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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 22 JANUARY 2022

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m0013jck)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:30 It's Always Summer Somewhere (m0013pwl)
Episode 5

Part five of White's memoir about cricket, music and loss, read by the author. After life in a world-touring band, Felix returns to his first love - cricket - and recalls a redemptive victory for the England side.

Felix White is a musician, writer and broadcaster best known as a guitarist in The Maccabees. He subsequently co-founded independent record label Yala! and co-presents the BBC’s Tailenders podcast with Greg James. In It's Always Summer Somewhere he recalls growing up, his mother's illness and slowly replacing an ambition to be a left arm spinner in his school cricket team with the dazzling realities of life in a world renowned band.

Abridger: Julian Wilkinson
Producer: Ciaran Bermingham


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0013jcn)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0013jcr)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0013jcw)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m0013jd0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0013jd4)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi Julia Neuberger.

Good morning, and shabbat shalom to those of you observing the Jewish Sabbath.

It’s been a tough few weeks for staff in the two hospitals I chair. COVID has been rife, and staff have been off sick or isolating, whilst beds have been full and the numbers coming in with COVID have risen. Staff are thinly stretched, and exhausted, and that’s been the case on and off since March 2020, when all this started. There are short down periods, and then it all starts all over again.

I have enormous admiration for our teams of staff. They are working so hard night and day, and their resilience, and consistent kindness to frightened people, never ceases to amaze me. But I have never been more aware of the need for a day of rest than I am now. Shabbat shalom, we say. Sabbath peace.

Jews believe that it was the ancient Israelites, forerunners of the Jewish people, who invented the first weekly day of rest. Some think there may have been something a bit similar in the Assyrian empire, but no-one really knows, and it didn’t insist on rest for everyone. For what’s remarkable is that Shabbat applied not only to Israelites, but to anyone who worked for them, even if from another tribe. And it applied to the animals too. Every living creature deserves a day of rest.

The only problem is that a single day of rest isn’t long enough if you’ve been working flat out for months. You need longer. But the principle is right. Human beings, and animals, need rest to set their minds at peace and to give their bodies time to recalibrate. All of us creatures need time off, a day- or more- of rest. It re-energises us and it relaxes us. Shabbat shalom, and rest well. Take that day off, if not more, and celebrate it. It’s a wonderful thing.

Amen.


SAT 05:45 The Death of Nuance (m000qm04)
In Praise of Moderation

Oliver Burkeman explores what it means to be a moderate, in an age when proclaiming to be a moderate is likely to annoy people on both sides of the political divide.

He speaks with Damon Linker, a senior correspondent at TheWeek.com, and an outspoken moderate in the USA about why his columns generate so much ire on both sides of the isle, but curiously enough moreso with the people he generally sides with. And why moderation is not apathetic, but deeply passionate, and often a very mentally taxing way of life.

And he discovers a potential way to give people a method to open their minds to ideas from another side, with Daniel Ravner, and Israeli writer and creator of The Perspective, a website that show news stories from both sides, in an attempt to open minds and shatter filter bubbles that have such a profound effect on modern society.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m0013qrv)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (m0013hjm)
Goats on the Gun Batteries

Purdown is a large green hilly area on the edge of Bristol and is one of the highest points of the city. It's marked out by two buildings: the telecom tower and the large yellow dower house - a familiar sight to anyone who regularly drives along the nearby M32. In this programme Helen Mark explores the area, finding out about its significance in World War II, and meeting the goats which are now helping to preserve the remains of the gun placements put there to protect the city from bombing raids. She also learns about the history of Stoke Park estate, and goes on a hunt for hidden artwork in the woods.

Produced by Emma Campbell


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m0013qrx)
22/01/21 Farming Today This Week: agricultural pollution

Farming and pollution: can you have one without the other?
A report by MPs says England’s rivers are in a mess, with 40% affected by agricultural pollution.
We discuss the kinds of pollution agriculture causes and the efforts underway to solve it.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


SAT 06:57 Weather (m0013qrz)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 07:00 Today (m0013qs1)
Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m0013qs5)
Vicky McClure

Radio 4's Saturday morning show brings you extraordinary stories and remarkable people.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (m0013qs7)
Series 35

Home Economics: Episode 50

Jay Rayner hosts a culinary panel show packed full of tasty titbits. Mel Erdal, Jordan Bourke, Tim Anderson and Dr Zoe Laughlin answer questions on all things gastronomic.

This week our experts share their favourite ways to cook cauliflower - whole roasted, deep-fried and straight up with cheese (and pickled onions!). They also explore the magic of toasting, and debate the perfect fruit-to-topping ratio of a crumble.

Producer - Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer - Bethany Hocken

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m0013qs9)
Radio 4's assessment of developments at Westminster


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m0013qsc)
Searching for Mexico's Drug-War Disappeared

The drug-related violence in Mexico is sometimes described as being “like a war.” Certainly, the death toll justifies calling it that, with three hundred thousand people killed in the past fifteen years, many of them innocent civilians. About a hundred thousand have simply disappeared, presumed dead, and with their families left to search for them. Will Grant travelled to the northern state of Sonora, and joined locals digging in the ground, both hopeful - and fearful - of what they might find.

The long-running civil war in Syria has forced half the country to leave their homes: around six and a half million are internally displaced within Syria, and another six and a half million have fled abroad. Most of those who reached Europe have gone to Germany, many traumatised, having survived bombings, or lost family members in the fighting – some have been tortured. You might expect these people would form tight-knit communities, as victims of similar harsh experiences looking out for each other. However, when Michael Ertl spoke to Syrian refugees in Berlin he found a community divided by mistrust.

The streets in Kazakhstan's cities are quiet now, and the Russian soldiers have gone home; the country is returning to some semblance of normality, after anti-government protests which left at least two hundred people dead. However, the country’s Defence Minister has been sacked for failing to quell the protests when they started, and the head of Kazakhstan’s intelligence agency, the KNB, has been arrested for treason. Meanwhile, Abdujalil Abdurasulov says, thousands of protestors remain in detention, with allegations they have been tortured.

Here’s a puzzle: what cost nearly a billion pounds, has not been finished, and will not do what it was designed for any time soon? The answer is: a new road in Montenegro. It was supposed to link the country’s main port to Montenegro’s neighbour, Serbia, encouraging valuable cargo to the country. However, the project is already two years late, and so far, this road to the sea does not actually reach the sea stopping way short. Chinese money is involved, along with Montenegrin politicians past and present, and some allege corruption behind what Linda Pressly says is fast becoming another Balkan scandal.

If it is true that cats have nine lives, then Mohamed Ibrahim Moalimuu must be running them a close second. A former BBC journalist, Mohamed has been caught up in no fewer than five suicide attacks, all in his home country, Somalia. Number five came last Sunday; he survived, but another suicide attack that same day killed at least eight people – just another weekend in a country torn apart by violence for the past three decades. So what makes someone like Mohamed continue to do work which places them directly in harm’s way? Mary Harper has known him for many years, and even she struggles to understand how he keeps going.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m0013r2k)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m0013qsh)
The latest news from the world of personal finance


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (m0013jc5)
Series 107

Episode 4

Andy Zaltzman and the News Quiz satirise the week's news from the UK and beyond.

This week Andy is joined by Alice Fraser, Chris McCausland, Daliso Chaponda and Hugo Rifkind. They try to make sense of a week of big dogs, pork pies and red meat.

Chair's Script: Written by Andy Zaltzman
Additional Material: Written by Heidi Regan, Cameron Loxdale, Stephen Buchanan and Tasha Dhanraj.
Production Coordinator: Katie Baum
Sound Editor: Marc Willcox
Producer: James Robinson

A BBC Studios Production


SAT 12:57 Weather (m0013qsk)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News and Weather (m0013qsm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m0013jc9)
Louis de Bernières, Sir Edward Leigh MP, Layla Moran MP, Baroness Smith

Chris Mason presents political debate and discussion from Gedney Hill and District Memorial Hall in Lincolnshire with the author Louis de Bernières, the Conservative MP Sir Edward Leigh, Liberal Democrat MP and Spokesperson for Foreign Affairs at Westminster Layla Moran and Labour's Leader in the Lords Baroness Smith.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: Sharon Hughes


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m0013qsr)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:45 39 Ways to Save the Planet (m000qwt1)
Super Rice

We’re resourceful, adaptable and the smartest thing this planet has ever seen. We got ourselves into this mess but we can get ourselves out of it. BBC Radio Four, in partnership with the Royal Geographical Society presents 39 ideas to relieve the stress that climate change is exerting on the planet.

From tiny solar cells to the total transformation of the Siberian landscape, Tom Heap and Dr Tamsin Edwards from Kings College, London view the fundamental problem of our age from a fresh perspective. Small things that make a big difference. Big things that make a small difference. We’re going to need every one of them.

In the first programme Tom discovers the secret of low-carbon rice with Dr Smita Kurup from Rothamsted Research.

Producer : Alasdair Cross

Researcher: Sarah Goodman

Produced in association with the Royal Geographical Society. Special thanks for this episode to Professor Vincent Gauci from the University of Birmingham.


SAT 15:00 Drama (m000shgc)
The Beautiful and Damned. Part 1

F Scott Fitzgerald's novel which charts the Jazz Age via a glamorous but doomed marriage.

Anthony Patch, presumptive heir to a vast fortune, marries renowned beauty, Gloria Gilbert.
True socialites, the couple spend their time partying, drinking and dreaming of the millions they will have to spend when Anthony finally inherits.

Part One

Anthony Patch ..... Joel MacCormack
Gloria Gilbert ..... Jessica Hardwick
Fred Passmore ..... Rhashan Stone
Maury Noble ..... David Sturzaker
Joseph Bloeckman ..... Tom Mothersdale
Muriel Kane ..... Melody Grove
Adam Patch/Bounds ..... Ben Onwukwe

Adapted by Robin Brooks
Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m0013qsw)
Highlights from the Woman's Hour week


SAT 17:00 PM (m0013qt0)
Full coverage of the day's news


SAT 17:30 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (m0013qt4)
The Steve Baker Leadership Crisis One

The former Brexit minister on checkmate for the PM, the ‘collateral damage’ of lockdowns and why he uses a parachute


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0013qt6)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m0013qt8)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0013qtb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m0013qtd)
Kiefer Sutherland, Elizabeth McGovern, Rob Brydon, Janis Ian, David Morrissey, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and David Morrissey are joined by Kiefer Sutherland, Elizabeth McGovern and Rob Brydon for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Janis Ian and Kiefer Sutherland.


SAT 19:00 Profile (m0013qtg)
Sue Gray

From pub landlady to chief interrogator, Adrian Goldberg profiles Sue Gray, the woman who secretly “runs Britain”, and is leading the investigation into Downing Street parties. We hear about her unconventional background, a mysterious career break involving brushes with the IRA, and her meteoric rise to become Whitehall’s most feared inquisitor. She’s been called “the most powerful person you’ve never heard of”. But, will she be able to withstand the pressure of investigating her own boss, the Prime Minister?


SAT 19:15 Rethink (m001328g)
Rethink Population

Living in a young country

In episode three of the series, Amol Rajan is joined by guests from Africa and the Middle East to look at the challenges and opportunities faced by countries with rapidly growing young populations. Will this mean demographic dividend or disaster for states like Nigeria?

GUESTS

Dr Wangui Kimari, Junior Research Fellow, Institute for Humanities in Africa at the University of Cape Town

Cheta Nwanze, Lead Partner at SBM Intelligence

Meray Maddah, Research Assistant, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Dr. Paul Morland, Author of ‘The Human Tide: How Population Shaped the Modern World’

Presenter: Amol Rajan
Producer: Ayeisha Thomas-Smith
Editor: Kirsty Reid


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m0013qtj)
Bloody Sunday: 50 Years On

Fifty years ago on 30 January 1972, a day that came to be forever known as “Bloody Sunday”, soldiers of the First Battalion, the Parachute Regiment, shot dead 13 civil rights marchers in Londonderry/Derry. Peter Taylor tells the story of that day with a mix of his own unique archive and new interviews from those on all sides about what the events meant then and still mean today - including a rare interview with Lord Saville, who carried out an exhaustive 12 year Inquiry into the events of that day.

Bloody Sunday was the moment that changed the history of the conflict in Northern Ireland. It saw the re-birth of the IRA with hundreds of new recruits joining in the immediate aftermath of that day's events. And it was the spark which ignited and intensified the so-called Troubles, which left 3600 dead and tens of thousands injured.

Producer: Jim Frank
Editor: Penny Murphy


SAT 21:00 Tumanbay (m0002ltw)
Series 3

The Blind Man

Weakened by occupation, an offer of friendship and protection comes from the Balarac, a formidable group of priest warriors led by the blind Grand Master Amalric (Anton Lesser). But protection comes at a price the city can ill-afford.

While General Qulan leaves to build an army, in the palace Gregor (Rufus Wright), the Sultana’s chief spy-master, finds himself in a desperate struggle for power and influence with his adversaries - Alkin (Nathalie Armin) the Sultana’s confident and lover, and Cadali (Matthew Marsh) the ambitious ex-vizier.

Cast:
Gregor........Rufus Wright
Manel........Aiysha Hart
Cadali........Matthew Marsh
Grand Master, Amalric........ Anton Lesser
Bavand........Peter Polycarpou
Alkin........Nathalie Armin
Herod........Amir El-Masry
Selim........Farshid Rokey
Heaven........Olivia Popica
General Qulan........Christopher Fulford
Frog........Finn Elliot
Matilla........Humera Syed
Akiba........Akin Gazi
Nurse........Annabelle Dowler
Slave Captain........George Georgiou
Balarac Captain........Antony Bunsee
Balarac Sergeant........Alexander Arnold
Merick........Carl Prekopp
Madam.......Annabelle Dowler
Prostitute.......Marlene Madenge
Barli........Vivek Madan
Courtier........Nadir Khan

Tumanbay is created by John Scott Dryden and Mike Walker and inspired by the Mamluk slave rulers of Egypt.

