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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 18 SEPTEMBER 2021

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m000zl0g)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:30 God: An Anatomy by Francesca Stavrakopoulou (m000zl0j)
Desiring the Divine

Professor Francesca Stavrakopolou reads God: An Anatomy, her surprising and often controversial examination of God, in all his bodily, uncensored, scandalous forms.

In this final episode, she explores the staggering beauty of the God of the Bible.

“God’s aesthetic qualities are more usually veiled in translation by the mistaken assumption that no one believed God had a body to be seen. His magnetic good looks are recast instead as immaterial moral virtues, so that, in most Bibles today, God is described not as ‘good-looking’, but ‘good’; he is not ‘lovely looking’, but ‘gracious’. And yet the Hebrew terms used in these psalms – tob and na‘im – carry with them a strong sense of the aesthetic, and they are often used to describe attractive people, pretty places and wondrous sights, rather than abstract qualities. God may well have embodied praiseworthy values, but he was also staggeringly beautiful…”

Professor Francesca Stavrakopoulou studied theology at Oxford and is currently Professor of Hebrew Bible and Ancient Religion at the University of Exeter. The author of a number of academic works, she also presented the BBC2 documentary series The Bible’s Buried Secrets. She regularly appears on BBC1’s The Big Questions and Sunday Morning Live, and writes for the Guardian, the Mail on Sunday and the Times Literary Supplement.

Abridged and produced by Elizabeth Burke.
A Loftus Media Ltd production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000zl0l)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000zl0n)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000zl0q)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m000zl0s)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000zl0v)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Dr Rosa Hunt, co-principal of South Wales Baptist College.


SAT 05:45 Four Thought (m000zl0x)
And They Said We'd Be Glowing

Laura Dockrill describes her frightening experience of post partum psychosis after giving birth to her son. She calls for a wider conversation about risks to parental mental health and for help to be open to everyone. "This almost invisible illness was an assassin. An apparition that nobody else could see." "Silence only inflames the symptoms, the stigma and creates an ideal culture for a mental illness to thrive. Shame, judgment and fear follow fast in the wake and it's a perfect storm, one that can unfortunately end in tragedy. But it doesn't have to. Post-Partum Psychosis is treatable."
Laura Dockrill is an award winning author, illustrator and performance poet. "What Have I Done?" is her memoir on motherhood and mental health.
Presenter: Olly Mann
Producer: Sheila Cook


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m000zswl)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (m000zmj6)
The Turquoise Sea and White Sands of Ardnamurchan

Clare explores a remote and beautiful stretch of coastline between Portuairk and Sanna Bay on the Ardnamurchan Peninsula. Ardnamurchan's far coastline is the most westerly part of the British mainland and has some of Scotland’s most gorgeous beaches. Sanna Bay, in particular, is an expanse of white sand and turquoise seas with views that stretch across to the inner Hebridean islands of Rum, Eigg and Muck. Her guide is Dee Heddon, a Professor of Theatre at the University of Glasgow. She co-created the ‘Walking Library’, a project that brings together walking and reading; and she’s recently launched a new study to explore how creativity and walking have become more connected during the pandemic.

Scroll down on the Ramblings webpage to the 'related links' box to find out more about Dee's projects.

Presenter: Clare Balding
Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Karen Gregor


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m000zswn)
18/09/21 Farming Today This Week: Labour shortages, potatoes, lack of interest in the new environmental funding scheme

We hear what labour shortages mean for farmers, from dumping milk to the pigs stuck on farm.
MPs launch an inquiry into how labour and trade issues are affecting the food supply chain.
We ask what's putting farmers off applying for the new public money for public goods Environmental Land Management schemes.
And we join a potato harvesting team on the Yorkshire coast.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


SAT 06:57 Weather (m000zswq)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 07:00 Today (m000zsws)
Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m000zswv)
Paul Merson

Paul Merson was one of English football’s brightest stars in the 1990s. He was capped for England 21 times and scored 99 goals for Arsenal before transferring to Middlesborough for the then highest fee ever paid by a first division team. But throughout his career, Paul waged a very public battle with addictions to alcohol, drugs and gambling, as depicted in his new memoir Hooked. He talks to Richard Coles and Nikki Bedi.

Jamie Laing grew up in Oxfordshire and Knightsbridge, attending prestigious public schools and moving in exclusive social circles. Despite never having had a “proper job”, Jamie has found fame in Made in Chelsea, made it to the final of Strictly Come Dancing, launched a successful confectionary brand and describes his journey in his new memoir I Can Explain.

Sue Tilley was once Lucian Freud’s favoured life model and his painting of her have broken auction house records - one sold for £35 million in 2015 and another belongs to Roman Abramovich after it was snapped up for a cool £17 million. But how did a long-time manager at a central London JobCentre light up the art world? And have the millions changed Sue’s perception of her own body and life?

The chance return of a box of family artefacts led listener Corinna Edwards-Colledge to trace the extraordinary history of her father Paul and uncle Roy. They were both involved the Surrealist art scene of the 50s and 60s, with her uncle living in Farley House with Roland Penrose and Lee Miller. She reveals how recovering their paintings and poetry has changed her understanding of them.

And we hear the Inheritance Tracks of comedian Tez Ilyas.

Producer: Laura Northedge
Editor: Richard Hooper


SAT 10:30 You're Dead To Me (p08nf7t2)
The Haitian Revolution

Greg Jenner is joined by Professor Marlene Daut and comedian Athena Kugblenu to examine the events and aftermath of the 18th century revolution in Haiti, the first nation to abolish slavery. We look at the life of revolutionary leader Toussaint Louverture, confront the atrocities committed against the people of Haiti and the literal price they were forced to pay for their freedom.

A Muddy Knees Media production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m000zswy)
After Boris Johnson's long-awaited reshuffle Christopher Hope of the Daily Telegraph looks back at the week in Westminster. Conservative MP Sir Geoffrey Clifton-Brown and Liberal Democrat MP Layla Moran discuss the Government's Covid winter plan. Former Cabinet minister Liam Fox, who chairs the new Conservative Friends of America group, discusses the special relationship and the new tri-lateral security partnership between the UK, US and Australia. Katy Balls of The Spectator and Catherine Haddon of The Institute for Government dissect the reshuffle. And the former General Secretary of Unite, Len McCluskey, discusses his autobiography and the prospects for Keir Starmer's Labour.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m000zsx0)
Life in Exile

Refugees have been fleeing Iran, as the economic situation there worsens, with food prices going up, and shortages of clean water and power. Meanwhile, there are fears among some people that the country is about to become more oppressive, with a new, hard-line president in charge. It is these conditions which have prompted many Iranians to escape. Iranian Kurds in particular have been seeking sanctuary in the Kurdish part of Iraq. But life there is not always easy. And among this community in exile are armed groups, determined to overthrow Iran’s Ayatollahs. Some of these groups have now come under aerial attack as Lizzie Porter explains:

Have they changed or not? That remains one of the crucial questions about The Taliban, as they secure their hold on Afghanistan. Last time they ran the country in the late 1990s, women were excluded from most public roles, and forced to cover up from head to toe. Music was banned along with most other forms of entertainment. With the Taliban now back in power, some detect a new tone: they give news conferences, they have said they want to work with the international community. But this week, the Taliban said that women would not be allowed to study alongside men, nor can they take part in sport. And there’ve been reports of revenge killings, carried out against those who worked for the previous government. For Sahar Zand, this has all brought back memories of the time she met a senior Taliban representative, one who did at least admit to having watched TV:

It must have seemed like a good idea at the time. Last month, Canada’s Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, called a snap election. Polling suggested he was popular among voters, with many crediting him for a relatively smooth handling of the Covid crisis. This, it seemed, might be the moment to go to the country and perhaps win a majority of seats, something which eluded him last time round. But the election takes place on Monday, with some predicting the Prime Minister will lose power altogether. One particular area where he’s having to defend his record is on the environment, which is proving to be an unusually important issue in this contest, as Jatinder Sidhu now reports, from Canada’s west coast:

There was a time when Papal visits were relatively simple affairs. The Pope showed up in a country, held a mass or two for some of his flock, and glad-handed all the right people, both religious and secular – perhaps expressing his admiration for whichever country he was in, and his best wishes for those who run it. But it’s not quite so simple with the current Pontiff. Pope Francis has a reputation for speaking his mind with unprecedented frankness, and that’s what happened this week when he travelled to Hungary. The Hungarian Prime Minister, Victor Orban, does also have quite a reputation for plain speaking, with hardline views on Islam and immigration in particular. So what happened when the two met? Nick Thorpe was in Budapest finding out.

September may sound too early to be thinking about Christmas, but for some people, September is precisely the month when it’s most on their minds. These are the pine seed pickers of Georgia – every year at this time, they climb their country’s giant fir trees, to get hold of the pine cones which grow on them. Inside, are seeds which are then planted to make Christmas trees. In fact, most of the Christmas trees in Europe are grown from seeds that come from Georgia – it’s a huge business. And yet as Amelia Stewart found out, the work of those who do the actual seed-picking is often poorly paid, and can also be very dangerous:


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m000ztdz)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m000zsx4)
The latest news from the world of personal finance


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (m000zkzz)
Series 106

Episode 3

Andy Zaltzman is joined by comedians Paul Sinha, Neil Delamere and Zoe Lyons to discuss the week's news, including Boris Johnson's reshuffle, winter covid plans and Emma Raducanu's heroics in New York

Hosted and written by Andy Zaltzman with additional material by Alice Fraser, Max Davis, Richard Stott and Rajiv Karia.

Producers: Sam Michell and Gwyn Rhys Davies
Production Coordinators: Caroline Barlow and Katie Baum
Sound Editing: Marc Willcox

A BBC Studios Production


SAT 12:57 Weather (m000zsx6)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News and Weather (m000zsx8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m000zl03)
Conor Burns MP, Sir Jeffrey Donaldson MP, Claire Hanna MP, Declan Kearney MLA

Chris Mason presents political debate and discussion from Newcastle Community Cinema with Conor Burns MP, Sir Jeffrey Donaldson MP, Claire Hanna MP and Declan Kearney MLA.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: John Benson


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m000zsxb)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:45 Just One Thing - with Michael Mosley (m000zljp)
Exercise Less, More Often

It can be hard to fit a full workout into every day - but it turns out you really don’t need to! In this episode, Michael enlists the help of Marie Murphy, Professor of Exercise and Health at Ulster University, to explore why doing short bursts of exercise can actually be more beneficial than a hard gym session. A brisk 10-minute walk here, taking the stairs there, and it really does add up.


SAT 15:00 The Pallisers (m000bdly)
Episode 2

The Pallisers, based on the novels by Anthony Trollope. Dramatised by Mike Harris.
Episode 2.
Bold and pacy adaptation of the famous novels about high life and low politics in Victorian England. Starring Jessica Raine and Tim McMullan. Plantagenet and Cora Palliser have gone abroad in an effort to repair their marriage. Lady Violet has gone with them, leaving behind a very angry husband.

Cora ..... Jessica Raine
Plantagenet ..... Tim McMullan
Mary Flood ..... Sinead MacInnes
Phineas ..... Edward MacLiam
Violet ..... Scarlett Courtney
Marie Goesler ..... Melody Grove
Burgo ..... Blake Ritson
Kennedy/Duke ..... Neil McCaul
Finn's mother ..... Heather Craney
Servant ..... Ikky Elyas
Producer/Director Gary Brown


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m000zsxf)
Highlights from the Woman's Hour week


SAT 17:00 PM (m000zsxk)
Full coverage of the day's news


SAT 17:30 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (m000zsxp)
Nick Robinson talks about what's really going on in British politics.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000zsxt)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m000zsxy)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000zsy2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m000zsdq)
Karen Gillan, Jo Brand, Ola Ince, Elis James, José González, Alexis Taylor, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Yasmeen Khan are joined by Karen Gillan, Jo Brand, Elis James and Ola Ince for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from José González and Alexis Taylor.


SAT 19:00 Profile (m000zsy8)
An insight into the character of an influential person making the news headlines


SAT 19:15 The Infinite Monkey Cage (p08j3qzh)
Series 22

When the Monkeys Met the Chimps

Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined by Dr Jane Goodall DBE, comedian Bill Bailey and primatologist Dr Cat Hobaiter to find out what we've learnt in the 60 years since Jane first discovered the chimpanzees of Gombe. From tool use, to language and even to culture, her revolutionary work has transformed our understanding of our great ape cousins, and ourselves. The panel chat about how far our understanding has come in that time, and talk about their own unique close-up experiences of chimpanzees, macaques and baboons, and Bill gets a masterclass in how to speak Chimp from a true expert!

Producer: Alexandra Feachem


SAT 19:45 It Ain't Me You're Looking For: Bob Dylan at 80 (m000w330)
Three: Vanishing Acts (1966-1979)

Three: Vanishing Acts (1966-1979)

In the week before the Nobel Prize-winner's birthday, Sean Latham, Director of the Institute for Bob Dylan Studies at the University of Tulsa and editor of 'The World of Bob Dylan', continues his series exploring the life, work and influence of one of the most important and elusive artists of modern times.

The third episode covers the period from the motorcycle crash in 1966 through the long running Rolling Thunder Revue that ended a decade later. Latham focuses on Dylan’s growing ability to create characters in song, and traces a sense of crisis that comes to a head in 1979, leading to his religious conversion

He draws heavily on never-before-seen notebooks from the Bob Dylan Archive to look closely at Dylan's creative seclusion in Woodstock, and the Basement experiment - his decision to write in collaboration with others and away from the demands of both celebrity and politics. Dylan invents new kinds of songs, laden with mystery and truth that do not cohere around a fixed sense of self or message. Dylan becomes 'Jokerman' morphing into many different characters: a country gentleman, a gunslinger, a grizzled sailor, a wandering hobo, a caring father, an anxious lover, and a Biblical prophet.

A sense of crisis pervades his masterpiece 'Blood on the Tracks' and Latham looks closely at the development and constant revision of the painterly song 'Tangled Up in Blue', in which the characters Dylan has imagined begin to collapse into chaos. He looks, too, at the strange plastic mask Dylan wore for the Rolling Thunder Revue and the account of his sudden spiritual crisis when a woman threw a cross on stage in 1979

Producer: Julian May


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b07wmzxg)
Radio Dada

Alexei Sayle explores the cultural impact of the Dada movement, 100 years since it was founded.

On February 5th 1916 a small group of poets, artists and musicians gathered in Zurich at the Cabaret Voltaire nightclub. The gathering would become recognised as the birth of Dada, a nihilistic movement that emerged in response to the trauma of The Great War.

Dada was anti-art, anti-bourgeois, anti-establishment. anti-Dada. From the performance of nonsense poems with a backdrop of gigantic cucumbers, to vitriolic manifestos decrying bourgeois culture, the Dadaists forged a set of anarchic strategies, attitudes and philosophies that would sweep across Europe and America - 'the chaos from which a thousand orders rise', forever changing not only perceptions, but the very definitions of art.

Comedian, writer and one-time art student Alexei Sayle explores the absurdist sounds of a movement that may have been fleeting, but has had a profound impact on the art, music and comedy of the 20th and 21st centuries - from the Goons to Lady Gaga via hay-eating pianos and conceptually rich tunafish sandwiches.

With thanks to:
filmmaker Helmut Herbst for excerpts from his Dada documentary,
Trio EXVOCO for their recording of Karawane by Hugo Ball,
KRAB FM for their interview recording with George Maciunas.

Presenter: Alexei Sayle
Producer: Chris Elcombe
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:00 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b03dv1c1)
Series 1

Episode 3

A new long-running drama series from G F Newman based on the characters from the multi-award winning writer's best-selling crime novel. Spanning six decades, it plots the course of one family against the backdrop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

Joey Oldman is a Russian Jew, who arrived in Britain before the war with only two words of English and married Cathy Braden. They had a son, Brian, and a daughter, Rose. Cathy's widowed mother, Gracie, takes up with a famous and glamorous gangster, Billy Hill, while her brother Jack wants to become World Light Heavyweight Boxing Champion. Both the army and the Kray twins interfere with this ambition. Jack is left feeling bitter and angry and plunges headlong into crime, running protection rackets and claiming a piece of other criminals' sometimes infamous pies. His actions become ever more savage and bizarre and harder to reconcile.

Haunted by the murder of his grandfather which he witnessed when he was six, Brian Oldman holds a terrible secret that he must keep for fear of his life as he falls deeper under his mother's spell. But there is a more disturbing secret he has yet to discover - one that will threaten his very existence. All the while he becomes a willing participant in the criminal underworld in the 1950s, where gangs such as the Krays and the Richardson are emerging to challenge the old guard in savage battles for territory.

