. Original songs produced by Jack Martin.

Producer - Pete Strauss
Production Co-Ordinator - Katie Baum
Executive Producer - Julia McKenzie

BBC Radio Fjord is a BBC Studios Production.



WEDNESDAY 13 APRIL 2022

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m0016887)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


WED 00:30 The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer (m001686w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0016889)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m001688c)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m001688f)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m001688h)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m001688k)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the Rev Neil Gardner of Canongate Kirk, Edinburgh.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m001688m)
The proportion of estate sales in Scotland held behind closed doors, doubled last year according to new figures released by the Scottish Land Commission. It showed there was also a marked shift in who’s buying the land, with nearly half all estates purchased in Scotland in 2021, sold to corporate bodies, investment funds or charitable trusts – motivated by the potential for carbon offsetting and developing large-scale environmental improvement.

Increased fuel price rises are having a direct impact on fishing businesses, with reports some boats are tied up in harbour, waiting for prices to drop before head out to sea.

And we meet a young woman with no background in farming who has taken up a graduate scheme role in horticulture.

Presented by Anna Hill
Produced for BBC Audio Bristol by Heather Simons


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b091w8gz)
Tiffany Francis on the Corncrake

Tiffany Francis recalls not realising, after stumbling across some baby ducks on the island of Lunga, she had infact seen corncrake chicks for this Tweet of the Day.

Producer Maggie Ayre.


WED 06:00 Today (m00168b3)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Life Changing (m00168b5)
Moving mountains

It’s 2013 when Gilbert and Jane both have to face a major transformative moment. Jane has been studying for a much longed-for PhD and a new exciting career is on the horizon. Their life together is built on a shared love of nature and hiking. But then Gilbert can no longer walk. Some big decisions have to be made and just when they are at their lowest, the mountain view from their bedroom window sparks something remarkable.


WED 09:30 Ingenious (m000y0qh)
The HIV Gene

HIV is an incurable disease - or is it? It turns out that some people are naturally immune to HIV, and their genes can be used in to remove the virus from a patient’s system altogether. But given that HIV is a new disease, how did this resistance evolve? And what does this mean for the millions living with the condition? Kat Arney digs into the buried past of the “HIV gene”, and its life-saving future, with Dr Stephen O’Brien and Dr Ravi Gupta.

Presenter: Kat Arney
Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton
Sound Mix: James Beard
Editor: Penny Murphy


WED 09:45 The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer (m00168dk)
Episode 3

The story of the invention of the motion picture and the mysterious man behind it.

In 1888, the French artist and inventor Louis Le Prince recorded the first ever moving image on film using a single lens camera of his own design. It featured members of his family moving about the garden of their home and can still be seen online.

In September 1890 he paid a visit to his brother in Dijon, France, intending after that to join his wife and family in New York where they lived. On 16th September he caught a train to Paris. He never arrived in Paris, and was never seen again.

One month later, Thomas Edison announced his own invention of a camera which could take moving pictures. At a time of fierce competition among inventors to obtain patents for their own products, the mystery of the disappearance of Louis le Prince has never been solved.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Paterson Joseph
Produced by Celia de Wolff
Executive Producer: Caroline Raphael
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m00168b9)
Dame Barbara Woodward; Maggie Oliver on police apology to grooming victims

Throughout April the UK holds the presidency of the United Nation’s Security Council as the world focuses its attention on the war in Ukraine. The woman who takes on that role is Dame Barbara Woodward who’s the UK’s Permanent Representative to the UN. She talks to Emma about her priorities and plans for a new global code of conduct to improve the pursuit of justice for survivors of conflict-related sexual violence.

The Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police has met and personally apologised to three victims of grooming gangs in Rochdale for failures in the investigation of the sexual exploitation of children. The apology comes exactly a decade after the 2012 trial that resulted in some members of the gangs being convicted for their crimes. We hear from Maggie Oliver, the former detective who blew the whistle on the police’s failure to tackle these crimes.

Two new authors, Georgina Scull and Tanya Shadrick, both open their books with a description of how they came very close to death in their thirties. The experience changed them radically. Their books are Regrets of the Dying and The Cure for Sleep. They join Emma to talk about what they have learnt.

This week, Alice Walker from Derbyshire became the oldest female winner of the BBC quiz show Mastermind. She was 66 when the grand final was recorded - she has turned 67 now, and joins Emma to talk about her specialist subject the Peak District and Morris dancing in clogs.


WED 11:00 Tax Me, I’m a Millionaire (m001681s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Oti Mabuse's Dancing Legends (m00168bc)
Street dancers – The Lockers

Dancer, actor and presenter Stephen ‘tWitch’ Boss joins Oti Mabuse to talk about his career and his dancing influences.

tWitch came to prominence competing on the So You Think You Can Dance show before later becoming the resident DJ on The Ellen Show. He tells Oti about his love for street dance and he recognises that this love came from watching street dance crew The Lockers perform.

The Lockers appeared on American primetime TV shows including Saturday Night Live and they gained worldwide fame with their locking moves.
tWitch and Oti explore the groundbreaking career of this dance group with archive clips as well as expert contribution from DJ Renegade.

Oti also puts on her trainers to go to the dance studio to learn some street dance moves in the style of The Lockers. Stefan Puxon of Dakoda's Dance Academy joins her and teaches a routine to put her through her paces.

Presenter: Oti Mabuse
Producer: Candace Wilson
Production Team: Emily Knight and Rema Mukena
Editors: Kirsten Lass and Chris Ledgard
A BBC Audio Bristol production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:00 News Summary (m00168hr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 You and Yours (m00168bh)
Loan Sharks, City Living, Takeaway Trends

New inflation figures out today show inflation has risen to 7%, up from 6.2 per cent in February, hitting its highest level in 30 years, according to the Office for National Statistics. We speak to Clear Barrett about what it means for consumers.

Our reporter Shari Vahl tags along with the police on a raid of a suspected illegal money lender - or loan shark - and we hear from Tony Quigley, Head of the Illegal Money Lending Team about the tactics criminals are using to extort money from vulnerable people who have borrowed money, often as a last resort as they can't get credit.

We look at what's happening with takeaway trends - has our love for takeaways in lockdown continued? New data from Barclays, takeaway spend has risen by 79% compared to March 2019. But Deliveroo figures show while the number of orders in the UK has risen, spend per order has fallen - perhaps due to the rising cost of living.

We look at whether the 'death of the city' narrative was overplayed in the pandemic. Is city living as popular as ever? We hear from Tim Heatley, a property developer in Manchester and Angus Johnston a property expert from PWC.
If you live in a city centre tell us what you like about city living. Email us youandyours@bbc.co.uk

PRESENTER: PETER WHITE

PRODUCER: MIRIAM WILLIAMSON


WED 12:57 Weather (m00168bk)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m00168bm)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


WED 13:45 The Museums That Make Us (m00168br)
Birmingham

Neil MacGregor presents a new series for BBC Radio Four celebrating the role and ambition of museums the length and breadth of the country, and in the process he'll be finding answers to the question ‘What are Museums For in 2022’.

While Birmingham is a relatively young city with a pioneering industrial history in the 19th century, the city museum have chosen an object that helps describe the sound of their city in the last years of the 20th century. Basil Gabidon was the lead guitarist for the Roots Reggae band Steel Pulse. His Gibson custom Les Paul guitar featured in a number of their most celebrated tracks, and it now takes its place alongside the museum's other treasures, helping to describe the cultural mix of the city today. Neil talks to joint CEOs Sara Wajid and Zak Mensah about plans for the museum and how it's addressing the changes the city has, and is still, experiencing.

Museums have always been telescopes trained on the past to help locate a sense of place in the present. Neil believes that role is an active one, responding to changes in the people museums serve and the shifting social and cultural landscape they inhabit. After spending much of his life at the centre of our national Museum life in London, Neil is taking to the road to discover more about the extraordinary work being done in Museums outside the capital, from Stornoway to Stowmarket, and Belfast to Birmingham.

In each episode he visits a single museum, inviting them to choose an object from their collections which they feel best illustrates their civic role, and the way they relate and want to relate to their local audience. Very rarely have they chosen a crown jewel from their often priceless collections. More often it's an object with a particular local resonance, or which helps tackle episodes from the past which are being viewed very differently by citizens in the 21st century.

He’ll be visiting the great national museums of Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland, as well as major city institutions in Birmingham, Leeds, Liverpool and elsewhere. And in spite of the challenges of the last two years, everywhere he meets passionate teams who are dedicated to providing a unique experience for both local audiences and visitors from further afield.

Neil writes: “What’s going on in our museums is at once challenging and exciting and it can only really be understood by visiting as many as possible and finding out how they have approached what is a vital role in providing a sense of local, regional and national identity.”

Producer - Tom Alban
Original music composed by Phil Channell


WED 14:00 The Archers (m001687s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 From Fact to Fiction (m000rnlc)
Our Truth, Their Lies

Our Truth Their Lies is a reactive drama about an alarming phenomenon in British society – the growing influence of conspiracy theories such as QAnon. High-profile proponents like David Icke come from a reassuringly loony fringe, but many of those now subscribing to and spreading unproven theories are hitherto rational people from very ordinary backgrounds. There are multiple gateways to QAnon obsession: a belief that 5G played a role in the pandemic, concerns that organised child sex abuse is coordinated by a cabal of global elites, fears that vaccines are a form of insidious government control. A belief in any one of these often exposes social media users to a barrage of unfounded stories about the others.