Original Music by Sacha Puttnam

Sound Design by Eloise Whitmore
Additional Music by Jon Ouin

Produced by Emma Hearn, Nadir Khan and John Scott Dryden
Written by Mac Rogers
Directed by John Scott Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:45 Sandi Toksvig's Hygge (m0012sb7)
Series 2

Lyse Doucet

Joining Sandi Toksvig in her cosy log cabin today is the BBC's Chief International Correspondent Lyse Doucet. Over a drink they talk about the right way to start the day, the gardens of Kabul, love of water and the soothing magic of fragrance.

Starring... Sandi Toksvig
Guest...Lyse Doucet
Additional material... Tasha Dhanraj and Rajiv Karia
Producer...Julia McKenzie
Production coordinator...Katie Baum
A BBC Studios Production


SAT 22:00 News (m0013qtl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (m0013jf7)
The Rules - Expectations and Apologies

In spite of his apology the calls continue for the Prime Minister to resign. He did not follow his own rules so he must go, says a sizeable majority in the polls. But why must he go? Sympathy, understanding and forgiveness are all virtues to celebrate - unless we happen to be talking about people we don’t like. Most of those who broke the lockdown rules (maybe you, maybe me) got away with it. Some got a caution or a fine; very few lost their jobs.

The charge against Boris Johnson is not so much that he broke the law as that he crossed a moral boundary. So, what are the moral rules he is accused of breaking? And why isn’t his very public apology deemed by some to be not good enough?

Anthropology tells us that the basic rules of morality are universal. But sociologists say that cultural norms dictate how we’re expected to behave, and Britain is culturally diverse. Given that politics is almost by definition an interplay of pragmatism and integrity, perhaps we should learn to live with our politicians’ clay feet and look elsewhere for paragons of moral virtue? With former Conservative MP Edwina Currie, Anthropologist Dr Oliver Scott Curry, Political theorist Dr Stephen de Vijze and Philosophy professor Quassim Cassam.

Produced by Olive Clancy


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (m0013hy1)
Series 35

Heat 4, 2022

(4/13)
With tastes covering every aspect of music, the competitors facing Paul Gambaccini's questions in today's heat will be hoping the breadth of their knowledge can carry them through to the semi-finals. They'll need to know about Bach and Richard Strauss as well as Stevie Wonder, Led Zeppelin and Bacharach & David. There are plenty of musical extracts to identify and snippets of music trivia along the way.

Today Paul welcomes
Philip Beard from Twickenham
Lawrence Long from West Sussex
Rachel Thomas from Hertfordshire

Assistant Producer: Stephen Garner
Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 Uncanny (m0013qtn)
Case 14: The Haunting of Tanfield House

A young woman breaks away from her Catholic background when she attends art school. Memories of a childhood exorcism haunt her, but when it appears there is a poltergeist in her new house, she once again consider the existence of the Devil.

But does the poltergeist really mean harm or is it just trying to get a message through?

Written and presented by Danny Robins
Editor and Sound Designer: Charlie Brandon-King
Music: Evelyn Sykes
Theme Music by Lanterns on the Lake
Produced by Danny Robins and Simon Barnard

A Bafflegab and Uncanny Media production for BBC Radio 4



SUNDAY 23 JANUARY 2022

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m0013qtq)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:15 The East Coast Listening Post (m000677v)
Series 2

Laugh

American reporters and sisters, Jenna and Dana Johnson, return to the UK to investigate the people of Great Britain. This week Jenna and Dana meet Mick Tanner from the historic town of Luton, who is undergoing therapy to change his laugh in the pursuit of love. To meet someone new, Mick agrees to take part in a reality dating show called 'Rapid Banter'.

The East Coast Listening Post was written and performed by Celeste Dring and Freya Parker, with performances from David Elms and Nick Mohammed. The original score was composed by Owain Roberts. The script editor was Matthew Crosby. The East Coast Listening Post was produced by Suzy Grant and is a BBC Studios production.


SUN 00:30 The Poet and the Echo (m0013jbp)
Jubilate Agno

Writers choose poems as inspiration for new stories.

Episode 2/3

Jubilate Agno

A young woman, surrounded by silence, finds solace in the freedom of the outdoors.

A moving story inspired by Christopher Smart’s ‘Jubilate Agno’, by Jessie Greengrass.

Credits
Writer ..... Jessie Greengrass
Reader ..... Jessica Hardwick
Producer ..... Claire Simpson

A BBC Scotland Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0013qts)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0013qtv)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0013qtx)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m0013qtz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m0013qv1)
All Saints Church, Allesley near Coventry

Bells on Sunday comes from All Saints Church, Allesley near Coventry. There has been a church on the site for over 800 years. Until 1901, the bells hung as an anti-clockwise ring of five when a new clockwide frame was installed and another bell added. In 1946, two new bells were added to make a ring of eight with a tenor in the note of G sharp weighing twelve hundredweight. We hear them ringing Cambridge Suprise Major.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m0013qtg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Summary (m0013qw7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b0606md8)
The Enclosed Garden

From paradise to The Secret Garden, the composer Michael Zev Gordon reflects on the peculiar magic of the enclosed garden. From the hopefulness of planting seeds to the delight of watching your garden grow.

A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (m0013qw9)
Wales' Only City Farm, Swansea

In the last of three programmes marking the 50th anniversary year of the city farm movement, Ruth Sanderson visits Wales' only city farm, in Swansea.

Produced by Beatrice Fenton.


SUN 06:57 Weather (m0013qwc)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m0013qwf)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m0013qwh)
A look at the ethical and religious issues of the week


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m0013qwk)
Orchid Project

Nurse and activist Hoda Ali makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Orchid Project

To Give:
- UK Freephone 0800 404 8144
-You can donate online at bbc.co.uk/appeal/radio4
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Orchid Project’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘Orchid Project’.
Please note that Freephone and online donations for this charity close at 23.59 on the Saturday after the Appeal is first broadcast. However the Freepost option can be used at any time.

Registered Charity Number: 1141057


SUN 07:57 Weather (m0013qwm)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m0013qwp)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m0013qwr)
Transformational Friendship

Rev Steve Stockman is a Presbyterian minister in Belfast; Father Martin Magill is a Roman Catholic Parish Priest in the city. They have been close friends and colleagues for several years. In this service during the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, they reflect on what they have learnt from each other, what they have achieved together and how friendship can be the beginning of transformation for individuals and communities.

Let us build a house (Marty Haugen)
O Love that will not let me go. (AL Peace)
St John 17.20-25
St Luke 7.27-36
Make me a channel of your peace (Sebastian Temple)
All for Jesus (Robin Mark)
Father Eternal, Ruler of Creation (Genevan Psalter 1551)
Will you come and follow me (John L Bell)


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m0013jcc)
The Right Side of History

Sarah Dunant asks if we should judge the past by the standards of the present or future, as shifting social attitudes colour our view of how the past is portrayed.

"What current historians share with those historians of the past whose vision we vehemently decry, is that they too thought they were right at the time...If we now find their views abhorrent and unjust then how about us; what might there be about our present moral certainty that the future might take issue with. What might we be missing?"

Producer: Sheila Cook
Sound: Peter Bosher
Production Coordinator: Gemma Ashman


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b09rzm9w)
David Rothenberg on the Song Thrush

Music professor and philosopher David Rothenberg asks a simple question, why is the song thrush with its beautiful, exuberant and melodious song not famous for this Tweet of the Day.

Producer: Tim Dee
Photograph: Feathers Allan.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m0013qwt)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m0013qww)
Writer, Nick Warburton
Director, Rosemary Watts
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Kenton Archer ….. Richard Attlee
Jolene Archer ….. Buffy Davis
Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Phoebe Aldridge ….. Lucy Morris
Leonard Berry ….. Paul Copley
Harrison Burns ….. James Cartwright
Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Chris Carter ….. Wilf Scolding
Tracy Horrobin ….. Susie Riddell
Jim Lloyd ….. John Rowe
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Lily Pargetter …. Katie Redford
Fallon Rogers ….. Joanna Van Kampen


SUN 11:00 Desert Island Discs (m0013qwy)
John Caudwell, businessman

John Caudwell is a businessman and philanthropist who founded the mobile phone company Phones 4U in 1996. It became the UK’s largest independent mobile phone retailer and made him one of Britain’s most successful businessmen.

John was born in Birmingham and grew up in Stoke-on-Trent. He came up with his first business venture when he was five – he sold his toys to the other children in his neighbourhood. After he left school he became an apprentice engineer at the Michelin Tyre Factory but the hunger to have his own business drove him on. In his spare time he set up a variety of enterprises from a grocery store to a mail order business selling motorcycle clothing.

In 1980 he set up a car dealership with his brother Brian and a few years later spotted a mobile phone in use at a car auction. Although the phone was heavy and cumbersome, John saw the potential of cellular technology and set up his own retail business, starting off with 26 phones which took him almost a year to sell.

In 2000 he set up Caudwell Children, his charity which helps children with disabilities, and remains its largest single benefactor. He was one of the first people in the UK to sign up to Bill and Melinda Gates’s Giving Pledge, vowing to give away 70% of his wealth during his lifetime. In 2006 John sold the Caudwell Group for £1.5 billion.

Presenter Lauren Laverne
Producer Paula McGinley


SUN 11:45 New Year Solutions (m0001vl0)
Water

As global warming threatens the future of our society, Jo Fidgen tackles the ways in which ordinary people can make a difference.

We're often told that we could help the environment by driving less, eating less meat, or using less water.

But in the face of a challenge as significant as global warming, how big a difference can small changes really make? And what would the world look like if we took those solutions to their logical extremes?

Britain may be wet and rainy a lot of the time, but our water supply is more fragile than many realise, especially as global warming starts to kick in. By borrowing the ingenuity of those who live in hotter, drier weather, can we find ways that we can cut out pointless water waste?

Producer: Robert Nicholson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m0013qx0)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (m0013hy8)
Series 27

Episode 2

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Pippa Evans, Geoff Norcott, Fern Brady and Simon Evans are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as shoes, beer, diets, and metal.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m0013qx2)
Angela Hartnett: A Life Through Food

In this episode Sheila Dillon is joined by a chef, restaurateur, author and campaigner, Angela Hartnett, for another in the programme’s series of Lives told through Food.

Angela Hartnett is seen as an icon in the food industry - she started out learning on the job in Cambridge - and later rose up working for Gordon Ramsey, first at The Aubergine, and later at the Connaught Hotel, where she earned her first Michelin star.

During that time she started to become a familiar face on British Television, appearing regularly on Hell’s Kitchen and the Great British Menu.

In 2010, Angela bought Ramsay out of the restaurant she still runs today - Murano - where she received another Michelin star.

In January 2022, Angela was awarded an OBE for her services to the hospitality industry, and for the work she did for the NHS during the Covid-19 pandemic.

In this conversation, Angela reflects on her campaigning, changes in the industry, and family life.

Presented by Sheila Dillon
Produced in Bristol by Natalie Donovan


SUN 12:57 Weather (m0013qx4)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m0013qx6)
Jonny Dymond looks at the week’s big stories from both home and around the world.


SUN 13:30 The Listening Project (m0013qx8)
Resilience is...

Fi Glover presents three conversations between strangers.

This week: Helene and Rose reflect on their experiences of being whistleblowers; Alex and Hamsia share their stories of being diagnosed with epilepsy in their youth and learning to live with the condition; and Julie and Meg talk about their love of acting and about ageism in the industry.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation lasts up to an hour and is then edited to extract the key moments of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in this decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0013jbk)
GQT at Home: Sowing Roots and Hanging Fruit

Peter Gibbs hosts the horticultural programme featuring the ever-knowledgable Kirsty Wilson, Matt Biggs, and Anne Swithinbank fielding questions from listeners across the country.

This week, the panellists share their ideas on nature-based solutions to flooding, bestow tips on splitting dahlia tubers and offer some inspiration for growing in hanging baskets and containers, with sustainability in-mind.

Beyond the questions, Claire Ratinon visits the Sowing Roots: Caribbean Garden Heritage in London exhibition at the Garden Museum and talks to one of the curators, Dr Ekua McMorris, and contributor Ras Prince Morgan, about the important gardening practices brought to Britain with the Windrush generation.

And, Dr Chris Thorogood transports us to a remote tract of dunes on La Graciosa island in Spain, as he hunts for a rare botanical marvel, the cynomorium coccineum.

Producer - Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer - Bethany Hocken

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 The Seventh Test by Vikas Swarup (b04471lv)
The Wedding

Sapna Sinha works as a sales assistant in a TV showroom in New Delhi. Being the only bread-winner in the family she works long hours to provide for her widowed mother and younger sister. But then a man walks into her life with an extraordinary proposition: pass seven "life" tests of his choosing and she will have wealth and power. At first the tests seem easy, but things are not quite as they seem. Dramatised by Ayeesha Menon and John Dryden from Vikas Swarup's best-selling novel "The Accidental Apprentice".

3) The Wedding

A thriller set in India from the author of "Slumdog Millionaire".

Sent to a village outside Delhi to install electrical appliances, TV sales assistant, Sapna Sinha, discovers a wedding about to take place - and that the young bride is being married against her will. What Sapna decides to do about it will be a matter of life and death. Could this be one of the seven tests that she has signed up for?

Dramatised from Vikas Swarup's best-selling novel "The Accidental Apprentice".

Writers:
Vikas Swarup is an Indian diplomat and a best-selling novelist. His first novel "Q & A" was made into the Oscar winning film "Slumdog Millionaire" as well as Sony Award winning radio drama serial for BBC Radio .

Ayeesha Menon dramatized Vikas Swarup's other novels SIX SUSPECTS and Q & A, which won a Sony Award for Best Drama. She also wrote for Radio 4 THE MUMBAI CHUZZLEWITS, UNDERCOVER MUMBAI, THE CAIRO TRILOGY and MY NAME IS RED. Her stage play PEREIRA'S BAKERY AT 76 CHAPEL ROAD, which was developed with the Royal Court Theatre, was recently staged by the Curve Theatre, Leicester.

John Dryden wrote the original three-part dramas series SEVERED THREADS, THE RELUCTANT SPY and PANDEMIC, which won the Writer's Guild Award for best radio drama script. His dramatisation of BLEAK HOUSE won a Sony Award for Best Drama. Other dramatisations include A SUITABLE BOY, A HANDMAID'S TALE and FATHERLAND one of the most repeated dramas on R4 Extra.