Cast:
Joey Oldman..........Toby Jones
Cath Oldman..........Denise Gough
Brian Oldman.........Rory McMenamin
Jack Braden............Tom Weston-Jones
Gracie Braden.........Ruth Gemmell
Bobby Brown..........Charles Davies
Billy Hill...................Robert Glennister
D I Drury /
Fat Cecil..................Matthew Marsh
Frank Cockain.........Michael Eaves
Sammy Cohen /
Spotty.....................Jonathan Tafler
Leah Cohen............Jasmine Hyde
Ronnie Kray.............Lewis McLeod
P C Watling.............Nigel Cooke
Shop Owner............Theo Fraser Steele

With Ross Kemp as Narrator.

Written by G F Newman
Produced and directed by Clive Brill

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:45 Shorts (b06z1zfg)
Scottish Shorts

The Mary Tree by Linda Cracknell

By Linda Cracknell
A boy visiting his mother in hospital meets a woman with intriguing tales of a lost landmark.
Read by Robert Jack
Producer Eilidh McCreadie

Author Linda Cracknell was been inspired by her work as writer-in-residence at the The Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Edinburgh. The new Royal Hospital for Children and Young People officially opened in 2021.


SAT 22:00 News (m000zsyg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:15 Bringing Up Britain (m000zmln)
Series 14

Do stereotypes matter?

The relationship between the sexes is high on the agenda thanks to the revelations of school harassment on Everyone's Invited, children's increasing exposure to porn and hashtags like #NotAllMen. But how are parents navigating this complex area? In this four part series of Bringing Up Britain, Anjula Mutanda sets out to find answers. She explores whether stereotypes matter, how to prepare boys for adolescence, the pros and cons of single sex education and how to parent children through the complexities of online harassment and abuse.

In this first episode, Anjula speaks to Sophie, a mother who was adamant she would protect her children from society's expectations of them, but finds herself with a toddler son who loves tractors and trains and a three-year-old daughter who loves pink and princesses. Sophie wants to know how these stereotypical interests get ingrained so young and whether it matters for her children's future lives and relationships. Anjula brings together a series of experts from neuroscientists, to sociologists and psychologists to explore the gender norms children learn from the moment they are born and provide some answers for Sophie.

Producer: Ellie Bury


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (m000zkpf)
Heat 9, 2021

(9/17)
Competitors from Belfast, Edinburgh, County Durham and Merseyside join Russell Davies for the general knowledge contest.

Which metal is extracted from its ore using the Kroll process? Spook, The Brain and Fancy-Fancy were companions of which cartoon character? And which play was Abraham Lincoln watching when he was shot? These and many other answers will be required, in order to stand a chance of getting through to the semi-finals. There's also a chance for a listener to win a prize by stumping the Brains with his or her own questions.

Today's competitors are
Innis Carson, a researcher living in Belfast
Dorothy Clarkson, a retired superintendent registrar from Weardale in County Durham
Dave McBryan, a writer from Edinburgh
John O'Malley, a retired doctor from Liverpool.

The programme was recorded in Salford under socially distanced conditions.

Assistant Producer: Stephen Garner
Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets (m000zlk3)
North East Scotland

Through discussions with passionate dialect poets and advocates, writer and performer Shane Strachan uncovers the breadth of exciting initiatives promoting the North East Scots dialect, Doric, to new audiences. He finds that Doric is not only surviving; it's thriving.

In his home city of Aberdeen, Shane performs his own contemporary work in the dialect before delving into its complex linguistic history with Scots language expert Robert McColl Millar. The region’s most prolific poet, Sheena Blackall, shares her experiences of speaking in Doric during her school years and her time promoting the dialect in schools since, while teacher Jamie Fairburn discusses the positive impacts his burgeoning Scots language course has had on his pupils in Aberdeenshire.

Shane also meets spoken-word artists Jo Gilbert and Mae Diansangu, who have been engaging with the dialect in new and inclusive ways, such as Jo’s Doric Poetry Slam, open to all, and Mae’s queer nature poetry with a Doric twist.

Other episodes in this fourth series of Tongue and Talk look at the dialect poetry of Northern Ireland and Wales.

A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4



SUNDAY 19 SEPTEMBER 2021

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m000zsyl)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:15 Green Originals (m000d7jw)
Margaret Thatcher

Margaret Thatcher might seem to some like an unlikely pioneer of the need for climate action but, in the late 1980s, she made a series of remarkable speeches and interventions on the subject and catapulted the issue to the foreground of media and public attention.

In 1988, at a Royal Society dinner, she gave a speech warning of the dangers of what was then known as the greenhouse effect, and the need for action. Tellingly, a key paragraph setting out practical suggestions for global action was struck out by the then Chancellor of the Exchequer, Nigel Lawson.

She encouraged discussion of the subject at Cabinet level, inviting leading climate scientists into Downing Street to educate her Ministers, and described the urge to protect the environment as a key plank of Tory philosophy.

In 1989, she addressed the UN General Assembly on the subject of climate change and called for immediate and urgent action to address it.

Alice Bell is co-director at climate change charity, Possible, and is writing a book about the history of climate change. She reflects on Margaret Thatcher’s brief and vigorous engagement with the question of climate change.

Contributors include Lord Deben, Sir Crispin Tickell, Professor Sir Brian Hoskins and Jonathan Porrit.

Producer: Natalie Steed
Series Editor: David Prest
A Whistledown production in association with The Open University


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m000zkzk)
Water Duppy

A mysterious new factory promises jobs and happiness to the people of a small town, but a new worker is wary of the changes it brings.

An original short story from Kandace Siobhan Walker, read by Faith Alabi.

Produced by Naomi Walmsley

Kandace Siobhan Walker is a writer and film-maker. Her work has most recently appeared in bath magg and LUMIN and she was the 2021 winner of The White Review Poet’s Prize. She grew up in Wales and lives in London.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000zsyq)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000zsyv)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000zsyz)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m000zsz3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m000zsz6)
The parish church of St Erme, Truro in Cornwall

Time now for Bells on Sunday, which today comes from the parish church of St Erme just north of Truro in Cornwall. The tower contains a ring of six bells. Two of these were cast in 1776 by John Pennington the 4th of Stoke Climsland. In 1906 Taylor's of Loughborough added a further four bells with the tenor, weighing just over eight hundredweight, tuned to G. We hear them ringing Gold Surprise Minor.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m000zsy8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Summary (m000zt6m)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b099v2cc)
Play

Academic Sarah Goldingay argues that as adults we lose something vital when we stop being playful. We are taught that as we age, we must "grow up" and "knuckle down" and that it's "time to face reality". According to Sarah, we have much to gain by rekindling the playfulness of our early years.

Sarah draws upon her own experiences as a theatre practitioner to reveal the ways actors can incorporate playing to get over creative blockages, injecting a welcome dose of surprise, novelty, and fun into their work.

Brian Eno's "Oblique Strategies" are, according to Sarah, a fine example of how playful provocations can breathe life back into our creative endeavours when we're running low on ideas.

In the west, playing is all too often seen as a subversive distraction from "serious work" but Sarah explains that not all cultures understand play in the same way. In India play is intrinsic, fundamental and at the very heart of a divine universe. According to Hindus, the universe itself is a playful expression of the consciousness of God. Drawing upon the work of the philosopher Alan Watts, Sarah explains that when Hindus speak of the creation of the universe they call it the play of God not the work of God.

Sarah concludes by explaining that, for her, playing isn't something worthless and transitory but a way into leaps of unbounded imagination, experimentation, and joy.

Presenter: Sarah Goldingay
Producer: Max O'Brien
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (m000zt6p)
Food & Farming Awards finalist: The Good Life Project

Andrew Booth has been recording health metrics for his dairy cows for 25 years. This year, he also started measuring their emotional wellbeing. That's because his farm is part of The Good Life Project.

Livestock farms that supply Waitrose already have to meet specific standards on issues like antibiotic use and diet. Now the supermarket is introducing a system to measure the emotional wellbeing of the livestock on the farms which it buys from. An app has been designed so that auditors can measure aspects of animal behaviour, with the data being used to provide an overall score. So far the app has been introduced for ducks, chickens, dairy cows, pigs and veal calves. In the coming years it will be extended across beef cattle, lamb and even farmed salmon.

The Good Life Project has been chosen by Charlotte Smith as one of her three finalists in the "Farming for the Future" category of this year's BBC Food and Farming Awards. In this programme, Charlotte visits Andrew's farm to get an idea of how the project works on the ground, and meets one of the academics behind it.

Presented by Charlotte Smith
Produced by Heather Simons


SUN 06:57 Weather (m000zt6r)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m000zt6t)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m000zt6w)
A look at the ethical and religious issues of the week


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m000zt6y)
DeafKidz International

British poet and writer Raymond Antrobus makes the BBC Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of DeafKidz International

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘DeafKidz International’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘DeafKidz International’.
- You can donate online at bbc.co.uk/appeal/radio4

Registered Charity Number: 1151219


SUN 07:57 Weather (m000zt70)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m000zt72)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m000zt74)
Hope in Despair

The Right Rev Dr David Bruce, Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland reflects on how hope may be found in situations of despair.
Led by the Rev. Joanne Smith
Psalm 23
Revelation 21.1-7
Through all the changing scenes of life
The King of Love (St Columba)
Blessings
Goodness of God
He will hold me fast
with music from the New Irish Choir, directed by Jonathan Rea.
Producer: Bert Tosh


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m000zl05)
Little Amal

As thousands of Afghan refugees look to make their home in the UK, Michael Morpurgo tells the story of one child refugee, Little Amal.

"Surely," he argues, "just as we now fully acknowledge our global responsibility to restore the world about us, the world we ourselves have damaged, so we must play our part as one of the richest nations on earth, to welcome in as many refugees as we can, to give them safe haven with us, to treat them right, as we know we should."

Producer: Adele Armstrong
Recorded by James Vickery of Radio Devon


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mztpj)
Ring-necked Parakeet

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the ring-necked Parakeet. These long-tailed emerald-green parakeets from Africa and Asia first appeared in the wild in the UK in 1969. Forty years on ring-necked parakeets are here to stay and their progress is being carefully monitored.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m000zt76)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m000zt78)
Writer, Nick Warburton
Director, Peter Leslie Wild
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Jolene Archer …. Buffy Davis
Kenton Archer …. Richard Attlee
Pat Archer …. Patricia Gallimore
Jennifer Aldridge …. Angela Piper
Harrison Burns …. James Cartwright
Alice Carter … Hollie Chapman
Chris Carter … Wilf Scolding
Ian Craig … Stephen Kennedy
Eddie Grundy …. Trevor Harrison
Emma Grundy… Emerald O’Hanrahan
Adam Macey …. Andrew Wincott
Fallon Rogers … Joanna Van Kampen
Oliver Sterling …. Michael Cochrane
Peggy Woolley … June Spencer
Counsellor … Simon Ludders


SUN 11:00 Desert Island Discs (m000zt7b)
Baroness Hale of Richmond, former judge

Baroness Hale of Richmond, former judge, shares the eight tracks, book and luxury item she would take with her if cast away to a desert island. With Lauren Laverne.


SUN 11:45 Just One Thing - with Michael Mosley (m000zt7d)
Change Your Mealtimes

Can’t face cutting down on your favourite foods? In this episode, Michael Mosley speaks to Dr Emily Manoogian from the Salk Institute in California to find out how simply changing when you eat - not what you eat - could help you lose weight, lower your blood pressure and cut your risk of Type 2 diabetes. They reveal what exactly happens when your eating times work against your body’s internal rhythms, and why eating late at night can stop you from going to sleep.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m000zt7g)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (m000zkpr)
Series 87

Episode 2

Sue Perkins hosts the return of Radio 4’s longest running panel show, Just a Minute. This episode was produced using remote recording technology, with the audience joining from their homes all over the world. Caroline Barlow blows the whistle.

Devised by Ian Messiter

Produced by Hayley Sterling

A BBC Studios Production


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m000zsfb)
High Spirits: A story of vodka

Vodka is a spirit with a rich cultural history in a host of European countries including Russia and Poland, where it’s been distilled for centuries.

In the west, it's traditionally been considered either a base for other flavours, or something to be knocked back as quickly as possible. But the recent craft spirits boom has seen more distillers experimenting with vodka, showcasing the subtle flavours of base ingredients or trying out quirky botanical additions; and now, a growing vodka fan club is eager to prove it has more to offer than some might think…

Jaega Wise sets out to learn more about the most neutral of spirits - visiting 2021 BBC Food and Farming Awards finalist Black Cow Vodka in Dorset to hear about distilling with milk, and trying some food pairings courtesy of local chef and restaurateur Mark Hix.

She also visits Ognisko Polskie, one of London's oldest Polish clubs, for a masterclass in tasting with Ognisko Restaurant director Jan Woronieki, also the founder of vodka brand Kavka; and Veronika Karlova, a drinks writer and consultant, chair judge for the World Vodka Awards and founder of GirlsDrinkVodka.com.

We also hear stories of slightly different vodka ventures from Arbikie Distillery in Scotland and Bakon Vodka in the United States – and get the mixologist's perspective, courtesy of Norwegian bartender Monica Berg: a founder of the non-profit industry discussion hub P(OUR) and co-owner of the London bar and restaurant Tayēr + Elementary.

Presented by Jaega Wise
Produced by Lucy Taylor in Bristol


SUN 12:57 Weather (m000zt7k)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m000zt7m)
Edward Stourton looks at the week’s big stories from both home and around the world.


SUN 13:30 The Listening Project (m000zt7p)
The Winds of Change

This week Fi Glover presents three conversations between strangers Edrees and Hameeda who both came here from Afghanistan under the previous Taliban regime, about their deep concerns for the plight of their families and their countrymen living under the new regime; colleagues and friends Edie and Lai Leng, about how much they relish working from home; and strangers Sandra and Jane, two mums on how their lives are about to change as they prepare to see their children off to university.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation lasts up to an hour and is then edited to extract the key moments of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in this decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000zkzg)
GQT at Home: Creeping Thyme and Chimney Pot Design

Peter Gibbs hosts the horticultural programme with Pippa Greenwood, Matt Biggs and Christine Walkden.

This week, the panellists get imaginative with planting ideas for a chimney pot garden feature. They also take on an unruly Jasmine, and suggest some fence climbing plants that will help attract wildlife.

As autumn is approaching, Ashley Edwards explains how to bring in houseplants that were taken outside over the summer. Meanwhile, Matthew Wilson helps demystify all things plant food.

Producer - Jemima Rathbone
Assistant Producer - Aniya Das

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 Green Originals (m000d7jw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:15 today]


SUN 15:00 Drama (m00055ql)
Rage - Part 2: Punishment and Crime

The third in the popular Zygmunt Miloszewski novel series about Prosecutor Teodor Szacki - an engaging protagonist with quickfire sarcastic wit and a relentless dedication to uncovering the truth.

When fresh bones mysteriously stripped of all flesh are discovered on a historic site, Szacki is forced to confront the issue of domestic violence within Poland's traditionalist culture. The action builds to a nightmarish crisis that tests his resolve - and feeds his rage.

Published in 2016, Rage deals with a major issue in modern Poland – domestic violence. It continues to show the consequences of the rise to political power of the authoritarian and anti-EU Law and Justice Party at a time when Donald Tusk was still the country’s Prime Minister.

Mark Lawson adapts the novel from Antonia Lloyd Jones' translation with sharp observation and wit. The cast is again lead by Bryan Dick as Teodor Szacki.

Part Two: Punishment and Crime
As the grisly skeleton investigation becomes increasingly linked to domestic violence, the personal pressure on Szacki hits the roof when his daughter Hela becomes directly involved in the case. A race against time ensues.

Zygmunt Milosewski is a leading Polish writer. The Teodor Szacki series is hugely popular in Poland and the book series is currently being filmed.

The translator Antonia Lloyd Jones is a full time translator of Polish literature. She won the Found in Translation Award 2008 for the English version of The Last Supper by Pawel Huelle, and is a committee member of the UK Translators Association.

