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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 19 JUNE 2021

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m000x1h2)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:30 The Devil You Know by Gwen Adshead and Eileen Horne (m000x1fc)
Episode 5

Leading forensic psychiatrist, Dr Gwen Adshead, has spent thirty years as a therapist in secure hospitals and prisons. In THE DEVIL YOU KNOW she introduces some of her patients - individuals shaped and scarred by their own violence - who must live with the consequences of their actions forever. With compassion and wisdom, Gwen seeks to understand terrible crimes and to offer a new approach to the concept of evil.

Gwen offers private therapy to a fellow doctor with a dark and disturbing secret.

PART FIVE - DAVID

Read by Gwen Adshead
Written by Gwen Adshead and Eileen Horne
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Producer: Gaynor Macfarlane


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000x1h4)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000x1h6)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000x1h8)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m000x1hb)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000x1hd)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev'd Dr Craig Gardiner, a tutor at South Wales Baptist College.

Good morning.

Today churches in the Eastern tradition celebrate the feast day of St Jude. Western churches remember him in October, but it is the same man either way, though, just to add to the confusion, he’s also known as Thaddeus and Judas. Calling him Jude maybe a variation of Judas that emerged deliberately to distinguish him from that other Judas, Iscariot, the disciple who betrayed Jesus.

It can be really difficult if you share a name with someone who is of a very different character. Recently, I read about a computer analyst who couldn’t open a bank account because the background search kept returning information about a criminal fraudster with the same name.

Protecting a reputation is a problem as old as time, or at least since when the writer of the biblical book of Proverbs reminded us that, ‘a good name is more desirable than riches, and to be esteemed is better than silver or gold.’ But to be thought well of like this is a fragile thing, not least because it largely depends on what others think of us. Maybe that’s why American basketball coach, John Wotten used to tell his players to be more concerned with their character than their reputation, because character is who and what we really are.

The challenge for us is to live today with an authenticity of character. And if our public presence matches an interior life that is self-aware, shaped by honesty, kindness, and loving respect, what might be seen as Christlike, then surely a reputation more valuable than riches will follow.

Dear God
We welcome the interior life
and the space to meet with you
who knows best who we are
when no one else can see or hear
Shape our character today
Until it resembles your own
Until we resemble you
Amen


SAT 05:45 Four Thought (m000wz41)
The Meaning of Statues

Jak Beula says statues and memorials matter because they show who a society values. His organisation is working to erect more to honour people of colour, including a new statue which he has designed for Windrush and Commonwealth nurses and midwives at the Whittington Hospital in London.
"It helps to improve equality and inclusion, to uncover the stories of historic characters who have positively impacted Britain, but for whatever reason remain unknown, unsung and unheralded."

Dr Jak Beula is the founder and CEO of Nubian Jak, an African and Caribbean community organisation.

Presenter: Olly Man
Producer: Sheila Cook


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m000x643)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (m000x0yg)
Dawn on the Sea Loch

It's not yet dawn when wildlife cameraman John Aitchison strolls down to the shore where he chips off the ice on a kayak, before he can set out across the sea loch near his home in western Scotland, in search of the early signs of spring. He travels through the darkness following a trail of light caused by the reflections of the moon in the calm water. His journey takes him across the loch and along the far shoreline before he heads for an island and then returns home. As the sun rises he encounters seals and otters, watches shelduck chasing one another, listens to curlew and skylarks, and catches sight of his favourite geese: white-fronted geese which will soon leave and head to Greenland. As he paddles across the loch, John reflects on the landscape of interlocking fingers of water and rock, and on how it was formed. "How much has this landscape and its wildlife changed over time?" he wonders. As time and the seasons pass and winter changes to spring, the geese will depart and other birds will arrive - like the swallows which migrate from Africa and nest in the shed by John’s home. The sea loch is a link between the north and the south, between Greenland and South Africa, between the geese and the swallows. John spotted the first two swallows arriving a few days earlier and suddenly the world seems a much smaller place and our responsibility to look after it so evident. “Imagine if the swallows didn’t return”, he ponders. But this year they have. The seasons are changing, and after such a long winter we can look forward to summer once again.

Presenter John Aitchison. Producer Sarah Blunt.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m000x647)
19/06/21 Farming Today This Week: Australian trade deal, Jeremy Clarkson's farm, fell runner Joss Naylor

We discuss the issue which has dominated agricultural conversations, and political ones this week: the UK/Australia trade deal. Australia's deputy Prime Minister says it's a good deal for his farmers, but Leicestershire farmer, Joe Stanley, describes it as "a betrayal".
We hear from Jeremy Clarkson on his new farming series, and about a new report which is blunt in its assessment of the image of farming. Urgent change is needed to prevent disastrous labour shortages, according to academics at Exeter University.
And we're up on the Cumbrian hills with the record-breaking Joss Naylor, the supreme fell-runner and farmer.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


SAT 06:57 Weather (m000x64c)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 07:00 Today (m000x64h)
Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m000x64l)
Johnny Flynn and James O'Brien

Johnny Flynn is in the rare position and being both an acclaimed musician and a successful actor who is breaking into the A-list both here and in America. He recently starred as David Bowie in the biopic Stardust and Mr Knightly in a big-screen adaptation of Emma and has just released an album he made during lockdown with writer Robert MacFarlane; Lost in the Cedarwood. He joins Nikki Bedi and Richard Coles to talk about combining music, acting and family life.

James O’Brien grew up knowing he wanted to follow in the footsteps his journalist father by having his own career in the media. However, after experiencing a crisis in his personal life a few years ago, James realised that neither is job as a broadcaster on LBC or his expensive public school education had prepared him to cope with his emotional trauma. He talks about his book How Not to be Wrong: The Art of Changing Your Mind.

When most people take pictures of their friends, the photos are briefly admired but usually quickly forgotten. But when Carinthia West took photos of her friends in the 70s, they included icons such as The Rolling Stones and Helen Mirren. Carinthia’s candid photos which offer a glimpse into the private lives of the rich and talented were left unprinted for decades and have only recently been revealed to the public for the first time.

Steve Brown was captain of Great Britain’s wheelchair rugby team at the London Paralympics in 2012. Since then, he has become a regular fixture on our TV screens as a presenter on Countryfile and Escape to the Country. He talks to us about his love of nature and the moments which changed the course of his life.

And we hear the Inheritance Tracks of Sugababe Keisha Buchanan.

Producer: Laura Northedge
Editor: Richard Hooper


SAT 10:30 You're Dead To Me (p08qg3xl)
Genghis Khan

Greg Jenner is joined by Professor Peter Frankopan and comedian Phil Wang in the 12th century to meet one of the most feared conquerors in world history, Genghis Khan.

We find out why silk shirts weren’t just a fashion choice and how kittens were apparently used as weapons as Genghis Khan established the largest land empire in history.

A Muddy Knees Media production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m000x64s)
Radio 4's assessment of developments at Westminster


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m000x64w)
News Management in Belarus

The crackdown on dissent and reporting in Belarus goes on, and its authorities are keen to present their version of events to the world. At a recent press conference in Minsk, Jonah Fisher was presented with a dilemma when detained blogger and protester Roman Protasevich was brought out to speak to assembled journalists and diplomats.

High in the Himalayas, Nepal is one of the world's poorest countries, with a weak and under-funded health system, particularly in rural areas. Rajini Vaidyanathan travelled there to report on the impact the pandemic is having on families across the country.

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman was one of the most infamous drug cartel heads in Mexico for years - though he's ended up jailed for life in a supermax prison in the USA. Tara McKelvey covered his trial in New York in 2019, where she saw one of his former mistresses give dramatic testimony - and met his wife in the courthouse cafeteria. Two years on, the two women's fortunes have very much reversed.

Bukhara is one of the most renowned of the ancient cities along the ancient Silk Road linking China and the West - a storied place with millennia of artistic and intellectual history embedded in its mosques, madrasas and mausoleums. Sara Wheeler chose a more intimate kind of building to get a feel of its history.