Our story backtracks through 2020 as it follows Jen’s journey into the darker reaches of the online conspiracy theory universe. We get a portrait of a loving, mostly functional family thrown into crisis as Michael and Louise try to make sense of Jen’s transformation. They reach an uneasy accommodation with Jen, but it is painfully apparent that she has seen the dark heart of the world and it’s her moral duty to spread the word. For her silence is not an option.

Written by Hugh Costello

Jen Monica Dolan
Michael Nicholas Murchie
Louise Macy Nyman
Luka Matthew Aubrey
Newcaster/
Bot Jane Slavin

Director Eoin O’Callaghan
A Big Fish Radio Production for BBC Radio 4


WED 15:00 Money Box (m00168bw)
Small Businesses and Scams

Scams are on the rise and small businesses are no safer from fraudsters than consumers. And in some cases, businesses are being scammed by their own customers.

Action Fraud, the UK’s national reporting centre for fraud and cyber-crime, say that one in four small businesses are affected by fraud every year, with costs to businesses estimated at early £19 billion.

How do entrepreneurs keep their budding business safe? What should companies do to protect their data? And when it all goes wrong, who can help small businesses?

Louise Cooper hears from Shara, Raoul and Louise about their experience of scammers targeting their businesses.

And she’s joined by our expert panel:

Paul Meskall - Manager of Fraud & Cyber Crime Prevention - UK Finance

Dr Roger Barker - Director of Policy and Corporate Governance - Institute of Directors

Gary Rycroft - Partner - Joseph A. Jones & Co.


WED 15:30 The Invention of... (m001680p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Monday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (m00168c0)
Strongmen

Strongmen – what accounts for the global rise of authoritarian leaders? Laurie Taylor talks to Ruth Ben-Ghiat, Professor of History and Italian Studies at New York University, and analyst of the blueprint which autocratic demagogues, from Mussolini to Putin, have followed over the past 100 years. What lessons might be learned to prevent disastrous rule in the future? They're joined by Christophe Jaffrelot, Professor of Indian Politics and Sociology at King's College, London, whose recent study of Narendra Modi, Prime Minister of India, examines how a popularly elected leader has pursued Hindu nationalist policies, steering the world's largest democracy towards further ethnic strife and intolerance, according to many observers.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m00168c4)
Translating the French election

The government’s plan to privatise Channel 4 has now been revealed. But who is lining up to buy the broadcaster and what could a change in ownership mean for viewers? Also in the programme, the French newspaper Le Monde is hoping to capitalise on interest in the elections by launching a English language edition. But is there a market for it?

Guests: Chris Curtis, editor-in-chief of Broadcast; Elvire Camus, editor of Le Monde in English; Dominic Hinde, lecturer in Media and Communication at Glasgow University; Bénédicte Paviot, France 24’s UK Correspondent.

Producer: Dan Hardoon
Presenter: Katie Razzall
Studio engineer: Duncan Hannant


WED 17:00 PM (m00168c8)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00168ch)
Inflation has risen to 7 per cent - its highest level for thirty years.


WED 18:30 The Confessional (m000v848)
Series 1

The Confession of Cariad Lloyd

Actor, comedian and broadcaster Stephen Mangan presents a new comedy chat show about shame and guilt.

Each week, Stephen invites a different guest into his virtual confessional box to make three confessions - with remarkable storytelling and surprising insights.

We’re used to hearing celebrity interviews where stars are persuaded to show off about their achievements. Stephen's not interested in that. He doesn’t want to know about his guests' proudest moments, he wants to know what they’re ashamed of. That’s surely the way to find out what really makes a person tick.

Stephen and his guest reflect with empathy and humour on why we get embarrassed, where our shame thresholds should be, and the value of guilt.

Series guests include Joan Bakewell, Clarke Peters, Phil Wang, Dr Phil Hammond and more.

In this first episode, he takes the confession of the award winning improvisational comedian, actor and presenter of Griefcast, Cariad Lloyd.

Written and presented by Stephen Mangan
With extra material by Nick Doody
Produced by Dave Anderson and Frank Stirling
A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4


WED 19:00 The Archers (m00168cn)
Jazzer and Tracy are both job hunting – Tracy’s after something better paid than Grey Gables. It’s depressing, there’s nothing out there and it would break her heart to leave, but she comments that Adil’s told her she has a lot of potential and could do well elsewhere. Jazzer doesn’t understand; if Adil thinks she’s so good, why’s he encouraging her to leave? Jazzer declares he’s going to find another job. He’s not letting Tracy chuck in Grey Gables.
Josh wants an opinion on his Easter idea for promoting egg sales, but distracted Freddie’s keen to track down the Easter Bunny and get him to Lower Loxley. He’s drawing interest on social media and is clearly a crowd puller. He cracks the clue as to the Bunny’s current location and heads off, taking Josh with him for assistance. However his plan goes awry and he reports later to Elizabeth that they couldn’t get anywhere near the Bunny. Meanwhile Josh updates Freddie on Vince’s investment in his solar panels. Freddie declares Vince is on the verge of investing in him, too, though later Vince tempers Freddie’s enthusiasm. He assures Elizabeth he’ll set Freddie straight if he thinks he’s punching above his weight.
David’s insistent it’s a no to Vince’s investment in the solar panels. Elizabeth tries to win him round, unsuccessfully. Vince shrugs breezily, but frustrated Elizabeth can’t understand David and Ruth’s reticence. Vince explains the Brookfield Archers don’t necessarily see him like she does. He counsels leaving it to him. He’ll handle this one himself.


WED 19:15 Front Row (m00168cs)
Jude Owusu, Operation Mincemeat, Wrexham's bid for UK City of Culture 2025

Tom Robinson is the black man wrongly accused of raping a white girl in To Kill a Mocking Bird. In Harper Lee's novel and the film he is at the centre of the story but, defended by the white lawyer, Atticus Finch, almost voiceless. In the acclaimed new stage production now in the West End, the actor playing Tom Robinson, Jude Owusu, discusses his approach to the role and the relevance of the story today.

The UK’s City of Culture 2025 will be announced next month and Front Row is hearing from the four places on the shortlist. Tonight, Emily Hughes reports on Wrexham County Borough’s bid.

Simran Hans reviews the new film Operation Mincemeat, the new British war drama directed by John Madden.

Presenter Tom Sutcliffe
Producer Julian May


WED 20:00 The Exchange (m00168cx)
Honesty

Two people who share a common experience meet for the first time. Each has a gift for the other - something that unlocks their story. Together with presenter Catherine Carr, they exchange personal experiences, thoughts and beliefs, as well as uncovering the differences between them.

Michael and Dina have both made radical choices about how they interact with the world and everyone in it – choices about honesty and the lies we tell ourselves and each other.

Michael Leviton was a raised in family where honesty was the only policy. Michael’s parents believed that it was important to share what was on your mind at all times, and never conceal something with a lie - not even to protect someone’s feelings. As he got older, however, Michael found that this kind of radical honesty was detrimental to relationships – romantic and platonic - and employment. Following a heartbreak, Michael decided his incessant truth-telling was no longer worth it and, at the age of 29, vowed to be less honest and to start lying in his social interactions.

Dina Kaplan is the opposite. For most of her life, she told little white lies like most of us do. But in 2012, she went on a ten-day silent retreat which required her to sign a series of vows to join the programme. This included a vow of honesty, which didn't seem so intimidating. But at the end of the retreat, Dina was told that these vows now applied to the rest of her life. At that moment, she decided to try an experiment - to live her working and personal life never lying about anything, ever.

Dina had always considered herself a pretty honest person. But now - committed to stopping all lying (except to save the life of someone or to protect their health) - Dina was shocked to discover how often she lied to people about little, inconsequential things. Dina continues to live as honestly as possible.

Dina and Michael exchange gifts which shed light on their own stories and will, they hope, have meaning for the other.

With thanks to Dina Kaplan: https://www.thepath.com/dina and Michael Leviton: http://michaelleviton.com/explanations/

Presented by Catherine Carr
Produced by Jo Rowntree

A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


WED 20:45 Lent Talks (m00168d1)
"I was in prison and you visited me"

Lent Talks is a series of personal reflections inspired by an aspect of the story leading up to Easter. This year’s theme is the power of hospitality, based on Jesus’ encouragement in Matthew’s gospel to feed the hungry, welcome the stranger and look after the sick.

In this episode, the ex-gangster John Pridmore reflects on his troubling past as he considers the words, "I was in prison and you visited me".

Producer: Dan Tierney.

--

If you have been affected by any of the issues raised in the programme, details of organisations that can provide help and support are available here:

Suicide/Emotional distress
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/4WLs5NlwrySXJR2n8Snszdg/information-and-support-suicide-emotional-distress

Victims of crime
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/2MfW34HqH7tTCtnmx7LVfzp/victims-of-crime


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (m001687g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 The Media Show (m00168c4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m00168d5)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


WED 22:45 The Promise by Damon Galgut (m00168d7)
8: 'Life got in the way.'