Production:
Sound Design - Steve Bond
Editing Assistant - Varun Bangera
Script Editor - Mike Walker
Assistant Producer - Toral Shah

Music - Sacha Putnam

Dramatised by Ayeesha Menon and John Dryden from the novel "ACCIDENTAL APPRENTICE" by Vikas Swarup.

Director - John Dryden
Producer - Nadir Khan
A Goldhawk Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 15:00 Drama (m0013qxb)
Darkness

The summer of 1816 was known as the ‘year without a summer’. It was a summer of great, even apocalyptic, turmoil in the world and in Byron's own life. 1816 saw meteorological conditions across Europe unknown in modern times; the eruption of Mount Tambora had created so much ash that the sun was blocked out, and abnormal conditions held Europe in terror throughout that summer.

Michael Symmons Roberts’ drama, set in that dark summer in the Villa Diodati on the shores of Lake Geneva, interweaves Lord Byron’s famous poem 'Darkness' with the story of Byron’s own turbulent summer. Exiled from England by a scandalous incestuous relationship with his half sister and hounded by journalists, the weather seemed to reflect Byron's internal crisis and provided inspiration for his vivid narrative poem. As Byron writes his poem conjuring an apocalyptic vision of a world where, one day and without warning, the sun fails to appear, he experiences his own darkness and catharsis.

Drama written by Michael Symmons Roberts interwoven with Lord Byron’s poem Darkness

LORD BYRON.....Alfred Enoch
AGNES MARCH.....Daisy Head
JOHN POLIDORI.....Ashley Margolis

Sound Design by Steve Brooke

Directed by Nadia Molinari

A BBC Audio Drama North Production


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m0013qxd)
Tessa Hadley

Programme looking at new fiction and non-fiction books, talking to authors and publishers and unearthing lost classics. Producer: Di Speirs


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (m0013qxg)
Dana Gioia

The former poet laureate of California talks about his life in poetry and chooses favourites from amongst listener requests. His selection includes poetry by Charles Bukowski, Li Bo, and his former teacher and friend, Elizabeth Bishop.
Producer Sally Heaven


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m0013hrt)
Mental health rehab - the forgotten patients

The NHS is sending patients with the most complex mental health needs to spend months or even years in specialist rehabilitation units, with the promise of helping them to recover. Adam Eley speaks to some patients who say they were sent to units sometimes hours from home, where poor care meant their condition got worse. Some experts say there is not enough oversight of the care provided.

Credits:
Reporter: Adam Eley
Producer: Emma Forde
Editor: Nicola Addyman


SUN 17:40 Profile (m0013qtg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0013qxj)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m0013qxl)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0013qxn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m0013qxq)
Lindsey Chapman

Take a breath and deep dive into big thinking, lessons in listening and the fallible nature of being human. Can we trust our own memories? Does cash make us care? And how many brains does an octopus actually have? From ways to relax to edge of your seat science, there’s music, comedy and a host of burrowing animals! We’ll start with a bang and finish with some base. So expect the unexpected.

Presenter: Lindsey Chapman
Producer: Emmie Hume
Production Coordinator: Elodie Chatelain
Studio Manager: Sue Stonestreet


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m0013qxs)
It’s the end of the road for David while Pip is on a mission.


SUN 19:15 Now You're Asking with Marian Keyes and Tara Flynn (m0013qxv)
The ‘Resting Bitch Face’ Problem

Marian and Tara discuss serial bad-boy dating, what your face says about you, a missing mojo, personal grooming issues and much more.

Marian Keyes is a multi award-winning writer, with a total of over 30 million of her books sold to date in 33 languages. Her close friend Tara Flynn is an actress, comedian and writer. Together, these two friends have been through a lot, and now want to use their considerable life experience to help solve your biggest - and smallest - problems.

From dilemmas about life, love and grief, to the perils of laundry or knowing what to say at a boring dinner, we’ll find out what Marian and Tara would recommend - which might not solve the problem exactly, but will make us all feel a bit better.

Recorded in Dublin with emails received from listeners around the world, the hosts invite you to pull up a chair at their virtual kitchen table as they read and digest their inbox.

Got a problem you want Marian and Tara to solve? Email: marianandtara@bbc.co.uk.

Producer: Steve Doherty
A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds


SUN 19:45 Bright Lights, Dead City (m0013qxx)
Episode 3. An Actor Prepares

An American film crew descends on a Northern Irish city to make a lavish prestige drama series about the Troubles called ‘Dead City’, inspiring the locals to get involved in the production, only for filming to be halted by the mysterious disappearance of the lead actress.

The Writer
Séamas O'Reilly is a columnist for the Observer and has written about media and politics for the Irish Times, New Statesman, Guts, and VICE. His memoir 'Did Ye Hear Mammy Died?' was an Irish Times Number One Bestseller and was awarded the Dubray Biography of the Year Award at the 2021 An Post Irish Book Awards.

Reader: Dearbháile McKinney
Writer: Séamas O'Reilly
Producer: Michael Shannon
Exec Editor: Andy Martin

A BBC Northern Ireland production.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (m0013jbx)
Are women 32% more likely to die after operation by a male surgeon?

Are women 32% more likely to die after operation by a male surgeon? Headlines asserting this were shared across social media recently - but the truth is a bit more complicated.

We compare the price and the quality of the UK’s Test and Trace system with that of Germany and check on what’s happening to the Covid death toll during the Omicron wave.

And we investigate the worrying statistic that one in ten people are planning to start a podcast in the coming year.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m0013jbt)
Lord Sainsbury, David Stuart, Elizabeth Selby, Ronnie Spector (pictured)

Matthew Bannister on

Lord Sainsbury of Preston Candover who led the expansion of the family grocery business during the 1970s and 80s.

David Stuart, the former gay escort and drug dealer who turned his life around and became a much loved support worker and advocate for the LGBT community.

Elizabeth Selby, who with her husband ran one of the UK’s most successful photographic agencies, supplying pictures to newspapers and magazines around the world.

And Ronnie Spector, lead singer of the Ronettes and wife of the notorious music producer Phil Spector.

Producer: Neil George

Interviewed guest: Sir Timothy Sainsbury
Interviewed guest: Adam Leyland
Interviewed guest: Matthew Hodson
Interviewed guest: John Selby
Interviewed guest: Herbie Knott

Archive clips used: Sainsburys, Jamie Oliver Advert 2003; BBC Archive, Woman's Hour - Centenary of J. Sainsbury Ltd 18/04/1969; BBC Radio 4, The Fall & Rise of Reginald Perrin: The Manipulators 29/01/1980; .NOBI Films, hu.mans: David Stuart 2016; David Stuart YouTube Channel, Why chemsex support doesn't belong in traditional addiction services 30/12/2021; BBC 6 Music, Lauren Laverne with Ronnie Spector 15/06/2016; BBC Radio 2, Tycoon of Teen 21/12/1996.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m0013qsh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m0013qwk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Short Cuts (m000yyr1)
Video Games

Audio adventures and short documentaries about gaming, presented by Josie Long. The joy and frustration of new adventures, fast cars and family days out at the M6 Southwaite Services, and finding love by the fountain in Dalaran.

Go South
Produced by Mae-Li Evans

Pole Position
Featuring Steve, Alistair and Sandy Urquhart
Produced by Steve Urquhart

Meet you at the fountain in Dalaran
Featuring Michelle and Alberto Naso

Curatorial team: Alia Cassam and Eleanor McDowall
Producer: Andrea Rangecroft
Executive Producer: Axel Kacoutié
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m0013qxz)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 Think with Pinker (m0013hjp)
Sentence first, verdict afterwards

Decision making in the courtroom: In his guide to thinking better, Professor Steven Pinker explores the life and death choices made by judges and juries.

To help him sift signals from noise, he’s joined by:

Judge Nancy Gertner: former United States district judge and now professor of law at Harvard University

Elizabeth Loftus; professor at the University of California and one of the most influential psychologists of the 20th century

Producer: Imogen Walford
Editor Emma Rippon

Think with Pinker is produced in partnership with The Open University.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b0606md8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 24 JANUARY 2022

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m0013qy1)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (m0013jdv)
Why Sociology Matters

Laurie Taylor explores the meaning and purpose of public sociology with Michael Burawoy, Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley and author of a new book which describes his own contribution to reshaping the theory and practice of sociology across the Western world. He argues that social scientists should engage with the world they inhabit, rather than refusing to take positions on the most pressing issues of the twenty-first century. They're joined by Celine-Marie Pascale, Professor of Sociology at the American University, Washington, whose research advocates for, as well as describes, the daily lives of people in communities marked by poverty, racism, violence and misogyny. From Appalachia to the Standing Rock and Wind River Reservations and Oakland, California, she spoke to the self described 'struggling class'. She suggests that their stories can't be reduced to individual experience but illustrate a nation's deep economic and moral crisis and the collusion between governments and corporations that prioritise profits over people and the environment.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m0013qv1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0013qy3)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0013qy5)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0013qy7)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m0013qy9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0013qyc)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi Julia Neuberger.

Good morning.

On this day back in 1656, the first Jewish doctor in the North American colonies, Jacob Lumbrozo, arrived in Maryland, from Lisbon via the Netherlands. In Portugal, Lumbrozo had been a ‘secret Jew’, outwardly professing Christianity. But in Maryland, he was openly Jewish in his religious practices, and in 1658 was convicted of blasphemy, in a state where the warring factions were Protestants and Catholics, usually ignoring the few Jews around.

But before his trial could resume, the governor of Maryland decided to celebrate the accession of Richard Cromwell as Lord Protector of England by issuing a pardon to all who "stood indicted, convicted or Condemned to dye." Lumbrozo’s case was dropped. By 1663, he had served on a jury and acquired all the rights of an English citizen. Nor did his beliefs get him into trouble with the courts again, though it was not until 1823 that Jews were finally granted full relief from Maryland’s discriminatory religious laws.

Just under 200 years ago. And religious discrimination still persists- against Catholics in regard to some positions, such as Lord Chance llor, in England, against non-Muslims in some Muslim countries, against Muslims in parts of Hindu majority India, and so on……… Sometimes I feel we will never learn. But the good news story here is that the case against Lumbrozo was dropped, that no other Jews were accused of blasphem y in Maryland, and no-one of any faith was put to death there for it.

So things can get better, and here’s an example we can hold up of where they did. Worth celebrating, I think, as tolerance became a serious American virtue- and spread the world over. We should remember those who pressed for moderation, and stopped the desire to kill those whose religious beliefs were different from their own. May we celebrate their memory, and hold up their example as a lesson to us all.

Amen.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m0013qyf)
24/01/22 Mystery shellfish deaths; Food labelling; New farm support payments.

It’s three months since dead crabs and lobsters started washing up on beaches across the north east of England. At the time, the Environment Agency said investigating the source of the deaths was ‘a top priority’ but since then thousands of shellfish have died and those deaths are still unexplained. Now fishermen say they’re losing their livelihoods and the government must help.

Campaigners are calling for reforms to food labelling. A new organisation called OmniAction wants a new set of global standards. Tim Lang, Emeritus Professor of Food Policy at City University, London says better labelling, which offered consumers more details, would put pressure on companies to improve their standards.

Some farmers in the South West have described government plans for the future of farming as "confused and patronising". New Environmental Land Management schemes are replacing the previous system of support payments in England, rewarding farmers for ‘public goods’ like carbon capture and improving habitats. Communities in Exmoor National Park are sceptical about how the scheme will work for them.


MON 05:56 Weather (m0013qyh)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mzv7x)
Shoveler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the story of the shoveler. Swimming in circles, their huge beaks trawling the surface, shovelers do the job of baleen whales on our lakes and ponds. In winter our shoveler population is boosted by Continental birds. They're rather shy though and you're not likely to see them taking bread on the park lake!


MON 06:00 Today (m0013r0h)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m0013r0k)
Modernism

Modernism is a cultural and philosophical movement that emerged in the West during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It’s a complex hydra-headed beast that was pervasive in the arts, but also spread through modern industrial societies influencing architecture and science.

As part of a series of programmes on BBC Radio 3 and 4 celebrating modernism, Kirsty Wark presents an introduction to modernism – how and why did it arise at this time, and its legacy today. She is joined by the cultural historian Matthew Sweet who is presenting a 10-part series for BBC Radio 4 on a crucial year for modernism: 1922 – The Birth of Now.

Suzanne Hobson, from Queen Mary University of London, is an expert on modernist literature, and examines the defining characteristics of the genre, while the musician Soweto Kinch discusses the impact of modernism on music, especially the development of jazz, and how it plays out today.

While innovations in the arts including stream of consciousness, atonal music and abstract art are the headline acts for modernism the academic Charlotte Sleigh looks more closely at what was happening in the sciences, and how innovations in physics, psychology and technology changed the way people experienced the world.

Producer: Katy Hickman

Image: Modulor le Corbusier. Cover template.


MON 09:45 Worn by Sofi Thanhauser (m0013r0m)
Linen

Sofi Thanhauser loves clothes.

She has travelled across the world to meet people making linen, cotton, silk, synthetics and wool to get to the heart of an industry which is worth four times the global arms trade.

In Worn: A People’s History of Clothing, Sofi examines what’s changed in the history of fabric production and explores local stories of craft, labour and industry. She wants to know how and why we moved from a system of making fabric for ourselves to a complex one that sullies creativity, the environment and worker rights.

Between 2000 and 2014, clothing production around the world doubled. This was possible because clothing had become almost completely disposable. But fast fashion’s evils aren’t new problems, textile making has been damaging our environment for centuries.

In this episode, Sofi profiles the oldest fibre - linen. How has it gone from a cloth worn by everyone to the preserve of the rich? Sofi travels to New England to find out more about the relationship between women, spinning wheels and cloth. From the museum guide in 18th century dress to descriptions of the women working in England’s industrial north, Sofi discovers that the female experience of manufacturing is often based on hard labour and exploitation.

Read by Lanna Joffrey
Abridged and produced by Alexandra Quinn
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0013r0q)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


MON 11:00 The Wedding Detectives (m0011rtr)
Episode 4

Wedding albums capture the happiest day of a couple’s life. But what happens when those pictures are lost? Wedding album collector Charlotte Sibtain and journalist Cole Moreton uncover the stories behind the photographs and try to reunite them with the family.