And Andrew Harding recalls moments on the road across Africa - from Libya to Liberia, Cote d'Ivoire to Zimbabwe - when it took a team to get the job done. While the joke goes that reporters get the credit and camera operators get the fun, what is the producer's lot? Some of them - like his colleague Becky Lipscombe, now leaving the BBC - really can make all the difference.

Producer: Polly Hope


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m000x650)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m000x60g)
The latest news from the world of personal finance


SAT 12:30 Dead Ringers (m000x1gn)
Series 21

Episode 2

The truth behind the summit between presidents Putin and Biden, the true value of Liz Truss’s trade deals, and someone else who’s been tricked by Martin Bashir finally comes forward.

The writing squad for the series: Tom Jamieson and Nev Fountain, Laurence Howarth, Tom Coles & Ed Amsden, Jeffrey Aidoo, Simon Alcock, James Bugg, Nastassia Dhanraj , Athena Kugblenu, Sophie Dickson, Becca Bain, Duncan Wisbey, Rajiv Karia, Vivienne Riddoch & Jane Mccutcheon , Edward Tew.

Producer: Bill Dare
Production Coordinator: Sarah Sharpe
A BBC Studios Production for Radio 4.


SAT 12:57 Weather (m000x654)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News and Weather (m000x658)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m000x1gs)
Dame Andrea Leadsom MP, Eluned Morgan MS, Ellie Mae O'Hagan, Richard Walker

Chris Mason presents political discussion from the Holroyd Community Theatre in Oswestry with the Conservative MP and former Cabinet Minister Dame Andrea Leadsom MP, the Minister for Health and Social Services in the Welsh Government Eluned Morgan MS, the director of the CLASS thinktank Ellie Mae O'Hagan and the Managing Director of Iceland Foods Richard Walker.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: Owain Williams


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m000x65d)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:45 One to One (m000vp31)
Tech for Good: Marcus Smith speaks to Tristan Harris

Have you ever scrolled through social media and been surprised by an advert for something you were looking at the other day? This is no accident. Every view, every like, every click is stored, assessed and calculated, and allows the companies who run these platforms to target you with increasingly accurate advertising. But if you're not paying for the platform you're using, is there anything wrong with that? Well yes, according to Tristan Harris, one of the contributors to the successful Netflix documentary, The Social Dilemma. Social media may have started as a means of staying in touch with friends but it has led to multi-million pound businesses which use an economic model that competes for our attention, and Tristan fears this is doing society irrevocable harm.

Marcus Smith is a content creator from Bristol and a digital native. He is fascinated by technology's impact on us and has studied the effects of online gambling on young people. For 'One to One' Marcus is looking at the 'tech for good' movement and speaks to two leading figures in the tech industry - one who argues that it is currently a force for bad, and one who tries to work with tech to harness the good.

For this programme Marcus asks Tristan where he thinks we've gone wrong, and what social media companies, regulators and society should be doing about it.

Producer: Toby Field


SAT 15:00 Castle of the Hawk (b0b90xxd)
Hawk Hunting

Hawk Hunting: Rudolf of Habsburg has managed to be elected as Holy Roman Emperor but securing a dynasty is much harder. In order for his son Albert to succeed, several enemies must be removed from his path, starting with his former ally King Ottokar of Bohemia. Meanwhile, Ibrahim is teaching philosophy and making his own secret deals.

Mike Walker's epic chronicle of the Habsburg dynasty which was to rule most of Europe - as well as much of the New World - for 600 years.

Sound design Nigel Lewis
Director Alison Hindell

BBC Cymru Wales production.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m000x65j)
Weekend Woman's Hour: The award-winning composer Shirley J Thompson, Domestic Violence Prevention & Managing our data

Composer Shirley J. Thompson is the first woman in Europe to have composed and conducted a symphony within the last 40 years. She tells us about her new work Emanation, which she’s written for the disabled-led ensemble BSO.

Dame Darcey Bussell Former Principal of The Royal Ballet & Strictly Judge, President of the RAD & creator of Diversity Dance Mix, Dame Darcey Bussell tells us about her mission to rescue Britain’s ballet dancers and raise spirits and money for struggling dance companies by creating the British Ballet Charity Gala at the Royal Albert Hall in London bringing together eight ballet companies in one evening of dance.

We discuss the results of a BBC Freedom of Information request which asked police forces in the UK how many police had been accused of sexual misconduct. We hear from our reporter Melanie Abbott, from Ruth a former officer who found herself being sexually assaulted by a colleague and Harriet Wistrich from the Centre for Women’s Justice.

This year the government has announced an extra 19 million pounds for domestic abuse schemes in England and Wales the majority of which will go to towards perpetrator programmes. . But just how effective are they? We hear from John who has just completed a 20 week domestic violence prevention programme at the Hampton Trust and to Vicky Gilroy who is a facilitator on those prevention programmes at the Trust.

In today’s online digital world everything we do now on our phones or our computers—everything we look at, click on or say online—becomes “data”. Companies and governments increasingly share and use this information to make decisions about our lives. A small UK based team of experts called Foxglove is challenging how our data’s used and they’ve had some remarkable successes over the last year. It’s director Cori Crider tells us how the group successfully challenged the A Level grading algorithm last year.

Presenter: Anita Rani
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Siobhann Tighe


SAT 17:00 PM (m000x65n)
Full coverage of the day's news


SAT 17:30 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (m000x65r)
Nick Robinson talks about what's really going on in British politics.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000x65t)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m000x65w)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000x65y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m000x660)
Jenna Russell, Maggie Aderin-Pocock, Ben Bailey Smith, Imran Mahmood, Angelique Kidjo, Rasha Nahas, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson is joined by Jenna Russell, Maggie Aderin-Pocock, Ben Bailey Smith and Imran Mahmood for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Angelique Kidjo and Rasha Nahas.


SAT 19:00 Profile (m000x662)
Naftali Bennet

The military commando turned self-made tech millionaire who is now prime minister of Israel.

The right-wing, nationalist, supporter of Jewish settlement in the West Bank has formed an unlikely alliance of left and right, secular and religious, Jewish and Arab. Once the chief of staff to Benjamin Netanyahu, Naftali Bennett brought an end to his old boss’s 12 years in power.

Presenter: Mark Coles
Researcher: Sowda Ali
Studio manager: Graham Puddifoot
Programme co-ordinator: Janet Staples
Producer: Joe Kent
Editor: Alex Lewis


SAT 19:15 Women Talking About Cars (m0001fdq)
Series 3

Jennifer Saunders

Jennifer Saunders talks to Victoria Coren Mitchell about her life and some of the cars she has driven along the way, from the much-polished Ford Zephyr of her childhood that her father let her steer as a special treat to the day her husband to be Adrian Edmondson reversed into her much-loved Alfa Spider, nearly ending their romance before it began.
Car descriptions read by Sarah Hadland.

Produced by Gareth Edwards

A BBC Studios Production


SAT 19:45 Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious (b08nl6c1)
Series 1

A Serpent in the Garden

Can a huge global brand look beyond profit and leverage its huge turnover to do genuine good - beyond a catchy song and a pretty advert? Rory Sutherland explores how marketing plays upon questions of faith and idealism: from Coca-Cola's iconic "Hilltop" advertisement of 1971 to contemporary Islamic branding. Are big brands' moves to cater for the beliefs of its consumers really about doing genuine good for humanity - or exploiting social and moral issues to make a fast buck?

Shelina Janmohamed - writer and vice-president of Ogilvy Noor, the world's first Islamic branding consultancy - outlines the emergence of "Generation M": the world's 1 billion Muslims under the age of 30, of whom 90% say their faith informs their consumer decisions.

Meanwhile, senior ad creative Steve Henry and composer Roger Greenaway tell the story of perhaps the most famous "message" advertisement in history: Coca-Cola's "Hilltop" ad of 1971, which gave the world the song "I'd Like To Teach The World To Sing".

Producer: Steven Rajam

-----

Why do certain marketing campaigns - from Nike's "Just Do It" to the MND Ice Bucket Challenge - cast such a spell over us? Rory Sutherland explores the story - and the psychology - behind ten of the most influential campaigns in history - with first-hand accounts from the creative minds that conceived them, and contributions from the worlds of evolutionary biology, behavioural psychology, socio-economics and anthropology.