2021's Booker Prize-winning novel charts the crash and burn of the Swarts, a white South African family, living on a farm outside Pretoria. Told over four decades and four funerals, it is the story of family, land and a promise, set against a changing South Africa.

Today: Amor confronts her brother again over Ma's final promise to Salome...
Reader: Jack Klaff
Writer: Damon Galgut
Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Producer: Justine Willett


WED 23:00 Little Lifetimes by Jenny Eclair (m00168d9)
Series 7

Poor Rosemary

Written by Jenny Eclair
Read by Fenella Woolgar
Producer ..... Sally Avens

When Rosemary fails to catch a bouquet at her flatmate's wedding it seems she is destined to remain single for the rest of her life as her friends get on with the merry go round of marriage and children.

Fenella Woolgar is an award winning actress on stage and screen appearing most recently in 'Call The Midwife'.


WED 23:15 The Skewer (m00168dc)
Series 6

Episode 2

Jon Holmes's The Skewer returns to twist itself into current affairs. This week - Hashtag Partygate, Kicking Against The Pickles, You've Got A Friend In Prince Charles, and Boris is (Steven) Toast (of Westminster).

An Unusual production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:30 A House in History (m00168df)
A House In History is a brilliant new reality TV show which is nothing like Big Brother, actually - we follow one family, the Colchesters, as they live in a 1940s house with the clothes, amenities, food and restrictions that would have been in place.

Unfortunately the show is also massively over-budget, so the producers desperately need to ensure the Colchesters get nowhere near completing the six weeks in the house, which would see them win £100,000.

A House In History is written and directed by Will Farrell and Ben Rowse, the creative team behind the hit web series Petrichor (“A perfectly pitched portrait of deluded creatives pursuing a misguided passion project, it nailed the comedy of cringe without being self-indulgent... easily one of the best indie projects released over lockdown” - Chortle) and the podcast Capital (“disturbingly funny” - The Guardian).

Cast:
Phil Colchester - Alistair Green
Carol Colchester - Kath Hughes
Clementine Colchester - Jess Robinson
Kelly - Emily Lloyd-Saini
Alex - Alexander Owen
Reality contestant - Adam Drake
Narrator - Kevin McCloud

Writers/Directors - Will Farrell and Ben Rowse
Sound Design - Rich Evans
Producer - Ed Morrish
A Novel production for BBC Radio 4.



THURSDAY 14 APRIL 2022

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m00168dh)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


THU 00:30 The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer (m00168dk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00168dm)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00168dp)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00168dr)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m00168dt)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00168dw)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the Rev Neil Gardner of Canongate Kirk, Edinburgh.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m00168dy)
14/04/22 - Australia trade deal, Lump Sum Exit scheme, new entrants and tractor driving

There are concerns that the UK-Australia trade deal will be detrimental to farmers here in the UK, by allowing Australian imports produced to a lower standard into the country. Ministers asked the Trade and Agricultural Commission to scrutinise the agreement to establish the impact the deal will have on the UK, and the TAC has just released its report. It concludes that these worries are 'overblown'.

This week we're talking to new entrants about getting into the farming industry and hearing how one of the hardest parts can be finding land. The government hopes that offering English farmers £100,000 to retire will help, as part of it's Lump Sum Exit scheme. Some farmers contemplating the scheme say it's not quite that simple, but the Tenant Farmers' Association think for farmers renting their land, it could be a way in to the industry.

And on the theme of new entrants, we meet some young men learning to drive tractors in Lincolnshire and a young woman speaking to us from a lambing shed in Exmoor, about her own journey into farming. Emily Davis was first advised to study architecture, but instead chose farming despite no family links to agriculture. She says experience abroad can be a great way into agriculture.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08q3sz6)
Cyrus Todiwala on the house sparrow.

In this programme, London based chef and restaurant owner Cyrus Todiwala talks about his love of the city's house sparrow, bringing a bit of joy to the bustling streets.

Producer Maggie Ayre.


THU 06:00 Today (m00168ld)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (m00168lg)
Homo erectus

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss one of our ancestors, Homo erectus, who thrived on Earth for around two million years whereas we, Homo sapiens, emerged only in the last three hundred thousand years. Homo erectus, or Upright Man, spread from Africa to Asia and it was on the Island of Java that fossilised remains were found in 1891 in an expedition led by Dutch scientist Eugène Dubois. Homo erectus people adapted to different habitats, ate varied food, lived in groups, had stamina to outrun their prey; and discoveries have prompted many theories on the relationship between their diet and the size of their brains, on their ability as seafarers, on their creativity and on their ability to speak and otherwise communicate.

The image above is from a diorama at the Moesgaard Museum in Denmark, depicting the Turkana Boy referred to in the programme.

With

Peter Kjærgaard
Director of the Natural History Museum of Denmark and Professor of Evolutionary History at the University of Copenhagen

José Joordens
Senior Researcher in Human Evolution at Naturalis Biodiversity Centre and Professor of Human Evolution at Maastricht University

And

Mark Maslin
Professor of Earth System Science at University College London

Producer: Simon Tillotson


THU 09:45 The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer (m00168n2)
Episode 4

The story of the invention of the motion picture and the mysterious man behind it.

In 1888, the French artist and inventor Louis Le Prince recorded the first ever moving image on film using a single lens camera of his own design. It featured members of his family moving about the garden of their home and can still be seen online.

In September 1890 he paid a visit to his brother in Dijon, France, intending after that to join his wife and family in New York where they lived. On 16th September he caught a train to Paris. He never arrived in Paris, and was never seen again.

One month later, Thomas Edison announced his own invention of a camera which could take moving pictures. At a time of fierce competition among inventors to obtain patents for their own products, the mystery of the disappearance of Louis le Prince has never been solved.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Paterson Joseph
Produced by Celia de Wolff
Executive Producer: Caroline Raphael
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m00168ll)
Meera Syal in 'Roar', Women prisoners facing racism report, 'Goblin mode', Single women Ukrainian refugees, Esme Young

Described as 'darkly comic feminist fables' ‘Roar’ is a new eight-part drama series adapted from Cecilia Aherne's short story collection. Each episode shines a spotlight on women's experiences and how women navigate through other's perceptions of them as well as their own. Comedian, writer, playwright, singer, journalist and actor, Meera Syal, plays ‘The Woman Who Returned her Husband’. She joins Chloe Tilley.

A new report highlights the experiences of over 260 Black, Asian, minority ethnic and foreign national women in the twelve prisons across England. Their accounts of indirect and direct racism have been described as shocking and distressing The report is compiled by the Criminal Justice Alliance in collaboration with the Independent Monitoring Boards. Nina Champion is Director of the Criminal Justice Alliance and Dame Anne Owers is National Chair of the Independent Monitoring Boards and the former Chief Inspectorate of Prisons.

Have you got an inner goblin? Do you ever let it out? Not washing for days, slobbing in bed, binge watching TV series in one sitting, eating random things left at the back of your fridge with melted cheese on… these would all be considered ‘goblin mode’. You might do it in private but would you post pictures to social media for the world to see? Well this has become a new trend taking over TikTok with videos using the hashtag gaining over 2.1 billion views. So why are generation Z women turning their back on the gym going, smoothy drinking, ‘It’ girl whose aim is self-improvement, to reveal their inner goblins to the world? To explain more we hear from Ione Gamble, writer and editor-in-chief of Polyester zine and podcast and Halima Jibril, writer and editor of Ashamed zine.

The UK government has been told to stop matching lone female Ukrainian refugees with single men. The UN has intervened following concerns that women and sometimes children are at risk of sexual exploitation. Under the government’s Homes for Ukraine scheme, British hosts must link up with refugees themselves, leaving tens of thousands of people to resort to unregulated social media groups to connect. More than 200,000 people in Britain have applied to host refugees under the scheme but just 28,500 visas have been issued so far. We hear from Louise Calvey, Head of Services and Safeguarding at Refugee Action and Times reporter, Shayma Bakht. She posed as a 22 year old Ukrainian woman online and within minutes was inundated with inappropriate messages.

Esme Young has been at the cutting edge of the fashion industry for over 50 years. From launching her own label Swanky Modes, dressing stars like Grace Jones and Cher and more recently being one half of the judging duo on The Great British Sewing Bee. Esme joins Chloe to discuss her new book, 'Behind The Seams', where she recounts iconic outfits and raucous parties and the clothes in her wardrobe she just can't part with.

Presenter: Chloe Tilley
Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Interviewed Guest: Meera Syal
Interviewed Guest: Nina Champion
Interviewed Guest: Dame Anne Owers
Interviewed Guest: Ione Gamble
Interviewed Guest: Halima Jibril
Interviewed Guest: Louise Calvey
Interviewed Guest: Shayma Bakht
Interviewed Guest: Esme Young


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (m00168ln)
Russia's Unwelcome New Exiles

Hundreds of thousands of Russians – mainly young and well-educated - have fled abroad since their country invaded Ukraine. It’s the biggest brain drain in a short period of time in Russian history. Some fear a political crackdown. They worry they could be arrested for expressing opposition to the war, and young men might be drafted into the army. Others are escaping economic sanctions, trying to keep their businesses afloat now it’s become hard to transfer money into or out of Russia.