This time, from a box of ephemera, they uncover the moving love story of Thelma, a young woman who fell in love with Tony, a dashing Royal Marine. She saved his letters, a lock of his hair, the programmes from the plays they went to see and more. Her scrapbooks show a developing love affair, from the edge of childhood into adulthood. There’s an engagement notice and excitement about the wedding to come.

Then, instead of a wedding album, there is a sombre black-bound album with newspaper reports about the Royal Marines Commando Display at Madison Square Garden of the summer of 1960. Tony would abseil from a great height every night, dressed in a City gent’s outfit, holding an umbrella. On 1st July he fell to his death. The tragedy made headlines.

In an emotional journey, Charlotte and Cole find out what happened to Thelma and the wedding that never was, and the lasting impact on Tony’s family.

A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m0013qtd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m0013r0x)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


MON 12:04 Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf (m0013r0z)
1: Life, London

As part of Radio 4's celebration of the birth of Modernism a hundred years ago, Sian Thomas reads Virginia Woolf's classic Modernist novel, set over a single day in 1923.

The lives of a woman preparing for a lavish party and a young man suffering from shell-shock converge on one June day in 1920s London, in Woolf's great novel of time, memory, war and city.

Today: it is the morning of a very special party, and memories, both sweet and painful, are sparked, as Clarissa Dalloway begins her preparations...

Reader: Sian Thomas
Author: Virginia Woolf is one of the most important Modernist novelists of the 20th-century. She was a central member of the Bloomsbury group, whose novels include To the Lighthouse, The Waves and Orlando.
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m0013r12)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


MON 12:57 Weather (m0013r14)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m0013r16)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


MON 13:45 1922: The Birth of Now (m0013r18)
The Shabolovka Tower and the Gherkin

1922: The Birth of Now - Ten programmes in which Matthew Sweet investigates objects and events from 1922, the crucial year for modernism, that have an impact today. An omnibus edition of four programmes broadcast this week

1. The Shabolovka Tower and the Gherkin. In 1922 Vladimir Shukhov built a tower in Moscow radically modernist in purpose - to transmit radio - and in design. He used a diagonally intersecting framework, his diagrid system, which uses less steel and requires no columns. This was a catalyst of Soviet modernism. Norman Foster describes the Shabolovka Tower as “a structure of dazzling brilliance and great historic importance.” Inspired by it he used Shukhov's diagrid system in the design of 30 St Mary Axe - The Gherkin - from the top of which Matthew Sweet looks at the streets and churches T. S. Eliot mapped in The Waste Land.

Reader Neil McCaul

Producer: Eliane Glaser


MON 14:00 The Archers (m0013qxs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 United Kingdoms (m0013r1c)
Flying

United Kingdoms: Flying

A ground-breaking new series capturing contemporary life across the UK with bitesize dramas, monologues, poetry and song. Each episode features five short works by five writers from across the UK, and each episode responds to a different theme.

BALLYNHINCH
Secrets don't stay secret long in this small town as Grace soon learns.
Written and performed by Charis McRoberts
Sound design by Lucinda Mason Brown and David Chilton
Produced by Celia de Wolff

DYFI VALLEY
A love song to the beautiful, contested landscape of west Wales, with bilingual Welsh-English rap.
Written by Izzy Rabey and performed by Izzy Rabey and Molly McBreen
Sound design by Nigel Lewis
Produced by Emma Harding

GOVANHILL
Two strangers meet on a Glasgow street in the snow.
Written by Maryam Hamidi
Performed by Barbara Rafferty and Marisa Coveci
Sound design by Kris McConachie, Fraser Jackson and Joanne Willott
Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane

LEEDS
A woman remembers her dreams of flying above the streets of Leeds; she sees family, Chapeltown Town Carnival, the People, Culture, Spirit and music.
Written and performed by Khadijah Ibrahiim
Sound design by Jon Nicholls
Produced by Polly Thomas and Yusra Warsama

HEADINGTON
A woman reflects on her memories of a park, questioning why it is that she’s constantly moving on.
Written by Sofie Drew
Performed by Joe Bolland and Poppy Gilbert
Sound design by Lucinda Mason Brown and David Chilton
Produced by Celia de Wolff

Original music composed by Niroshini Thambar
Illustration by Eleanor Hibbert

Flying was curated by Gaynor Macfarlane for BBC Scotland. It is a co-production with Naked Productions, BBC Cymru Wales, Pier Productions and BBC Northern Ireland.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (m0013r1f)
Series 35

Heat 5, 2022

(5/13)
The contenders answering Paul Gambaccini's challenging music questions this week all come from London and the south-east. As always, they'll need to demonstrate the range of their musical knowledge, and identify extracts from many eras and styles, to be in with a chance of competing in the semi-finals in a few weeks' time. Stephen Sondheim and the music of classic Westerns may be up their street, but how will they fare with Dua Lipa, Sinatra, or classic album covers?

Because of precautions against the spread of the omicron variant of Covid-19, the programme was recorded remotely with the contestants competing from home.

Taking part are
Emily Channon from London
Lillian Crawford from Kent
Damian Evans from London

Assistant Producer Stephen Garner
Producer Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m0013qx2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Happy Little Trees (m000j1z2)
"You absolutely have to have dark in order to have light." This sentiment from television art instructor Bob Ross is perhaps more resonant than ever at the present time.

Former army sergeant Bob Ross shot to fame in the 1980s and 90s with an instructional TV show called The Joy of Painting. It ran on the American Public Broadcast network until 1994, a year before Bob’s death. Twenty years later, his shows have found a new audience via YouTube, particularly among young people. His gentle manner presenting his real-time paint-along technique, peppered with advice about life itself, provides an alternative form of therapy - reducing anxiety, relieving stress and aiding sleep .

Presented by 25 year old Jack Taylor, himself no stranger to anxiety, and recorded before and during the lockdown, Happy Little Trees invites listeners into landscapes that, as Bob himself says, 'exist only in mind' before finding expression on canvas.

With contributions from art instructor Jayne Good (of Paint With Jayne), student medic Orkun Colak, Fern Oxley from Doncaster, Jack's friend Louis Judkins, Sarah Rodway-Swanson and Nick Farrer (Nightline Association).

With thanks to Bob Ross Inc.

Produced by Hannah Dean
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


MON 16:30 My Name Is... (m000ytns)
My Name Is Anna

Anna's grandfather had his life savings stolen by his carers, and she wants to stop it happening to anyone else. Anna knew something wasn't right, but she didn't realise what until it was too late. Now, as the carers go on trial for theft, Anna invites us to join her during the court case, as she speaks to people involved in her grandfather's care, and to people who might be able to stop something similar from happening again.

In Bridlington, Anna chats to her grandfather's neighbour Martin, who describes the kind of man he was, how they became friends, and what happened when he tried to raise his concerns. In Hull she speaks to Ben, a police officer with Humberside Police who deals with economic crimes, and in Leeds to Kay, the Crown Prosecutor who oversaw the legal case against her grandfather's carers.

Anna also speaks to Joel from Age UK, and Veronica from Hourglass, two charities devoted to supporting older people and ending the abuse they suffer.

But as the court case reaches its conclusion, will the system do its bit to protect other vulnerable people from these carers, and other people who might wish to take advantage of them?

Producer: Giles Edwards


MON 17:00 PM (m0013r1j)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0013r1l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (m0013r1n)
Series 27

Episode 3

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Alan Davies, Lucy Porter, Lou Sanders and Justin Edwards are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as beds, marsupials, blood and Jackie Chan

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


MON 19:00 The Archers (m0013r1q)
Josh questions whether he’s up to the task and Leonard offers some sound advice


MON 19:15 Front Row (m0013r1s)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 20:00 This Union: Being Welsh (m0013r1v)
Episode 1

BBC journalist Jeremy Bowen returns home to Wales in search of what it means to be Welsh.

Jeremy is sometimes made to feel he’s not Welsh enough. Although he hasn't lived in Wales for a very long time, he doesn't believe that dilutes his Welshness at all. It's something he feels most acutely when the national side are playing rugby.

Standing pitch side at the stadium in Cardiff, Jeremy begins his journey through Welsh politics, history and culture in search of Welsh identity and where it comes from. Rugby is Wales' national game; a working class sport promoting egalitarian values. But is it really?

In this first episode, Jeremy seeks to separate truth from myth about Wales today and where the modern sense of Welshness comes from. With contributions from Carolyn Hitt, Tony Collins, Jac Larner, Martin Johnes and Sian James.

This is a history of industry, trade unionism and the construction of modern Wales. What are the key factors holding the nation together? And what factors might be pulling it away from the rest of the Union?

Produced by Glyn Tansley


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (m0013hhg)
Hunting Syria's War Criminals

Imagine walking down a street in a European capital and meeting your torturer. For many Syrian refugees fleeing war and human rights abuses, Europe was meant to be a sanctuary. So it was a shock when people began bumping into their torturers out shopping or in a cafe. In fact many of those involved in the Syrian government’s notorious interrogation facilities are hiding in plain sight in European cities having used the refugee wave as a “ratline” out of the country. More and more are now being investigated, arrested and put on trial in European courts. But with President Assad firmly in control in Syria the long arm of the state is reaching those willing to testify. For Crossing Continents, Chloe Hadjimatheou and Michael Ertl look at how the Syrian war is continuing to play out in Europe.

Presented and produced by Chloe Hadjimatheou and Michael Ertl
Editor, Bridget Harney


MON 21:00 The Coming Storm (m0013hqs)
3. The Basement

QAnon and the plot to break reality...

A severely disabled boy from upstate New York is shocked when his online community of video game fans is flooded with porn. He gets sucked into a toxic world of mostly young men stuck in their parents’ basements, making memes out of snippets of popular culture and Nazi symbols. He becomes a major figure in a dark new counterculture germinating on a niche website called 4chan.

As the 2016 Presidential election approaches, a story grows on 4chan about Hillary Clinton’s campaign manager, paedophilia, and references to pizza. The story bursts out into the real world when a man walks into a pizza restaurant with a gun.

Producer: Lucy Proctor
Presenter: Gabriel Gatehouse


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m0013r0k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m0013r1z)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf (m0013r0z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (m0013hrc)
When Words Fail Us

Kathryn Mannix, author and palliative care specialist, joins Michael Rosen to think about those discussions we would rather avoid. She calls them "tender" conversations.

In the moments that really count, how do we respond to someone sharing bad news or raw emotion? How do we listen well? What do we say – and what should we not say?

Kathryn and Michael talk about why we tell stories to help us process important moments and how silence is often the most caring response to someone in distress. They also talk about having conversations aloud or in our heads with loved ones who have died and how this can help us work through loss.

Kathryn Mannix is the author of Listen: How to Find the Words for Tender Conversations and With the End in Mind: How to Live and Die Well.

Produced by Sarah Goodman for BBC Audio in Bristol.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0013r21)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



TUESDAY 25 JANUARY 2022

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m0013r23)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 00:30 Worn by Sofi Thanhauser (m0013r0m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0013r25)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0013r27)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0013r29)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m0013r2c)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0013r2f)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi Julia Neuberger.

Good morning.

A couple of weeks ago an article in The Times newspaper highlighted the high numbers of unaccompanied children referred to the National Referral Mechanism, the government system for identifying victims of human traffic. Two thousand, six hundred and thirty four who had arrived in the UK in the past four years were possibly victims of human trafficking and 2008 of those were confirmed cases. These are tragedies, each and every one of them. Children sold into modern slavery by parents or abandoned; maybe their parents had disappeared or were killed.

They washed up in France and took a perilous small boat journey, brought by people who intend them to be prostitutes, criminals, or, at the very least, modern day slaves in car washes or nail bars. This trade in people is taking place right under our noses. We have legislation on Human Trafficking and we can help through safeguarding. But there are delays and overburdened social workers; it is all too easy to slip through the net. We often celebrate the end of slavery in the former British colonies, but rarely give a thought to our modern slaves. Young, defenceless, frightened, often without anyone who cares for them. We are all appalled by the deaths of migrants trying to cross the Channel.

But how many of us give a thought to the ones who make it here but are all alone, abandoned, and trafficked. The Jewish tradition has a clear message: “You know the heart of the stranger, because you were strangers in the land of Egypt,” as we read in the Biblical book of Exodus, or “You… must befriend the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt” in Deuteronomy. It’s not an option. It’s a command. Befriend. The stories of modern slaves matter.Don’t ignore them. That’s the rule. Let’s heed that commandment and take action. May this be God’s will.

Amen.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m0013r2h)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thwxg)
Black-throated Diver

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the black-throated diver. Black-throated divers are strong contenders for our most beautiful bird. Their breeding plumage with a neck barcoded in white, an ebony bib and a plush grey head, is dramatic. The black dagger-like bill and broad lobed feet are perfect for catching and pursuing fish which the divers bring to their chicks in nests on the shoreline of the Scottish Lochs on which they breed.


TUE 06:00 Today (m0013rr4)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 Room 5 (m0013rr6)
3: Serena

‘I wiped my tears away and had to carry on with the party.’
When Serena is given an unexpected diagnosis, she has to make a life-changing decision.

In Room 5, Helena Merriman interviews people who - like her - were changed by a diagnosis.

Written, presented and produced by Helena Merriman
Composer: Jeremy Warmsley
Sound Design: Eloise Whitmore

Production Co-ordinator: Janet Staples
Editor: Emma Rippon
Commissioning Editor: Richard Knight

#Room5

End song: Miffed by Tom Rosenthal

If you have a story you’d like to share you can email: room5@bbc.co.uk


TUE 09:30 The Political Butterfly Effect (m0012qgc)
The Guardian's Media Editor Jim Waterson explores how different the world would look were it not for the occasional, well-timed flap of a butterfly's wings.


TUE 09:45 Worn by Sofi Thanhauser (m0013rr8)
Cotton

Sofi Thanhauser loves clothes.

She has travelled across the world to meet people making linen, cotton, silk, synthetics and wool to get to the heart of an industry which is worth four times the global arms trade.

In Worn: A People’s History of Clothing, Sofi examines what’s changed in the history of fabric production and explores local stories of craft, labour and industry. She wants to know how and why we moved from a system of making fabric for ourselves to a complex one that sullies creativity, the environment and worker rights.