Marketing. It's come to be one of the most misunderstood - and maligned - disciplines of our age: perceived variously as the Emperor's New Clothes, an emblem of the ills of capitalism, a shadowy dark art designed to steal away our hard-earned money and make us do (or buy, or vote for) things we don't want.

Yet marketing is undeniably a key part of contemporary culture. It's a science that's fundamentally about human behaviour - marketers, to some extent, understand us better than we know ourselves - and in the most successful campaigns we find our deepest emotions and urges, from altruism to shame, hope to bravado, systematically tapped into and drawn upon.

But what are these primal behaviours that the best campaigns evoke in us - and how do they harness them? Is marketing purely about commercial gain or can it underpin real common good and societal progress? And does the discipline manipulate our subconscious instincts and emotions - or simply hold a mirror to them?

Over ten episodes, senior advertising creative and Spectator writer Rory Sutherland unravels the story of some of the most powerful, brilliant and influential campaigns of our age. Set alongside personal testimonies from the brilliant minds that created them, we'll hear from a host of experts - from biologists to philosophers, novelists to economists - about how these campaigns got under our skin and proved to be so influential.

Contributors include: writer and former copywriter Fay Weldon; social behaviourist and expert on altruism Nicola Raihani; Alexander Nix, CEO of big data analysts Cambridge Analytica; philosopher Andy Martin; writer on Islamic issues and advisor to the world's first Islamic branding consultancy, Shelina Janmohamed; and evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miler.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b08gw91n)
The Shape of Things That Came

HG Wells' future history novel looks back from the year 2106. Halfway through the novel's time span, Sean Street explores what the author got almost right - or terribly wrong.

In 1933, Wells published a novel which purported to be a history of the years 1929 to 2105, received from the future in dreams. He called his book The Shape of Things to Come, a phrase that has since become a part of the English language. Now, 84 years into the time scale of this prophetic book and with 88 more to go to complete the story - poet and professor of radio Sean Street goes back to the text and explores what Wells got right, what he got wrong - and what may be yet to come.

From predicting another world war to a utopian world government, he navigates a journey through Wells' future past using audio archives and contemporary news bulletins, with expert help from Christopher Frayling, Andy Sawyer and Orson Wells.

Reader: Jenny Lane
Producer: Andy Cartwright
A Soundscape production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz (b071v5rz)
Series 7

Shoulder Hill

By Sebastian Baczkiewicz

William Palmer has promised to dispose of his former friend and erstwhile magician, Morgan Hambleton. But things have not gone as planned and trouble is coming.

Pilgrim ..... Paul Hilton
Linda ..... Susan Jameson
Mrs. Welbelove ..... Joanna Monro
Ronnie ..... Sam Rix
Becker ..... Adeel Akhtar
Charity ..... Claire Price
Delancey ..... David Schofield
Queen of the Corn ..... Rose Hilton Hille
Mr. Shambles ..... Sean Baker

Directed by Marc Beeby


SAT 21:45 The Hotel (m000n4yl)
3: The Build

Maxine Peake continues Daisy Johnson's series of deliciously unsettling of ghost stories, set in a remote hotel on the Fens.

Today, in 'The Build', work starts on the foundations of The Hotel, but resistance seems to be coming from the ground itself...

Writer: Daisy Johnson is a British novelist and short story writer. Her debut novel, Everything Under, was shortlisted for the 2018 Man Booker Prize, making her the youngest nominee in the prize's history.
Reader: Maxine Peake
Producer: Justine Wilett


SAT 22:00 News (m000x664)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (m000wz56)
The Morality of Swearing

Strong swear words are becoming an increasing part of everyday life, according to research from the British Board of Film Classification. Six in ten of us are now comfortable cursing. A third of us have a greater propensity for profanity than five years ago. What has not changed is the desire to censor swearing in age-restricted cinema and DVD releases. This seems almost quaint in an internet age where almost no content has a gatekeeper. It does, however, point to contradictory attitudes to bad language. Those who dislike swearing think it is vulgar, morally corrupting and intellectually base; the words themselves can be seen an aggressive act, unacceptable in any context. Some see swear words as morally neutral, where any real or perceived harm is entirely dependent upon the intent of the speaker. Others think they can even have a moral power as an expression of strong sentiment and solidarity. Others still, see the creative influence of swear words as linguistically and culturally enriching. Have we become too complacent about bad language? What do generational attitudes to swearing reveal about wider social change? Why have some strong obscenities become more acceptable, while slurs have become less acceptable? How do we negotiate a public discourse in which everyone draws their own lines about the acceptability of swearing? Frankly, should we give a damn? With Peter Hitchens, Dr Rebecca Roache, Esther Rantzen and Simon Donald.

Producer: Dan Tierney.


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (m000wz2d)
Series 11

Brasenose College Oxford

A funny, lively and dynamic quiz presented by Steve Punt and recorded on location at a different university each week, pitting three undergraduates against three of their professors. This week the show comes from the Brasenose College, Oxford.

The rounds vary between specialist subjects and general knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students’ knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors’ awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Ed Sheeran. And the Head-to-Head rounds, in which students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offer plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

The specialist subjects this week are Philosophy, Law and Chemistry and the questions range from rocket fuel and robbing a bank to Plato and pole vault.

The other universities in this series are Southampton, Nottingham Trent, Northampton, Anglia Ruskin and Cumbria.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 23:30 Our Souls So Knit (m000wywx)
Caroline Bird is on a mission to uncover the story behind Victorian poet Michael Field., who was actually two women, Katherine Bradley and Edith Cooper. Friends and contemporaries of Robert Browning and Oscar Wilde, the women were aunt and niece, but also lovers.

Producer for BBC Audio in Bristol: Sally Heaven



SUNDAY 20 JUNE 2021

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m000x666)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m000x1gd)
Bog Girls

An original short story commissioned by BBC Radio 4 from the writer Louise Farr. As read by Séainín Brennan and Eimear Fearon.

The Writer

Louise Farr is a teacher and writer from Northern Ireland. In 2018, she was the winner of the Benedict Kiely Short Story Competition and The Trisha Ashley Award. In 2019, she won The Ink Tears Short Story Competition and The Dalkey Writing Festival Short Story Competition. In 2020 Louise was shortlisted for the Benedict Kiely Short Story Competition and her story ‘Tinder’ was nominated for the An Post Short Story of the Year Award. She is currently working on her second novel.

Writer: Louise Farr
Reader: Séainín Brennan
Reader: Eimear Fearon
Producer: Michael Shannon
Exec Editor: Andy Martin

A BBC Northern Ireland production.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000x668)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000x66b)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000x66d)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m000x66g)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m000x60n)
The church of St. Mary the Virgin, Hanbury in Worcestershire

Bells on Sunday comes from the church of St. Mary the Virgin, Hanbury in Worcestershire. You may hear these bells more often than you think because The Archers uses them as the fictional “St. Stephen’s Church”. The present ring of eight bells was last cast before the Second World War by John Taylor of Loughborough. We now hear them ringing Single Oxford Bob Triples.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m000x662)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Summary (m000x5zj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b04lp626)
George Herbert

George Herbert provided the series Something Understood with its title and so is, in a sense, the programme's literary patron. Mark Tully presents a celebration of the seventeenth century metaphysical poet's life and work in conversation with his latest biographer John Drury, and discusses the relevance Herbert can still have for us today.

There are readings of Herbert's work and the music his verse has inspired. The featured authors and composers include Vikram Seth, T S Eliot, Alec Roth, Sandy Denny and Vaughan Williams.

The readers are Jane Whittenshaw, David Westhead and Francis Cadder.

Produced by Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 Natural Histories (b05w99rp)
Butterflies

Shards of stained glass falling through sunlight – the butterfly is an image of beauty. Delicate, colourful yet exquisitely fragile we have painted and eulogised the butterfly from time immemorial.

A “butterfly mind” skips from subject to subject... they are modern metaphors for the trivial and light-hearted. Yet we forget that at times some butterflies have been used as menacing creatures.