Tim Whewell travels to Russia’s southern neighbour, Georgia, to meet some of the 25,000 Russians who’ve fled there. Some are strong opponents of Vladimir Putin, who are now showing their support for Ukraine by volunteering for a new project by Russian exiles, ‘Helping to Leave’, that organizes evacuations of Ukrainian civilians from the war zone. Others are business people – often in IT, who try to steer clear of politics, but hope they can help Georgia’s economy by creating a new ‘silicon valley’ there.

But Georgia, itself invaded by the Kremlin’s forces in 2008, has a tense relationship with Russia. Georgia’s a hospitable country – but the new arrivals are not universally welcome. Georgians worry that the exiles – often wealthier than local people – will force them out of the property market. And they fear the Russian influx may include spies and provocateurs who might provide Putin with a pretext to intervene there again. The new exiles may sympathise with Ukraine – but do they understand Georgia’s long struggle with Russia?

Reporter: Tim Whewell
Produced by Tim Whewell and Rayhan Dmytrie.

(Image: Russian exile, Katya Lapsha Credit: Lago Gogilashvili /BBC)


THU 11:30 Invisible Man: A Parable for Our Times? (m00168lq)
April 2022 marks the 70th anniversary of Ralph Ellison's blistering and impassioned first novel, Invisible Man, which tells the extraordinary story of a man who is invisible “simply because people refuse to see me”. The invisibility of Ellison’s protagonist - a black man caught in the discord of 20th century racism - is, above all, about what it means to be black. In the wake of Black Lives Matter, the idea of invisibility for young black men, and women, exists perhaps not merely as a metaphor, but has become a matter of necessity. Seventy years on, how does Ellison's story speak about the black experience today? Four notable black artists define, or redefine, what his novel can say now about being a black body in the public space.

Producer: Cecile Wright
Contributors: Adjoa Andoh, Jacob Sam La Rose, Rommi Smith, Tyler Mitchell
Novel Extracts read by Chris Jack


THU 12:00 News Summary (m00168p7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 You and Yours (m00168lv)
Gap Finders - Anne Boden

Today's guest is the computer scientist and founder of Starling Bank, Anne Boden..

Anne has worked in the finance industry for more than forty years and has become known for her approach to developing new banking technology and her desire to prove people wrong.

The daughter of a steelworker and a department store assistant from Bonymaen in Swansea, Anne Boden had a fairly ordinary childhood. As a pupil at Cefn Hengoed Comprehensive, Anne was good at sciences and went on to study chemistry and computer sciences at the local university. That interest in technology was been a key driver throughout her career, which started at Lloyds Bank in London in 1981.

A turning point was the 2008 banking crisis when embarrassment about her job and a desire for change led to her rethinking her future career plans and in 2014 formed Starling Bank. Starling is digital-only, with customers using the app, with data and analytics to help them keep across transactions and manage different areas of their personal finances.

Following major investment, the bank has continued to grow, reporting in excess of 2.14 million customers, breaking even for the month of October 2020 and has recorded a profit every month since then.

We explore the ways in which Anne wanted to disrupt the banking industry and the hopes she has for the future of Starling Bank.

PRESENTER: WINIFRED ROBINSON

PRODUCER: LINDA WALKER


THU 12:32 Sliced Bread (m00168lx)
Sustainable Jeans

Sustainable Jeans

“Make better. Buy better. Wear it longer.” Lots of fashion brands are including claims like this in their adverts and one item of clothing that’s really getting the stamp of supposed “sustainability” is jeans.

Maddie has asked Greg to look into what “sustainability” actually means when it comes to denim. Is it a term that marks genuine eco-impact, or is it more marketing BS?

And, as adverts claim, do “sustainable” jeans last longer?

Greg speaks to an organisation that rates clothing brands’ sustainability credentials and visits Manchester Metropolitan University to hear the results of their ‘rub test’.

Do you have a suggestion of a ‘wonder-product’ making a bold claim that Greg can investigate next?

Send us your suggestions to sliced.bread@bbc.co.uk or send it direct to Greg on twitter or instagram where he’s @gregfoot

PRESENTER: GREG FOOT
PRODUCER: JULIAN PASZKIEWICZ


THU 12:57 Weather (m00168lz)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m00168m1)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


THU 13:45 The Museums That Make Us (m00168m3)
Liverpool

Neil MacGregor presents a new series for BBC Radio Four celebrating the role and ambition of museums the length and breadth of the country, and in the process he'll be finding answers to the question ‘What are Museums For in 2022’.

Immigration has been part of Liverpool's story for centuries. As a port city communities from all over the globe settled there, but it was the Irish immigration, particularly during the time of the famine, that had the most dramatic impact. But the Museum of Liverpool, with its spectacular position on the harbour front, has chosen a Jewish Butcher's shop to illustrate that it wasn't just Irish Immigrants who made the city their own. Galkoff's green tiled frontage was a familiar sight to many Liverpudlians, including the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture and Sport, Nadine Dorries. It now has a permanent place in the museum, along with stories from the Galkoff family who ran it and the many people living in the neighbourhood of Pembroke Place.

Museums have always been telescopes trained on the past to help locate a sense of place in the present. Neil believes that role is an active one, responding to changes in the people museums serve and the shifting social and cultural landscape they inhabit. After spending much of his life at the centre of our national Museum life in London, Neil is taking to the road to discover more about the extraordinary work being done in Museums outside the capital, from Stornoway to Stowmarket, and Belfast to Birmingham.

In each episode he visits a single museum, inviting them to choose an object from their collections which they feel best illustrates their civic role, and the way they relate and want to relate to their local audience. Very rarely have they chosen a crown jewel from their often priceless collections. More often it's an object with a particular local resonance, or which helps tackle episodes from the past which are being viewed very differently by citizens in the 21st century.

He’ll be visiting the great national museums of Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland, as well as major city institutions in Birmingham, Leeds, Liverpool and elsewhere. And in spite of the challenges of the last two years, everywhere he meets passionate teams who are dedicated to providing a unique experience for both local audiences and visitors from further afield.

Neil writes: “What’s going on in our museums is at once challenging and exciting and it can only really be understood by visiting as many as possible and finding out how they have approached what is a vital role in providing a sense of local, regional and national identity.”

Producer - Tom Alban
Original music composed by Phil Channell


THU 14:00 The Archers (m00168cn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Our Friends in the North (m00168m5)
Ep 5: 1974

Peter Flannery once famously said of Our Friends in the North, "it's just a posh soap opera - but it's a posh soap opera with something to say."

And now he has rewritten his multi-award winning and highly acclaimed television series as an audio drama for BBC Radio 4.

Ambitious in scale and scope, the drama chronicles the lives of four friends over three decades beginning in the 1964. The series tackles corporate, political and police corruption in the 1960s, the rise and fall of the Soho porn empires in the 1970s, the Miners’ Strike of the 1980s and the rise of New Labour in the 1990s.

In episode five, it’s 1974, the start of the 3-day week introduced by Edward Heath’s government to conserve electricity. Nicky is back in Newcastle offering to campaign for the Labour Party, Geordie is determined to exact revenge on Benny Barratt, Mary is a local councillor and Tosker’s business interests continue to grow. Under the new leadership of Commissioner Jellicoe, the Met are finally beginning to crack down on the Soho porn industry, as well as their own internal corruption.

Cast
Nicky: James Baxter
Felix: Trevor Fox
Florrie: Tracey Wilkinson
Austin Donohue / Claud Seabrook: Tom Goodman-Hill
D.I. Conrad: Andrew Byron
Commissioner Jellicoe: Darren Kuppan
Commander Fieldson: Des Yankson
Tosker / DI John Salway: Philip Correia
Harold Chapple / Eddie Wells: James Gaddas
Geordie / Ray: Luke MacGregor
Paula / Lucille: Eve Shotton
Mary: Norah Lopez Holden
Benny Barratt: Tony Hirst
John Edwards: Maanuv Thiara

Writer: Peter Flannery
Studio Engineer: Paul Clark
Sound Design: Paul Cargill
Producer: Melanie Harris
Executive Producer: Jeremy Mortimer

A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4


THU 15:00 Open Country (m00168m7)
Mammoth Hunting on the Norfolk Coast

This week's Open Country is a journey along a stretch of familiar coastline, but also back in time, to a far less familiar landscape. Emily Knight explores the Deep History Coast of North Norfolk, where the crumbling shoreline has given up some of the most impressive fossil remains ever discovered. To help her get a sense of the landscape that came before this one, she meets palaeontologist and author of "Otherlands", Dr Thomas Halliday, who explains what this ancient place would have looked like, how it might have felt to walk through it, and who you might have met along the way.

One of our companions on this stroll through time might have been a true giant of the past - four metres tall and weighing in at ten tonnes - the West Runton Mammoth. It's the most complete mammoth skeleton ever found, buried in the shifting sands of the beach for hundreds of thousands of years, before being discovered after a storm in 1990. While we stroll along a sandy beach, the West Runton Mammoth would have strolled instead along a muddy river-bed through a dense forest, surrounded by sights both familiar to us, and extraordinary: seven-foot tall deer, rhinos and hyaenas. Dr Tori Herridge, evolutionary biologist and elephant expert from the Natural History Museum, is on hand to talk about the life and death of this impressive creature, while local fossil-hunter Michelle Smith gives Emily a lesson in safe and sustainable fossil-hunting.