The dramatist Mark Lawson is a well-known writer, critic and journalist

Cast:
Teodor Szacki – Bryan Dick
Olga Kuzniecow – Alexandra Mathie
Klara Dybus/Danuta Kiwit - Rachel Austin
Sister Kristina/Maria K - Claire Benedict
Wojciech Zimmerman/Leon Rudzki/Witold Kiwit – Jonathan Keeble
Hela Szacki – Caitlin Ward
Joanna Parulska/Newsreader – Mina Anwar
Teresa Najman/Jadwiga Korfel – Olwen May

Polish backgrounds – Zofia Morus
Polish language advisor – Antonia Lloyd Jones

Producer / Director…………….Polly Thomas
Sound Design /Producer……………….. Eloise Whitmore
Executive Producer……………John Dryden

A Naked production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m000zt7r)
Malorie Blackman

Malorie Blackman talks to Johny Pitts about the final novel in her hugely successful Noughts and Crosses series.
In the first Noughts & Crosses novel, Blackman began the story of a deeply forbidden romance between Sephy (a Cross) and Callum (a nought) – a love affair that had repercussions for their families for generations. The aptly titled, Endgame, brings the series to a conclusion. Influenced by the unprecedented global events of recent years, the novel is full of twists and turns, as the characters find their way to a new future. Johny talks to Malorie about her incredible journey with the characters, the legacy of the series, and what she's looking forward to writing next.

And another groundbreaking children's novelist PJ Palacio, author of Wonder, shares her own childhood favourite in The Book I'd Never Lend.

Book List

Endgame by Malorie Blackman
Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman
An Eye for an Eye by Malorie Blackman
Knife Edge by Malorie Blackman
Checkmate by Malorie Blackman
Double Cross by Malorie Blackman
Callum by Malorie Blackman
Nought Forever by Malorie Blackman
Betsey Biggalow the Detective by Malorie Blackman
Betsey Biggalow Is Here! by Malorie Blackman
Hurricane Betsey by Malorie Blackman
Betsey's Birthday Surprise by Malorie Blackman
The Big Book of Betsey Biggalow by Malorie Blackman
Magic Betsey by Malorie Blackman
Boys Don’t Cry by Malorie Blackman
Chasing the Stars by Malorie Blackman
Girl Wonder and the Terrific Twins by Malorie Blackman
Girl Wonder's Winter Adventures by Malorie Blackman
Amazing Adventures of Girl Wonder by Malorie Blackman
Girl Wonder to the Rescue by Malorie Blackman
The Deadly Dare Mysteries by Malorie Blackman
Deadly Dare by Malorie Blackman
The Computer Ghost by Malorie Blackman
Lie Detectives by Malorie Blackman
Crossfire by Malorie Blackman
Rachel and the Difference Thief by Malorie Blackman
Crazy Crocs by Malorie Blackman
Rachel Versus Bonecrusher the Mighty by Malorie Blackman
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Wonder by R. J. Palacio
Pony by R. J. Palacio


SUN 16:30 Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets (m000zt7t)
Wales

Through discussions with passionate dialect poets and dialect experts on location in South Wales, BAFTA Award-winning actor Rakie Ayola looks at how the words and accent of the area where she grew up have changed over time.

Rakie was raised in the Ely district of Cardiff and, in this programme, she meets others from the same area and close by. Meanwhile she explores the significance of so-called Wenglish, dialect in Swansea and the ‘bard of Gower’.

She also discovers dialect poetry in ‘the valleys’, including Merthyr Tydfil, and finds out how rap is bringing new words to the South Wales dialect.

Among the poets taking part are Mab Jones, Jack Jones, Eric Ngalle, Lloyd Robson, Mike Jenkins, Topher Mills, Gemma June Howell and singer/songwriter Craig Cherry.

Produced by Ashley Byrne and Iain Mackness
A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m000zlqt)
Hush Money: the Rise and Fall of an International Fraudster

File on 4 reveals the inside story of Ramon Abbas, one of a new breed of prolific global cyber fraudsters. As Abbas awaits sentencing in the US for money-laundering, File on 4 asks is enough being done to protect us from online criminals operating across international borders.

Snared by the FBI in 2020, Abbas’ is better known as Instagram influencer Hushpuppi, who flaunted a life of designer clothes, private jets and penthouse apartments to millions of followers. Little did they know that his lavish lifestyle was funded through a complex web of cyber-heists. He even had a hand in an audacious attempt to steal £100 million from a Premier League Football Club.

Most cyber-criminals remain nameless, faceless, anonymous and all but untraceable. Now, File on 4 unmasks Ramon Abbas, revealing a complicated, sometimes ruthless character driven by a thirst for wealth and celebrity status.

In addition, we expose the inner workings of a clandestine operation that earned him a reputation as the world’s most high-profile money-launderer.

Reporters: Paul Connolly and Princess Abumere
Producer: Helen Clifton
Editor: Maggie Latham


SUN 17:40 Profile (m000zsy8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000zt7w)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m000zt7y)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000zt80)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m000zt82)
Farrah Jarral

On the programme this week you’ll hear infectious tennis ecstasy and discussions of mass catharsis at the Royal Opera House. Step into a painting to meet a surrealist owl and travel back a few hundred million years to learn about ancient crocodiles walking on two feet. Also this week, we'll meet a French fashion house that wants you to buy fewer clothes, a farmer who's milking cows a different way and two local ladies who helped raise the Oban Phoenix Cinema from the ashes. ...join Farrah for the best of BBC audio this week.

Presenter: Farrah Jarral
Producer: Emmie Hume
Production support: Pete Liggins & Liz Poole
Studio Manager: Mike Smith


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m000zsf1)
Jennifer fears the worst and there’s a twist at the Flower and Produce Show.


SUN 19:15 Henry Normal: A Normal... (m000sj8s)
Communication

"Shove up National Treasures. We need to make room for Henry Normal"
Simon O'Hagan - Radio Times

The seventh instalment in this acclaimed, occasional series in which acclaimed, occasional writer Henry Normal tackles those subjects so big only radio can possibly contain them. So far Henry has covered ‘Family’, ‘Life’, ‘Love’, ‘Imagination’, ‘Nature’ and ‘The Universe’; in this new episode he explores ‘Communication’, recorded with a virtual audience.

Through poetry, stories, jokes and quotes Henry will be looking at the way ‘how’ we communicate colours ‘what’ we communicate and exploring ‘why’ we communicate in the first place.

Henry Normal is a multi-award winning writer, producer and poet. Co-writer of award winning TV programmes such as The Royle Family, The Mrs Merton Show, Coogan’s Run and Paul Calf, and producer of, amongst many others, Oscar-Nominated Philomena, Gavin and Stacey and Alan Partridge.

He’s published eight collections of poetry including his most recent ‘The Beauty Within Shadow’. Plus his memoir written with Angela Pell ‘A Normal Family’ everyday adventure with our autistic son.

Praise for previous episodes in this series:

"It's a rare and lovely thing: half an hour of radio that stops you short, gently demands your attention and then wipes your tears away while you have to have a little sit down"

"It's a real treat to hear a seasoned professional like Henry taking command of this evening comedy spot to deliver a show that's idiosyncratic and effortlessly funny"

"Not heard anything that jumps from hilarious to moving in such an intelligent, subtle way as Henry Normal's show"

Written and performed by Henry Normal
Production Coordinator - Beverly Tagg
Produced by Carl Cooper

This was a BBC Studios production.


SUN 19:45 Making Amends (m000zt84)
Bruce

Five wry stories on the nature of and need for apology, by Nick Walker, the writer of Annika Stranded.

Making Amends is a therapeutic process that encourages people to recognise behaviour in their past which, because of addiction problems, goes against their values and standards. But the need to make amends and apologise for lapses of behaviour is not just confined to the addicted.

5/5. Bruce
Still troubled by something he said to Jo when they were both 8 years old, Bruce goes back to his hometown.

Nick Walker is the writer of Annika Stranded, which ran for six seasons on BBC Radio 4 between 2013 and 2020. Annika - a TV version - will be broadcast in 2021. He has also written two critically-acclaimed novels , Blackbox and Helloland. His plays and other short stories for radio include The First King of Mars, Life Coach and Stormchasers.

Writer: Nick Walker
Reader: Tony Gardner
Sound Design: Jon Calver
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:00 More or Less (m000zkzq)
Death, Tax and Dishwashers

Why is estimating the number of unvaccinated people so tricky? New data appears to show that double vaxxed people between 40 and 79 are getting Covid at higher rates than people who are unvaccinated, but that's not case. It's all down to how Public Health England estimates the size of different populations.

The Office for National Statistics described 2020 as "the deadliest year in a century". Now that we're more than two-thirds into 2021, we examine how this year is shaping up. We answer your questions on the new health and social care levy, and have words of congratulations and caution following Emma Raducanu's astonishing win in the US Open.

Plus, where do you stand on in the dishwasher vs kitchen sink debate?

GUESTS:
Mathematician James Ward
Adele Groyer of the Covid-19 Actuaries Response Group
Helen Miller of the Institute for Fiscal Studies


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m000zkzn)
Otelo Saraiva de Carvalho, Jean-Paul Belmondo (pictured), Angela Milner, Inge Ginsberg

Datshiane Navanayagam on Otelo Saraiva de Carvalho, the army officer who led the Carnation Revolution in Portugal.

Jean-Paul Belmondo, the unconventional film star who made his name in the film Breathless.

Angela Milner the palaeontologist who identified the previously unknown fish-eating theropod, the Baryonyx Walkeri.

Inge Ginsberg - the holocaust survivor who became a heavy metal singer in her nineties.

Produced by Neil George

Interviewed guest: Kenneth Maxwell
Interviewed guest: Raquel Varela
Interviewed guest: Neil Christie
Interviewed guest: Paul Barrett
Interviewed guest: Pedro da Silva
Interviewed guest: Lucia Caruso

Archive clips used: Thames TV, Portugal The Carnation Revolution 02/05/1974; Les Productions Georges de Beauregard/Société Nouvelle de Cinématographie (SNC)/Les Films Imperia, A Bout de Souffle 1960; YouTube, Tetes d'affiche Jean-Paul Belmondo interview 1961; Films Georges de Beauregard/Rome Paris Films/Société Nouvelle de Cinématographie (SNC), Pierrot Le Fou (trailer) 1965; Cerito Films/Les Films/ArianeSimar Films, Stavisky (trailer) 1974; Dinosaurs Dinosaurs Dinosaurs, Interview with Angela Milner 1985; Natural History Museum, Baryonyx - the discovery of an amazing fish-eating dinosaur 2011; The New York Times YouTube Channel, How a Holocaust Survivor Became Death Metal Grandma 2018.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m000zsx4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m000zt6y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 The Untold (m000wrlx)
The Boy Next Door

A year of lockdowns has made a lot of us re-evaluate our lives and our priorities. For busy people, especially busy people who actually like their work, it can be a challenging thing to slow down. What happens when the thing at the centre of your life – the thing that makes your life make sense – ceases to be there? And what might that make space for, if you let it? Maybe you’d start to notice other things that you had overlooked, because you were so busy all the time…

Grace Dent tells the story of a Leicester secondary school teacher whose life has been radically changed by a year of lockdowns.

Produced by Mair Bosworth in Bristol for BBC Audio


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m000zt86)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (m000zmj8)
Emma Thomas: How Batman Began

With Antonia Quirke

Producer Emma Thomas reveals the conversation she had with partner Christopher Nolan that led to the making of Batman Begins, the film the changed the course of the superhero movie.

Robert Shaw's son Ian takes us behind some of the scenes in Jaws that form the basis of his new play The Shark Is Broken, and explains why the famous Indianapolis speech had to be filmed twice

In his last ever diary entry before the programme ends on September 30th, cinema owner Kevin Markwick explains why Bond movies have always been important to the survival of The Uckfield Picturehouse; this year more than ever before.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b099v2cc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 20 SEPTEMBER 2021

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m000zt88)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (m000zml6)
The Smartphone

The Smartphone: Nearly 90 per cent of British adults now own a smartphone and ownership among those aged 55 and over has soared from 55 per cent in 2019 to 70 per cent in 2020. Laurie Taylor explores the ways in which this ubiquitous object is transforming everyday life, from China to Ireland, & considers its impact on intimate relationships. He's joined by Daniel Miller, Professor of Anthropology at UCL and co-author of a new study involving 11 anthropologists who each spent 16 months living in communities in Africa, Asia, Europe and South America, focusing on the take up of smartphones by older people. They found that smartphones are technology for everyone, not just for the young, and are transformed by their users & national context. Also, Mark McCormack, Professor of Sociology at the University of Roehampton, considers the impact of smartphones on relationships in the UK. Are they keeping couples together when apart, and driving them apart when together?

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m000zsz6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000zt8b)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000zt8d)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000zt8g)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m000zt8j)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000zt8l)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Dr Rosa Hunt, co-principal of South Wales Baptist College


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m000zt8n)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


MON 05:56 Weather (m000zt8q)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020trjh)
Wryneck

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Wryneck. These strange birds - with feathers intricately barred and blotched in browns, blacks, fawns and creams - are so-called because of their habit of writhing their heads round at seemingly impossible angles.


MON 06:00 Today (m000zsdd)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m000zsdg)
Climate activism: the next generation

Richard Powers’s prize-winning Overstory was an impassioned evocation of the natural world and a call to arms to save it. In his latest novel, Bewilderment, a father and son navigate a world seemingly bent on destruction. Powers tells Andrew Marr how the father, an astrobiologist, models planets in far away galaxies searching for life, while his nature-loving 9 year old struggles to understand why earth’s life forms are so thoughtlessly destroyed.

Mya-Rose Craig, aka ‘birdgirl’, is a young British-Bangladeshi ornithologist and activist. From a deep love of bird watching she has gone on to become a prominent environmentalist. In ‘We Have A Dream’ she speaks to 30 young indigenous people of colour to find out how their environments have been affected by climate change, and why young people are so involved in protecting the natural world.

The journalist Simon Mundy argues that climate change is affecting more than just the environment: everything from energy, farming, technology and business, as well as migration. In Race for Tomorrow, Mundy has travelled the world talking to the people at the front line of this transformation, from those battling to survive the worst impacts, to those eager to reap the financial rewards.

Producer: Katy Hickman


MON 09:45 The Amur River by Colin Thubron (m000zsg9)
Episode 1

The Amur River is almost unknown. Yet it is the tenth longest river in the world, rising in the Mongolian mountains and flowing through Siberia to the Pacific.

For 1,100 miles it forms the tense border between Russia and China. Haunted by the memory of land-grabs and unequal treaties, this is the most densely fortified frontier on earth.

In his 80th year, Colin Thubron takes a dramatic journey from the Amur's secret source to its giant mouth, covering almost 3,000 miles. Harassed by injury and by arrest from the local police, he makes his way along both the Russian and Chinese shores, starting out by Mongolian horse, then hitchhiking, sailing on poacher's sloops or travelling the Trans-Siberian Express.

Having revived his Russian and Mandarin, he talks to everyone he meets, from Chinese traders to Russian fishermen, from monks to indigenous peoples. By the time he reaches the river's desolate end, where Russia's 19th-century imperial dream petered out, a whole, pivotal world has come alive.

The Amur River is a shining masterpiece by the acknowledged laureate of travel writing, an urgent lesson in history and the culmination of an astonishing career.

Written by Colin Thubron
Read by Robert Powell
Abridged by Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000zsdl)
The life & legacy of Chancellor Angela Merkel

As Germany’s long serving Chancellor Angela Merkel prepares to stand down later this month we look at her life and legacy and ask what’s she done for women? Her biographer Margaret Heckel and the journalist Stefanie Bolzen from Die Welt join Emma Barnett to discuss the woman who has been at the heart of European and global Politics for the last twenty years through the tumultuous years of the financial crisis, Brexit and the Covid 19 pandemic.

Presenter: Emma Barnett
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore


MON 11:00 The Delirium Wards (m000zsdn)
Ten years ago, in 2011, David Aaronovitch felt like he was losing his grip on reality. He'd been placed in a coma, after a surgery gone wrong. Now he was awake and in Intensive Care.

Every time he closed his eyes the inside of his eyelids would display a kaleidoscope of red, black and yellow violent cartoon images. Faces appeared before him like odd animation of computer game avatars. That was just the beginning. For the next four days and night David experienced what he describes as a "waking nightmare".

These types of hallucinations are called delirium and are a very common side effect of being placed in an induced coma.

Now the number of people experiencing delirium is on the rise. That's because those who are critically ill with Covid often have to be ventilated. While it helps their bodies fight the virus, and will often save their lives, the mental toll can be as serious as the physical one. Increasingly, patients are leaving hospital physically healed but mentally scarred.