Their eye-spots, used to deter predators, were interpreted as eyes watching you from hedgerow and meadow to make sure no lewd behaviour happened in the fields. The deep, blood red colour of the red admiral was seen as a sign of Christ’s crucifixion and therefore a symbol of suffering a death.

The butterfly metamorphoses between body forms, reminding us that our earthly body will one day be transformed.

Butterflies have also been the subject of overwhelming passion. Intense, obsessive collectors have chased them over every continent, even shooting them from the skies with guns and then trembling with overwhelming excitement as they put a blackened, torn creature into their displays. They are souls of the dead flying to heaven or an inspiration for fashion designers, or a symbol of death. Few creatures have had so much laid on their delicate shoulders.

Today, butterflies are symbols of freedom and harmony with nature, the poster insects for a utopia where people and nature are at one.

Original Producer : Sarah Pitt
Archive Producer : Andrew Dawes

Revised Repeat : First Broadcast BBC Radio 4; 16th June 2015


SUN 06:57 Weather (m000x5zm)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m000x5zp)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m000x5zr)
A look at the ethical and religious issues of the week


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m000x5zt)
SSAFA, the Armed Forces Charity

Matt Hill, a former soldier, makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of SSAFA, the Armed Forces Charity.

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘SSAFA’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘SSAFA’.
- You can donate online at bbc.co.uk/appeal/radio4

Registered Charity Number: 210760


SUN 07:57 Weather (m000x5zw)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m000x5zy)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m000x600)
The world's favourite psalm

It is 1,500 years since the birth of Columba, the major missionary monk in the Celtic church who evangelised Scotland and brought, among many other things, the Book of Psalms to its shores. John Bell and Christine Reid of the Iona Community reflect on Psalm 23, probably the best-loved psalm, with which Scotland has a special connection.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m000x1gv)
Anti-Zionism and the Death of Tragedy

"To locate Zionism's origins," argues Howard Jacobson, "we must leave historical for spiritual time."

Howard ponders whether a hint of the tragic world view would change perceptions today in the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians.

Producer: Adele Armstrong


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (m0003631)
Gillian Clarke on the Red Kite

Welsh poet and playwright Gillian Clarke first saw a red kite in the Welsh mountains as a child, a bird which now has expanded east and now Gillian regularly sees them sky-dancing over Reading while she travels to London on the train.

You can hear more from Gillian in her Tweet of the Week omnibus, available as a download from the website, or on BBC Sounds

Producer : Andrew Dawes


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m000x602)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m000x604)
Writers, Caroline Harrington, Adrian Flynn
Directors; Peter Leslie Wild, Kim Greengrass
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Helen Archer … Louiza Patikas
Brian Aldridge … Charles Collingwood
Phoebe Aldridge ..... Lucy Morris
Lilian Bellamy ----- Sunny Ormonde
Lee Bryce … Ryan Early
Rex Fairbrother ..... Nick Barber
Joy Horville … Jakie Lye
Adam Macy … Andrew Wincott
Lynda Snell ..... Carole Boyd
Roy Tucker ..... Ian Pepperell
Peggy Woolley ..... June Spencer


SUN 10:54 Tweet of the Day (m000x6cg)
Tweet Take 5 : Corncrake

The repetitive crex crex call of the corncrake was once a familiar sound across much of the British Isles. Today as a result of changes in farmland management, these secretive summer visitors are found only in a few places in the west of Britain, though attempts are being made to reintroduce them to parts of Cambridgeshire. As we'll hear from wildlife cameraman Mark Smith, wildlife presenter Steve Backshall and musician Joe Acheson.

Producer : Andrew Dawes for BBC Audio in Bristol


SUN 11:00 Desert Island Discs (m000x6cj)
Richard Wilson, actor and director.

Richard Wilson is an actor and director who became a household name when he played the part of Victor Meldrew in the BBC sitcom One Foot in the Grave.

Richard was born in Greenock in Scotland in 1936. As a child he performed in amateur drama productions and harboured a secret desire to become an actor. He left school at 17 and trained as a laboratory technician at Stobhill Hospital in Glasgow.

Following National Service in Singapore, he moved to London and at the age of 27 successfully auditioned for a place at RADA. His first role was as a stonemason in Dr Finlay’s Casebook and he later reached a wider audience playing snooty Jeremy Parsons QC in the television series Crown Court.

Richard went on to carve out a successful theatre and television career as both an actor and director. He starred in the comedy Only When I Laugh and later in the series Tutti Frutti alongside Emma Thompson and Robbie Coltrane.

In 1990 he delighted audiences with his portrayal of the grumpy pensioner Victor Meldrew in One Foot in the Grave, with his catchphrase ‘I don’t believe it!’ – a phrase which has haunted Richard ever since. The series regularly attracted an audience of 17 million viewers and Richard won two BAFTAs for his performance.

Richard received an award for his outstanding contribution to film and television at the Scottish BAFTAs in 2013.

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Paula McGinley


SUN 11:45 Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious (b08nq5wq)
Series 1

The Allure of Altruism

When we donate, who are we really benefiting? And does it really matter?

Rory Sutherland explores perhaps the most influential and successful charitable campaign of recent times: the Motor Neurone Disease / ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. Spread virally by social media, yet decried by some as mere vanity and "slacktivism", the campaign nevertheless proved hugely valuable to both the fight against disease, and understanding attitudes to altruism in the age of Facebook.

We hear powerful testimonies from the families who created it, with insights into our attitudes to giving unravelled by experimental psychologist Nichola Raihani, one of the UK's leading experts in altruism.

Producer: Steven Rajam

---

Why do certain marketing campaigns - from Nike's "Just Do It" to the MND Ice Bucket Challenge - cast such a spell over us? Rory Sutherland explores the story - and the psychology - behind ten of the most influential campaigns in history - with first-hand accounts from the creative minds that conceived them, and contributions from the worlds of evolutionary biology, behavioural psychology, socio-economics and anthropology.

Marketing. It's come to be one of the most misunderstood - and maligned - disciplines of our age: perceived variously as the Emperor's New Clothes, an emblem of the ills of capitalism, a shadowy dark art designed to steal away our hard-earned money and make us do (or buy, or vote for) things we don't want.

Yet marketing is undeniably a key part of contemporary culture. It's a science that's fundamentally about human behaviour - marketers, to some extent, understand us better than we know ourselves - and in the most successful campaigns we find our deepest emotions and urges, from altruism to shame, hope to bravado, systematically tapped into and drawn upon.

But what are these primal behaviours that the best campaigns evoke in us - and how do they harness them? Is marketing purely about commercial gain or can it underpin real common good and societal progress? And does the discipline manipulate our subconscious instincts and emotions - or simply hold a mirror to them?

Over ten episodes, senior advertising creative and Spectator writer Rory Sutherland unravels the story of some of the most powerful, brilliant and influential campaigns of our age. Set alongside personal testimonies from the brilliant minds that created them, we'll hear from a host of experts - from biologists to philosophers, novelists to economists - about how these campaigns got under our skin and proved to be so influential.

Contributors include: writer and former copywriter Fay Weldon; social behaviourist and expert on altruism Nicola Raihani; Alexander Nix, CEO of big data analysts Cambridge Analytica; philosopher Andy Martin; writer on Islamic issues and advisor to the world's first Islamic branding consultancy, Shelina Janmohamed; and evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miler.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m000x6cl)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:04 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (m000wz2p)
Series 75

Episode 1

The 75th series of Radio 4's multi award-winning ‘antidote to panel games’ promises yet more quality, desk-based entertainment for all the family. The series comes from the hallowed Radio Theatre in Broadcasting House but with a 1000-strong remote audience drawn exclusively from the South of England. For this show, regular panellists Tony Hawks and Marcus Brigstocke are joined by first-timers Vicki Pepperdine and Henning Wehn, with Jack Dee as the programme's reluctant chairman. Regular listeners will know to expect inspired nonsense, pointless revelry and Colin Sell at the piano. Producer - Jon Naismith. It is a BBC Studios production.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m000x6cn)
The Medical Field: Why student doctors are getting out on farms

The Food Programme first met Iain Broadley and Ally Jaffee in 2017, when they were studying medicine in Bristol.