Between 2000 and 2014, clothing production around the world doubled. This was possible because clothing had become almost completely disposable. But fast fashion’s evils aren’t new problems, textile making has been damaging our environment for centuries.

In this episode, Sofi travels to Lubbock in Texas to watch the cotton harvest. It’s a town with a rich history where Buddy Holly’s band used to play at the local Cotton Club. Two local third-generation farmers, Dennis and Edwin, show Sofi the environmental changes they’ve witnessed on their land. She learns about the fragility of the area’s production processes and the effect on human health and wellbeing.

Read by Lanna Joffrey
Abridged and produced by Alexandra Quinn
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0013rrb)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


TUE 11:00 The Coming Storm (p0bchpyg)
4. Q Drops

QAnon and the plot to break reality...

In Oct 2017 Donald Trump says something weird in a room full of military figures: “Maybe this is the calm before the storm.”

A few weeks later a poster on 4chan who calls himself Q starts to tell a crazy story about a coming storm, in which Trump is engaged in an epic battle against a cabal of satanic paedophiles who have hijacked the American Republic.

A group of bloggers mainstream the theory and it starts having a life of its own with real world consequences. Qanon is born. But who is directing it?

Producer: Lucy Proctor
Presenter: Gabriel Gatehouse


TUE 11:30 My Name Is... (m000zknt)
My Name Is Emma

Emma has lived in North Devon her whole life, but now she’s not sure she’ll be able to stay. A few months ago, she was given notice to leave by her landlord but, with rental properties scarce and prices soaring, finding a new place to live is proving difficult.

Emma wants to understand the forces making North Devon, along with many rural spots across the country, unaffordable for locals, and how she can reset the balance. She also examines the toll the rise in staycations and the boom in rural living have had on her tight-knit community.

Even as she fights to stay in the village where she grew up, Emma recognises it is becoming less and less like the place she loves. But in leading a campaign to help local renters, Emma feels the passion and power of her community once again.

Producer: Pippa Smith
Executive Producer: Katherine Godfrey
Sound Engineer: Nigel Appleton
A Novel production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m0013rrf)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:04 Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf (m0013rrh)
2: Had not that, after all, been love?

As part of Radio 4's celebration of the birth of Modernism a hundred years ago, Sian Thomas reads Virginia Woolf's classic Modernist novel, set over a single day in 1923.

With preparations for the party underway, Clarissa Dalloway's thoughts return to Bourton - and Sally Seaton.

Reader: Sian Thomas
Author: Virginia Woolf is one of the most important Modernist novelists of the 20th-century. She was a central member of the Bloomsbury group; her novels include To the Lighthouse, The Waves and Orlando.
Producer: Justine Willett
Abridger: Katrin Williams


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m0013rrk)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


TUE 12:57 Weather (m0013rrm)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m0013rrp)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


TUE 13:45 1922: The Birth of Now (m0013rrr)
The Criterion, which published The Waste Land

1922: The Birth of Now - Ten programmes in which Matthew Sweet investigates objects and events from 1922, the crucial year for modernism, that have an impact today.

2. The Criterion. T. S. Eliot founded this literary magazine in which The Waste Land first appeared. It contained new voices - but some were speaking in the language of the dead. The Criterion also published Yeats and Proust, who were both interested in the occult, auras and voices from other worlds. Matthew Sweet explores some of the forgotten preoccupations of Modernism, such as the trauma of war, dirt, pollution and mysticism, that are still potent a century later, with writer Gary Lachman and critics including Lisa Mullen and Xine Yao.

Producer: Eliane Glaser

Readings: Neil McCaul and Michael Begley

Photograph courtesy of The Manhattan Rare Book Company


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m0013r1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Fault Lines: Money, Sex and Blood (m0013rrt)
Series 3: Blood

Confessions

Fault Lines: Blood
Confessions by Michael Simmons Roberts
Constance is trying to find the murderer amongst her family. Could it be the husband of her beloved neice Celeste, the saintly Richard? Just before he left the priesthood, Constance unburdened her soul during several confessions. What secrets has she told him? Could this be the trigger for the murder?
Constance........................Glenda Jackson
Richard...............................Matthew Gravelle
Celeste...............................Melody Grove
Director/Producer Gary Brown
Sound Design Simon Highfield


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (m0013qs7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 The Long View (m0013rrw)
The Long View of the Future

The Rise of China

Jonathan Freedland explores what history can tell us about how today's tensions with China today might play out.

Jonathan looks for historical precursors to the rise of China. He examines the rise of the Macedonian Empire in the 4th century BC, the Anglo-Dutch Wars in the 17th century and the rise of the United States in the second half of the 19th century.

What can history tell us about how conflict might be avoided when a new power threatens an existing one?

Producer: Laurence Grissell


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (m0013rry)
It's language, Jim, but not as we know it

Could aliens 'speak' in chemicals? Could they converse in electricity? Would they be able to hear us? In the absence of a Star Trek-style universal translator, how would you talk to an alien newly arrived on Planet Earth?

Dr Hannah Little is a science communicator, linguist and comedian. She joins Michael Rosen for some fascinating thought experiments on extraterrestrial communication and animal interactions closer to home. What might all this tell us about how human language first appeared, and why does it matter?

Produced by Sarah Goodman for BBC Audio in Bristol.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (m0013rs0)
Spike Milligan

Henry Normal reckons Spike Milligan changed his life, in particular his 1973 poetry collection entitled Small Dreams of a Scorpion. Spike's other work - The Goons, the books about the war (Adolf Hitler: My Part in his Downfall and Rommel? Gunner Who?) these were important, but it was the poetry that really made Henry Normal think again.

Spike was born Terence Alan Milligan in India in 1918. His family moved to Catford in south east London in 1931. "It was the first time in life I was deprived of everything in vision ... except the sky," you'll hear him say. There's a lot of Spike in this episode. "I think I'm a good comedy writer - I think I'm the best." He died in February 2002. His gravestone in Winchelsea - which Henry Normal has visited - reads 'Duirt me leat go raibh me breoite' which is Gaelic for I told you I was ill.

Henry Normal was born in Nottingham, published his first book of poetry aged 19, and co-wrote The Mrs Merton Show and the first series of The Royle Family before setting up Baby Cow with Steve Coogan. The company's productions include Gavin and Stacey, Alan Partridge and the Mighty Boosh.

The presenter is Matthew Parris.

The producer for BBC Audio in Bristol is Miles Warde


TUE 17:00 PM (m0013rs2)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0013rs4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Tudur Owen: United Nations of Anglesey (m0013rs6)
Episode 1

In 1978 a Japanese film crew came to 11-year-old Tudur Owen’s farm on Anglesey to make a programme about his life for a TV show called Children of the World. Then a Patagonian gaucho turned up. As did a man claiming to be a geology student called Hector. But were they all what they seemed?

Written and narrated by Tudur Owen with additional voices from Lisa-Jên Brown, Richard Harrington, Gwenno Hodgkins and Yuriko Kotani.

Script editor: Gareth Gwynn
Production co-ordinator: Katie Baum
Sound design: David Thomas
Producer: Richard Morris

A BBC Studios Production


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m0013rbj)
There’s an unexpected guest at Brookfield, and the green-eyed monster strikes for Jill.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m0013rs9)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (m0013rsc)
Deadly Delays: The Ambulance Crisis

Record ambulance delays are leaving patients waiting hours for emergency care to arrive with waiting times increasing every month. Some patients wait hours at home, many wait outside the hospitals for a bed to become available, but for a small number, ambulances are arriving too late and patients are dying while waiting for help to arrive. In this episode of File on 4 we hear how the crisis is impacting both patients and ambulance staff.

In a series of six devastating 999 calls over one hour we hear how ambulance delays in Manchester changed one families life forever while paramedics and 999 call handlers chart the huge strain on the ambulance service through Christmas and New Year via personal audio diaries which reveal their innermost thoughts, concerns and experiences as they battle through the crisis.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m0013rsf)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (m0013rbq)
A weekly quest to demystify the health issues that perplex us.


TUE 21:30 Room 5 (m0013rr6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m0013rsh)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf (m0013rrh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 Fortunately... with Fi and Jane (m0013rsk)
219. Slow Eaters' Tables and French Roundabouts, with Paris Lees

This week on Fortunately, Fi and Jane chat to the journalist and presenter Paris Lees. Paris tells them about her podcast The Flipside, which offers interesting insights on human nature through two stories that seem opposing, exploring topics such as extremism and forgiveness. She also discusses her book What It Feels Like for a Girl and how she is getting on with driving lessons. Before Paris logs in there is bouncebackability and Boney M. Radio 4’s The Flipside is available on BBC Sounds.

Get in touch: fortunately.podcast@bbc.co.uk


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0013rsm)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



WEDNESDAY 26 JANUARY 2022

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m0013rsp)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


WED 00:30 Worn by Sofi Thanhauser (m0013rr8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0013rsr)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0013rst)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0013rsw)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m0013rsy)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0013rt0)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi Julia Neuberger.

Good morning.

On this day in 1482, a Jewish printer, Abraham ben Hayyim dei Tintori, completed the first Hebrew printed edition of the Torah, or Five Books of Moses, in Bologna. Copies are very rare, like all books printed before 1500. And it was a dramatic breakthrough for anyone interested in the Hebrew text; they could buy a copy and read it without strain.

We think of books as commonplace. But that printing achievement must have been as much of a gamechanger as modern paperbacks. Or perhaps it was more like the invention of the internet and material being published online. Revolutionary.

We Jews are people of the book, or text. We teach our children to read very young. Spreading knowledge by printing made it available to everyone, and stopped the priests and rabbis holding all the power. Before, they had been the only people who could read. Now everyone could learn to read, and study. It was thought essential to be able to access knowledge.

And it still is. That’s why supporting literacy worldwide is so important. That’s why girls need to be educated as much as boys- to give them power. You can only make decisions if you have access to finding things out for yourself, whether online or in print. Sometimes what’s available will be rubbish. Or deliberately malign.

But we need to be able to distinguish good from bad and understand what we read. Printing was a revolution. The internet has been another. So, as we go online more and more, let us use the knowledge it gives us for good, and see off those who want to publish untruths. Knowledge should give us strength.

When we Jews finish reading a book of the Torah we say Chazak, chazak, ve nitchazek. Be strong, be strong, let us strengthen one another. Strength comes from both knowledge and understanding. Let us pursue both with open hearts.

Amen.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m0013rt2)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08z9p9t)
Nadia Archer on the Peregrine

Nadia Archer of the RSPB recalls volunteering in Manchester on a peregrine watch at the Arndale Centre for Tweet of the Day, where the call of the wild could bring relaxation to a busy city centre.

Producer Tom Bonnett.


WED 06:00 Today (m0013r9t)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 More or Less (m0013r9w)
Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics used in everyday life


WED 09:30 The Death of Nuance (m000qm04)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 on Saturday]


WED 09:45 Worn by Sofi Thanhauser (m0013r9y)
Silk

Sofi Thanhauser loves clothes.

She has travelled across the world to meet people making linen, cotton, silk, synthetics and wool to get to the heart of an industry which is worth four times the global arms trade.

In Worn: A People’s History of Clothing, Sofi examines what’s changed in the history of fabric production and explores local stories of craft, labour and industry. She wants to know how and why we moved from a system of making fabric for ourselves to a complex one that sullies creativity, the environment and worker rights.

Between 2000 and 2014, clothing production around the world doubled. This was possible because clothing had become almost completely disposable. But fast fashion’s evils aren’t new problems, textile making has been damaging our environment for centuries.

In this episode, Sofi travels to southern China to meet Mr Bo, the owner of a silk filature where strands of silk are unravelled from the silkworm’s cocoon. But business is hard and he fears for the future.

Read by Lanna Joffrey
Abridged and produced by Alexandra Quinn
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0013rb0)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


WED 11:00 This Union: Being Welsh (m0013r1v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Oti Mabuse's Dancing Legends (m0013rb2)
Choreographer Alvin Ailey

Choreographer, theatre director and presenter Arlene Phillips joins Oti Mabuse to talk about her career highlights and her dancing inspiration.

Arlene founded the popular dance troupe Hot Gossip, and she choreographed music videos for artists including Whitney Houston and Duran Duran. Her career has spanned more than fifty years, but Arlene pays homage to a choreographer she was inspired by right at the beginning of her work – Alvin Ailey.

Ailey’s production Revelations has been performed all over the world and has been seen by millions. His dance company, founded more than sixty years ago, is still running today.

Arlene and Oti explore Ailey’s life and remarkable career with the help of archive clips and expert knowledge from professor and author Thomas F DeFrantz.

Oti wants to connect to the dancing legend Alvin Ailey further, and she joins dancer Jazmine JT in the dance studio to learn about Ailey’s modern contemporary style.

Presenter: Oti Mabuse
Producers: Emily Knight and Candace Wilson
Production Team: Rema Mukena
Editors: Kirsten Lass and Chris Ledgard
A BBC Audio Bristol production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:00 News Summary (m0013rb4)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 12:04 Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf (m0013rb6)
3: "Are you happy, Clarissa?"

As part of Radio 4's celebration of the birth of Modernism a hundred years ago, Sian Thomas reads Virginia Woolf's classic Modernist novel, set over a single day in 1923.

It is the morning of her special party, and, with preparations underway, Clarissa Dalloway receives a very unexpected visitor...

Reader: Sian Thomas
Author: Virginia Woolf
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m0013rb8)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


WED 12:57 Weather (m0013rbb)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m0013rbd)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


WED 13:45 1922: The Birth of Now (m0013rbg)
The True Story of Ah Q, by Lu Xun

1922: The Birth of Now - Ten programmes in which Matthew Sweet investigates objects and events from 1922, the crucial year for modernism, that have an impact today.

3. The True Story of Ah Q, by Lu Xun. Matthew Sweet and guests, including the writer and film-maker Xiaolu Guo and academic and author Gregory Lee, explore the first Chinese modernist short story. Lu Xun wrote in vernacular language, itself a revolutionary act, and created the first existentialist story about a proletarian person. But the revolution does not benefit Ah Q. This text was to influence modernist literature and culture in both China and also Britain, helping to shape the aesthetic style of poets such as Ezra Pound. But Virginia Woolf and T. S. Eliot would not have been very in interested in the likes Ah Q, the ordinary man.