In this powerful and immersive documentary David Aaronovitch hears from three people who have struggled with delirium, and shares his own experience.

Producer: Caitlin Smith
Executive Producer: Peter McManus
Researcher: Anna Miles
Sound Design: Eloise Whitmore

With thanks to Paul Henderson, Zara Slattery, Robin Hanbury-Tenison, ICU nurse Crystal Wilson and Dr Dorothy Wade of Barking Havering and Redbridge Universities Hospital Trust and North EAst London Foundation Trust.

Image courtesy of Zara Slattery.


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m000zsdq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m000ztlb)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


MON 12:04 Meet Me at the Museum (m000tcnr)
Episode 1

In 1964, Professor Glob, the curator of the Silkeborg Museum in Denmark, dedicated his book The Bog People to a group of schoolgirls who had written to him about his recent archaeological discoveries. Fifty years later, at a defining moment in her life, Tina Hopgood writes him another letter about a planned pilgrimage to Denmark with her best friend, Bella, to visit the 2000-year-old Tollund Man. Why did they never make the trip?

She doesn’t expect a reply.

When Anders Larsen, a lonely museum curator responds, neither does he.

Their unexpected correspondence becomes a shared meditation on love, loss, life choices made and the opportunity to make new and different ones.

Starring Tamsin Greig and Paul Ritter

Written by Anne Youngson
Adapted for radio by Richard Leaf

Producer: Karen Rose
Sound: Lucinda Mason Brown
Production Coordinator: Sarah Tombling

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m000zsdv)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


MON 12:57 Weather (m000zsdx)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m000zsdz)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


MON 13:45 Could Do Better (m0000m83)
Last Day

Lucy Kellaway charts her new start as a trainee teacher at the age of 58, moving from the comfortable life of an FT columnist to the realities of teaching in East London.

In 2016, the Financial Times’ management columnist Lucy Kellaway announced she was starting a new career as a teacher. Calling on others of a certain age to join her, she set up the Now Teach organisation to help older professionals become trainees in challenging schools. The scheme received over a thousand applications and selected just under fifty to join, including former corporate lawyers, investment bankers and senior civil servants.

This series follows Lucy and the other trainees over their first year as they encounter the ups and downs of their new life as novice teachers in inner city London.

Episode 1 – Last Day
It’s Lucy’s final day in her old job at the Financial Times. She talks to sceptical colleagues and undergoes that final duty of leaving a workplace - the boss’s speech.

Producer: Russell Finch
Assistant Producer: Dasha Lisitsina
A Somethin’ Else production for BBC Radio 4


MON 14:00 The Archers (m000zsf1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 United Kingdoms (m000zsf3)
Survival

United Kingdoms: Survival

A ground-breaking new series capturing contemporary life across the UK with bitesize dramas, monologues, poetry and song. Each episode features five short works by five writers from across the UK, and each episode responds to a different theme.

NEW BRIGHTON

On New Brighton Promenade, the New Years Eve ‘sky radio’ sings with a voice from long ago. Liz, with her trusty solid state tape recorder, realise that this voice and the feelings it elicits don’t need to hold her back.

Written by Jeff Young
Performed by Liz Carr and Matthew Lewney
Sound Design by Eloise Whitmore
Produced by Dermot Daly

CARRICK-A-REDE

Bridges – a perfect metaphor for mental health or a perfectionist’s worst nightmare? An anxious overachiever struggles to stop surviving and start living.

Written by Claire Sullivan
Performed by Claire Sullivan
Sound Design by Lucinda Mason Brown
Produced by Celia de Wolff

NEWPORT

Emily is running late for her holiday with Bae, but dodgy trains aren't the only obstacle to their flying away together. What happens when your favourite AI just doesn't want to be dumped?

Written by Darragh Mortell
Performed by Emily Burnett, Scarlett Courtney, and Tom Forrister
Sound Design by Nigel Lewis
Produced by John Norton

SKYE

When the daughter decides to bury her mother in the lawn of their family estate, a story of reparations and land rights unfolds.

Written by Iain Finlay MacLeod
Performed by Fiona MacNeil and Iain Macrae
Sound Design by Joanne Willott
Produced by Kirsty Williams

CAMBORNE

In a world of tourists hurrying to return to normal and grab what staycations they can, what of Nan and her attempts to survive the pandemic? How long will spinach grown in the bath and a sherry with the neighbours enjoyed from the safety of the poly-tunnel sustain her? A tale of everyday hope, fear and daytime telly from Cornwall’s often over-looked heartland.

Written by Rebecca Morden
Performed by Susan Penhaligon and Rebecca Morden
Sound Design by Lucinda Mason Brown
Produced by Celia de Wolff

Programme illustration by Eleanor Hibbert
Original Music composed by Niroshini Thambar

Survival was curated by John Norton for BBC Cymru Wales, BBC Scotland, BBC Northern Ireland, Pier Productions and Naked Productions for BBC Radio 4


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (m000zsf5)
Heat 10, 2021

(10/17)
Who's the only rugby player to have been named BBC Sports Personality of the Year? In what field of activity is Stanley Gibbons a famous name? And if Joe Biden is the 46th President of the USA, what number Vice President is Kamala Harris?
Russell Davies puts these and many other questions to the competitors in today's Brain of Britain contest, with another semi-final place at stake. The programme comes from Salford and was recorded under socially distanced conditions.
The Brains will also be tackling a pair of questions suggested by a listener, who'll be hoping to stump them and win a prize.

Taking part today are:
Alan Hay, a financial administrator from Paisley
Edward Brunt, a retired IT analyst from Altrincham in Cheshire
John Payne, a warehouse operative from Manchester
Ian Welham, a retired headteacher from Middle Rasen in Lincolnshire.

Asst Producer: Stephen Garner
Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 BBC National Short Story Award (m000zsf7)
BBC National Short Story Award 2021

All the People Were Mean and Bad by Lucy Caldwell

The first in this year's BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University. In this story about love and lust, and the kindness of strangers, a woman makes a heart-breaking decision on a flight back to London.

Now in its sixteenth year, the BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University is one of the most prestigious for a single short story. Following the announcement of the shortlist on Radio 4's Front Row, on Friday 10th September, the five stories in contention for the 2021 award will be broadcast each weekday afternoon on Radio 4 at half past three from Monday, 20th September. Each of the shortlisted writers will be interviewed the evening preceding the broadcast of their story on Front Row, and the winner will be announced live on the programme Tuesday 19th October. All the stories will be available on BBC Sounds after broadcast, and there will be a special edition of the Short Story podcast for each to download.

For links and the most up to date information go to bbc.co.uk/nssa

Read by Laura Pyper

Abridged and produced by Justine Willett


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (m000zsfb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (m000zsfd)
Scotland and the Union

There has been a ‘Great Britain’ for over 300 years but the union is now under threat. Part of what has held Scotland and England together is the fact that they have shared a monarch since 1603. But whilst the Queen holds the title 'Defender of the Faith and Supreme Governor of the Church of England', she not not the Supreme Governor of the Church of Scotland. The two nations have different ecclesiastical arrangements. Anglicanism in Scotland is not very prominent whilst - until recently - the Presbyterian Church of Scotland dominated the religious landscape. Numbers in the Scottish Catholic Church have been maintained by immigration from Ireland and, more recently, from Eastern Europe but it too is in decline; whilst black, Asian and minority ethnic communities are growing in size and influence. Has the change in the religious landscape in Scotland had any influence on the move for political independence? And why do the religious bodies appear so reluctant to take a public stance in the debate about Scotland and the union?

Ernie Rea is joined by a panel which is split equally between pro and anti-union sentiments. Murdo Fraser is a Conservative Member of the Scottish Parliament and a Patron of the Conservative Christian Fellowship; the Rev Scott Rennie is a Church of Scotland Minister in Aberdeen and a member of the Lib Dems; both are pro union. Angela Haggerty is a Catholic journalist and commentator and shares a pro independence position with Graham Campbell an SNP councillor on Glasgow City Council and a Rastafarian.


MON 17:00 PM (m000zsfg)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000zsfl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (m000zsfn)
Series 87

Episode 3

Sue Perkins hosts Radio 4’s longest running panel show, Just a Minute. Sue challenges guests Paul Merton, Anneka Rice, Dane Baptiste and Lucy Porter to talk without hesitation, deviation, or repetition. This episode was produced using remote recording technology, with the audience joining from their homes all over the world.

Devised by Ian Messiter

Whistle blown by Caroline Barlow

Produced by Hayley Sterling

A BBC Studios Production


MON 19:00 The Archers (m000zsfq)
Joy brings worrying news and Chris attempts to move forwards.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m000zsfs)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 19:45 NatureBang (m000612w)
Starlings and Social Networks

Starling murmurations, those swirling, shifting sky-patterns made by hundreds of birds moving in synchrony, are one of nature’s greatest spectacles. How do they avoid crashing into each other? Becky Ripley and Emily Knight delve into the maths behind the movement with some computer modelling to help them chart the flight patterns, and discover the secret.

As for us humans, sadly we don’t fly together through the sky in swirling clouds. But there are patterns to how we interact with one another. Like a ripple of movement, travelling through a cloud of starlings, ideas can spread through social media with blistering speed. Here too, computer modelling can help us chart how opinions morph as we react to those around us. Do we have more in common with the birds than we think?

Featuring Jamie Wood from the University of York, and Dr Jennifer Golbeck from the University of Maryland.


MON 20:00 This Union: Two Kingdoms (m000zsfv)
This Union: Two Kingdoms - Cementing the Union

Allan Little presents This Union: Two Kingdoms, for BBC Radio 4. The epic story of how and why Scotland entered into union with England, of why that Union endured for so long, and of the historic changes that have brought Scotland closer to independence than it’s been since 1707.

Having witnessed the emergence of new independent states from the Balkans to the Soviet Union and across Africa, Allan Little explores his homeland, Scotland, tracing the powerful and deep-rooted forces which are now changing - and might yet end - Scotland’s place in the UK.

In a sweeping history of national pride, ingenious character, passionately held values and political plots, Allan uncovers the people who drove the creation, development and now the unravelling of the Union.

From the catastrophe that cost Scotland half its national wealth, the sticks and carrots that the Crown used to draw Scotland into England’s embrace, to the building of a new British national identity and mythology – this is a story about the emergence of a powerful partnership forged in Empire, industry and war that some now feel is falling apart. Allan reveals the shared national enterprises that shaped the United Kingdom, and the tensions and conflicting values that might now end it.

Allan finds the hidden qualities and shared values that once bound Scotland powerfully to its British destiny, and what happens when those values diverge and then clash. with profound consequences for millions of people on both sides of the border.

Presenter: Allan Little
Producers: Jonathan Brunert and Caitlin Smith


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (m000zmhm)
Libya's Unfinished Revolution

It’s ten years since Libya’s dictator Col Muammar Gaddafi was overthrown. But the country’s still not a a democracy – or even a unified functioning state. The militias that brought down the dictatorship in 2011 never disbanded. They turned the country into a battleground, abducting and murdering countless citizens. Since last year, there’s been a ceasefire in the long civil war. Elections are planned. But how powerful are the militias – even now? And how hopeful are Libyans about their future? Reporter Tim Whewell, who covered the uprising in 2011, returns to find out what happened to Libya’s revolution. At spectacular horse-races in the city of Misrata, he meets Libyans who say they have more opportunities now than under Gaddafi. But many writers and activists have fled the country or gone silent, fearing they might disappear if they say anything that displeases armed groups. Some militias have officially been turned into security arms of the state. But that’s given them access to valuable state resources - and militia commanders are accused of becoming mafia bosses. Tim meets possible future leader Fathi Bashagha, who vows to tame the armed groups. But would he prosecute their commanders for past crimes? And can the eastern and western sides of Libya, effectively still under separate authorities despite a unity government, be brought together? Many think war may break out again, and some young Libyans, despairing for their country’s future, are even risking the dangerous passage across the Mediterranean, to emigrate.

Producer: Bob Howard


MON 21:00 Electric Ride UK (m000zmc8)
Episode 1

Peter Curran is getting back on the road, in an electric vehicle. When Peter set out on his first adventure in an electric vehicle for Radio 4, ten years ago, owning one was more of a niche interest than a regular part of life.

But things have changed. And with a deadline of 2030 on the last sale of combustion engine cars in Britain, manufacturers and researchers have had to kick their work up a gear.

In this new series, Peter travels from Land’s End to John O’Groats and asks whether the country is ready for the new era of electric cars.

Along the way, he’ll explore what makes an electric car, from mining of lithium and the latest in battery technology, to how manufacturers like Nissan plan to keep up with soaring demand. And he’ll also speak to people pushing electric vehicles to their very limits, whether it be in racing, like McLaren and Extreme-E, to Chris Ramsey, a maverick planning to drive an electric vehicle from pole to pole.

Presenter: Peter Curran
Producer: Ellie Clifford
Executive Producer: David Prest


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m000zsdg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m000zsfy)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


MON 22:45 Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney (m000zsg0)
Episode 1

Alice, a novelist, meets Felix, who works in a warehouse and asks him if he’d like to travel to Rome with her. In Dublin, her best friend Eileen is getting over a break-up and slips back into flirting with Simon, a man she has known since childhood.

Alice, Felix, Eileen and Simon are still young – but life is catching up with them. They desire each other, they delude each other, they get together, they break apart. They worry about sex and friendship and the world they live in. Will they find a way to believe in a beautiful world?

Beautiful World, Where Are You is Sally Rooney’s third novel published 7th September 2021 following on from the huge global success of her novels Conversations With Friends (2017) and Normal People (2018).

Niamh Algar is one of Ireland’s most acclaimed young actors. In addition to her most recent lead role in Channel 4’s Deceit, Niamh starred alongside Stephen Graham earlier this year in Shane Meadows highly acclaimed drama The Virtues. Niamh is currently filming a Netflix adaptation of Emma Donoghue’s psychological thriller The Wonder shooting in Wicklow.

Author: Sally Rooney
Reader: Niamh Algar
Abridger: Rowan Routh
Producer: Gemma McMullan
A BBC Northern Ireland Production.


MON 23:00 Lights Out (m000zsg3)
Series 4

Episode 3 of 4: Kaleidoscope

What does it feel like to be a child or teenager navigating the ups and downs of youth, under the shadow of constant media scrutiny about your identity, your choices and whether you fit into society?

Transgender kids and teenagers are often spoken about in the media, but rarely get the chance to speak for themselves. In this episode of Lights Out, three young trans people, aged 10, 15 and 16, let us into their inner worlds. Their mums share how media scrutiny of their families affects their lives and an academic in media studies and queer theory reflects on how the media constructs narratives about marginalised groups, exploring why queer people and children are easy targets for moral panic.

Produced by Arlie Adlington
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000zsg5)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament.



TUESDAY 21 SEPTEMBER 2021

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m000zsg7)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 00:30 The Amur River by Colin Thubron (m000zsg9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000zsgd)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000zsgg)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000zsgj)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m000zsgl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000zsgn)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Dr Rosa Hunt, co-principal of South Wales Baptist College


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m000zsgq)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03whpln)
St Kilda Wren

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Bill Oddie presents the St Kilda wren. The Island of St Kilda is not where you'd expect to see wrens but the wrens that sing along the cliffs of St Kilda are the same species as the common wren, but after 5000 years of isolation they've evolved a different song and are slightly larger and slightly paler than the mainland wrens. Bill Oddie remembers an encounter with the St Kilda Wren.


TUE 06:00 Today (m000zt8s)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (m000zt8v)
Brenda Boardman on making our homes energy efficient.

When did you last really think about the amount of electricity your household uses? Are all your appliances A rated? Have you switched to LED lights? And what about the Energy Performance Certificate of your home? Is there room for improvement there?

For decades now, Brenda Boardman has been thinking about how to reduce the amount of energy we use in our homes. We have Brenda to thank for the rainbow-coloured energy efficiency labels with their A- G ratings that appear on new fridges, freezers, TVs, dishwashers, and washing machines. As a result of these labels and subsequent legislation, it’s no longer possible to buy an energy inefficient fridge or incandescent light bulbs. And there’s a strong incentive for manufacturers to make appliances ever more energy efficient. But the introduction of the Energy Performance Certificate for homes has been less successful.

So, is achieving carbon net zero in our homes a realistic proposition?

Brenda tells Jim Al-Khalili how much she learnt travelling the world, having just missed out on a place at university. And why in her thirties she decided to study part-time for a degree. Working and bringing up children at the same time, it took a while to complete a degree and then a PhD. But, aged 48, Brenda began her academic career working at the Environmental Change Institute in Oxford and has no regrets about the time she spent getting to know who she was an what the world was like.