Alongside these extraordinary animals were people too - of a kind. Not quite our ancestors, more like our very distant cousins, Homo Heidelbergensis and Homo Antecessor both made their mark along this stretch of coastline. Dr David Waterhouse from Norfolk Museum explains how we think they might have lived, and what that tells us about our own origins.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m00168f9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m00168g3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 Unreal: The VFX Revolution (m000xzds)
The New Flesh

Oscar winner Paul Franklin tells how visual effects changed and how they changed cinema. By the mid 1990s, Industrial Light & Magic, the VFX house at the heart of the rebirth of photochemical illusions, was home to a small but growing band of digerati convinced that the next breakthrough was at their fingertips. Jurassic Park not only proved their point but showed audiences and filmmakers that nothing could be the same again. The quest for the illusion of life, for the subtlety of performance would eventually lead back to Middle Earth and the evolution of Gollum - the perfect fusion of man and digits. Meanwhile the illusory world of The Matrix put its extraordinary moments of Bullet Time at the heart of its story and ideas. This was visual effects as both story and metaphor. Christopher Nolan's Inception took that warping of reality to a different, hyper-real realm as Paul Franklin and his team folded the streetscapes of Paris upon each other. And now? What does the future hold for storytelling and visual effects?

Producer Mark Burman


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m00168m9)
A Trip-Switch for Depression?

Could magic mushrooms be the key to a revolution in treating depression? Professor David Nutt, director of the Imperial Centre for Psychedelic Research, thinks so. He tells Vic Gill about recent research suggesting that psilocybin - the psychedelic compound found in magic mushrooms - triggers rewiring of the brain in people with treatment-resistant depression. Vic Gill speaks with trial participant Steve Shorney who was diagnosed with depression 30 years ago.

Nanobodies. That's the name scientists have given to the tiny antibodies found in the blood of camelids like llamas, alpacas and camels. Reporter Samara Linton heads to Berkshire to meet the llamas whose nanobodies were recently found to neutralise the Covid-19 virus. We hear from Professor Gary Stephens, University of Reading, who is responsible for the llamas' safety and well-being, and Professor James Naismith, director of the Rosalind Franklin Institute which is carrying out the pioneering research with engineered nanobodies.

And just as the James Webb Space Telescope is poised to peer deep into the universe, we look at a recent image captured by its great predecessor, Hubble, which has thrown down a telescopic gauntlet. Astronomer Dr Emma Chapman, author of the book “First Light” guides us through these incredible pictures of the furthest, faintest, most ancient of stars yet seen.

Presented by Victoria Gill
Reporter: Samara Linton
Producer: Alex Mansfield


THU 17:00 PM (m00168mc)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00168mh)
The government agrees multi-million pound deal to send some asylum seekers to Rwanda.


THU 18:30 The Tim Vine Chat Show (m00168mk)
Easter Special 2022

Tim Vine tells some jokes and chats to the Great British Public. This Easter Special includes a guessing game about eggs and some questions for the Easter Bunny.

Producer: Richard Morris
Production Coordinator: Sarah Nicholls

A BBC Studios Production


THU 19:00 The Archers (m00168mm)
Vince goes on a charm offensive at Brookfield, declaring he’s grown fond of the whole family. He likes Ruth and David – that’s why he’s offered them the loan for the solar panels scheme. He’s aware of how he might come across, and regrets they got off on the wrong foot with the business over Crowthers. But they were great with Steph’s wedding, he’s got a lot of time for Ben, and Elizabeth’s bowled him over. He rates Josh, and would like to play a part in his future success. Privately Ruth and David agree the solar panel deal’s very good, and they’re confident Vince isn’t hiding anything. When they accept his offer, Vince plants a kiss on surprised Ruth.
In a change of plan Beth’s in the lambing shed with Ben. As he briefs her on the nitty gritty of birthing, Ruairi arrives and informs Beth her dad’s on the farm. But then a lamb’s foot appears, and it’s clear they have a job on their hands. Under Ben’s guidance Beth delivers her first lamb. Ruairi suggests it needs a name. Beth agrees, and Baa-naby is welcomed to Brookfield. Later Ruairi remarks to Ben how happy he and Beth seem, and Ben admits the love word has been dropped. So what about Ruairi and Julianne, persists Ben. Who is she? Ruairi finally admits Julianne is an older woman he met online, and he’s her sugar baby. He keeps her company in return for money and gifts – but they’re not sleeping together. Shocked Ben agrees reluctantly to keep Ruairi’s secret.


THU 19:15 Front Row (m00168mp)
Benedetta film and Let the Song Hold Us exhibition reviewed; Slung Low Theatre

Our Thursday review critics, Dr. Kirsty Fairclough and poet Joelle Taylor, give their assessment of Paul Verhoeven's film Benedetta and the exhibition Let the Song Hold Us at Liverpool's Fact Gallery.

Nick meets Alan Lane, Artistic Director of Slung Low Theatre Company in Leeds, to discuss his 'pandemic memoir', The Club on the Edge of Town.

Presenter: Nick Ahad
Producer: Ekene Akalawu

Photo: Daphne Patakia (L) and Virginie Efira (R) in the film Benedetta (Credit: MUBI)


THU 20:00 Terrorism and the Mind (m00146hc)
Getting the Balance Right

How should we manage people with mental health issues who are convicted of terrorism? Raffaello Pantucci explores some new proposals that don't automatically lead to prison.

We hear from the relatives of two young men who are in prison for their association with banned Far Right groups,, who both have autism. Their relatives say this was an influencing factor in their exploration of extremism, but neither were allowed to raise the issue in their trial.

How aware is the justice system to the needs and nuances of neuro-diverse people, and is prison the best place for non-violent terrorist offenders?

Raffaello explores what alternatives might be available to authorities to manage individuals outside of the criminal courts - and asks how risky is such a strategy?

Can we guarantee both public safety and the best-possible outcome for vulnerable individuals who have been radicalised?


THU 20:30 Life Changing (m00168b5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 on Wednesday]


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m00168m9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (m00168lg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m00168mt)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


THU 22:45 The Promise by Damon Galgut (m00168mw)
9: 'Make it all stop.'

2021's Booker Prize-winning novel charts the crash and burn of the Swarts, a white South African family, living on a farm outside Pretoria. Told over four decades and four funerals, it is the story of family, land and a promise, set against a changing South Africa.

Today: Amor confronts her brother again over Ma's final promise to Salome...
Reader: Jack Klaff
Writer: Damon Galgut
Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Producer: Justine Willett


THU 23:00 The Likely Dads (m00168my)
Series 2

Organisation

Host Tim Vincent and regular panelists Mick Ferry and Russell Kane come together in The Likely Dads to discuss the importance of organisation in parenting.

How organised are they? Is there any point having an agenda or an itinerary when a moment of spontaneity from a child can throw a spanner in the works? And should people who planned their children be trusted?

As ever, "Mick & Russell's Dad Off" pits our two regular Likely Dads against each other to see how they would handle hypothetical situations using their own distinct parenting styles and our panel is asked to deduce the source of an anonymous fact from within the group.

Joining Tim, Mick and Russell this week are author and comedian George Lewis and Coronation Street's Steve McDonald and I'm A Celebrity runner-up, Simon Gregson.

Producers: Kurt Brookes and Ashley Byrne
A Made In Manchester production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Suggs: Love Letters to London (m000s3nw)
Oxford Street

Suggs takes you on a trip through a familiar part of London, Europe’s busiest shopping street, also known as Oxford Street. There's a few stories, a couple of songs and even a well crafted joke or two.

Performed by Suggs
Written by Suggs with Owen Lewis
Directed by Owen Lewis
Musical Director: Owen Parker
Producer: Richard Melvin
A Dabster production for BBC Radio 4



FRIDAY 15 APRIL 2022

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m00168n0)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 00:30 The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer (m00168n2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00168n4)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00168n6)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00168n8)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m00168nb)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00168nd)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the Rev Neil Gardner of Canongate Kirk, Edinburgh.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m00168ng)
Farming with no farm

Andy Moye and Abbie Bryant are new entrants to farming.

They have 14 cattle and 19 sheep, no tractor, no buildings, and they rent out grass for their animals, keeping them outside all year round.

They set up their grazing enterprise in the Suffolk village of Melford over the last three years, and only in the last couple of months decided to make the big leap of giving up their jobs. Andy previosuly worked on a livestock farm, Abbie as a childcare specialist.

Now, the pair plan to focus their energies on creating a self-sufficient farm that can feed a local community the size of a hamlet.

They’ve been laughed at and criticised for their ambition, but say their vision is to use regenerative farming to link people up with the reality of quality meat production - and they're harnessing the power of social media to do that.

But can they realise their ambition, or is it pie in the sky?

Presented and produced by Anna Hill.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mztpd)
Great Tit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the Great Tit. That metallic 'tea-cher, tea-cher' song of the great tit is instantly recognisable and you can hear it on mild days from mid-December onwards. It's the origin of the old country name, 'Saw-Sharpener'.


FRI 06:00 Today (m00168qs)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (m00168fp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer (m00168qv)
Episode 5

The story of the invention of the motion picture and the mysterious man behind it.

In 1888, the French artist and inventor Louis Le Prince recorded the first ever moving image on film using a single lens camera of his own design. It featured members of his family moving about the garden of their home and can still be seen online.