Reader: Daniel York Loh

Producer: Julian May


WED 14:00 The Archers (m0013rbj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Fault Lines: Money, Sex and Blood (m0013rbl)
Series 3: Blood

Bad Blood

Fault Lines: Blood. 5/5
Bad Blood by Eve Steele.
Maria is Constance's niece. Sensitive and highly strung, she has never really felt part of the family. Yet she is the key to the murder. The final episode of the series where the corrosive secret at the heart of the Sterling family is finally revealed.
Constance...............Glenda Jackson
Maria........................Christine Bottomley
Lily.............................Poppy O’Brien
Miles.........................Robert Glenister
Sarah........................Pippa Nixon
Adrian/Edward.....Jake Ferretti
Archie...................Dominic Lane
Director/Producer Gary Brown
Sound Designer Sharon Hughes.


WED 15:00 Money Box (m0013rbn)
Energy Prices

Charmaine Cozier, listeners and experts discuss the impact of rising energy prices.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (m0013rbq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (m0013rbs)
Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m0013rbv)
Social media, anti-social media, breaking news, faking news: this is the programme about a revolution in media.


WED 17:00 PM (m0013rbx)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0013rbz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Ellie Taylor's Safe Space (m000z1jp)
Series 2

Holidays

Comedian Ellie Taylor (The Mash Report, Live At The Apollo, Hypothetical) hates holidays. Too much faff, too expensive, too exhausting, so why go? With help from her ever loyal sidekick Robin Morgan (Mock The Week), Ellie sets out to convince her studio audience to come over to her way of thinking and give holidays the heave-ho. She also talks to members of the public about the things they'd like to get off their chest (judgment free of course!) and speaks to senior travel editor of The Independent, Simon Calder, to ask him about why he still believes holidays are the way forward.

Written by Ellie Taylor and Robin Morgan.

Sam Michell produces for BBC Studios.


WED 19:00 The Archers (m0013rc1)
Alistair comes to the rescue and Kenton has a game plan


WED 19:15 Front Row (m0013rc3)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m0013rc5)
Live debate examining the moral issues behind one of the week's news stories. #moralmaze


WED 20:45 Witness (b01m9n83)
Farzad Bazoft - Observer journalist in Baghdad

In September 1989 the Observer journalist Farzad Bazoft was arrested in Baghdad and accused of spying for Britain. Six months later he was executed by the Iraqi authorities.

A British nurse called Daphne Parish was also arrested. She was eventually released and returned to the UK. She, and British diplomat Robin Kealy, spoke to Witness about their memories of Farzad Bazoft.


WED 21:00 Sketches: Stories of Art and People (m000c4y1)
On the Road

The writer Anna Freeman presents a showcase of true stories about the meaning of art in people's lives. This week, how it feels to travel, how it feels to return home, and the art that comes out of the journeys we take. First up, a sweaty cycle-touring Shakespeare troop look back on their tour and then to look forward... into the unfamiliar face of "normal life". Then Anna tells a story of how travel feeds her writing - and how writing feeds her travel. And finally we meet Gemma Paintin and James Stenhouse, who toured 28,000 km across Europe recording love songs in their van, which doubles as their home and mobile recording studio. What have they learned about Europe, and about love, from this listening odyssey?

Produced by Mair Bosworth and Becky Ripley


WED 21:30 The Media Show (m0013rbv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m0013rc7)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf (m0013rb6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 Bunk Bed (m0013rc9)
Series 9

Ep 3 Discussions continue with Harry Shearer from the Simpsons

Harry Shearer of The Simpsons is back on the pull out bed for more late night musings in the dark with Patrick Marber and Peter Curran.

The conversation continues with startling examples of how live audiences change and shape performances, respect for burrowing animals, and the death of manners.

Produced by Peter Curran
A Foghorn Company production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:15 The John Moloney Show (m0013rcc)
Series 5

New For Old

The Godfather of British stand-up, John Moloney, returns to the live stage to share his musings on helpful neighbours and no quibble policies. Jokes, surprises and a few special guests feature along the way.

Written and performed by John Moloney
Produced by Richard Melvin

A Dabster production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0013rcg)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



THURSDAY 27 JANUARY 2022

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m0013rcj)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


THU 00:30 Worn by Sofi Thanhauser (m0013r9y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0013rcl)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0013rcn)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0013rcq)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m0013rcs)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0013rcv)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi Julia Neuberger.

Holocaust Memorial Day

Good morning.

Today is Holocaust Memorial Day, when we remember all those who were murdered so brutally, Jews, Sinti, Gays, Communists, and many more. But I want to remember a group of British POWs held captive in Auschwitz III, Monowitz, where they saw terrible things. Take Arthur Dodd, for instance. Captured at Tobruk, he was transferred to Auschwitz III in 1943, which housed over 10,000 Jewish slave labourers, as well as POWs and forced labourers from all over occupied Europe.

There, he lived in absolute filth, with a constant accompanying smell of burning flesh from the nearby crematoria at Auschwitz II. For 14 months, he witnessed the mistreatment and killing of Jewish inmates by their SS guards. Some British POWs endangered themselves to get any scraps of food they could to the Jewish prisoners.

And many of them deliberately sabotaged the pipes they were forced to work on by placing stones or blank flanges in them. One suspicious German engineer ordered a pressure test on the pipes. The POWs knew no pipe would pass the test- they would be shot in 20 minutes. But just as the test was starting, the air raid siren went off; and they were ordered into the shelters.

Dodd remembered. "We knew … they had found out what we had done. They had us lined up against a wall to shoot us as soon as the pipes failed…. I had just said a prayer when the air-raid siren went and everyone… dived into the air raid shelters. We heard a bomb fall and, when the raid was over, we saw that the only bomb to hit the factory had blown out the wall where the pipes were. God was looking after us that day……"

As we remember those who were murdered, let us also remember those who helped and tried to help. There is good in the world alongside evil. Let us choose good.

Amen.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m0013rcx)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09sqvxm)
Helen Moncrieff on the Shag

Ever since her first encounter with a Scarf as they are known locally when she was a child and her Mum rescued a casualty of an oil spill, Helen Moncrieff, Shetland Manager for RSPB Scotland has had a particular fondness for these birds seeking them out in in the darkness of sea caves where they nest on ledges and fill the air with their strange sounds.

Producer: Sarah Blunt
Photograph: Paul Lee.


THU 06:00 Today (m0013rmt)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (m0013rmw)
Colette

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss one of the outstanding French writers of the twentieth century. The novels of Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (1873 - 1954) always had women at their centre, from youth to mid-life to old age, and they were phenomenally popular, at first for their freshness and frankness about women’s lives, as in the Claudine stories, and soon for their sheer quality as she developed as a writer. Throughout her career she intrigued readers by inserting herself, or a character with her name, into her works, fictionalising her life as a way to share her insight into the human experience.

With

Diana Holmes
Professor of French at the University of Leeds

Michèle Roberts
Writer, novelist, poet and Emeritus Professor of Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia

And

Belinda Jack
Fellow and Tutor in French Literature and Language at Christ Church, University of Oxford

Producer: Simon Tillotson


THU 09:45 Worn by Sofi Thanhauser (m0013rqm)
Nylon

Sofi Thanhauser loves clothes.

She has travelled across the world to meet people making linen, cotton, silk, synthetics and wool to get to the heart of an industry which is worth four times the global arms trade.

In Worn: A People’s History of Clothing, Sofi examines what’s changed in the history of fabric production and explores local stories of craft, labour and industry. She wants to know how and why we moved from a system of making fabric for ourselves to a complex one that sullies creativity, the environment and worker rights.

Between 2000 and 2014, clothing production around the world doubled. This was possible because clothing had become almost completely disposable. But fast fashion’s evils aren’t new problems, textile making has been damaging our environment for centuries.

In this episode, Sofi charts female employment opportunities with the rise of nylon in the 20th and 21st centuries. From rationed wartime stockings to 1970s designer ‘career wear’, nylon has been central to women’s experience of household and office work. Although it has been a liberating fabric, Sofi finds that more recently it has come to represent both political and personal exploitation.

Read by Lanna Joffrey
Abridged and produced by Alexandra Quinn
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4

DuPont archive courtesy of Hagley Library.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0013rn0)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (m0013rn2)
Insight and analysis from BBC correspondents around the world


THU 11:30 Taxi Drivers (m0013tfk)
Episode 1

The late painter Lucian Freud once referred to himself as the passenger who knows where he wants to go and his printmaker as the driver who knows how to get him to his destination.

Scottee - himself an artist and performer, as well as broadcaster - takes a closer look at the relationship between artists and the makers who assist them and discovers the different 'language' required of materials, particularly in sculptural practice. Also, he looks to art history to question the idea of brand-building and the origins of the idea of the lone artistic genius.

With contributions from Sir Antony Gormley and his Foundry Manager Mick Booth, artist Christine Borland, glass-maker Jin Won Han, artist Thomas J Price, contemporary art historian Dr Danielle Childs and curator Nabila Abdel Nabi.

Produced by Hannah Dean
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:00 News Summary (m0013rr2)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


THU 12:04 Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf (m0013rn6)
4: "It's no use!"

To celebrate Radio 4's celebration of the birth of Modernism a hundred years ago, Sian Thomas reads Virginia Woolf's classic Modernist novel, set over a single day in 1923.

After his meeting with Clarissa, Peter Walsh remembers their dreadful parting back at Bourton...

Reader: Sian Thomas
Author: Virginia Woolf
Producer: Justine Willett
Abridger: Katrin Williams


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m0013rn8)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


THU 12:57 Weather (m0013rnd)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m0013rnj)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


THU 13:45 1922: The Birth of Now (m0013rnm)
Bertolt Brecht's play Drums in the Night

1922: The Birth of Now - Ten programmes in which Matthew Sweet investigates objects and events from 1922, the crucial year for modernism, that have an impact today.

4. Drums in the Night. When a culture finds itself in ruins, as Europe's did after the First World War, it faces, too, the possibility of new beginnings. Bertolt Brecht's play, first performed in 1922, introduced the concept of a very new kind of emotional alienation in theatre, something contemporary dramatists make powerful use of today. Brecht also looked back to theatre’s Greek roots. Matthew Sweet and guests including the scholar of German literature and culture Karen Leeder, and the author Frances Stonor Saunders, explore Modernism’s rejection of Victorian sentimentality and often its rejection of emotion altogether. Germany opened a Museum of Hygiene, and in Britain, the National Council for Mental Hygiene was formed in this key year, 1922. What did Modernists find unhygienic, how did they go about attempting to clean it up and how does this continue now?

Producer: Eliane Glaser


THU 14:00 The Archers (m0013rc1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (m0013rnr)
Bangla Bantams

Bangla Bantams
by Kamal Kaan and Mary Cooper
This moving and inspiring drama focuses on a fictionalised family, based on the true story of how a Bradford women's community group became part of the Bangla Bantams supporters group for Bradford City Football. When Nessa's son-in-law proposes her Ladies group come and watch the football live, she thinks he's crazy.
Her best friend, Farida thinks differently.

Nessa - Sudha Bhuchar
Farida - Nina Wadia


THU 15:00 Open Country (m0013rnw)
California's Giant Cousins

Not far from Offa's Dyke in mid-Wales there stands a grove of Coast Redwoods - the oldest and largest of its kind in Europe. Brought over from their native California in the 1850s, the trees - which are still in their infancy - tower above others nearby. The author Tracy Chevalier ('Girl with a Pearl Earring') visited these woods with her husband, plant writer Jonathan Drori, 30 years ago. In her 2016 novel, 'At the Edge of the Orchard' she tells the story of how the trees were collected and brought to Wales by her hero Robert Goodenough. The Redwood Grove stands next to a pinetum which includes other varieties of Redwood, Fir, Cedar and Cypress. It is here that the infamous Leylandii tree was first registered, after two varieties of Cypress, which would not meet naturally in the wild, cross pollinated, creating the fast-growing evergreen. In his book, 'Around the World in 80 Trees', Drori tells the story of how the tree went on to be the source of so many neighbour disputes. In 1958 the Redwood and Pinetum was donated to the Royal Forestry Society by Charles Ackers, who planted many more Coast Redwoods on the site in the 1930s. His daughter, Torill Freeman recalls visits to the woods as a child, and explains why her father dedicated the woods to her mother.

Presented by Felicity Evans
Produced in Bristol by Natalie Donovan

Photo Credit: Website photo taken by Jonathan Drori


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m0013qwk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m0013qxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 Think with Pinker (m0013rp0)
Headlines and trendlines

The media fills our minds with vivid images of rare events from plane crashes to terrorist attacks. In his guide to thinking better, Professor Steven Pinker explores how we can stop the news from distorting our understanding of the world.

He’s joined by:

James Harding a former editor of The Times and director of BBC News, and now the co-founder of Tortoise Media.

Anna Rosling Rutland, co-founder and vice president of the Gap Minder Foundation and co-author with Hans and Ola Rosling of “Factfulness; Ten Reasons Why We're Wrong About the World and Why Things Are Better Than You Think”

Producers: Imogen Walford and Joe Kent
Editor: Emma Rippon


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m0013rp4)
A weekly programme that illuminates the mysteries and challenges the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (m0013rp9)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0013rpj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Plum House (b0b48ksz)
Series 2

A Sound Investment

Comedy about the inept staff at a historic house. Starring Simon Callow, Jane Horrocks and Miles Jupp.

Every year, thousands of tourists flock to the Lake District. But one place they never go to is Plum House - the former country home of terrible poet George Pudding (1779-1848). Now a crumbling museum, losing money hand over fist, it struggles to stay open under its eccentric curator Peter Knight (Simon Callow). Tom Collyer (Tom Bell) tries and fails to get the museum back on track, alongside the hopelessly out of touch deputy Julian (Miles Jupp), corner-cutting gift shop manager Maureen (Jane Horrocks), put-upon education officer Emma (Louise Ford), and enthusiastic but dim-witted caretaker Alan (Pearce Quigley).

In the first episode of the new series, the team are making an audio tour they hope will bring visitors flocking. But they can't agree on who will star in the recording, and Tom has a bigger problem when he accidentally breaks the most valuable artefact in the museum.