Producer: Anna Buckley


TUE 09:30 One to One (m000zt8x)
Changing Language: Cindy Yu meets Leslie Orozco

Journalist and broadcast editor at The Spectator, Cindy Yu, moved from China to the UK aged 9. That meant switching languages. So how did that change her childhood and her view of the world? Cindy meets Leslie, who moved from the US to Mexico at a similar age. Leslie says it was traumatic at the time but now she feels the experience was a positive one, and she is proudly bilingual.

Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Chris Ledgard


TUE 09:45 The Amur River by Colin Thubron (m000zt8z)
Episode 2

The Amur River is almost unknown. Yet it is the tenth longest river in the world, rising in the Mongolian mountains and flowing through Siberia to the Pacific.

For 1,100 miles it forms the tense border between Russia and China. Haunted by the memory of land-grabs and unequal treaties, this is the most densely fortified frontier on earth.

In his 80th year, Colin Thubron takes a dramatic journey from the Amur's secret source to its giant mouth, covering almost 3,000 miles. Harassed by injury and by arrest from the local police, he makes his way along both the Russian and Chinese shores, starting out by Mongolian horse, then hitchhiking, sailing on poacher's sloops or travelling the Trans-Siberian Express.

Having revived his Russian and Mandarin, he talks to everyone he meets, from Chinese traders to Russian fishermen, from monks to indigenous peoples. By the time he reaches the river's desolate end, where Russia's 19th-century imperial dream petered out, a whole, pivotal world has come alive.

The Amur River is a shining masterpiece by the acknowledged laureate of travel writing, an urgent lesson in history and the culmination of an astonishing career.

Written by Colin Thubron
Read by Robert Powell
Abridged by Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000zt91)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


TUE 11:00 Electric Ride UK (m000zt93)
Episode 2

Peter Curran is getting back on the road, in an electric vehicle. When Peter set out on his first adventure in an electric vehicle for Radio 4, ten years ago, owning one was more of a niche interest than a regular part of life.

But things have changed. And with a deadline of 2030 on the last sale of combustion engine cars in Britain, manufacturers and researchers have had to kick their work up a gear.

In this new series, Peter travels from Lands’ End to John O’Groats and asking whether the country is ready for the new era of electric cars.

Along the way he’ll explore what makes an electric car, from mining of lithium and the latest in battery technology, to how manufacturers like Nissan plan to keep up with soaring demand. And he’ll also speak to people pushing electric vehicles to their very limits, whether it be in racing, like McLaren and Extreme-E, to Chris Ramsey, a maverick planning to drive an electric vehicle from pole-to-pole.

Presenter: Peter Curran
Producer: Ellie Clifford
Executive Producer: David Prest

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 11:30 Dante 2021 (m000rmjc)
Episode 3

Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy is commonly considered the greatest single work of all European literature, but this three-part epic poem isn't only for those with a taste for medieval Italy.

Seven hundred years after Dante's death in 1321, Katya Adler, the BBC's Europe Editor and lover of all things Italian, sets out to discover why the Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso are such key works for the 21st Century.

With Michael Sheen as Dante.

Three guides conduct Katya through their region of the afterlife - just as Virgil, and Dante’s great lost love Beatrice, do in the original - taking her to hell and back again.

Each guide proposes seven reasons why Dante (a great lover of numerology as well as a great poet) is such a powerful contemporary read - adding up to 21 reasons in the 21st year of the 21st century.

3. Dr Vittorio Montemaggi, Senior Lecturer in Religion and the Arts at King's College, London, and Acting Director of the Von Huge Institute in Cambridge, is Katya's guide through Paradise. Although Paradiso is often considered the least appealing of Dante's three regions, Vittorio points out surprising resonances for today, and shares his own personal epiphany, experienced while reading Dante with inmates of a high-security prison, that we each carry within us a spark of Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso.

Specially commissioned music by Emily Levy, sung by Michael Solomon Williams, Jon Stainsby and Emily Levy.

Further contribtutions from Fatemeh Keshavarz, Professor of Persian Studies at the University of Maryland and presenter of podcast, Radio Rumi

Italian readings by Alession Baldini.

Producer: Beaty Rubens


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m000zt95)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:04 Meet Me at the Museum (m000td0p)
Episode 2

In 1964, Professor Glob, the curator of the Silkeborg Museum in Denmark, dedicated his book The Bog People to a group of schoolgirls who had written to him about his recent archaeological discoveries. Fifty years later, at a defining moment in her life, Tina Hopgood writes him another letter about a planned pilgrimage to Denmark with her best friend, Bella, to visit the 2000-year-old Tollund Man. Why did they never make the trip?

She doesn’t expect a reply.

When Anders Larsen, a lonely museum curator responds, neither does he.

Their unexpected correspondence becomes a shared meditation on love, loss, life choices made and the opportunity to make new and different ones.

Episode Two
Tina opens up about her family life and presses Anders about his wife, Birgitt.

Starring Tamsin Greig and Paul Ritter

Written by Anne Youngson
Adapted for radio by Richard Leaf

Producer: Karen Rose
Sound: Lucinda Mason Brown
Production Coordinator: Sarah Tombling

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m000zt97)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


TUE 12:57 Weather (m000zt99)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m000zt9c)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


TUE 13:45 Could Do Better (m0000mjw)
First Day

Lucy Kellaway charts her new start as a trainee teacher at the age of 58, moving from the comfortable life of an FT columnist to the realities of teaching in East London.

In 2016, the Financial Times’ management columnist Lucy Kellaway announced she was starting a new career as a teacher. Calling on others of a certain age to join her, she set up the Now Teach organisation to help older professionals become trainees in challenging schools. The scheme received over a thousand applications and selected just under fifty to join, including former corporate lawyers, investment bankers and senior civil servants.

This series follows Lucy and the other trainees over their first year as they encounter the ups and downs of their new life as novice teachers in inner city London.

Episode 2 – First Day
Lucy has her first day at her new school in East London, and teaches her very first maths lesson.

Producer: Russell Finch
Assistant Producer: Dasha Lisitsina
A Somethin’ Else production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m000zsfq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Brief Lives (m0009cdx)
Series 11

Episode 5

Brief Lives by Tom Fry and Sharon Kelly
Frank is called as a witness for the prosecution and is not best pleased.

FRANK.... David Schofield
SARAH.... Kathryn Hunt
MAYA.... Rosie Fleeshman
WORTHINGTON..... Adonis Anthony
SHELLEY...... Jonathan Keeble
DS RICKARDS....... Natalie Grady
Director/Producer Gary Brown


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (m000zt9f)
Elders

Josie Long presents short documentaries and adventures in sound about those who have gone before - from finding connection with someone whose last dance was over a century ago to one of the last people in the UK to have performed an old ritual.

Curatorial team: Alia Cassam and Andrea Rangecroft
Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
Executive Producer: Axel Kacoutié
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:30 BBC National Short Story Award (m000zt9h)
BBC National Short Story Award 2021

The Body Audit by Rory Gleeson

The second in this year's BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University. In this story, a group of teenagers carry out a revealing ritual, with surprising results.

Now in its sixteenth year, the BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University is one of the most prestigious for a single short story. Following the announcement of the shortlist on Radio 4's Front Row, on Friday 10th September, the five stories in contention for the 2021 award will be broadcast each weekday afternoon on Radio 4 at half past three from Monday, 20th September. Each of the shortlisted writers will be interviewed the evening preceding the broadcast of their story on Front Row, and the winner will be announced live on the programme Tuesday 19th October. All the stories will be available on BBC Sounds after broadcast, and there will be a special edition of the Short Story podcast for each to download.

For links and the most up to date information go to bbc.co.uk/nssa

Read by Emmet Kirwan

Abridged and produced by Anne Isger


TUE 16:00 The Town Made of Stories (m000zt9k)
The Tuscan town of Pieve Santo Stefano is home to a very unusual collection - Italy’s National Diary Archive. It preserves diaries, letters and memoirs sent from all over the country, everything from contemporary accounts of life under lockdown to centuries-old journals, fragile with age.

Writer and translator Orla O’Neill visits Pieve to delve into the archive’s holdings. She shares the intimate thoughts and reflections that she discovers - accounts of ‘ordinary’ lives recorded in the telling, and often touching, domestic detail that tends to be omitted from textbook history.

Along the way, she meets the town’s Story Eaters – a committee of local people who read every new diary – and hears the moving story of how Pieve, once described as ‘the town without memories’, came to be the archive’s home.

Presenter: Orla O’Neill
Producers: Orla O’Neill and Cathy FitzGerald
Executive Producer: Sarah Cuddon
Mix Engineer: Mike Woolley
Sound Recording: Stefano Ferrara
Photography: Luigi Burroni
Interviewees: Luisa Oelker, Giacomo Benedetti, Lisa Marri
Readers: Tommaso Ghiazza, Alessandra Normanno, Erica De Lazzari, Alessandro Pini and Penelope Nicholson
Diary writers: Massimo Bartoletti Stella, Silvana Baldini, Luisa T. Claudio Foschini and Clelia Marchi
“Lu Pulverone” performed by Paola Nepi

With thanks to the Archivio Diaristico Nazionale.

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (m000zt9m)
Yanis Varoufakis on Hypatia

The Greek politician and economist takes us back to ancient Alexandria and the life of the first woman to make her name as a mathematician. But Hypatia is best known now for being brutally murdered. Yanis Varoufakis makes the case for her as a philosopher and mathematician, and explores how her story has been interpreted and misinterpreted in the centuries after her death. He's joined by the writer and broadcaster, Professor Edith Hall.

Presented by Matthew Parris and produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Chris Ledgard


TUE 17:00 PM (m000zt9p)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000zt9r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 The Birthday Cake Game (m000zt9t)
Series 1

Episode 4

A brand new comedic quiz hosted by Richard Osman that poses one simple question - do you know how old people are? Part quiz show, part panel show, and sometimes part chat show - The Birthday Cake Game is always play-along and full of entertaining guesses, with some surprising take home facts.

The trio joining Richard this week, battling to prove they're the best at working out ages and to take home the coveted birthday cake, are Rhys James, Maisie Adam and Rick Edwards. Tune in to find out who comes out on top and see if you can beat the players and score higher at home.

Production Manager: Ellie Threlfall
Production Executive: Gemma Whitford
Producer: Tamara Gilder

A Remarkable production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m000zsp5)
The walls close in on Lee and Fallon faces an uphill struggle


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m000zt9w)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (m000zt9y)
Mental Health Profiteers

Mental health profiteers: The dark world of online anxiety ‘cures’.
Jane Deith and Jordan Dunbar investigate the rogue operators exploiting the long wait for mental health services on the NHS. The explosion in unregulated online recovery programmes has led to claims of people paying thousands of pounds for treatment by unqualified practitioners which has made their anxiety worse – not better. File on 4 investigates one company guaranteeing to cure anxiety in children. And we ask – why isn’t the law protecting people who seek help online?


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m000ztb0)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.


TUE 21:00 Three Pounds in My Pocket (m000c8qp)
Series 3

Episode 3

Kavita Puri hears what that catch-all term “Asian” really means for British South Asians. Although the Indian subcontinent is a vast place, the main migrant groups from the early "three pound" generation came from a handful of places. Each of these regions has its own distinctive language, food and tradition. All these years on, what matters to them and their children: is it the region they first came from on the Indian subcontinent, or the country? Their religion? A mix? Or does it no longer matter? And we hear how for some it's not just the “Asian” bit of British South Asian that can be hard to define, right now it’s also the “British” part. These are personal reflections rarely voiced.

Presenter: Kavita Puri
Producer: Ant Adeane
Editor: Hugh Levinson

Historical consultants:
Dr Florian Stadtler, Exeter University
Dr Edward Anderson, Cambridge University


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (m000zt8v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m000ztb2)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney (m000ztb4)
Episode 2

Alice, a novelist, meets Felix, who works in a warehouse and asks him if he’d like to travel to Rome with her. In Dublin, her best friend Eileen is getting over a break-up and slips back into flirting with Simon, a man she has known since childhood.

Alice, Felix, Eileen and Simon are still young – but life is catching up with them. They desire each other, they delude each other, they get together, they break apart. They worry about sex and friendship and the world they live in. Will they find a way to believe in a beautiful world?

Beautiful World, Where Are You is Sally Rooney’s third novel published 7th September 2021 following on from the huge global success of her novels Conversations With Friends (2017) and Normal People (2018).

Niamh Algar is one of Ireland’s most acclaimed young actors. In addition to her most recent lead role in Channel 4’s Deceit, Niamh starred alongside Stephen Graham earlier this year in Shane Meadows highly acclaimed drama The Virtues. Niamh is currently filming a Netflix adaptation of Emma Donoghue’s psychological thriller The Wonder shooting in Wicklow.

Author: Sally Rooney
Reader: Niamh Algar
Abridger: Rowan Routh
Producer: Gemma McMullan
A BBC Northern Ireland Production.


TUE 23:00 Fortunately... with Fi and Jane (m000ztb6)
203. Collar Bone to Bellybutton, with Ugo Monye

This week the Question of Sport captain and Strictly contestant Ugo Monye shimmies into the Fortunately podcast to chat to Fi and Jane. The former England Rugby International beams in from the Strictly Come Dancing rehearsal room in a top secret location. He tells Garvey and Glover about his experience so far as well as his new job on the legendary quiz show. Expect tales of costumes, missing boots and poor eyesight. Before Ugo's entrance we head to the Artic Circle via Didcot Parkway.

Get in touch: fortunately.podcast@bbc.co.uk


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000ztb8)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament.



WEDNESDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 2021

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m000ztbb)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


WED 00:30 The Amur River by Colin Thubron (m000zt8z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000ztbd)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000ztbg)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000ztbj)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m000ztbl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000ztbn)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Dr Rosa Hunt, co-principal of South Wales Baptist College


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m000ztbq)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qj1l)
Swallow

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the swallow. You can see Swallows at this time of year gathering on telegraph wires, strung out like musical notes on a stave, before their long journey south to Africa. The female swallow often rears two broods of young each year but in sunny weather when there are plenty of flying insects, she may manage three broods.


WED 06:00 Today (m000zsnd)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 More or Less (m000zsnj)
Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics used in everyday life.


WED 09:30 Four Thought (m000zsnl)
Thought-provoking talks in which speakers explore original ideas about culture and society.


WED 09:45 The Amur River by Colin Thubron (m000zsqc)
Episode 3

The Amur River is almost unknown. Yet it is the tenth longest river in the world, rising in the Mongolian mountains and flowing through Siberia to the Pacific.

For 1,100 miles it forms the tense border between Russia and China. Haunted by the memory of land-grabs and unequal treaties, this is the most densely fortified frontier on earth.

In his 80th year, Colin Thubron takes a dramatic journey from the Amur's secret source to its giant mouth, covering almost 3,000 miles. Harassed by injury and by arrest from the local police, he makes his way along both the Russian and Chinese shores, starting out by Mongolian horse, then hitchhiking, sailing on poacher's sloops or travelling the Trans-Siberian Express.

Having revived his Russian and Mandarin, he talks to everyone he meets, from Chinese traders to Russian fishermen, from monks to indigenous peoples. By the time he reaches the river's desolate end, where Russia's 19th-century imperial dream petered out, a whole, pivotal world has come alive.

The Amur River is a shining masterpiece by the acknowledged laureate of travel writing, an urgent lesson in history and the culmination of an astonishing career.

Written by Colin Thubron
Read by Robert Powell
Abridged by Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000zsnq)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


WED 11:00 This Union: Two Kingdoms (m000zsfv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 What's Funny About ... (m000zsns)
Series 2

1. Ricky Gervais on The Office

TV veterans Peter Fincham and Jon Plowman talk to the writers, producers, and performers behind Britain’s biggest TV comedy hits, and hear the inside story of how they brought their programmes to the screen.

In the first episode of the new series of What’s Funny About… Peter and Jon talk to Ricky Gervais – the man who created, wrote, directed, and starred in what is, by any metric you’d care to measure it, one of the most influential sitcoms of the 21st century - The Office.

Ricky discusses the challenge of getting The Office commissioned and made, and the very real fear that the audience would think it was just another docu-soap, and simply wouldn’t realise it was a sitcom. He talks about how he crafted many of the show’s most famous moments and reveals how a combination of Homer Simpson, James Cagney, and a bloke with a pony tail who worked at a temp agency in Reading, all helped inspire the character of David Brent.