The pair saw a disconnect between the rise of diet-related diseases, and the training they received around nutrition - with some students getting as little as eight hours of compulsory nutrition education during their entire time at medical school. So Ally and Iain founded Nutritank, an organisation championing better nutritional education for healthcare professionals, which earned them the Pat Llewellyn New Talent trophy at the 2019 BBC Food and Farming Awards.

Today Nutritank's active in more than 20 medical school societies across the UK, and has been part of a working group charged with finalising a new nutritional curriculum for medical schools, due out this autumn.

Now, they're piloting a scheme taking student and junior doctors out on farm visits - in a bid to better educate future healthcare professionals about food production and nutrition, so that they in turn can better advise their patients.

So could it work? Sheila joins them on a farm visit to the Great Tew Estate in Oxfordshire, to find out.

She also speaks to Kate Henderson from the estate's farm team, Liz Lake and Caroline Drummond from Linking Environment and Farming, and Dr Glenys Jones: a registered public health nutritionist and deputy chief executive of the Association for Nutrition.

Presented by Sheila Dillon; produced in Bristol by Lucy Taylor.


SUN 12:57 Weather (m000x6cq)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m000x6cs)
News with Edward Stourton including how the West should deal with Iran's new President and can the Democratic Unionist Party survive its latest leadership crisis? Plus the artwork being made from the sounds of an abandoned house on Anglesey.


SUN 13:30 The Listening Project (m000x6cv)
Knowing ourselves

Fi Glover presents friends, relatives and strangers in conversation.

This week: Sue and Caroline discuss the impact of an ADHD diagnosis later in life; Anne and Rick compare the pros and cons of staying put vs travelling the world; artists John and Florence discuss the importance of staying true to oneself in an industry that can appear to value conformity; and Carol and Jane consider how the grieving process is altered when a proper funeral isn't possible.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moments of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in this decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Ellie Bury


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000x1gb)
RHS Bridgewater: Postbag Edition

Peter Gibbs and the panel are at the newly opened RHS Bridgewater answering your gardening questions. Joining him this week are regular panellists Matthew Wilson, Pippa Greenwood and Matthew Pottage, along with Curator Marcus Chilton-Jones and Sylvia Travers, Team Leader of the Inner Walled Garden. Together, they answer your questions on pruning plum trees, unhappy rhododendrons and strange additions to the compost heap.

Producer - Daniel Cocker
Assistant Producer - Jemima Rathbone

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 Thought Cages (m0001b0w)
Instinct Before Logic: The Postbox at the O2

If you think humans are rational beings then think again. Rory Sutherland continues his exploration of mysterious psycho-logic with a look at why reason has been dropped as the weapon of choice when it comes to persuading us to change our behaviour. We visit the so-called ‘Nudge Unit’ to find out how behavioural science has found its way to the heart of government, and discover how a simple hack has led to a massive increase in pension contributions in many countries.

Produced by Michael Surcombe for BBC Wales


SUN 15:00 DH Lawrence: Tainted Love (m000x6cx)
The Rainbow

'DH Lawrence: Tainted Love’ dynamically puts centre stage Lawrence's daring writing on the complexity of love. The Rainbow dramatised by Linda Marshall Griffiths

Ursula Brangwen wants to know about passion and desire. Delving into her own family history she defiantly questions the choices open to women.

Ursula ..... Cassie Bradley
Tom ..... Karl Collins
Lydia ..... Aneta Piotrowska
Young Ursula ..... Florence Hunt
Anna ..... Rosalie Craig
Young Anna ..... Lauren Tanner
Will ..... Lee Ingleby

Directed by Nadia Molinari

‘DH Lawrence: Tainted Love’ is a pairing of two novels 'The Rainbow' and 'Women in Love' linked by Ursula Brangwen. Sexual awakening, transgression and repression are explored as his characters try to find happiness and fulfilment in uncertain times. Set in a mining town in Nottinghamshire, 'Tainted Love' is a celebration of Lawrence at his most daring, pushing the boundaries of sexuality in the dawning of the Twentieth Century.

Seen through the eyes of Ursula, ‘The Rainbow’ spans three generations of the Brangwen family from 1840s to 1905 exploring the complexity of desire, sexuality and liberty. As Ursula reflects on her family history, she defiantly questions the choices open to women, rejecting the path taken by her mother Anna who found fulfilment in childrearing and finding inspiration in the advice of her grandmother Lydia, a Polish refugee, who tells her to seek someone who will love her for what she is, not for what he wants. Upon publication in 1915 the novel was suppressed on the grounds of obscenity, all copies were destroyed and it remained banned in Britain for 11 years under the Obscene Publications Act 1857.

With thanks to the Estate of Frieda Lawrence Ravagli.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m000x6d0)
Zakiya Dalila Harris

Elizabeth Day talks to Zakiya Dalila Harris about her debut novel, The Other Black Girl, a biting social satire on the publishing industry. The novel tells the story of 26-year-old Nella, an editorial assistant and the only Black woman in her office. When Hazel, a new Black colleague arrives, she assumes they will bond, but when tensions escalate, sinister notes are left on Nella’s desk and she falls out of favour is there more to Hazel than meets the eye. The novel swerves into thriller territory with a dash of magical realism.

Last year, Small Pleasures was writer Clare Chambers first novel in a decade, which became a word of mouth bestseller and longlisted for the Women’s Prize. Set in the 1950s, the novel features Jean Swinney, a reporter on the North Kent Echo, who investigates an alleged virgin birth. The writer AJ Pearce also has a female journalist - described as The Bridget Jones of the Blitz - at the centre of her novels. Emmeline Lake is the upbeat heroine of both the hugely successful Dear Mrs Bird and now Pearce’s follow-up, Yours Cheerfully, where the magazine she works for has been conscripted by the government to inspire women to join the war effort. The writers talk about putting journalists at the heart of their novels and the unerring stoicism of their characters as they undertake duty ahead of self-fulfilment.

And writer Leone Ross, who recently published This One Sky Day, shares the Book I've Never Lend.

Book List – Sunday 20 June and Thursday 24 June

The Other Black Girl by Zakiya Dalila Harris
Small Pleasures by Clare Chambers
Yours Cheerfully by A. J. Pearce
Dear Mrs Bird by A. J. Pearce
The Lunatic by Anthony C Winkler
All the Blood is Red by Leone Ross
Orange Laughter by Leone Ross


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (m000x6d2)
Yomi Sode

Poet Yomi Sode shares a selection of his favourite poems, including Roger Robinson, Sinéad Morrissey, Casey Bailey and Raymond Carver. Yomi also reads a poem from his upcoming collection MANORISM, which explores fatherhood and masculinity.

Producer: Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio in Bristol


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m000wz0j)
Above the law?

Since reporting on a story about police abuses earlier this year reporter Anna Adams has been inundated with calls and messages from women all telling her the same thing; they were a victim at the hands of a police officer. For File on 4 Anna investigates the failures of police forces to properly manage and investigate accused officers within their own ranks. Many of the women she speaks to are police officers themselves

Reporter: Anna Adams
Producer: Kate West & Mick Tucker
Editor: Gail Champion


SUN 17:40 Profile (m000x662)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000x6d4)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m000x6d6)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000x6d8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m000x608)
Julie Fowlis

Presenter: Julie Fowlis
Producer: Elizabeth Foster
Production support: Ellen Orchard
Studio Manager: Sue Stonestreet


SUN 19:00 Short Works (b07w6kn9)
The Authorities: A Modern Elegy by Jenn Ashworth

One of five stories originally commissioned from the best younger British writers to accompany the shortlist of the BBC National Short Story Award 2016:

The Authorities: A Modern Elegy by Jenn Ashworth
There's a body on the beach. Various facts are unknown. But it also means the investigators must imagine certain events leading up to death..

Reader Caroline Catz

Producer Duncan Minshull


SUN 19:15 The Confessional (m000x60b)
Series 1

The Confession of Alastair Campbell

Actor and broadcaster Stephen Mangan presents a comedy chat show about shame and guilt.

Each week Stephen invites a different eminent guest into his virtual confessional box to make three 'confessions' . This is a cue for some remarkable storytelling, and surprising insights.