In September 1890 he paid a visit to his brother in Dijon, France, intending after that to join his wife and family in New York where they lived. On 16th September he caught a train to Paris. He never arrived in Paris, and was never seen again.

One month later, Thomas Edison announced his own invention of a camera which could take moving pictures. At a time of fierce competition among inventors to obtain patents for their own products, the mystery of the disappearance of Louis le Prince has never been solved.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Paterson Joseph
Produced by Celia de Wolff
Executive Producer: Caroline Raphael
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m00168qx)
Diane Morgan, Clinic Investigation, Divorce

The actor, writer and comedian Diane Morgan. She started her career as a stand-up but you may know her best as the ill-informed interviewer Philomena Cunk, or laid back Liz in the parenting sitcom Motherland, or even Kath in Ricky’s Gervais series After Life. She’s also written, directed and starred in her own comedy series Mandy about a woman who's got big dreams but can’t be bothered to do the work to get there, and whose short lived jobs are a disaster. Now she's in Inside Number 9 on BBC 2.

Police in Northern Ireland are investigating a clinic in Belfast which claims to help infertile couples have a baby. The police investigation follows a BBC Northern Ireland documentary called The Babymaker Uncovered. The clinic is called Logan Wellbeing and Medical and is run by Ruth Ellen Logan who claims that she was trained in America. She's been offering treatments like massage and reflexology, as well a IV drips and vitamin injections. Women who are desperate for a child, including some who are medically menopausal, have spent thousands. We speak to reporter, Jennifer O’Leary and fertility expert Professor Alison Murdoch.

In the second part of our new series on divorce, our reporter Henrietta Harrison meets Amina who talks about the impact it's had not just on her but on her parents too.

And we talk to Kate Jayden who's completed 100 marathons in 100 days. She was raising money for charity and describes what kept her putting one foot in front of the other.


FRI 11:00 Three Pounds in My Pocket (m00168qz)
Series 5

Episode 2

British South Asians and the noughties: too British or not British enough? For almost a decade Kavita Puri has been charting the social history of these communities in post-war Britain. Many of the pioneers arrived with as little as £3 due to strict currency controls.

Kavita hears stories of strike action from a group of Indian women that brought Heathrow to a standstill and about how life changed for British South Asians after the 7/7 terrorist attacks in London. She looks at the latter years of Blair's premiership and how questions about Britishness became very public as the rhetoric around multiculturalism soured. And she explores lesser-known - but no less significant - stories of quiet rebellion and accommodation, as the second generation came to terms with life in Britain in the 21st century.

Producer: Ant Adeane
Editor: Hugh Levinson

Historical consultants:
Dr Florian Stadtler, University of Bristol
Dr Edward Anderson, Northumbria University
Professor Gurharpal Singh, School or Oriental and African Studies


FRI 11:30 Whatever Happened to Baby Jane Austen? (m00168r1)
Series 1

Episode 2

Dawn French and Jennifer Saunders star as respected novelist Florence and movie star Selina, in a sparkling comedy series about two sisters at war, by Veep writer David Quantick.

Florence becomes obsessed with her sister Selina's old movies – The Vixen, The Vixen 2 and The Vixen 3D. Meanwhile Selina takes Florence’s daughter Lucy clothes shopping and Lucy interrogates her about her mysterious absent father, Jonathan. The day ends in chaos as Florence unwittingly tells a journalist that she’d love to make a sex tape.

Critical reaction to the first episode in this series, originally broadcast in December 2020:
“The leads’ natural chemistry, plus David Quantick’s witty script… make for an enjoyable comedy with series potential” The Observer

“It’s as slick, dark and funny as one would expect – but surely this cannot be a one-off? The ending alone leaves us begging for a series” Radio Times

“French and Saunders sparkle with a magic that is so rarely heard in new radio comedies that I’d almost forgotten it was possible” Daily Telegraph

Cast:
Florence - Dawn French
Selina - Jennifer Saunders
Mrs Ragnarrok – Rebecca Front
Lucy - Lisa McGrillis
All the men - Alistair McGowan

Written by David Quantick
Producer: Liz Anstee

A CPL production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m00168r3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Archive on 4 (m00167st)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


FRI 12:57 Weather (m00168r6)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m00168r8)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Jonny Dymond.


FRI 13:45 The Museums That Make Us (m00168rb)
Leeds

Neil MacGregor presents a new series for BBC Radio Four celebrating the role and ambition of museums the length and breadth of the country, and in the process he'll be finding answers to the question ‘What are Museums For in 2022’.

In a week telling the story of immigration, demographic change and refugees, Neil finishes in Leeds with evidence of one of the oldest peoples to visit and settle in this country. But the Roman child's sandal has been chosen by the museum as an example of their ambitious scheme which establishes partnerships with primary schools in the Leeds area and organises museum exhibits to go out to the schools themselves in special 'museum boxes'. It's a ground-breaking adjunct to the conventional 'schools visit', and allows teachers to make the most of a fantastic local resource. Neil talks to Head of Learning and Access Kate Fellows and local Head teacher Caroline Carr about the importance and success of the scheme.

Museums have always been telescopes trained on the past to help locate a sense of place in the present. Neil believes that role is an active one, responding to changes in the people museums serve and the shifting social and cultural landscape they inhabit. After spending much of his life at the centre of our national Museum life in London, Neil is taking to the road to discover more about the extraordinary work being done in Museums outside the capital, from Stornoway to Stowmarket, and Belfast to Birmingham.

In each episode he visits a single museum, inviting them to choose an object from their collections which they feel best illustrates their civic role, and the way they relate and want to relate to their local audience. Very rarely have they chosen a crown jewel from their often priceless collections. More often it's an object with a particular local resonance, or which helps tackle episodes from the past which are being viewed very differently by citizens in the 21st century.

He’ll be visiting the great national museums of Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland, as well as major city institutions in Birmingham, Leeds, Liverpool and elsewhere. And in spite of the challenges of the last two years, everywhere he meets passionate teams who are dedicated to providing a unique experience for both local audiences and visitors from further afield.

Neil writes: “What’s going on in our museums is at once challenging and exciting and it can only really be understood by visiting as many as possible and finding out how they have approached what is a vital role in providing a sense of local, regional and national identity.”

Producer - Tom Alban
Original music composed by Phil Channell


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m00168mm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Limelight (m00168rd)
Dead Hand

Dead Hand – Episode 3: Hierarchy of Victims

A contemporary thriller set in Northern Ireland written by Stuart Drennan.

Greg is the host of a true crime podcast dedicated to uncovering the identity of a serial killer, last active over twenty years ago, known only as Dead Hand. A killer named after a mysterious radio transmission which has been broadcasting an indecipherable code in the years since Dead Hand vanished. A code told in the voices of Dead Hand’s victims; including Greg’s missing father. However, when a new voice is added to the code, Greg realises that Dead Hand is active again. With time already running out, can he finally crack the code and catch the killer?

Cast:
Greg ... Paul Mallon
DS Murray … Michelle Fairley
Kate … Roísín Gallagher
Lucy … Hannah Eggleton
Stacey … Eimear Fearon
May … Julia Dearden
Freya … Carol Moore
Daniel … Desmond Eastwood
All other roles played by members of the cast.

Writer … Stuart Drennan
Script Editor … Philip Palmer
Producer … Michael Shannon
Executive Editor … Andy Martin

A BBC Northern Ireland production for Radio 4.


FRI 14:45 Living with the Gods (b09bfmqn)
Fire and State

Neil MacGregor continues his series on the expression of shared beliefs in communities around the world and across time.

Many societies have seen the mesmerizing phenomenon of fire as a symbol of the divine. Neil MacGregor focuses on sacred fire which comes to represent the state itself: the perpetual fire in the Temple of Vesta in Rome, the great Parsi fire temple in Udvada, India, and 'la Flamme de la Nation', the Flame of the Nation, constantly burning beneath the Arc de Triomphe in Paris.

Producer: Paul Kobrak

The series is produced in partnership with the British Museum.
Photograph: (c) The Trustees of the British Museum.


FRI 15:00 Good Friday Meditation: A Personal Passion (m00168rg)
Last year, Revd. Sharon Grenham-Thompson received the news every parent dreads; her son, Leo, had died in tragic circumstances. She is now left to navigate grief as she experiences life without Leo.

As a priest in the Church of England, she has often brought comfort to bereaved families, but she now goes through that process herself on a personal and intimate level. She draws support from others who have lost loved ones, from ceremonies and rituals held in Leo’s memory, from her community, both in real life and online, and from her faith. The solemnities and festivals of the liturgical year bring up a range of thoughts and emotions – none more so than Holy Week and Good Friday.

There are poignant parallels between the Good Friday story and Sharon’s own experience as she identifies strongly with the heartbreak of Mary, the mother of Jesus, standing beneath the cross. Jesus’ death and resurrection is central to Christianity and Sharon turns to Jesus’ Seven Words from the Cross - the seven phrases reportedly uttered by Jesus in the final hours before his death - and asks how they might resonate with those who are grieving today.

Through conversation with those who have walked that road before her, Sharon explores grief from a personal perspective and reflects on how the Good Friday story encapsulates different elements of the grieving process. With music and poetry for Passiontide this is a search for spiritual solace in the heart of suffering that unites human experience with theological reflection.