Producer: Owen Braben
Produced by Expectation Entertainment for BBC Radio 4 Extra


WED 12:00 News Summary (m000ztyc)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 12:04 Meet Me at the Museum (m000tcbj)
Episode 3

In 1964, Professor Glob, the curator of the Silkeborg Museum in Denmark, dedicated his book The Bog People to a group of schoolgirls who had written to him about his recent archaeological discoveries. Fifty years later, at a defining moment in her life, Tina Hopgood writes him another letter about a planned pilgrimage to Denmark with her best friend, Bella, to visit the 2000-year-old Tollund Man. Why did they never make the trip?

She doesn’t expect a reply.

When Anders Larsen, a lonely museum curator responds, neither does he.

Their unexpected correspondence becomes a shared meditation on love, loss, life choices made and the opportunity to make new and different ones.

Episode Three
Anders' daughter Karin is pregnant. Will she tell the father?

Starring Tamsin Greig and Paul Ritter

Written by Anne Youngson
Adapted for radio by Richard Leaf

Producer: Karen Rose
Sound: Lucinda Mason Brown
Production Coordinator: Sarah Tombling

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m000zsnz)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


WED 12:57 Weather (m000zsp1)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m000zsp3)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


WED 13:45 Could Do Better (m0000mrd)
The Half-Term Wobble

Lucy Kellaway charts her new start as a trainee teacher at the age of 58, moving from the comfortable life of an FT columnist to the realities of teaching in East London.

In 2016, the Financial Times’ management columnist Lucy Kellaway announced she was starting a new career as a teacher. Calling on others of a certain age to join her, she set up the Now Teach organisation to help older professionals become trainees in challenging schools. The scheme received over a thousand applications and selected just under fifty to join, including former corporate lawyers, investment bankers and senior civil servants.

This series follows Lucy and the other trainees over their first year as they encounter the ups and downs of their new life as novice teachers in inner city London.

Episode 3 – The Half-Term Wobble
As the trainees reach half term, Lucy finds out how they are adapting to being at the bottom of the pecking order.

Producer: Russell Finch
Assistant Producer: Dasha Lisitsina
A Somethin’ Else production for BBC Radio 4


WED 14:00 The Archers (m000zsp5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (m000zsp7)
Song of the Reed

Whirlpool

We return to Fleggwick where the search is on to find the miniscule Whirlpool Ramshorn Snail – a tiny creature whose presence would bolster the case for the reserve as a habitat for rare species.

Sophie Okonedo and Mark Rylance star in the second of Steve Waters’ seasonal dramas following the life of a fictional wetlands nature reserve, over the period of one year.

Fleggwick, like the ecosystem it protects, is under threat. The site was not financially sustainable when its founder passed away, so his daughter Liv (Sophie Okonedo) needs to find a way for it to survive. But if that means selling out to ‘trendy conservation’, then Ian (Mark Rylance), the Warden, wants nothing to do with it.

Song of the Reed is recorded on location at RSPB’s Strumpshaw Fen. The story is informed by the real work and science of conservation taking place in the face of rapid environmental change in the wetlands of Norfolk, and everywhere. This episode also features Tom Fewins of the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust, playing himself.

Cast:
Liv...............Sophie Okonedo
Ian...............Mark Rylance
Tam.............Ella Dorman Gajic
Kay..............Molly Naylor
Sadegh......Zaydun Khalaf
Theo............Tom Goodman-Hill
Nikki.............Karen Hill
Tom...............Tom Fewins
Voice of the Reed...........Christine Kavanagh
Other parts played by staff and volunteers at RSPB Strumpshaw Fen

Music by Michael Somerset Ward with Rebecca Hearne
Sound design by Alisdair McGregor
Produced and Directed by Boz Temple-Morris

A Holy Mountain production for BBC Radio 4


WED 15:00 Money Box (m000zsp9)
Saving for Children

Do you have a question about saving and investing for children? Whether you’re interested in easy access, regular savings accounts or thinking of stocks and shares, our panel will be ready to help on Wednesday’s Money Box Live.

Whatever your question, e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now and please include a phone number if you’d like to take part in the programme.

Joining presenter Charmaine Cozier are:

• Chartered Financial Planner Claire Walsh
• Rachel Springall from financial comparison site Moneyfacts

Presenter: Charmaine Cozier
Producer: Diane Richardson
Editor: Emma Rippon


WED 15:30 BBC National Short Story Award (m000zw5v)
BBC National Short Story Award 2021

Night Train by Georgina Harding

The third story on the shortlist for this year’s BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University. Two strangers take the night train from Lvov to Kiev in Ukraine and strike up a conversation.

Now in its sixteenth year, the BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University is one of the most prestigious for a single short story. Following the announcement of the shortlist on Radio 4's Front Row, on Friday 10th September, the five stories in contention for the 2021 award will be broadcast each weekday afternoon on Radio 4 at half past three from Monday, 20th September. Each of the shortlisted writers will be interviewed the evening preceding the broadcast of their story on Front Row, and the winner will be announced live on the programme Tuesday 19th October. All the stories will be available on BBC Sounds after broadcast, and there will be a special edition of the Short Story podcast for each to download.

For links and the most up to date information go to bbc.co.uk/nssa.

Read by Sian Thomas

Abridged and produced by Julian Wilkinson.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (m000zspc)
Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m000zspf)
Social media, anti-social media, breaking news, faking news: this is the programme about a revolution in media.


WED 17:00 PM (m000zsph)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000zspm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 My Teenage Diary (m000zspp)
Series 10

Tim Downie

Rufus Hound's guest is star of Outlander and Paddington, Tim Downie. Tim's diary takes us back to his drama school days in North London in 1994 - reading Chekhov by candlelight, becoming a vegetarian and wearing a lot of collarless shirts.

A Talkback production for BBC Radio 4


WED 19:00 The Archers (m000zspr)
Helen takes evasive action and Alice has concerns.


WED 19:15 Front Row (m000zspt)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 19:45 NatureBang (m00060wy)
Sea-Sponges and the Illusion of Self

The humble sea sponge has been around for over 500 million years. We may think of them as ‘simple’ animals, with no brain, no nerves and no organs. But they have a pretty good party trick up their fleshy sleeves. Push a sponge through a mesh, until all that remains is a cloud of cells. Pour those cells into a tank, and watch as the cells reform themselves, like the terminator, back into a sponge.

Becky Ripley and Emily Knight ask: is it the same sponge it was before?

In the human world, nobody is queueing up to be forced through a discombobulating mesh. But enter the world of science fiction and there’s something that’s not far off… the teleportation machine. Would you allow yourself to be dissolved into a molecular cloud and flung through space and time? And would the ‘you’ at the other end really be the same ‘you’ that left?

Featuring Professor Sally Leys from the University of Alberta, and Philosopher Charlie Huenemann from Utah State University.


WED 20:00 Bringing Up Britain (m000zspw)
Series 14

How should I prepare my son for adolesence?

The relationship between the sexes is high on the agenda thanks to the revelations of school harassment on Everyone's Invited, children's increasing exposure to porn and hashtags like #NotAllMen. But how are parents navigating this complex area? In this four part series of Bringing Up Britain, Anjula Mutanda sets out to find answers. She explores whether stereotypes matter, how to prepare boys for adolescence, the pros and cons of single sex education and how to parent children through the complexities of online harassment and abuse.

In this episode, Anjula speaks to Lavinia, a mother of two boys aged 5 and 10 who wants to know how to prepare her older son for the world he's entering, while protecting him from life's harsh realities. While there has rightly been a huge focus on girls' wellbeing in recent years, are boys being left behind, or even discriminated against? Anjula brings together a series of experts from psychologists, to teachers and child development experts to explore just what boys on the cusp of adolescence are facing today.

Producer: Ellie Bury


WED 20:45 Four Thought (m000zsnl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (m000zspy)
How green is my golf course?

Golf courses do not have a good reputation when it comes to sustainability. Sybil Ruscoe finds out what efforts are being made to make them more environmentally friendly.

Producer: Emma Campbell


WED 21:30 The Media Show (m000zspf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m000zsq0)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney (m000zsq2)
Episode 3

Alice, a novelist, meets Felix, who works in a warehouse and asks him if he’d like to travel to Rome with her. In Dublin, her best friend Eileen is getting over a break-up and slips back into flirting with Simon, a man she has known since childhood.

Alice, Felix, Eileen and Simon are still young – but life is catching up with them. They desire each other, they delude each other, they get together, they break apart. They worry about sex and friendship and the world they live in. Will they find a way to believe in a beautiful world?

Beautiful World, Where Are You is Sally Rooney’s third novel published 7th September 2021 following on from the huge global success of her novels Conversations With Friends (2017) and Normal People (2018).

Niamh Algar is one of Ireland’s most acclaimed young actors. In addition to her most recent lead role in Channel 4’s Deceit, Niamh starred alongside Stephen Graham earlier this year in Shane Meadows highly acclaimed drama The Virtues. Niamh is currently filming a Netflix adaptation of Emma Donoghue’s psychological thriller The Wonder shooting in Wicklow.

Author: Sally Rooney
Reader: Niamh Algar
Abridger: Rowan Routh
Producer: Gemma McMullan
A BBC Northern Ireland Production.


WED 23:00 Njambi McGrath: Becoming Njambi (m000zsq4)
Who Am I?

Kenyan-born comedian Njambi McGrath goes on a challenging journey of self-discovery, as she traces the roots of her upbringing and the British influences that shaped her life.

In this episode, Njambi explores the history of British colonisation of her home country and how it directly impacted her father's life, and subsequently her own. Njambi shares the story of meeting her husband, starting a family and moving to the UK and becoming the talk of the town.

Produced by Julia Sutherland
A Dabster production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:15 Rhys James (b09pmbdw)
Series 1

Rhys James Is... Wise

Comedian Rhys James explores different aspects of himself through live stand up, spoken word poetry and interview clips. In this episode Rhys explores the topic of wisdom.

Written and performed by... Rhys James
Music by... Steve Dunne
Sound by... David Thomas
Produced by... Carl Cooper

A BBC Studios production


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000zsq7)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



THURSDAY 23 SEPTEMBER 2021

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m000zsq9)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


THU 00:30 The Amur River by Colin Thubron (m000zsqc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000zsqf)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000zsqh)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000zsqk)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m000zsqm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000zsqp)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Dr Rosa Hunt, co-principal of South Wales Baptist College.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m000zsqr)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sby2t)
Dartford Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the Dartford Warbler. Dartford Warblers prefer Mediterranean wine-producing climates, which means ice and snow is bad news for them. The harsh winters of 1961 and 1962 reduced the population to just 11 pairs, but fortunately the numbers have since recovered.


THU 06:00 Today (m000zv31)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (m000zv33)
Herodotus

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the Greek writer known as the father of histories, dubbed by his detractors as the father of lies. Herodotus (c484 to 425 BC or later) was raised in Halicarnassus in modern Turkey when it was part of the Persian empire and, in the years after the Persian Wars, set about an inquiry into the deep background to those wars. He also aimed to preserve what he called the great and marvellous deeds of Greeks and non-Greeks, seeking out the best evidence for past events and presenting the range of evidence for readers to assess. Plutarch was to criticise Herodotus for using this to promote the least flattering accounts of his fellow Greeks, hence the 'father of lies', but the depth and breadth of his Histories have secured his reputation from his lifetime down to the present day.

With

Tom Harrison
Professor of Ancient History at the University of St Andrews

Esther Eidinow
Professor of Ancient History at the University of Bristol

And

Paul Cartledge
A. G. Leventis Senior Research Fellow at Clare College, University of Cambridge

Producer: Simon Tillotson


THU 09:45 The Amur River by Colin Thubron (m000zv35)
Episode 4

The Amur River is almost unknown. Yet it is the tenth longest river in the world, rising in the Mongolian mountains and flowing through Siberia to the Pacific.

For 1,100 miles it forms the tense border between Russia and China. Haunted by the memory of land-grabs and unequal treaties, this is the most densely fortified frontier on earth.

In his 80th year, Colin Thubron takes a dramatic journey from the Amur's secret source to its giant mouth, covering almost 3,000 miles. Harassed by injury and by arrest from the local police, he makes his way along both the Russian and Chinese shores, starting out by Mongolian horse, then hitchhiking, sailing on poacher's sloops or travelling the Trans-Siberian Express.

Having revived his Russian and Mandarin, he talks to everyone he meets, from Chinese traders to Russian fishermen, from monks to indigenous peoples. By the time he reaches the river's desolate end, where Russia's 19th-century imperial dream petered out, a whole, pivotal world has come alive.

The Amur River is a shining masterpiece by the acknowledged laureate of travel writing, an urgent lesson in history and the culmination of an astonishing career.

Written by Colin Thubron
Read by Robert Powell
Abridged by Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000zv37)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (m000zv39)
Insight and analysis from BBC correspondents around the world.


THU 11:30 From the Steppes to the Stage (b09m165v)
Series 1

Episode 2

From the nomads of the vast steppe - to the glamour and adulation of the stage. Kate Molleson unravels the story of Mongolia's remarkable rise to being an opera superpower (2/2)

Mongolia is becoming a global leader in opera singing - and completely breaking the mould. Young nomadic herders and horsemen are being plucked from the vast plains and taken to Ulaanbaatar - where they're transformed into the next generation of top-flight tenors and baritones.

It's a fascinating synergy of young men with the perfect physique, often honed in a rugged, traditional outdoorsmen culture, and a superb Soviet-era music and arts education system that - just over half a century after its State Academic Theatre of Opera and Ballet first opened - is delivering the next generation of global singing superstars.

Radio 4 brings you a hypnotic audio portrait, taking you from the open plains, horse lullabies and throat singing of the endless Mongolian landscape to the cultural melee of Ulaanbataar - a place of stark contrasts where gleaming 21st century skyscrapers rise, yet where around half the population live in traditional gers (tents). A nation numbering just 3 million people, yet the size of Western Europe, and sandwiched between the gigantic superpowers of Russia and China - how much can Mongolia harness its cultural might to have a voice in global geopolitics?

In the concluding episode, Kate explores the political value of Mongolia's musical prowess. In the Soviet era, the communist government used the people's love of traditional song to advance opera, and with it a certain idea of "civilisation"; in 2017, the current government see Mongolia's operatic might as a way of punching above its weight in global geopolitics. The buzzword on everyone's lips is "soft power" - a way for Mongolia to be part of a global conversation with nations - like its neighbours Russia and China - they could never compete with militarily or economically.

But what does this mean for Mongolia's traditional culture? And in a digitally-connected world where international musical genres are consumed across old political boundaries, and a musician with an internet connection can become a global star without leaving their bedroom - how much do contemporary Mongolians get to pick and choose what constitutes their cultural identity?

As Mongolia's foremost opera star prepares to take the stage in Ulaanbaatar, Kate explores the diversity of Mongolia's musical makeup in 2017 - from breakout indie acts and hip hop DJs to women throat singers causing ripples in the nation's venerable traditional classical singing art.

Producer: Steven Rajam
Presenter: Kate Molleson
A BBC Wales production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 News Summary (m000zv3c)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Meet Me at the Museum (m000tfjr)
Episode 4

In 1964, Professor Glob, the curator of the Silkeborg Museum in Denmark, dedicated his book The Bog People to a group of schoolgirls who had written to him about his recent archaeological discoveries. Fifty years later, at a defining moment in her life, Tina Hopgood writes him another letter about a planned pilgrimage to Denmark with her best friend, Bella, to visit the 2000-year-old Tollund Man. Why did they never make the trip?

She doesn’t expect a reply.

When Anders Larsen, a lonely museum curator responds, neither does he.

Their unexpected correspondence becomes a shared meditation on love, loss, life choices made and the opportunity to make new and different ones.

Episode Four
There is a rumpus at the farm. Anders' relationship with his children deepens.

Starring Tamsin Greig and Paul Ritter

Written by Anne Youngson
Adapted for radio by Richard Leaf

Producer: Karen Rose
Sound: Lucinda Mason Brown
Production Coordinator: Sarah Tombling

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m000zv3f)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


THU 12:57 Weather (m000zv3h)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m000zv3k)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


THU 13:45 Could Do Better (m0000mlx)
Dark Days

Lucy Kellaway charts her new start as a trainee teacher at the age of 58, moving from the comfortable life of an FT columnist to the realities of teaching in East London.