We’re used to hearing celebrity interviews, where stars are persuaded to show off about their achievements and talk about their proudest moments. Stephen's not interested in that. He doesn’t want to know what his guests are proud of, he wants to know what they’re ashamed of. That’s surely the way to find out what really makes a person tick. Stephen and his guest reflect with empathy and humour on why we get embarrassed, where our shame thresholds should be, and the value of guilt.

In the final edition of this series, the writer, journalist and political strategist Alastair Campbell speaks about “maladaptive competitiveness”, technology which defeats him and dressing up at Lambeth Palace.

Other guests in this series include Cariad Lloyd, Dr Phil Hammond, Clarke Peters, Suzi Ruffell, Marian Keyes, Phil Wang, Joan Bakewell, Lucy Porter and Nigel Planer.

Written and presented by Stephen Mangan
With extra material by Nick Doody
Devised with Dave Anderson

Produced by Frank Stirling
A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 19:45 The Chronicles of Burke Street (m000x60d)
2: Winston's Story

{Paterson Joseph reads the next in the brilliantly funny short story series by the award-winning author of 'Love After Love', Ingrid Persaud.

Set on an everyday street in Port of Spain, Trinidad, 'The Chronicles of Burke Street' follows the lives and loves of its colourful residents. Burke Street might seem like an ordinary street, but behind its closed doors lurk secrets, superstitions and barely concealed lies.

Today, in 'Winston's Story', things don't quite go to plan when a dangerous jail bird on the run hijacks the local taxi driver's car...

Reader: Paterson Joseph
Writer: Ingrid Persaud
Producer: Justine Willett


SUN 20:00 More or Less (m000wz3z)
Covid deaths, outdoor swimming and care homes

The official number of deaths attributed to Covid 19 around the world in the whole of 2020 is 1.88 million. The global toll this year surpassed this figure on 11th of June. We look at how things are worse worldwide, despite vaccines and lock downs.

Does the UK have the worst bathing sites in Europe? That’s certainly a claim made by a number of newspapers. We show why this is not the case.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock has been in the news again with comments regarding care homes during the pandemic. Just how good was the government’s ‘ring of protection’ around care homes during the first wave - and the second?

We speak to Steven Johnson about his book ‘Extra Life: A Short History of Living Longer.’

(Bathers at the Thames Estuary in Whitstable, Kent. Credit: Richard Baker/Getty Images)


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m000x1gg)
Edward de Bono, Paul Van Doren, Alastair Hanton OBE, Violetta Elvin

Pictured: Edward de Bono

Matthew Bannister on

Edward De Bono, the psychologist who advocated lateral thinking – and sold the concept to companies around the world.

Paul Van Doren, the American businessman whose Vans sneakers were adopted by skateboarders, making him a multi-millionaire.

Alastair Hanton OBE, who set up the National Girobank and developed direct debits to allow greater access to banking before becoming a campaigner for ethical investing and greener transport.

Violetta Elvin, the Russian ballerina who made her name as a rival to Dame Margot Fonteyn at the Royal Ballet.

Producer: Neil George

Interviewed guest: Sarah Tucker
Interviewed guest: Steve Van Doren
Interviewed guest: Nicholas Smith
Interviewed guest: Angus Hanton
Interviewed guest: Raffaele Lauro
Interviewed guest: Ronald Hynd
Translator: Martin Esposito

Archive clips used: Logical and Lateral, Radio 4 29/12/1976; Today, Radio 4 29/04/1976; Fast Times at Ridgemont High, directed by Amy Heckerling, Universal Pictures 1982; LA Olympics Opening Ceremony, ABC News 1984; Alastair Hanton Oral History, The Hanton Family 2021.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m000x60g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m000x5zt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (m000wytt)
Marvellous Medicine

Most of us were blindsided by the novel virus SarsCov2, but infectious disease experts had been warning about the possibility of a global pandemic for some years. For them it was never a matter of if, but when. What did come as a surprise was the speed of scientific progress to fight Covid 19. The first effective vaccine, from Pfizer/BioNTech, was developed in under 300 days, followed in successive weeks by Moderna and Oxford/AstraZeneca. The results of the UK’s RECOVERY trial, which was organised in a matter of weeks, has saved an estimated million lives worldwide by identifying which treatments are effective in treating Covid 19. And regulators around the globe, like Britain’s MHRA, are using innovative programmes to get medical products to people faster. During the pandemic, the world witnessed how fast medicine can advance with an abundance of cash and collaboration. Is progress at this speed and cost sustainable? Sandra Kanthal asks if drug development is something which should still take decades, or have we learned how to permanently accelerate the process?

Guests:

Rod MacKenzie, Chief Development Officer, Pfizer
Nuala Murphy, President Clinical Research Services, Icon
Professor Sir Martin Landray, Co-Chief Investigator, RECOVERY Trial
Nicholas Jackson, Head of Programmes and Technology, CEPI
Christian Schneider, Interim Chief Scientific Officer, MHRA
Hilda Bastian, Independent Scientist

Producer and Presenter Sandra Kanthal
Editor Jasper Corbett


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m000x60j)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (m000x0yj)
Stanley Tucci

With Antonia Quirke

Stanley Tucci reveals how his latest film Supernova is the story of a long-lasting friendship, both on and off screen. He's been friends with his co-star Colin Firth for over twenty years, and Stanley reveals how he asked Colin to be in the film without the director's knowledge.

The Reason I Jump is a documentary that focuses on the experiences of non-speaking autistic people and director Jerry Rothwell explains how he used sound to immerse the viewer in a different perspective on the world.

It's been a month since the easing of restrictions resulted in the re-opening of cinemas. But as the full easing has been postponed by 4 weeks, cinema owner Kevin Marwick reveals how his business will be affected by only operating on 50% capacity.

Antonia visits the Phoenix Cinema in Oban and talks to general manager Jenny Larnie about the reasons they are starting a streaming service

There are more love letters to the cinema from listeners, and we hear from the Kremer family as they return to their favourite picture house and their favourite seats.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b04lp626)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 21 JUNE 2021

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m000x60l)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (m000wz4r)
Tourism - Travel

Tourism & travel: Laurie Taylor explores their past, present and future. He's joined by the Italian social theorist, Marco D' Eramo, whose latest book unpacks a global cultural phenomenon at the point at which some of us are considering the possibilities of foreign travel, once again. How did travelling, as an elite pastime, evolve into mass tourism? Why do tourists often despise other tourists? How 'authentic' is the average heritage site? What impact does tourism have on our cities and the environment? Might we find more 'otherness' by staying at home? They're joined by Emily Thomas, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Durham University, whose research has found that philosophers have theorised extensively about the meaning and purpose of travel in a quest to understand the complexity of the world and of ourselves. Thinking Allowed is produced in partnership with the Open University.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m000x60n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000x60q)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000x60s)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000x60v)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m000x60x)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000x60z)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev'd Dr Craig Gardiner, a tutor at South Wales Baptist College.

Good morning.

Do you say ‘thank you’ to the driver of the bus, or to the shop assistant serving at the till? This was the heart of a conversation I overheard quite recently while I was waiting in a queue. And despite being 2 metres apart and wearing masks, some others who were waiting joined in the conversation too.

Some thought there was no need to say anything, because people were only doing what was expected in their job. Others said something like ‘it does no harm to be polite’. Someone else put it more positively: ‘I just try to spread a little joy.’

As it turns out, saying ‘thank you’ does actually brings some tangible benefits. Of course, it can make those working feel appreciated, but it also helps those who are expressing their thanks – and that’s because learning to be grateful for the incidental good things that may come our way can fundamentally change our outlook on life. Indeed, some psychological research suggests that consciously attending to our thankfulness can help liberate us from fear, anxiety and other toxic emotions. Maybe that’s why, in the bible, St Paul repeatedly encouraged the persecuted church to give thanks in every situation; why he himself tried to rejoice amidst even the most difficult of circumstances.

So, whatever this new day may bring, if we want to know more joy in it, perhaps we should try a little thankfulness. As the monk Brother David Steindl-Rast has said, ‘it is not joy that makes us grateful, it is gratitude that makes us joyful.’