Written by Ben Cottam and Paul McKenna
Produced by Sarah Cartwright
Directed by Paul Schlesinger
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (m0013rpn)
Writer, Sarah Hehir
Director, Gwenda Hughes
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Jill Archer ….. Patricia Greene
David Archer ….. Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ….. Felicity Finch
Ben Archer ….. Ben Norris
Josh Archer ….. Angus Imrie
Pip Archer ….. Daisy Badger
Kenton Archer ….. Richard Attlee
Leonard Berry ….. Paul Copley
Beth Casey ….. Rebecca Fuller
Iris Casey ….. Susan Jameson
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Elizabeth Pargetter ….. Alison Dowling


THU 19:15 Front Row (m0013rps)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (m0013rpy)
David Aaronovitch presents in-depth explainers on big issues in the news.


THU 20:30 Lights Out (m00101m7)
Series 4

A Service for Society

Documentary adventures that encourage you to take a closer listen.

Eleven years after the partial decriminalisation of homosexuality in the United Kingdom, a sequence of events unfolded that would rock the British political establishment and test those campaigning for gay rights in the United Kingdom. It resulted in a dead dog, a political career in ruins, a classic comedy sketch and the cause of gay liberation being set back years.

Through remarkably candid interviews not previously broadcast in this country with Norman Scott (the former model) and Andrew Newton (the suspected hitman), two of the main protagonists in the trial of Jeremy Thorpe (former leader of the Liberal Party), this documentary revisits a very English scandal and gauges its impact on the struggle for gay rights.

We hear from the human-rights activist Peter Tatchell; a member of the Brixton Faeries, Julian Hows, who staged a satirical play based on the Thorpe case; and Tom Robinson, whose song Glad to be Gay hit the charts in 1978. We also hear from Derek Stimpson, archivist of the Worshipful Company of Gunmakers, and archive of Peter Cook as the 'biased judge'.

Archive of Norman Scott and Andrew Newton from 'The Jeremy Thorpe Affair' courtesy of CBC Radio's Sunday Morning (1978).

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m0013rp4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (m0013rmw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m0013rq3)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf (m0013rn6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 The Nether Regions (m0013rq7)
Series 1

Episode 4

Creators of the smash hit Radio 4 Sci Fi comedy, Quanderhorn, Rob Grant (Son of Cliché, Spitting Image, Red Dwarf) and Andrew Marshall (Burkiss Way, Whoops Apocalypse, 2point4children) invite you back for a deeper glimpse into the cobwebbed environs of their mildewed minds, known only as: The Nether Regions.

Manacled to the dripping walls are bright young talents Helen Cripps, Ed Rowett, and Holly Morgan.

The Nether Regions is our dystopian present – it’s Now, through the prism of Then, with nothing in between.
Past, present and future are spooned into a mental icing bag and piped in attractive spirals around your credulity.

Scream in terror. Then listen to the show. Then scream in terror again as you witness:

The Earl of Sandwich meeting his nemesis.
Herr Sausage meeting his nemesis.
And in Jane Austen’s Love Island, Elizabeth Bennet meeting … her nemesis.
Meanwhile, two people are trying to find their way out of World of Doors.

These and other hippocampus hatchetted horrors await the incautious patsy.
Make sure your affairs are in order.

Created and Written by Rob Grant and Andrew Marshall
Performed by Rob Grant, Andrew Marshall, Helen Cripps, Edward Rowett and Holly Morgan
Studio Engineered and Edited by Jerry Peal
Original Music by Pete Baikie
Programme Managed by Sarah Tombling
Recorded at The Shaw Theatre, London

Produced and Directed by Gordon Kennedy, Rob Grant and Andrew Marshall.
An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0013rqc)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



FRIDAY 28 JANUARY 2022

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m0013rqh)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 00:30 Worn by Sofi Thanhauser (m0013rqm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0013rqp)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0013rqr)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0013rqt)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m0013rqw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0013rqy)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi Julia Neuberger.

Good morning.

When I was a child, I had pen friends all over the world. One was in Tonga, the place we have been hearing about so much over the last couple of weeks because of the terrible tsunami that has affected it and covered it in ash, with under-sea power lines disrupted, and severe problems getting help to the islanders and checking water is safe to drink, let alone that food and medical supplies are adequate. I couldn’t help thinking of that wonderful cheerful girl who wrote to me from Tonga, so proud of her country and her delightful queen Salote Tupou III, all those years ago.

Queen Salote became something of a heroine in Britain after the coronation in 1953, where she rode in an open carriage in pouring rain. I just remember seeing her, as I was perched on my father’s shoulders watching the procession go by. And I also remember my father telling me then- and later, when I had my pen friend, that Tonga had been a magnificent ally, declaring war on Germany back in 1940 and putting all its resources at Britain’s disposal.

Last week’s news was terrible. It was a natural disaster. But natural disasters may be increasing because of human actions, because of climate change caused by our increasing burning of the atmosphere, our lack of respect for the natural world. We must do all we can to help Tonga, to make sure its citizens get their lives back to normal as soon as possible. But there is another imperative. The long haul one. We must apply our God given minds to arresting climate change, and, where possible, preventing its worst effects. It can’t be beyond us. But the question is whether we have the will to do it. I think the tsunami that engulfed Tonga in ash has strengthened our will. I pray it has and that us taking action is God’s will.

Amen


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m0013rr0)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b092fyw2)
Amy Liptrot on the Curlew

Writer Amy Liptrot reflects on her favourite bird, the curlew, whose evocative call reminds her of her childhood home back in the Orkneys, in this Tweet of the Day.

Producer: Mark Ward.


FRI 06:00 Today (m0013swc)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m0013qwy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Worn by Sofi Thanhauser (m0013swf)
Wool

Sofi Thanhauser loves clothes.

She has travelled across the world to meet people making linen, cotton, silk, synthetics and wool to get to the heart of an industry which is worth four times the global arms trade.

In Worn: A People’s History of Clothing, Sofi examines what’s changed in the history of fabric production and explores local stories of craft, labour and industry. She wants to know how and why we moved from a system of making fabric for ourselves to a complex one that sullies creativity, the environment and worker rights.

Between 2000 and 2014, clothing production around the world doubled. This was possible because clothing had become almost completely disposable. But fast fashion’s evils aren’t new problems, textile making has been damaging our environment for centuries.

In this final episode, Sofi charts the history of wool from 19th century Wyoming shepherds to the Navajo women preserving their culture of weaving today. It’s a history that has been, at times, brutal and violent.

Read by Lanna Joffrey
Abridged and produced by Alexandra Quinn
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0013swh)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


FRI 11:00 Terrorism and the Mind (m0013swk)
The Mental Health Frontline

Are terrorists mentally ill?

It's a question which has come to the fore in recent years as the terrorist threat has shifted from organised group actions to isolated incidents carried out by individuals.

News reports of attacks are increasingly filled with questions around an attacker's mental health, as people struggle to understand the reasons for what has happened.

Raffaello Pantucci explores what we know - and don't know - about the potential link between mental illness and the actions of violent extremists. He reveals how the changing nature of terrorism in the UK and elsewhere is forcing police and intelligence agencies to reconsider what motivates people to carry out attacks, as well as how they respond.

In this first episode, he looks at a ground-breaking programme which sees specially formed teams manage a growing number of people with mental health issues, who are referred through the Prevent scheme. He hears from police, psychiatrists and the people they have helped - such as a man living with schizophrenia who joined a proscribed far-right group.

Throughout the series Raffaello explores the growing body of academic research which seeks to better understand the potential link between mental illness and violent extremism, and considers concerns of stigma that may come from discussing this link.

Raffaello Pantucci has studied terrorism and counter-terrorism for over 15 years at strategic studies think tanks in London, Washington, Shanghai and Singapore. He is currently a Senior Associate Fellow at the Royal United Services Institute and Senior Fellow at the S Rajaratnam School of International Studies in Singapore.

Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith


FRI 11:30 The Train at Platform 4 (m0013swn)
Gilbert

Episode four of Punt and Dennis's new sitcom, set in the claustrophobic carriages of a cross-country rail service.

When First Class Steward Gilbert discovers his step-sister is a passenger on the train, he's forced to spend the journey hiding from her. It seems that his whole life Gilbert has been living a lie. Meanwhile, Sam must contend with a carriage full of Roundheads on their way to a re-enactment of the Battle of Naseby, armed with a collection of very realistic pikes.

Our heroes are the long-suffering train crew who manage to scrape through every shift like a dysfunctional family – Train Manager, Sam (Rosie Cavaliero; Inside No. 9) First Class Steward, Gilbert (Kenneth Collard; Cuckoo), Catering Manager, Dev (Ali Shahalom; Muzlamic) and Trolley Operator Tasha (Amy Geldhill; Life). The passengers are made up of a rolling roster of guest stars, which includes the odd cameo from Punt and Dennis themselves.

Sam…. Rosie Cavaliero
Gilbert…. Kenneth Collard
Dev….. Ali Shahalom
Tasha….. Amy Gledhill
Jocasta.... Anna Crilly
Colleague.... Justice Ritchie
Roundhead 1.... Hugh Dennis
Roundhead 2.... Steve Punt

Written by....Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis
Producer… James Robinson
A BBC Studios Production


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m0013t3m)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:04 Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf (m0013sws)
5: Cold as an icicle

As part of Radio 4's celebration of the birth of Modernism a hundred years ago, Sian Thomas reads Virginia Woolf's classic Modernist novel, set over a single day in 1923.

After his emotional meeting with Clarissa Dalloway, Peter Walsh muses on his past in Regent's Park, while, nearby, a former soldier struggles with the present...

Reader: Sian Thomas
Author: Virginia Woolf
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m0013swv)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


FRI 12:57 Weather (m0013swx)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m0013swz)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Jonny Dymond.


FRI 13:45 1922: The Birth of Now (m0013sx1)
Louis Armstrong leaves New Orleans for Chicago

1922: The Birth of Now - Ten programmes in which Matthew Sweet investigates objects and events from 1922, the crucial year for modernism, that have an impact today.

5. Louis Armstrong leaves New Orleans for Chicago in 1922, and works with King Oliver, a move that leads to him forming the Hot Five. Armstrong becomes the major figure as Jazz develops as an art and becomes the foremost cultural expression of African Americans, with profound influence, on the Harlem Renaissance and the poet Langston Hughes. When F. Scott Fitzgerald was searching for the definitive year of the jazz age, he said ‘may one offer in exhibit the year 1922!’ Matthew Sweet talks to jazz journalist Kevin Legendre who likens Armstrong’s journey from New Orleans to Chicago to James Joyce’s from Dublin to Paris. Satchmo hits High Cs and almost splits your ears. There is scat singing, wordless sounds that suggest the breakdown of speech? But also something new, akin to Eliot’s the Waste Land or the work Edith Sitwell - godmother of rap? Critic Lisa Mullen cites Claude McKay’s book Harlem Shadows,published in 1922, which deals explicitly and powerfully with the shadow-side of modernity, the hard-edged urban modernity which his African American subjects haunt like unquiet spirits or raging ghosts Can we speak of a distinctly Black Modernism?

Producer: Julian May


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m0013rpn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Limelight (p0b8cgn5)
SteelHeads

Steelheads – Episode 5: Plan D

When young British tennis pro, Joleen Kenzie (Jessica Barden), is diagnosed with a rare terminal illness, she has herself cryogenically frozen at an experimental lab in Seattle, in the hope that one day – perhaps hundreds of years into the future - there will be a cure and she can be revived.

She wakes up to a world divided. Joleen and Kit drive to Montana in the hope of joining the resistance.

From the creators of The Cipher and Passenger List, a chilling new medical thriller inspired by true events starring Jessica Barden.

Cast:
JOLEEN – Jessica Barden
REMI – Khalid Laith
KIT – Symera Jackson
DRE – Earl R Perkins
JAMAR – Jason Forbes
SUZIE – Laurel Lefkow

All other parts played by: Kerry Shale, Christopher Ragland, Eric Meyers, Andrew Byron, Annabelle Dowler, Daniel Ryan,
Gianna Kiehl and Lizzie Stables

Original theme composed by Pascal Wyse

Written and Created by Brett Neichin and John Scott Dryden
Script Editing by Mike Walker
Sound Design by Steve Bond
Sound Editor: Adam Woodhams
Assistant Producer: Eleanor Mein
Additional casting by Janet Foster
Trails by Jack Soper
Produced by Emma Hearn
Director and Executive Producer: John Scott Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 14:45 New Year Solutions (m0001w3q)
Space

As global warming threatens the future of our society, Jo Fidgen tackles the ways in which ordinary people can make a difference.

We're often told that we could help the environment by driving less, eating less meat, or using less water.

But in the face of a challenge as significant as global warming, how big a difference can small changes really make? And what would the world look like if we took those solutions to their logical extremes?

Too many of us are living in spaces that are too big, too cluttered and too inefficient. The alternative is to share more, to live more communally, and to free up space by getting rid of the things we don't need. And according to some, re-imagining our homes is not only essential for sustainability, but a step towards being happier too.

Producer: Robert Nicholson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0013sx4)
Horticultural programme featuring a group of gardening experts.


FRI 15:45 The Poet and the Echo (m0013sx6)
The Town Marshal

Writers choose poems as inspiration for an original short story.

Episode 3/3

The Town Marshal

While running a training session, a prison officer is confronted by an unusual event that questions his role.

A powerful story inspired by Edgar Lee Masters briefly banned Spoon River Anthology. By Phil Crockett Thomas.

Credits

Writer: Phil Crockett Thomas
Reader: Carl Prekopp
Producer: Naomi Walmsley

A BBC Scotland Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m0013sx8)
Matthew Bannister tells the life stories of people who have recently died, from the rich and famous to unsung but significant.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (m0013r9w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 on Wednesday]


FRI 17:00 PM (m0013sxb)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0013sxg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (m0013sxj)
Series 107

Episode 5

Andy Zaltzman presents a look back at the week's headlines


FRI 19:00 Past Forward: A Century of Sound (m00132v3)
Mary Whitehouse

Public historian Greg Jenner listens to an archive clip of Mary Whitehouse, the vocal critic of sex on screen, delves into the history of privacy with historian David Vincent, and asks to what extent private space and intimate relationships can be preserved in the digital age with writer and digital journalist Sophia Smith Galer.