In 2016, the Financial Times’ management columnist Lucy Kellaway announced she was starting a new career as a teacher. Calling on others of a certain age to join her, she set up the Now Teach organisation to help older professionals become trainees in challenging schools. The scheme received over a thousand applications and selected just under fifty to join, including former corporate lawyers, investment bankers and senior civil servants.

This series follows Lucy and the other trainees over their first year as they encounter the ups and downs of their new life as novice teachers in inner city London.

Episode 4 – Dark Days
Lucy confronts the difficulties of her new life and talks to others who have reached crisis point.

Producer: Russell Finch
Assistant Producer: Dasha Lisitsina
A Somethin’ Else production for BBC Radio 4


THU 14:00 The Archers (m000zspr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (m0006mr8)
Nine Bob Notes

Nine Bob Notes by Philip Meeks.
Daniel lives in a retirement home. He has lived his adult life as a gay man, but now finds that he has to suppress his sexual identity in order to fit in. But then an ex-policeman comes to the residence and he and Daniel realise they have met before many years ago. A gentle and poignant comedy drama about two elderly men who discover a passion for life in their twilight years. Starring Matthew Kelly.

Daniel......................Matthew Kelly
Kevin........................Russell Dixon
Audrey....................Sarah Parks
Olive.........................Susan Twist
Brenda....................Judith Barker
Simon.......................Lloyd Peters

Director/Producer Gary Brown


THU 15:00 Ramblings (m000zv3m)
Slippy Rocks and Otter Spotting on the Island of Mull

Clare takes on a challenging coastal route from Lochbuie to Carsaig on the island of Mull. Her guide is Wendy Lloyd who – like most islanders – has several strings to her bow. As well as working for Christian Aid, farming pigs on her croft, and hosting visitors in a yurt, she is interested in helping people navigate pilgrimage walking routes across Mull and over to Iona. She tells Clare about all of this as they attempt a long and arduous hike across slippy rocks and through shoulder-high bracken but the rewards are immense with spectacular scenery and obliging wildlife.

Scroll down to the foot of the Ramblings webpage to the 'related links' box where there is further information available.

Presenter: Clare Balding
Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Karen Gregor


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m000zt6y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 BBC National Short Story Award (m000zv3p)
BBC National Short Story Award 2021

Toadstone by Danny Rhodes

The fourth in this year's BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University. In this story, a man returns to his childhood village, and is haunted by his future.

Now in its sixteenth year, the BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University is one of the most prestigious for a single short story. Following the announcement of the shortlist on Radio 4's Front Row, on Friday 10th September, the five stories in contention for the 2021 award will be broadcast each weekday afternoon on Radio 4 at half past three from Monday, 20th September. Each of the shortlisted writers will be interviewed the evening preceding the broadcast of their story on Front Row, and the winner will be announced live on the programme Tuesday 19th October. All the stories will be available on BBC Sounds after broadcast, and there will be a special edition of the Short Story podcast for each to download.

For links and the most up to date information go to bbc.co.uk/nssa

Read by Shaun Dooley

Abridged and produced by Anne Isger


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (m000zv3r)
Film programme looking at the latest cinema releases, DVDs and films on TV.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m000zv3t)
A weekly programme that illuminates the mysteries and challenges the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (m000zv3w)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000zv3y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Stand-Up Specials (m000y64v)
Syd

Arthur Smith brings his hit Edinburgh Festival show to Radio 4.

Arthur's father Syd was an ordinary man in extraordinary times. Just 17 when he signed up, he fought at El Alamein, was captured and then imprisoned in Colditz and, after the war, joined the Metropolitan Police. He spent the rest of his working life patrolling the streets of London and had possibly the worst arrest rate in the force - having been a prisoner of war he had no desire to subject anyone else to suffer a loss of liberty.

In this funny and tender evocation of post-war Britain, Arthur brings us Syd's diary entries and conjures up the spirit of his father, a man of great integrity and humour.

Recorded in front of a live, socially distanced audience, with assistance from his brother Nick and music from Kirsty Newton.

Producer: Alison Vernon-Smith

A Yada-Yada Audio production for BBC Radio 4


THU 19:00 The Archers (m000zv42)
Writer, Adrian Flynn
Director, Rosemary Watts
Editor, Jeremy Howe

David Archer … Timothy Bentinck
Helen Archer … Louiza Patikas
Jolene Archer … Buffy Davis
Kenton Archer … Richard Attlee
Pat Archer … Patricia Gallimore
Tony Archer … David Troughton
Brian Aldridge …. Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge …. Angela Piper
Lee Bryce …. Ryan Early
Alice Carter …. Hollie Chapman
Chris Carter …. Wilf Scolding
Amy Franks …. Jennifer Daley
Eddie Grundy …. Trevor Harrison
Joy Horville …. Jackie Lye
Shula Hebden Lloyd …. Judy Bennett
Fallon Rogers …. Joanna Van Kampen


THU 19:15 Front Row (m000zv46)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music.


THU 19:45 NatureBang (m000610p)
The Portuguese Man O'War and the Individual

Strange things dwell out in the open ocean. Bobbing atop the waves, Becky Ripley and Emily Knight meet one such creature, the Portuguese Man O’War. With its bulbous air-sacs and trailing tentacles you’d be forgiven for thinking it’s a jellyfish, but you’d be wrong. It’s a colony, a society of tiny individual animals, who work together to eat, hunt and reproduce as one.

In the Age of the Individual, we humans like to think of ourselves as self-sufficient little nodes who don’t need nobody. But that perspective gets called into question when you consider where we live. Thanks to some complex maths and some incredible data-crunching, we’re beginning to see the cities we inhabit in a different light. They grow, move, breathe, and die, just like a living organism, according to strict mathematical principles. Just like polyps in a Man O’ War, are we really any more than cogs in a machine?

Featuring Marine Biologist Dr John Copley from the University of Southampton, and Geoffrey West, Theoretical Physicist from the Santa Fe Institute.


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (m000zv4b)
David Aaronovitch presents in-depth explainers on big issues in the news.


THU 20:30 Elon Musk: The Evening Rocket (m000y5ds)
Robin Hood

At the start of 2021, Elon Musk briefly became the richest man in the world. The global pandemic was a boom time for American billionaires, many of whom saw their wealth rise even as much of the world was locked down. As Musk, Bezos, Gates and others jockeyed for first place in the world’s richest-man contest, the rise of cryptocurrencies was generating headlines about the fictive quality of money. “All forms of currency are acts of imagination”, says Jill Lepore: they require communal belief in their value - what economists sometimes call the Tinkerbell Effect. Musk started tweeting about Dogecoin - a cryptocurrency started as a joke, based on a meme about a dog - even dubbing himself 'The Dogefather'. Although Musk’s tweets looked ironic, jokey, irreverent, they seemed to be having a very real and destabilizing effect on financial markets.

The Evening Rocket is presented by Jill Lepore, Professor of American History at Harvard University and staff writer at The New Yorker. Her latest book is If Then: How the Simulmatics Corporation Invented the Future. She is also the host of The Last Archive, a podcast from Pushkin Industries.

Producer: Viv Jones
Researcher: Oliver Riskin-Kutz
Editor: Hugh Levinson
Mixing: Graham Puddifoot
Original music by Corntuth


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m000zv3t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (m000zv33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m000zv4j)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


THU 22:45 Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney (m000zv4n)
Episode 4

Alice, a novelist, meets Felix, who works in a warehouse and asks him if he’d like to travel to Rome with her. In Dublin, her best friend Eileen is getting over a break-up and slips back into flirting with Simon, a man she has known since childhood.

Alice, Felix, Eileen and Simon are still young – but life is catching up with them. They desire each other, they delude each other, they get together, they break apart. They worry about sex and friendship and the world they live in. Will they find a way to believe in a beautiful world?

Beautiful World, Where Are You is Sally Rooney’s third novel published 7th September 2021 following on from the huge global success of her novels Conversations With Friends (2017) and Normal People (2018).

Niamh Algar is one of Ireland’s most acclaimed young actors. In addition to her most recent lead role in Channel 4’s Deceit, Niamh starred alongside Stephen Graham earlier this year in Shane Meadows highly acclaimed drama The Virtues. Niamh is currently filming a Netflix adaptation of Emma Donoghue’s psychological thriller The Wonder shooting in Wicklow.

Author: Sally Rooney
Reader: Niamh Algar
Abridger: Rowan Routh
Producer: Gemma McMullan
A BBC Northern Ireland Production.


THU 23:00 Slow Radio Comedy (m000zv4s)
Sound art meets comedy as performers swap the stage for immersive natural environments.

Simon Evans, Lemn Sissay, Natasha Hodgson, and Poppy and Rubina from the Brown Girls Do It Too podcast move their mics away from the studio to forests, beaches, and hillsides, where the sounds of nature become both their audience and co-star.

Recorded in binaural stereo.

An Unusual production for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000zv4x)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament.



FRIDAY 24 SEPTEMBER 2021

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m000zv51)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 00:30 The Amur River by Colin Thubron (m000zv35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000zv54)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000zv59)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000zv5f)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m000zv5k)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000zv5p)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Dr Rosa Hunt, co-principal of South Wales Baptist College.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m000zv5t)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tp50)
Razorbill

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Razorbill. Smart as a dinner-jacketed waiter and with a deep blunt patterned bill, the razorbill is a striking bird - though its looks could be compensation for its voice.


FRI 06:00 Today (m000zv7x)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m000zt7b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 The Amur River by Colin Thubron (m000zv7z)
Episode 5

The Amur River is almost unknown. Yet it is the tenth longest river in the world, rising in the Mongolian mountains and flowing through Siberia to the Pacific.

For 1,100 miles it forms the tense border between Russia and China. Haunted by the memory of land-grabs and unequal treaties, this is the most densely fortified frontier on earth.

In his 80th year, Colin Thubron takes a dramatic journey from the Amur's secret source to its giant mouth, covering almost 3,000 miles. Harassed by injury and by arrest from the local police, he makes his way along both the Russian and Chinese shores, starting out by Mongolian horse, then hitchhiking, sailing on poacher's sloops or travelling the Trans-Siberian Express.

Having revived his Russian and Mandarin, he talks to everyone he meets, from Chinese traders to Russian fishermen, from monks to indigenous peoples. By the time he reaches the river's desolate end, where Russia's 19th-century imperial dream petered out, a whole, pivotal world has come alive.

The Amur River is a shining masterpiece by the acknowledged laureate of travel writing, an urgent lesson in history and the culmination of an astonishing career.

Written by Colin Thubron
Read by Robert Powell
Abridged by Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000zv81)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


FRI 11:00 The Digital Human (m000blx0)
Series 18

Faceless

Johnathan Hirshon works in PR and marketing and describes himself as ‘The Faceless man' because he’s managed to keep his face off the internet for over twenty years. This may seem extreme but Neda Soltani explains how one online photo of her face, meant she had to leave her family, country and profession. Artist and curator, Bogomir Doringer whose archived and curated thousands of faceless images off the internet talks about how technology is not only choreographing the way we use our faces but persuading us to hand over our biometric data with our use of apps that change the way we look. .

Artist Zach Blas is interested in queer culture and has created masks using biometric data from minority groups, to push back on the possibility of people being categorised by biometrics. Zach uses masks to show that facial recognition technology can be disrupted. Stephen has been trying to do just that. Stephen is from Hong Kong and spent the summer protesting against the Extradition bill. He and his fellow protesters wore masks to evade identification from the police and Hong Kong's smart lamp posts. The remit of the protest grew when the wearing of masks by protesters was banned. Stephen believes that by using facial recognition technology on the streets of Hong Kong the authorities in Hong Kong and China are creating a sense of ‘white terror’. Stephen is now protesting in the UK but still feels this ‘white terror’. While protesting people from mainland China have been taking photos of him and other protesters. He knows that photos can go global and by using facial recognition tech he could be easily identified. Is it becoming impossible to escape recognition even when we would like to hide?

Produced by Kate Bissell
With special thanks to Bogomir Doringer


FRI 11:30 A Charles Paris Mystery (m000zv83)
A Deadly Habit

Episode 4

by Jeremy Front
based on the novel by Simon Brett

Charles ..... Bill Nighy
Frances ..... Suzanne Burden
Maurice ..... Jon Glover
Bethan ..... Christine Kavanagh
Justin ..... Tony Turner
Dervla ..... Jane Slavin
Neil ..... Simon Ludders
Peaches ..... Elinor Coleman

Directed by Sally Avens

With an actress and a stage doorman dead at The Aphra Benn theatre Charles believes he knows who the murderer might be.
But his sleuthing uncovers a deadly do-dependant relationship.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m000zv85)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:04 Meet Me at the Museum (m000tg5g)
Episode 5

In 1964, Professor Glob, the curator of the Silkeborg Museum in Denmark, dedicated his book The Bog People to a group of schoolgirls who had written to him about his recent archaeological discoveries. Fifty years later, at a defining moment in her life, Tina Hopgood writes him another letter about a planned pilgrimage to Denmark with her best friend, Bella, to visit the 2000-year-old Tollund Man. Why did they never make the trip?

She doesn’t expect a reply.

When Anders Larsen, a lonely museum curator responds, neither does he.

Their unexpected correspondence becomes a shared meditation on love, loss, life choices made and the opportunity to make new and different ones.

Episode Five
Anders is lonely after his children leave. But Tina is finding that communal living is lonely too.

Starring Tamsin Greig and Paul Ritter

Written by Anne Youngson
Adapted for radio by Richard Leaf

Producer: Karen Rose
Sound: Lucinda Mason Brown
Production Coordinator: Sarah Tombling

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m000zv87)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


FRI 12:57 Weather (m000zv89)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m000zv8f)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Jonny Dymond.


FRI 13:45 Could Do Better (m0000mp0)
Lessons Learnt

Lucy Kellaway charts her new start as a trainee teacher at the age of 58, moving from the comfortable life of an FT columnist to the realities of teaching in East London.

In 2016, the Financial Times’ management columnist Lucy Kellaway announced she was starting a new career as a teacher. Calling on others of a certain age to join her, she set up the Now Teach organisation to help older professionals become trainees in challenging schools. The scheme received over a thousand applications and selected just under fifty to join, including former corporate lawyers, investment bankers and senior civil servants.

This series follows Lucy and the other trainees over their first year as they encounter the ups and downs of their new life as novice teachers in inner city London.

Episode 5 – Lessons Learnt
Lucy moves to a new school and teaches her final lesson.

Producer: Russell Finch
Assistant Producer: Dasha Lisitsina
A Somethin’ Else Production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m000zv42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Nuremberg (m000zv8k)
By Their Fruits, We Know Them

20th November 1945 and the Defendants take their place in the dock – 22 of the most senior Nazis, representing each component of Hitler’s machine. But without simultaneous translation the trial will be unworkable – are the interpreters ready?

Seen through the eyes of Tatiana, a young Russian interpreter, the trial opens and the interpreters struggle - Nuremberg was the first ever use of simultaneous interpreting. They said it couldn’t be done.

And once the indictments have been read, Robert Jackson, Chief US Prosecutor makes the opening speech. The accused men in the dock seem almost proud of what they did. But the American team is relying too heavily on documents – they're chilling but there's a danger of the trial becoming bogged down by documents alone. The Defendants are even starting to feel they’re winning -n until the American Prosecutors change tack and show a 60-minute film of footage of the concentration camps.

The courtroom is reduced to silence, the defendants finally cowed.

Cast:
Tatiana Sablikova - AMANDA RYAN
Robert H Jackson - JOSEPH MYDELL
Sir Geoffrey Lawrence - NICHOLAS WOODESON
Leon Dostert - CLIVE WOOD
Robert Storey - HARI DHILLON
Sir David Maxwell-Fyfe - FORBES MASSON
Julius Streicher - HENRY GOODMAN
Albert Speer - JOSEPH ALESSI
Hermann Goering and other roles - NIGEL LINDSAY
Hans Marx and other roles - ILAN GOODMAN
Hans Fritzsche and other roles - NATHAN WILEY
Joachim von Ribbentrop and other roles - JASPER BRITTON
Wilhelm Keitel and other roles - JONATHAN CULLEN
Adolf Hitler and other roles - ANDREW WOODALL
German Interpreter and other roles - MARK EDEL-HUNT

Sound Designer - ADAM WOODHAMS
Studio Manager - MARK SMITH
Casting Director - GINNY SCHILLER
Original Score - METAPHOR MUSIC
Writer and Director - JONATHAN MYERSON
Producer - NICHOLAS NEWTON

A Promenade Production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds


FRI 14:45 A History of Ghosts (m000nmd4)
The Pregnant Ghost

Illustration by Seonaid Mackay

'She will be made whole in her life and her afterlife, even if that means bending the rules of nature and society to suit herself.'