God of life
and bringer of joy,
help us to count the blessings of this new day
and to bring to mind the good things in our midst
Help us to begin and end
each encounter with gratitude
and every conversation with thanks
so we may we inhabit joy
and share it wildly and widely in your world
Amen


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m000x611)
21/06/21 Tree planting, Arctic Terns, Soft fruit.

New figures from the Forestry Commission show Britain is failing to meet targets for planting woodlands. The Government aims to plant 30,000 hectares over the next four years, but the Confederation of Forest Industries, ConFor, says that in England, tree planting rates will have to treble if the country's to reach its goals.

The Farne Islands off the Northumbrian Coast are reknown for their colonies of Arctic Terns but bird lovers say that over the past 18 months, the nature reserves there have become overgrown and gulls have driven the Terns Away. The National Trust says its resident wardens haven't been able to manage the islands because of Covid restrictions. But critics say they've neglected an important habitat.

It's soft fruit season. Growers say the cold weather at the start of the season means the berries will taste better this year. But finding pickers is a struggle for many fruit farmers.

Presenter = Charlotte Smith
Producer = Rebecca Rooney


MON 05:56 Weather (m000x613)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09d3p60)
Gary Moore on the Stone Curlew

Braving dark countryside, sound recordist Gary Moore goes in search of the rarely-heard sound of the stone curlew and finds himself laying in wet grass swaying his mic in the air.

Producer: Tom Bonnett
Photograph: Andy Harris.


MON 06:00 Today (m000x4zn)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m000x4zq)
Jackie Kay on Bessie Smith

Scotland’s former National Poet Jackie Kay celebrates the tempestuous life of the great blues singer, Bessie Smith. Born in Tennessee in 1894 Bessie was a street singer before she made it big at a time of racial violence and segregation. Jackie Kay remembers growing up as a young black girl in Glasgow and she tells Kirsty Wark how she idolised this iconic singer.

In Time’s Witness the historian Rosemary Hill explores the historical shift in focus from the grand sweeping narratives of kings and statesmen to a new interest in the lives of ordinary people. She argues that the turn of the 19th century and the age of the Romantics ushered in a more vibrant and serious debate about the importance of oral history, clothes, music, food and art.

The artist Michael Armitage is exhibiting his latest work at the Royal Academy in London until September. Born in Kenya in 1984 but based between Nairobi and London, Armitage is influenced by contemporary East African art and politics, as well as drawing on European art history from Titian to Gauguin. His exhibition Paradise Edict showcases 15 of his large scale works painted on lubugo bark cloth, a material traditionally made in Uganda.

Producer: Katy Hickman


MON 09:45 Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez (m000x50l)
One

In Episode One of Arctic Dreams Barry Lopez reflects on his first encounters with the surprisingly varied and resilient inhabitants of the polar north and on modern man’s vexed relationship with this beguiling continent.
In his breath-taking natural, social and cultural history of the Arctic, Lopez reveals the essential mystery and beauty of a continent that has enchanted man's imagination and ambition since time immemorial.
Written well over a quarter of a century ago, Lopez's visionary account of his journey across the polar caps is a celebration of the Arctic in all its guises. A hostile landscape of ice, freezing oceans and dazzling skyscapes, home to millions of diverse animals and people, it is also the backdrop to massive migrations by land, sea and air and the setting of epic exploratory voyages.

In timeless, prophetic prose, as meditative and memorable as the land it describes, Arctic Dreams poses fundamental questions about how we should cherish our ever more vulnerable planet.
Arctic Dreams was written by Barry Lopez.
It is read by Kyle Soller and abridged by Richard Hamilton
The producer is Karen Holden


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000x4zv)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


MON 11:00 Tainted Money (m000w9v6)
David Cannadine knows a great deal about philanthropy - from the history of the 'robber barons' of the USA such as Carnegie and Rockefeller - to the way that today's museums and universities depend upon private giving. But philanthropy these days can often seem an enterprise fraught with moral ambiguity and possible reputational damage.

The ways universities and arts organisations raise and take money (and from whom) has rarely been a more urgent topic.

David speaks to those who support philanthropy (though they call for increased transparency) citing the good it can do. But we also hear from those who maintain that donations often come with strings attached, are fundamentally undemocratic and sometimes a handy reputational whitewash for the corporate or individual giver.

Philanthropy and the idea of 'tainted money' raises larger questions too - is the backlash against private giving simply a symptom of people's rejection of super-wealth and of the power that inevitably comes with it?

Presented by David Cannadine
Produced by Susan Marling
A Just Radio programme for BBC Radio 4


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m000x660)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m000x6p8)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


MON 12:04 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000x50d)
Episode 1

Helen Dunmore’s prize-winning first novel is set in the late spring, early summer of 1917. War haunts the Cornish coast and ships are being sunk by U-boats, strangers are treated with suspicion, and newspapers are full of spy stories.

Into this uneasy landscape, to a hamlet just outside St Ives, come DH Lawrence and his German wife, Frieda. They are hoping to escape the war-fever that grips London and also to live as cheaply as possible in a rented cottage. The pacifist Lawrence is reeling from his latest novel, The Rainbow, having been banned for obscenity, and is struggling to finish and publish its sequel, Women in Love.

They befriend Clare Coyne, a young artist who has lived alone with her father since her mother died when she was a child.

Written by Helen Dunmore
Read by Louise Brealey
Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m000x6pb)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


MON 12:57 Weather (m000x6pd)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m000x6pg)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


MON 13:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sqw6p)
Pilgrims, Raiders and Traders (900 - 1300 AD)

Vale of York Hoard

The history of the world as told through objects that history has left behind. This week Neil MacGregor, the director of the British Museum, has chosen objects that bring life to the traders, pilgrims and raiders who swept across the vast expanse of Europe and Asia between the 9th and 13th centuries.
Today he is with a great Viking treasure hoard that was discovered by metal detectors in a field in North Yorkshire. This dramatic, recent discovery, consisting of over 600 coins buried in a silver cup, dates back to the 10th century and reveals the astonishing range of Viking activity. There are coins here minted as far away as Afghanistan and Iraq! Neil describes what the England of the early 900's was really like. He unravels the clichés that abound about the Vikings. The historian Michael Wood helps set the scene and the father and son team who found the hoard, David and Andrew Whelan, recall the excitement of the discovery.

Producer: Anthony Denselow


MON 14:00 Drama (m000x6pk)
Song of the Reed: Swallowtail

Sophie Okonedo and Mark Rylance star in the first of Steve Waters’ seasonal dramas following the life of Fleggwick, a fictional wetlands nature reserve, over the period of one year.

Fleggwick, like the ecosystem it protects, is under threat. The site was not financially sustainable when its founder passed away so his daughter Liv (Sophie Okonedo) needs to find a way for it to survive. But if that means selling out to ‘trendy conservation’ then Ian (Mark Rylance), the Warden, wants nothing to do with it.

Recorded on location at RSPB’s Strumpshaw Fen, the story is informed by the real work and science of conservation taking place in the face of rapid environmental change in the wetlands of Norfolk, and everywhere.

It’s a rainy summer's day and a Swallowtail Safari is being held at the reserve with members of the public, as well as a manager from WildScapes, visiting Fleggwick with the hope of catching a glimpse of the elusive and utterly beautiful swallowtail butterfly. The future of the reserve may ride on it.

Cast:
Liv ..... Sophie Okonedo
Ian ..... Mark Rylance
Tam ..... Ella Dorman Gajic
Kay ..... Molly Naylor
Sadegh ..... Zaydun Khalaf
Nikki ..... Karen Hill
Voice of the Reed ..... Christine Kavanagh
Other parts played by staff and volunteers at RSPB Strumpshaw Fen

Written by Steve Waters
Music by Michael Somerset Ward with Rebecca Hearne
Sound Design by Alisdair McGregor

Produced and Directed by Boz Temple-Morris
A Holy Mountain production for BBC Radio 4


MON 14:45 The Why Factor (b0680lxv)
Why is our hair such an important part of who we are?

Why is hair such an important part of who we are?