READER: Christopher Eccleston

PRODUCER: Katharine Longworth


FRI 15:30 Lent Talks (m0015l2m)
"I was a stranger and you invited me in"

Lent Talks is a series of personal reflections inspired by an aspect of the story leading up to Easter. This year’s theme is the power of hospitality, based on Jesus’ encouragement in Matthew’s gospel to feed the hungry, welcome the stranger and look after the sick.

In this episode, the author and social entrepreneur Dr Krish Kandiah considers the words, "I was a stranger and you invited me in".

Producer: Dan Tierney.


FRI 15:45 Short Works (m00168rj)
Ghost Writer

Ghost Writer by Tom Vowler.

A writer goes to Tuscany to complete the unfinished novel of a dead author. In Lucca, he considers two failed marriages: one in the novel, the other his own.

Tom Vowler's story collection The Method, won the Scott Prize and the Edge Hill Readers' Prize. His most recent novel, Every Seventh Wave, was published in 2021.

Writer: Tom Vowler
Reader: Blake Ritson
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m00168rl)
Jordan Mooney (pictured), Jack Higgins, Robert Ashe, David McKee

John Wilson remembers the lives of those who have recently died including Jordan Mooney the punk icon known as ‘the original Sex Pistol’ who ended up as a veterinary nurse.

Jack Higgins, the thriller writer who hit the jackpot with The Eagle Has Landed, and sold more than 250 million books.

Robert Ashe, an aid worker who spent most of his working life supporting refugees all over the world.

And David McKee - author and illustrator who created timeless childhood favourites including Mr Benn and Elmer the multi-coloured elephant.

Producer: Neil George

Archive Clips Used: BBC 6Music, Three Minute Epiphany - The Essence of Punk and Defiance 05/06/2019; BBC TWO, The Culture Show - Jordan Mooney interview 01/07/2014; Megalovision/ Whaley-Malin Productions, Jubilee - trailer (1978); BBC Radio 2, The John Dunn Show 01/07/1992; Audible Audiobook/Harper Collins Publishers Ltd, The Savage Day by Jack Higgins 2019; BBC Radio 4, Desert Island Discs - Jack Higgins 12/12/1981; Associated General Films/ ITC Entertainment, The Eagle Has Landed - trailer (1976); BBC Radio 4, Profile - Jack Higgins 27/04/1984; ThamesTV/ Freemantle, The Killing Fields - Cambodia VT50536 18/01/1990; BBC News, 29/06/1980; BBC News, 23/10/1999; BBC Breakfast News, interview with David McKee 25/05/2019; BookTrust, David McKee reads Elmer 25/05/2022; Books Alive! YouTube Channel, Not Now Bernard by David McKee 08/11/2017; BBC TWO, Mr Benn - Pirate 31/03/1972; Made in Me - YouTube Channel, Me Books - David McKee interview 10/01/2013.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (m00168rn)
What can the BBC’s latest news podcast Ukrainecast offer listeners which its news programmes cannot? Roger Bolton puts that question to the podcast’s Producer Jonathan Aspinwall, and also asks him if his podcast is one-sided.

The Producer of Radio 4’s Lent Talks Dan Tierney explains why we need to talk about dying and, 40 years after the Falkland’s War, what do the Out of Your Comfort Zone listeners already know about a war they can’t remember?

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Kate Dixon
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 17:00 PM (m00168rq)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00168rs)
Plant makes the type of missiles which Ukraine claims sank Russian flagship Moskva. UK government insists its plan to send asylum-seekers to Rwanda will save tax-payers money.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (m00168rv)
Series 60

Episode 6

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by the voices of Jason Forbes and Sharlin Jahan. Sarah Keyworth talks about mental health, and Geoff Norcott looks ahead to the local elections. Music is provided by Jess Robinson.


FRI 19:00 Letter from Ukraine (m00168rx)
I always thought I was born after the war, not before

Acclaimed Ukrainian novelist Andrey Kurkov contemplates the troubling realisation that he was born in an interwar period, not 'after the war', as he had previously believed.

Translated by Elizabeth Sharp
Produced by Emma Harding

Production Co-ordinator Eleri McAuliffe
Sound by Nigel Lewis


FRI 19:15 Screenshot (m00168rz)
Easter

Mark Kermode and Ellen E Jones explore Christianity on screen, from faith films to nunsploitation.

Mark speaks to priest Father Peter Malone and controversial director Paul Verhoeven about two very different cinematic depictions of the crucifixion - Pasolini's Gospel According to Matthew and Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ.

And Ellen takes a look at nuns in the movies, from The Bells of St Mary's to The Devils, with the help of film critics Sister Rose Pacatte and Pamela Hutchinson.

Screenshot is Radio 4’s guide through the ever-expanding universe of the moving image. Every episode, Ellen E Jones and Mark Kermode journey through the main streets and back roads connecting film, television and streaming over the last hundred years.

Producer: Jane Long
A Prospect Street production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m00168s1)
Daisy Cooper MP, Gillian Keegan MP, Inaya Folarin Iman, David Lammy MP

Chris Mason presents political debate and discussion from Lambeth Town Hall with the Deputy Leader of the Liberal Democrats Daisy Cooper MP; Health Minister Gillian Keegan MP; the writer, GB News presenter and founder of The Equiano Project Inaya Folarin Iman; and the Shadow Foreign Secretary David Lammy MP.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: Kevan Long


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m00168s3)
What is a Woman?

Zoe Strimpel asks the seemingly simple question 'what is a woman', but finds no simple answer as she explores the question through a brief history of feminist thought.

She explores the ongoing controversy over trans women in women's competitive sport, and the reluctance of public figures to define what a woman is. while revealing her own views on the issue.

"As the history of feminism itself makes clear, gender and sex are genuinely complicated. That overconfident or oversimplified definitions of woman - which apparently we're all supposed to be able to produce - can be limiting and crude. Not just in relation to trans women but biological women too," she writes.

She continues: "The bitter debate about trans women versus women is a debate about the meaning and realness of biology. And yes, biological difference matters, sometimes hugely. It is certainly real. But there is room for nuance: indeed, there is a necessity for it. Without it, I fear a relapse into arguing that women are defined by their biology beyond the swimming pool or the cycling track or the locker room."

Producer: Sheila Cook
Sound: Peter Bosher
Production Coordinator: Janet Staples
Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith


FRI 21:00 The Museums That Make Us (m00168s5)
Week 3 Omnibus

Neil MacGregor presents a new series for BBC Radio Four celebrating the role and ambition of museums the length and breadth of the country, and in the process he'll be finding answers to the question ‘What are Museums For in 2022’.

In the third week of his series, Neil visits museums in cities which have seen demographic change, either gradual or sudden, over the past fifty years. In each case the museum, whether in Liverpool, Bristol, Birmingham or Leicester, has sought to reflect and respond to the new situation and make the museum a space in which everyone feels invested in looking back with insight and forward with positive ambition.

Museums have always been telescopes trained on the past to help locate a sense of place in the present. Neil believes that role is an active one, responding to changes in the people museums serve and the shifting social and cultural landscape they inhabit. After spending much of his life at the centre of our national Museum life in London, Neil is taking to the road to discover more about the extraordinary work being done in Museums outside the capital, from Stornoway to Stowmarket, and Belfast to Birmingham.

In each episode he visits a single museum, inviting them to choose an object from their collections which they feel best illustrates their civic role, and the way they relate and want to relate to their local audience. Very rarely have they chosen a crown jewel from their often priceless collections. More often it's an object with a particular local resonance, or which helps tackle episodes from the past which are being viewed very differently by citizens in the 21st century.

He’ll be visiting the great national museums of Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland, as well as major city institutions in Birmingham, Leeds, Liverpool and elsewhere. And in spite of the challenges of the last two years, everywhere he meets passionate teams who are dedicated to providing a unique experience for both local audiences and visitors from further afield.

Neil writes: “What’s going on in our museums is at once challenging and exciting and it can only really be understood by visiting as many as possible and finding out how they have approached what is a vital role in providing a sense of local, regional and national identity.”

Producer - Tom Alban
Original music composed by Phil Channell


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m00168s7)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


FRI 22:45 The Promise by Damon Galgut (m00168s9)
Episode 10

2021's Booker Prize-winning novel charts the crash and burn of the Swarts, a white South African family, living on a farm outside Pretoria. Told over four decades and four funerals, it is the story of family, land and a promise, set against a changing South Africa.

In today's final episode: Amor is determined to fulfil the promise her family made to Salome...

Reader: Jack Klaff
Writer: Damon Galgut
Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Producer: Justine Willett


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (m001687l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Suggs: Love Letters to London (m000sbf0)
Docklands

More capers and chaos from Suggs, as he crafts another love letter and takes us on a trip around London's Docklands.