Kirsty Logan explores the ghostly tales found in Pu Songling’s ‘Strange Tales from a Chinese Studio’, a collection of hundreds of fantastic, and slippery tales of ghosts, spirits and demons that include a most unusual ghost - a pregnant ghost, that gives birth to a living child.

Kirsty finds out how ghosts come to exist within a culture of ancestor worship - where the souls of dead family members should be at peace due to the care and veneration they receive from their descendants, and how the ghosts that emerge can be symbols of hope, or terror.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000zv8p)
Chelsea Flower Show: Postbag Edition

Kathy Clugston and the panel are at this year's Chelsea Flower Show answering your gardening queries. Joining Kathy are regular panellists Pippa Greenwood, Matt Biggs and Matthew Wilson. Chris Thorogood is the intrepid GQT correspondent, exploring all of this years' praiseworthy plantlife.

Producers - Daniel Cocker and Jemima Rathbone
Assistant Producers - Bethany Hocken and Aniya Das

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:30 BBC National Short Story Award (m000zv8t)
BBC National Short Story Award 2021

Maykopsky District, Adyghe Oblast by Richard Smyth

The final story in this year's BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University - a Cold War tale of secrets and lies out on the Russian steppe.

Now in its sixteenth year, the BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University is one of the most prestigious for a single short story. Following the announcement of the shortlist on Radio 4's Front Row, on Friday 10th September, the five stories in contention for the 2021 award will be broadcast each weekday afternoon on Radio 4 at half past three from Monday, 20th September. Each of the shortlisted writers will be interviewed the evening preceding the broadcast of their story on Front Row, and the winner will be announced live on the programme Tuesday 19th October. All the stories will be available on BBC Sounds after broadcast, and there will be a special edition of the Short Story podcast for each to download.

For links and the most up to date information go to bbc.co.uk/nssa

Read by Blake Ritson

Producer: Justine Willett


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m000zv8y)
Matthew Bannister tells the life stories of people who have recently died, from the rich and famous to unsung but significant.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (m000zsnj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 on Wednesday]


FRI 17:00 PM (m000zv93)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000zv97)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (m000zv9c)
Series 106

Episode 4

Andy Zaltzman presents a look back at the week's headlines.


FRI 19:00 Front Row (m000zv9h)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music.


FRI 19:45 NatureBang (m0006166)
Parasites and Personality

If you think you’re in control, think again.

What invisible forces might be guiding your behaviour, your decisions, your most intimate emotions? Becky Ripley and Emily Knight take a trip into the bizarre nightmare world of the undergrowth, and watch ‘zombie ants’ stumble forward, blindly following the orders of the deadly fungi controlling their brains. Parasites often get the upper hand of their hosts, manipulating their behaviour in sometimes horrifying ways. But is that true of humans too? Could we be unknowingly subservient to creatures that live inside us? Do they wish us well, or might they be plotting our downfall?

Featuring entomologist Dr David Hughes from Penn State University, and neuroscientist John Cryan from University College Cork.


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m000zv9k)
Dame Rachel de Souza

Chris Mason presents political debate and discussion from The Shoreham Centre in Sussex with a panel which includes the Children's Commissioner for England Dame Rachel de Souza.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: Simon Nicklinson


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m000zv9m)
Weekly reflections on topical issues from a range of contributors.


FRI 21:00 Archive on 4 (m000zv9p)
Teen Spirit: Nevermind at 30

On the 30th anniversary of the release of Nirvana’s Nevermind, leading figures from music, literature, fashion, art, and activism reflect on the impact it had on their lives.

Presenter Douglas Coupland, author of Generation X, explores how his own work is entwined with the album’s history. In the early 90s, Douglas Coupland, like Nirvana, was at the vanguard of a new movement that valued individualism and freedom.

In 1991, the music industry had modest ambitions for a second album from Seattle three-piece rock group Nirvana. Little did they know. Opening with hit single Smells Like Teen Spirit, Nevermind was a politically radical, powerful package of pop and punk music that made the “grunge” genre world-famous. The album knocked Michael Jackson off the top of the US charts, eventually selling 30 million copies. It made Kurt Cobain an icon. Though released on a major label, the record redefined the notion of independent spirit for a generation.

Musician Bat For Lashes talks about processing troubling teenage experiences through her Nirvana fandom. Actor Zawe Ashton reveals that Kurt Cobain directly inspired her character of Vod in sitcom Fresh Meat. Transgender activist Daniella Carter reflects on the ways the band defined her politics. Novelist Aaron Hamburger remembers how Kurt Cobain helped him come out as gay. Nevermind producer Butch Vig recalls the release changing his life overnight. Other contributors include poet Hanif Abdurraqib, author Deborah Levy, and musician and fashion expert Brix Smith.

Finally, folk band The Unthanks perform an exclusive Nirvana cover, and rare archive interviews with the band transport us back to the spirit of the time.

Producer: Jack Howson
Additional Production: Tess Davidson and Silvia Malnati

A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m000zv9r)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney (m000zv9t)
Episode 5

Alice, a novelist, meets Felix, who works in a warehouse and asks him if he’d like to travel to Rome with her. In Dublin, her best friend Eileen is getting over a break-up and slips back into flirting with Simon, a man she has known since childhood.

Alice, Felix, Eileen and Simon are still young – but life is catching up with them. They desire each other, they delude each other, they get together, they break apart. They worry about sex and friendship and the world they live in. Will they find a way to believe in a beautiful world?

Beautiful World, Where Are You is Sally Rooney’s third novel published 7th September 2021 following on from the huge global success of her novels Conversations With Friends (2017) and Normal People (2018).

Niamh Algar is one of Ireland’s most acclaimed young actors. In addition to her most recent lead role in Channel 4’s Deceit, Niamh starred alongside Stephen Graham earlier this year in Shane Meadows highly acclaimed drama The Virtues. Niamh is currently filming a Netflix adaptation of Emma Donoghue’s psychological thriller The Wonder shooting in Wicklow.

Author: Sally Rooney
Reader: Niamh Algar
Abridger: Rowan Routh
Producer: Gemma McMullan
A BBC Northern Ireland Production.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (m000zt9m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000zv9w)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Charles Paris Mystery 11:30 FRI (m000zv83)

A History of Ghosts 14:45 FRI (m000nmd4)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m000zl05)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m000zv9m)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m000zsxb)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m000zl03)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m000zv9k)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b07wmzxg)

Archive on 4 21:00 FRI (m000zv9p)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m000zv3t)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m000zv3t)

BBC National Short Story Award 15:30 MON (m000zsf7)

BBC National Short Story Award 15:30 TUE (m000zt9h)

BBC National Short Story Award 15:30 WED (m000zw5v)

BBC National Short Story Award 15:30 THU (m000zv3p)

BBC National Short Story Award 15:30 FRI (m000zv8t)

Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney 22:45 MON (m000zsg0)

Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney 22:45 TUE (m000ztb4)

Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney 22:45 WED (m000zsq2)

Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney 22:45 THU (m000zv4n)

Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney 22:45 FRI (m000zv9t)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m000zsz6)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m000zsz6)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (m000zsfd)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (m000zkpf)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (m000zsf5)

Brief Lives 14:15 TUE (m0009cdx)

Bringing Up Britain 22:15 SAT (m000zmln)

Bringing Up Britain 20:00 WED (m000zspw)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m000zt76)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (m000zspy)

Could Do Better 13:45 MON (m0000m83)

Could Do Better 13:45 TUE (m0000mjw)

Could Do Better 13:45 WED (m0000mrd)

Could Do Better 13:45 THU (m0000mlx)

Could Do Better 13:45 FRI (m0000mp0)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (m000zmhm)

Dante 2021 11:30 TUE (m000rmjc)

Desert Island Discs 11:00 SUN (m000zt7b)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m000zt7b)

Drama 15:00 SUN (m00055ql)

Drama 14:15 WED (m000zsp7)

Drama 14:15 THU (m0006mr8)

Electric Ride UK 21:00 MON (m000zmc8)

Electric Ride UK 11:00 TUE (m000zt93)

Elon Musk: The Evening Rocket 20:30 THU (m000y5ds)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m000zswn)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m000zt8n)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m000zsgq)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m000ztbq)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m000zsqr)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m000zv5t)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (m000zlqt)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (m000zt9y)

Fortunately... with Fi and Jane 23:00 TUE (m000ztb6)

Four Thought 05:45 SAT (m000zl0x)

Four Thought 09:30 WED (m000zsnl)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (m000zsnl)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m000zsx0)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (m000zv39)

From the Steppes to the Stage 11:30 THU (b09m165v)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m000zsfs)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m000zt9w)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m000zspt)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m000zv46)

Front Row 19:00 FRI (m000zv9h)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 21:00 SAT (b03dv1c1)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m000zkzg)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m000zv8p)

God: An Anatomy by Francesca Stavrakopoulou 00:30 SAT (m000zl0j)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (m000zt9m)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (m000zt9m)

Green Originals 00:15 SUN (m000d7jw)

Green Originals 14:45 SUN (m000d7jw)

Henry Normal: A Normal... 19:15 SUN (m000sj8s)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (m000zv33)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (m000zv33)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m000ztb0)

It Ain't Me You're Looking For: Bob Dylan at 80 19:45 SAT (m000w330)

Just One Thing - with Michael Mosley 14:45 SAT (m000zljp)

Just One Thing - with Michael Mosley 11:45 SUN (m000zt7d)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (m000zkpr)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (m000zsfn)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m000zkzn)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m000zv8y)

Lights Out 23:00 MON (m000zsg3)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m000zsdq)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m000zsdq)

Making Amends 19:45 SUN (m000zt84)

Meet Me at the Museum 12:04 MON (m000tcnr)

Meet Me at the Museum 12:04 TUE (m000td0p)

Meet Me at the Museum 12:04 WED (m000tcbj)

Meet Me at the Museum 12:04 THU (m000tfjr)

Meet Me at the Museum 12:04 FRI (m000tg5g)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m000zl0g)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m000zsyl)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m000zt88)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m000zsg7)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m000ztbb)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m000zsq9)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m000zv51)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m000zsx4)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m000zsx4)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m000zsp9)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (m000zkzq)

More or Less 09:00 WED (m000zsnj)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (m000zsnj)

My Teenage Diary 18:30 WED (m000zspp)

NatureBang 19:45 MON (m000612w)

NatureBang 19:45 WED (m00060wy)

NatureBang 19:45 THU (m000610p)

NatureBang 19:45 FRI (m0006166)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m000zl0s)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m000zsz3)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m000zt8j)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m000zsgl)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m000ztbl)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m000zsqm)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m000zv5k)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m000ztdz)

News Summary 06:00 SUN (m000zt6m)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m000zt7g)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m000ztlb)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m000zt95)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m000ztyc)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m000zv3c)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m000zv85)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m000zswl)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m000zt6t)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m000zt72)

News and Weather 13:00 SAT (m000zsx8)

News 22:00 SAT (m000zsyg)

Njambi McGrath: Becoming Njambi 23:00 WED (m000zsq4)

Nuremberg 14:15 FRI (m000zv8k)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (m000zt6p)

One to One 09:30 TUE (m000zt8x)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m000zt7r)

PM 17:00 SAT (m000zsxk)

PM 17:00 MON (m000zsfg)

PM 17:00 TUE (m000zt9p)

PM 17:00 WED (m000zsph)

PM 17:00 THU (m000zv3w)

PM 17:00 FRI (m000zv93)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m000zt82)

Political Thinking with Nick Robinson 17:30 SAT (m000zsxp)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m000zl0v)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m000zt8l)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m000zsgn)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m000ztbn)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m000zsqp)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m000zv5p)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m000zsy8)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m000zsy8)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m000zsy8)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m000zt6y)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m000zt6y)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m000zt6y)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (m000zmj6)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (m000zv3m)

Rhys James 23:15 WED (b09pmbdw)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m000zswv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m000zl0n)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m000zsyv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m000zt8d)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m000zsgg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m000ztbg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m000zsqh)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m000zv59)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m000zl0l)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m000zl0q)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m000zsxt)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m000zsyq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m000zsyz)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m000zt7w)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m000zt8b)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m000zt8g)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m000zsgd)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m000zsgj)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m000ztbd)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m000ztbj)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m000zsqf)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m000zsqk)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m000zv54)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m000zv5f)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (m000zt9f)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (m000zkzk)

Shorts 21:45 SAT (b06z1zfg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m000zsy2)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m000zt80)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m000zsfl)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m000zt9r)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m000zspm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m000zv3y)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m000zv97)

Slow Radio Comedy 23:00 THU (m000zv4s)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b099v2cc)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b099v2cc)

Stand-Up Specials 18:30 THU (m000y64v)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (m000zsdg)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (m000zsdg)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m000zt74)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m000zt6w)

The Amur River by Colin Thubron 09:45 MON (m000zsg9)

The Amur River by Colin Thubron 00:30 TUE (m000zsg9)

The Amur River by Colin Thubron 09:45 TUE (m000zt8z)

The Amur River by Colin Thubron 00:30 WED (m000zt8z)

The Amur River by Colin Thubron 09:45 WED (m000zsqc)

The Amur River by Colin Thubron 00:30 THU (m000zsqc)

The Amur River by Colin Thubron 09:45 THU (m000zv35)

The Amur River by Colin Thubron 00:30 FRI (m000zv35)

The Amur River by Colin Thubron 09:45 FRI (m000zv7z)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m000zt78)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m000zsf1)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m000zsf1)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m000zsfq)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m000zsfq)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m000zsp5)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m000zsp5)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m000zspr)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m000zspr)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m000zv42)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m000zv42)

The Birthday Cake Game 18:30 TUE (m000zt9t)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (m000zv4b)

The Delirium Wards 11:00 MON (m000zsdn)

The Digital Human 11:00 FRI (m000blx0)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (m000zmj8)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (m000zv3r)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m000zsfb)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (m000zsfb)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 19:15 SAT (p08j3qzh)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (m000zt8v)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (m000zt8v)

The Listening Project 13:30 SUN (m000zt7p)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m000zspf)

The Media Show 21:30 WED (m000zspf)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (m000zkzz)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (m000zv9c)

The Pallisers 15:00 SAT (m000bdly)

The Town Made of Stories 16:00 TUE (m000zt9k)

The Untold 21:30 SUN (m000wrlx)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (m000zswy)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m000zt7m)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m000zsfy)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m000ztb2)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m000zsq0)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m000zv4j)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m000zv9r)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (m000zml6)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (m000zspc)

This Union: Two Kingdoms 20:00 MON (m000zsfv)

This Union: Two Kingdoms 11:00 WED (m000zsfv)

Three Pounds in My Pocket 21:00 TUE (m000c8qp)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (m000zsg5)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (m000ztb8)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (m000zsq7)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (m000zv4x)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (m000zv9w)

Today 07:00 SAT (m000zsws)

Today 06:00 MON (m000zsdd)

Today 06:00 TUE (m000zt8s)

Today 06:00 WED (m000zsnd)

Today 06:00 THU (m000zv31)

Today 06:00 FRI (m000zv7x)

Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets 23:30 SAT (m000zlk3)

Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets 16:30 SUN (m000zt7t)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03mztpj)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b020trjh)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03whpln)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b038qj1l)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b01sby2t)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b020tp50)

United Kingdoms 14:15 MON (m000zsf3)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m000zswq)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m000zsx6)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m000zsxy)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m000zt6r)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m000zt70)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m000zt7k)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m000zt7y)

Weather 05:56 MON (m000zt8q)

Weather 12:57 MON (m000zsdx)

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Weather 12:57 THU (m000zv3h)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m000zv89)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m000zt86)

What's Funny About ... 11:30 WED (m000zsns)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m000zsxf)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m000zsdl)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m000zt91)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m000zsnq)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m000zv37)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m000zv81)

World at One 13:00 MON (m000zsdz)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m000zt9c)

World at One 13:00 WED (m000zsp3)

World at One 13:00 THU (m000zv3k)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m000zv8f)

You and Yours 12:18 MON (m000zsdv)

You and Yours 12:18 TUE (m000zt97)

You and Yours 12:18 WED (m000zsnz)

You and Yours 12:18 THU (m000zv3f)

You and Yours 12:18 FRI (m000zv87)

You're Dead To Me 10:30 SAT (p08nf7t2)