Marking the centenary of the BBC, Past Forward uses a random date generator to alight somewhere in the BBC's vast archive over the past 100 years. Public historian Greg Jenner hears an archive clip for the first time at the top of the programme, and uses it as a starting point in a journey towards the present day. The archive captures a century of British life in a unique way - a history of ordinary people’s lives, as well as news of the great events. Greg uncovers connections through people, places and ideas that link the archive fragment to Britain in 2022, pulling in help from experts and those who remember the time – and sometimes the speakers themselves, decades later - along the way. What he discovers are stories, big and small, that reveal how the people we were have shaped the people we have become.

Produced by Eliane Glaser for BBC Wales


FRI 19:15 Screenshot (m0013sxl)
Sesame Street and kids' TV

Street Gang: How We Got to Sesame Street is released in the UK on 31 January. This feature length documentary provides a rare window into the first years of the ground-breaking children’s TV show.
 
Ellen E Jones and Mark Kermode embrace the nostalgia of the television that shaped their childhoods.
 
Mark explores the impact of Sesame Street with Street Gang’s director, Marilyn Agrelo. He also reflects on one of the UK’s most popular children’s TV programmes, Play School, with one of its beloved presenters, Baroness Floella Benjamin.
 
And Ellen tests her theory concerning a unique connection between the world’s most popular children’s Youtube channels and early cinema with film historian, Pamela Hutchinson.
 
Screenshot is Radio 4’s guide through the ever-expanding universe of the moving image. Every episode, Ellen E Jones and Mark Kermode journey through the main streets and back roads connecting film, television and streaming over the last hundred years.
 
Producer: Hester Cant
A Prospect Street production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m0013sxn)
Michelle Donelan MP, Julia Hartley-Brewer, Dale Vince

Chris Mason presents political debate and discussion from the church of St Philip and St James in Leckhampton with a panel including the Conservative MP and Minister for Higher and Further Education Michelle Donelan, the TalkRadio presenter Julia Hartley-Brewer and the founder of Ecotricity Dale Vince.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: Tim Allen


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m0013sxq)
Weekly reflections on topical issues from a range of contributors.


FRI 21:00 1922: The Birth of Now (m0013sxs)
The Shabolovka Tower and the Gherkin, The Criterion, The True Story of Ah Q, Louis Armstrong goes to Chicago

1922: The Birth of Now - Ten programmes in which Matthew Sweet investigates objects and events from 1922, the crucial year for modernism, that have an impact today. An omnibus edition of four programmes broadcast this week

1. The Shabolovka Tower and the Gherkin. In 1922 Vladimir Shukhov built a tower in Moscow radically modernist in purpose - to transmit radio - and in design. He used a diagonally intersecting framework, his diagrid system, which uses less steel and requires no columns. This was a catalyst of Soviet modernism. Norman Foster describes the Shabolovka Tower as “a structure of dazzling brilliance and great historic importance.” Inspired by it he used Shukhov's diagrid system in the design of 30 St Mary Axe - The Gherkin - from the top of which Matthew looks at the streets and churches T. S. Eliot mapped in The Waste Land.

2. The Criterion. T. S. Eliot founded this literary magazine in which The Waste Land first appeared. The Criterion also published Yeats and Proust, who were both interested in the occult. Matthew Sweet explores the forgotten preoccupations of Modernism: intellectuals and the masses, and antisemitism, that are still potent a century later.

3. The True Story of Ah Q, by Lu Xun. Matthew Sweet and writer and film-maker Xiaolu Guo and academic and author Gregory Lee, explore the first Chinese modernist short story. This text was to influence modernist literature in China and Britain, helping to shape the aesthetic style of poets such as Ezra Pound.

4. Louis Armstrong leaves New Orleans for Chicago in 1922. Kevin Legendre likens Armstrong’s journey from New Orleans to Chicago to James Joyce’s from Dublin to Paris, from entrenchment to cultural emancipation.

Producers: Eliane Glaser and Julian May


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m0013sxv)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf (m0013sws)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (m0013rs0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0013sxx)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

1922: The Birth of Now 13:45 MON (m0013r18)

1922: The Birth of Now 13:45 TUE (m0013rrr)

1922: The Birth of Now 13:45 WED (m0013rbg)

1922: The Birth of Now 13:45 THU (m0013rnm)

1922: The Birth of Now 13:45 FRI (m0013sx1)

1922: The Birth of Now 21:00 FRI (m0013sxs)

39 Ways to Save the Planet 14:45 SAT (m000qwt1)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m0013jcc)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m0013sxq)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m0013qsr)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m0013jc9)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m0013sxn)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m0013qtj)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m0013rp4)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m0013rp4)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m0013qv1)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m0013qv1)

Bright Lights, Dead City 19:45 SUN (m0013qxx)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m0013qwt)

Bunk Bed 23:00 WED (m0013rc9)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (m0013hy1)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (m0013r1f)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (m0013hhg)

Desert Island Discs 11:00 SUN (m0013qwy)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m0013qwy)

Drama 15:00 SAT (m000shgc)

Drama 15:00 SUN (m0013qxb)

Drama 14:15 THU (m0013rnr)

Ellie Taylor's Safe Space 18:30 WED (m000z1jp)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m0013qrx)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m0013qyf)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m0013r2h)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m0013rt2)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m0013rcx)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m0013rr0)

Fault Lines: Money, Sex and Blood 14:15 TUE (m0013rrt)

Fault Lines: Money, Sex and Blood 14:15 WED (m0013rbl)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (m0013hrt)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (m0013rsc)

Fortunately... with Fi and Jane 23:00 TUE (m0013rsk)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m0013qsc)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (m0013rn2)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m0013r1s)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m0013rs9)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m0013rc3)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m0013rps)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m0013jbk)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m0013sx4)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (m0013rs0)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (m0013rs0)

Happy Little Trees 16:00 MON (m000j1z2)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (m0013rmw)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (m0013rmw)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m0013rsf)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (m0013rbq)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (m0013rbq)

It's Always Summer Somewhere 00:30 SAT (m0013pwl)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m0013jbt)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m0013sx8)

Lights Out 20:30 THU (m00101m7)

Limelight 14:15 FRI (p0b8cgn5)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m0013qtd)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m0013qtd)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m0013jck)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m0013qtq)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m0013qy1)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m0013r23)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m0013rsp)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m0013rcj)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m0013rqh)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m0013qsh)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m0013qsh)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m0013rbn)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (m0013jf7)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (m0013rc5)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (m0013jbx)

More or Less 09:00 WED (m0013r9w)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (m0013r9w)

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf 12:04 MON (m0013r0z)

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf 22:45 MON (m0013r0z)

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf 12:04 TUE (m0013rrh)

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf 22:45 TUE (m0013rrh)

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf 12:04 WED (m0013rb6)

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf 22:45 WED (m0013rb6)

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf 12:04 THU (m0013rn6)

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf 22:45 THU (m0013rn6)

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf 12:04 FRI (m0013sws)

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf 22:45 FRI (m0013sws)

My Name Is... 16:30 MON (m000ytns)

My Name Is... 11:30 TUE (m000zknt)

New Year Solutions 11:45 SUN (m0001vl0)

New Year Solutions 14:45 FRI (m0001w3q)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m0013jd0)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m0013qtz)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m0013qy9)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m0013r2c)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m0013rsy)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m0013rcs)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m0013rqw)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m0013r2k)

News Summary 06:00 SUN (m0013qw7)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m0013qx0)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m0013r0x)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m0013rrf)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m0013rb4)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m0013rr2)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m0013t3m)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m0013qrv)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m0013qwf)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m0013qwp)

News and Weather 13:00 SAT (m0013qsm)

News 22:00 SAT (m0013qtl)

Now You're Asking with Marian Keyes and Tara Flynn 19:15 SUN (m0013qxv)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (m0013qw9)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m0013qxd)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m0013qxd)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (m0013hjm)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m0013rnw)

Oti Mabuse's Dancing Legends 11:30 WED (m0013rb2)

PM 17:00 SAT (m0013qt0)

PM 17:00 MON (m0013r1j)

PM 17:00 TUE (m0013rs2)

PM 17:00 WED (m0013rbx)

PM 17:00 THU (m0013rp9)

PM 17:00 FRI (m0013sxb)

Past Forward: A Century of Sound 19:00 FRI (m00132v3)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m0013qxq)

Plum House 18:30 THU (b0b48ksz)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (m0013qxg)

Political Thinking with Nick Robinson 17:30 SAT (m0013qt4)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m0013jd4)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m0013qyc)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m0013r2f)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m0013rt0)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m0013rcv)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m0013rqy)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m0013qtg)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m0013qtg)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m0013qtg)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m0013qwk)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m0013qwk)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m0013qwk)

Rethink 19:15 SAT (m001328g)

Room 5 09:00 TUE (m0013rr6)

Room 5 21:30 TUE (m0013rr6)

Sandi Toksvig's Hygge 21:45 SAT (m0012sb7)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m0013qs5)

Screenshot 19:15 FRI (m0013sxl)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m0013jcr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m0013qtv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m0013qy5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m0013r27)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m0013rst)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m0013rcn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m0013rqr)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m0013jcn)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m0013jcw)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m0013qt6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m0013qts)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m0013qtx)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m0013qxj)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m0013qy3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m0013qy7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m0013r25)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m0013r29)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m0013rsr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m0013rsw)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m0013rcl)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m0013rcq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m0013rqp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m0013rqt)

Short Cuts 21:30 SUN (m000yyr1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m0013qtb)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m0013qxn)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m0013r1l)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m0013rs4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m0013rbz)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m0013rpj)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m0013sxg)

Sketches: Stories of Art and People 21:00 WED (m000c4y1)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b0606md8)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b0606md8)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (m0013r0k)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (m0013r0k)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m0013qwr)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m0013qwh)

Taxi Drivers 11:30 THU (m0013tfk)

Terrorism and the Mind 11:00 FRI (m0013swk)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m0013qww)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m0013qxs)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m0013qxs)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m0013r1q)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m0013r1q)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m0013rbj)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m0013rbj)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m0013rc1)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m0013rc1)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m0013rpn)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m0013rpn)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (m0013rpy)

The Coming Storm 21:00 MON (m0013hqs)

The Coming Storm 11:00 TUE (p0bchpyg)

The Death of Nuance 05:45 SAT (m000qm04)

The Death of Nuance 09:30 WED (m000qm04)

The East Coast Listening Post 00:15 SUN (m000677v)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m0013qx2)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m0013qx2)

The John Moloney Show 23:15 WED (m0013rcc)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (m0013qs7)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (m0013qs7)

The Listening Project 13:30 SUN (m0013qx8)

The Long View 15:30 TUE (m0013rrw)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m0013rbv)

The Media Show 21:30 WED (m0013rbv)

The Nether Regions 23:00 THU (m0013rq7)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (m0013jc5)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (m0013sxj)

The Poet and the Echo 00:30 SUN (m0013jbp)

The Poet and the Echo 15:45 FRI (m0013sx6)

The Political Butterfly Effect 09:30 TUE (m0012qgc)

The Seventh Test by Vikas Swarup 14:45 SUN (b04471lv)

The Train at Platform 4 11:30 FRI (m0013swn)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (m0013hy8)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (m0013r1n)

The Wedding Detectives 11:00 MON (m0011rtr)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (m0013qs9)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m0013qx6)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m0013r1z)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m0013rsh)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m0013rc7)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m0013rq3)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m0013sxv)

Think with Pinker 23:00 SUN (m0013hjp)

Think with Pinker 16:00 THU (m0013rp0)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (m0013jdv)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (m0013rbs)

This Union: Being Welsh 20:00 MON (m0013r1v)

This Union: Being Welsh 11:00 WED (m0013r1v)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (m0013r21)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (m0013rsm)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (m0013rcg)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (m0013rqc)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (m0013sxx)

Today 07:00 SAT (m0013qs1)

Today 06:00 MON (m0013r0h)

Today 06:00 TUE (m0013rr4)

Today 06:00 WED (m0013r9t)

Today 06:00 THU (m0013rmt)

Today 06:00 FRI (m0013swc)

Tudur Owen: United Nations of Anglesey 18:30 TUE (m0013rs6)

Tumanbay 21:00 SAT (m0002ltw)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b09rzm9w)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03mzv7x)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03thwxg)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b08z9p9t)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b09sqvxm)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b092fyw2)

Uncanny 23:30 SAT (m0013qtn)

United Kingdoms 14:15 MON (m0013r1c)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m0013qrz)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m0013qsk)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m0013qt8)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m0013qwc)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m0013qwm)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m0013qx4)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m0013qxl)

Weather 05:56 MON (m0013qyh)

Weather 12:57 MON (m0013r14)

Weather 12:57 TUE (m0013rrm)

Weather 12:57 WED (m0013rbb)

Weather 12:57 THU (m0013rnd)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m0013swx)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m0013qxz)

Witness 20:45 WED (b01m9n83)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m0013qsw)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m0013r0q)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m0013rrb)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m0013rb0)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m0013rn0)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m0013swh)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (m0013hrc)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (m0013rry)

World at One 13:00 MON (m0013r16)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m0013rrp)

World at One 13:00 WED (m0013rbd)

World at One 13:00 THU (m0013rnj)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m0013swz)

Worn by Sofi Thanhauser 09:45 MON (m0013r0m)

Worn by Sofi Thanhauser 00:30 TUE (m0013r0m)

Worn by Sofi Thanhauser 09:45 TUE (m0013rr8)

Worn by Sofi Thanhauser 00:30 WED (m0013rr8)

Worn by Sofi Thanhauser 09:45 WED (m0013r9y)

Worn by Sofi Thanhauser 00:30 THU (m0013r9y)

Worn by Sofi Thanhauser 09:45 THU (m0013rqm)

Worn by Sofi Thanhauser 00:30 FRI (m0013rqm)

Worn by Sofi Thanhauser 09:45 FRI (m0013swf)

You and Yours 12:18 MON (m0013r12)

You and Yours 12:18 TUE (m0013rrk)

You and Yours 12:18 WED (m0013rb8)

You and Yours 12:18 THU (m0013rn8)

You and Yours 12:18 FRI (m0013swv)