Performed by Suggs
Written by Suggs with Owen Lewis
Directed by Owen Lewis
Musical Director: Owen Parker
Producer: Richard Melvin
A Dabster production for BBC Radio 4




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

1922: The Birth of Now 14:45 SUN (m0013rnm)

A House in History 23:30 WED (m00168df)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m0016390)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m00168s3)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m00167s7)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m001638y)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m00168s1)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m00167st)

Archive on 4 12:04 FRI (m00167st)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m00168m9)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m00168m9)

BBC Radio Fjord 23:30 TUE (m0016885)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m00167t8)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m00167t8)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (m001681b)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m00168fk)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (m001687g)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (m001687g)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (m00162yd)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (m00168ln)

Desolation Jests 19:15 SUN (b085wjb8)

Drama 14:45 SAT (b08m8q81)

Drama 14:15 MON (m0016814)

Drama 14:15 TUE (m000glnk)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m00167rl)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m00168hh)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m001682k)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m001688m)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m00168dy)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m00168ng)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (m001638m)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (m00168rn)

From Fact to Fiction 14:15 WED (m000rnlc)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m00167rx)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m001681q)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m001687v)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m00168cs)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m00168mp)

Fungi: The New Frontier 21:00 TUE (m001394q)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 21:00 SAT (b04yk3d4)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m001638f)

Good Friday Meditation: A Personal Passion 15:00 FRI (m00168rg)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (m001687l)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (m001687l)

Guide Books 16:30 SUN (m000wyzj)

Homework 11:30 MON (b0b1q5n5)

Hybrid Humans by Harry Parker 00:30 SAT (m001637t)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (m00168lg)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (m00168lg)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m001687z)

Ingenious 09:30 WED (m000y0qh)

Invisible Man: A Parable for Our Times? 11:30 THU (m00168lq)

Jayde Adams: Hometown Glory 23:00 TUE (m0011cqq)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m001638k)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m00168rl)

Lent Talks 05:45 SAT (m00162ym)

Lent Talks 11:45 SUN (m00162ym)

Lent Talks 20:45 WED (m00168d1)

Lent Talks 15:30 FRI (m0015l2m)

Letter from Ukraine 00:15 SUN (m00165wm)

Letter from Ukraine 19:00 FRI (m00168rx)

Licence to Kill? 20:00 TUE (m001687x)

Life Changing 09:00 WED (m00168b5)

Life Changing 20:30 THU (m00168b5)

Limelight 14:15 FRI (m00168rd)

Little Lifetimes by Jenny Eclair 23:00 WED (m00168d9)

Living with the Gods 14:45 FRI (b09bfmqn)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m00167sm)

Loose Ends 23:00 SUN (m00167sm)

Lost Worlds 16:00 MON (m0014fyd)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m0016396)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m00167sy)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m00168gz)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m0016822)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m0016887)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m00168dh)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m00168n0)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m00167s1)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m00167s1)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m00168bw)

Natural Histories 06:35 SUN (b05w9b5n)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m001639g)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m00167t6)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m00168hc)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m001682f)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m001688h)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m00168dt)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m00168nb)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m00167vy)

News Summary 06:00 SUN (m00168f0)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m00168fr)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m001683s)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m0016874)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m00168hr)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m00168p7)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m00168r3)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m00167rj)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m00168f5)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m00168ff)

News and Weather 13:00 SAT (m00167s5)

News 22:00 SAT (m00167sw)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m00168g3)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m00168g3)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (m00162z9)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m00168m7)

Oti Mabuse's Dancing Legends 11:30 WED (m00168bc)

Our Friends in the North 14:15 THU (m00168m5)

PM 17:00 SAT (m00167sc)

PM 17:00 MON (m001681d)

PM 17:00 TUE (m001687n)

PM 17:00 WED (m00168c8)

PM 17:00 THU (m00168mc)

PM 17:00 FRI (m00168rq)

Parish Is Burning 23:30 MON (m0016820)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m00168gj)

Positive Thinking 09:00 TUE (m001686t)

Positive Thinking 21:30 TUE (m001686t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m001639j)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m00168hf)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m001682h)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m001688k)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m00168dw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m00168nd)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m00167sp)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m00167sp)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m00167sp)

Putin 11:00 TUE (m0016870)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m00168f9)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m00168f9)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m00168f9)

Rossum's Universal Robots 15:00 SUN (m00168g1)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (m00162ml)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (m0016816)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m00167rs)

Screenshot 19:15 FRI (m00168rz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m001639b)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m00167t2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m00168h7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m0016829)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m001688c)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m00168dp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m00168n6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m0016398)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m001639d)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m00167sf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m00167t0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m00167t4)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m00168g5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m00168h3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m00168h9)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m0016827)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m001682c)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m0016889)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m001688f)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m00168dm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m00168dr)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m00168n4)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m00168n8)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (m001638h)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (m00168rj)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m00167sk)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m00168gd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m001681j)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m001687q)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m00168ch)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m00168mh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m00168rs)

Sliced Bread 17:30 SAT (m00162yr)

Sliced Bread 12:32 THU (m00168lx)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01d23tn)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01d23tn)

Spring Stories 19:45 SUN (m00168gn)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (m001680h)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (m001680h)

Suggs: Love Letters to London 23:30 THU (m000s3nw)

Suggs: Love Letters to London 23:30 FRI (m000sbf0)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m00168fh)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m00168f7)

Tax Me, I’m a Millionaire 20:00 MON (m001681s)

Tax Me, I’m a Millionaire 11:00 WED (m001681s)

Teatime 18:30 TUE (m000fq41)

Terrorism and the Mind 20:00 THU (m00146hc)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m00168fm)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m0016812)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m0016812)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m001681n)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m001681n)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m001687s)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m001687s)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m00168cn)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m00168cn)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m00168mm)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m00168mm)

The Caretakers 11:30 TUE (m0016872)

The Confessional 18:30 WED (m000v848)

The Digital Human 21:30 SUN (m000k7jk)

The End of Invention 11:00 SAT (m0015v9g)

The Exchange 22:15 SAT (m00162yh)

The Exchange 20:00 WED (m00168cx)

The Falklands Now 17:00 SUN (m00162vk)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m0016818)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m0016818)

The Invention of... 11:00 MON (m001680p)

The Invention of... 15:30 WED (m001680p)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (m00167rv)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (m00167rv)

The Likely Dads 23:00 THU (m00168my)

The Listening Project 13:30 SUN (m00168fz)

The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer 09:45 MON (m0016824)

The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer 00:30 TUE (m0016824)

The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer 09:45 TUE (m001686w)

The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer 00:30 WED (m001686w)

The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer 09:45 WED (m00168dk)

The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer 00:30 THU (m00168dk)

The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer 09:45 THU (m00168n2)

The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer 00:30 FRI (m00168n2)

The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures by Paul Fischer 09:45 FRI (m00168qv)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m00168c4)

The Media Show 21:30 WED (m00168c4)

The Museums That Make Us 13:45 MON (m0016810)

The Museums That Make Us 13:45 TUE (m001687d)

The Museums That Make Us 13:45 WED (m00168br)

The Museums That Make Us 13:45 THU (m00168m3)

The Museums That Make Us 13:45 FRI (m00168rb)

The Museums That Make Us 21:00 FRI (m00168s5)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (m001638t)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (m00168rv)

The Open Box 23:30 SAT (m00161rk)

The Promise by Damon Galgut 22:45 MON (m001681y)

The Promise by Damon Galgut 22:45 TUE (m0016883)

The Promise by Damon Galgut 22:45 WED (m00168d7)

The Promise by Damon Galgut 22:45 THU (m00168mw)

The Promise by Damon Galgut 22:45 FRI (m00168s9)

The Reunion 11:00 SUN (m00168fp)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (m00168fp)

The Skewer 21:45 SAT (m00162z6)

The Skewer 23:15 WED (m00168dc)

The Tim Vine Chat Show 18:30 THU (m00168mk)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (m00162mw)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (m001681l)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m00168fx)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m001681w)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m0016881)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m00168d5)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m00168mt)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m00168s7)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (m00162xp)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (m00168c0)

This Cultural Life 19:15 SAT (m00167sr)

Three Pounds in My Pocket 21:00 MON (m001637y)

Three Pounds in My Pocket 11:00 FRI (m00168qz)

Today 07:00 SAT (m00167rq)

Today 06:00 MON (m001680f)

Today 06:00 TUE (m001686r)

Today 06:00 WED (m00168b3)

Today 06:00 THU (m00168ld)

Today 06:00 FRI (m00168qs)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03zqzsv)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03k5c26)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03zbtzz)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b091w8gz)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b08q3sz6)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03mztpd)

Unreal: The VFX Revolution 16:00 THU (m000xzds)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m00167rn)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m00167s3)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m00167sh)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m00168f3)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m00168fc)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m00168fv)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m00168g8)

Weather 05:56 MON (m00168hk)

Weather 12:57 MON (m001680w)

Weather 12:57 TUE (m0016878)

Weather 12:57 WED (m00168bk)

Weather 12:57 THU (m00168lz)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m00168r6)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m00168gs)

Whatever Happened to Baby Jane Austen? 11:30 FRI (m00168r1)

Witness 09:30 TUE (b036tqps)

Woman's Hour 16:15 SAT (m00167s9)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m001680m)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m001686y)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m00168b9)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m00168ll)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m00168qx)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (m00162v4)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (m001687j)

World at One 13:00 MON (m001680y)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m001687b)

World at One 13:00 WED (m00168bm)

World at One 13:00 THU (m00168m1)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m00168r8)

You and Yours 12:04 MON (m001680t)

You and Yours 12:04 TUE (m0016876)

You and Yours 12:04 WED (m00168bh)

You and Yours 12:04 THU (m00168lv)