Each year we spend billions of dollars on cutting, shaping and colouring our hair. It's important for personal, cultural and symbolic reasons.

But why? Find out, as Mike Williams hears the stories of people who have had their hair taken from them...


MON 15:00 The 3rd Degree (m000x6pm)
Series 11

Anglia Ruskin University

A funny, lively and dynamic quiz presented by Steve Punt and recorded on location at a different university each week, pitting three undergraduates against three of their professors. This week the show comes from the Anglia Ruskin University.

The rounds vary between specialist subjects and general knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students’ knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors’ awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Ed Sheeran. And the Head-to-Head rounds, in which students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offer plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

The specialist subjects this week are Sociology, Optometry and Psychology - and it's your chance to find out about the Pole Of Ignorance, the Tumbling E and a CGI lion.

The other universities in this series are Southampton, Nottingham Trent, Northampton, Brasenose College Oxford and Cumbria.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m000x6cn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Blue: Pain and Pleasure (m000x0y1)
Marking the 50th anniversary of the release of Joni Mitchell's seminal album Blue, Laura Marling tells the story behind the writing and recording of the album, and explains why Blue is regarded by critics as one of the greatest albums of all time.

Joni Mitchell’s masterpiece was conceived and created with raw emotion at its heart and she poured everything she had into the writing and recording of her music. As Joni said at the time, "I couldn’t look at people without weeping, I was just dripping in earnestness and sincerity. I realised a lot of people were listening to me, so they better find out who they’re worshipping, let’s see if they can take it, let’s get real - so I wrote Blue, which horrified a lot of people. I just revealed human traits. When people see themselves in it the communication is complete."

Laura explains how she first became aware of Blue and describes the enormous impact the album had on her - artistically and personally. Laura will also include contributions from other fans of Joni's iconic work - including Emeli Sande, Beth Orton, Ellie Goulding, James Taylor, Graham Nash, Sharon Corr, Greta Scacchi and Seal.

A Zinc Media production for BBC Radio 4


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (m000x6pq)
Series 20

SOS

Aleks Krotoski on how ordinary people stepped in to save lives during India's second wave.


MON 17:00 PM (m000x6ps)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000x4zz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (m000x501)
Series 75

Episode 2

The 75th series of Radio 4's multi award-winning ‘antidote to panel games’ promises yet more homespun wireless entertainment for the young at heart. This series is coming to you from the Radio Theatre in Broadcasting House but with a 1000-strong remote audience drawn exclusively from the Midlands. Regular panellists Tony Hawks and Marcus Brigstocke are once again joined by first-timers Vicki Pepperdine and Henning Wehn, with Jack Dee in the chair. At the piano – Colin Sell.

Producer - Jon Naismith
A BBC Studios production


MON 19:00 The Archers (m000x503)
Lee struggles to keep a secret and Shula faces a potentially tricky situation


MON 19:15 Front Row (m000x505)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 19:45 The Art of Innovation (m00099zp)
Wonder Materials

Sir Ian Blatchford, Director of the Science Museum Group, and the Science Museum’s Head of Collections, Dr Tilly Blyth, continue their series exploring how art and science have inspired each other from the Enlightenment to dark matter.

They focus on a new post-war age of ambivalence in the relationship between art and science through a 1951 parable about the drive for new artificial textiles and the dangers of scientific hubris.

The Ealing comedy the Man in the White Suit presents Britain seeking to relaunch itself as a high tech nation. It stars Alec Guinness as Sidney Stratton, a divisive chemist with the personal aim of making an indestructible synthetic fibre. It’s a potential boon for consumers but would deal a deathblow for the textile industry.

As Tilly reveals, the film reflects the mixed reactions to new synthetic substitutes for silk and cotton. It warns of the dangers of narrow minded scientific hubris, and shows how art can effectively address some of the big challenges we face in developing socially responsible technologies.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Produced in partnership with The Science Museum Group

Photograph by LMPC via Getty Images


MON 20:00 The New Deal - A Story For Our Times (m000n70z)
1: The Confidence Man

In 1933 American's clamoured for new leadership and direction. Their nation was at the epicentre of a global financial crisis A quarter of the working population unemployed. Farmers and workers in revolt, war veterans marching on the nation's capital. The siren song of populists filled the airwaves. Franklin D Roosevelt came to office amidst deep gloom with the banks about to fail. 'If I read the temper of our people correctly...we cannot merely take...we must give as well. Historian and writer Marybeth Hamilton explores the decade long experiment that was America's New Deal. There was no blue print for restoring the nation's fortunes or fortitude but to Roosevelt, and those he gathered around him, it was clear that the future of capitalism and democracy were at stake.

With the voices of Tony Badger, Steve Fraser, Gary Gerstle, Gardiner Means, Eric Rauchway, Rob Snyder and Elizabeth Wickenden.

Producer: Mark Burman


MON 20:30 Analysis (m000x507)
A New Unionism?

Unionism in Northern Ireland is facing a highly uncertain future. Its divided party politics make the headlines. But beyond that, post-Brexit border rules and talk of a possible vote on Irish reunification is causing much anxiety. Even more profoundly, changes in the province’s population and attitudes among different generations are weakening traditional loyalties. Pessimists fear all this could be seriously destabilising. Others argue that a new kind of unionism, focused on the practical benefits of links to Britain, can revive the cause. Chris Bowlby listens in to a debate with major implications for the UK as a whole.

Producer: Jim Frank
Editor: Jasper Corbett


MON 21:00 The Blind Astronomer (m000wyzg)
This is the story, and the sound, of Puerto Rican scientist Wanda Díaz-Merced, who is revolutionising astronomy by turning data from space into audio that can be explored by ear.

This process, ‘sonification’, is not only making the universe accessible to people with visual disabilities, it takes advantage of the human ear’s ability to explore vast ranges of data and spot patterns that could be missed by other means. It’s already proved its worth scientifically, with discoveries being made that are complementary to those found by traditional analysis.

Growing up, Wanda was always focused on a career in science, but when she began losing her sight at university, she realised that most areas of science were becoming impossible for her.

An epiphany came when she encountered NASA’s Radio Jove and was able to hear the sound of radiation from the Sun. She knew immediately that this was her new direction, but also that if she wanted astronomy to develop into audio, she was going to have to make it happen herself.

Her drive and ambition led to her working with NASA, followed by a doctorate in computer science, so as to learn and experiment with creating tools that would allow astronomers to analyse data by simply listening to it.

Having achieved success and recognition for her work over several years, her next project takes her into one of the hottest areas of current astronomy, the hunt for gravitational waves. These tiny ripples in space-time were found for the first time only in 2015. As technology improves, more signals will be detected but these will be surrounded by masses of non-gravitational wave signals. The human ear is better than any computer at categorising these signals, so through a huge citizen science project, Reinforce, Wanda and her team aim to work with many thousands of volunteers to listen to and analyse reams of data, to help progress this new area of science.
The future, as Wanda says, is not just about sound, or vision, it is multisensory – the more senses we can use to explore the world, the more we discover.

Contributors to the programme are: Wanda Diaz Merced, Professor Steve Brewster (University of Glasgow), Professor Martin Hendry (University of Glasgow), Professor Katrien Kolenberg, and Grant Miller (Zooniverse/Oxford University).

Specially composed music: Thomas Hoey

Presenter: Kate Molleson

Producer: Anne McNaught


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m000x4zq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m000x50b)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000x50d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 It's Funny and It's True (b08z9mhl)
Series 1

Episode 2

Comedy is at its most powerful when it takes on our darkest fears and hardest times, and transforms them into laughter. Julia Sutherland looks into the corners of fellow stand up comedians' lives - performers who have chosen to share their deeply personal stories on stage to give a voice to issues otherwise overlooked. They have overcome their troubles and empowered themselves and many others to laugh at the things you're not supposed to laugh at.

Through comedy, Julia shows that sometimes it's OK not to be OK.

This second programme in the series features Felicity Ward and Fern Brady. Felicity Ward is an Australian comedian who has struggled with severe anxiety throughout her adult life - particularly challenging when it's your job to entertain strangers every night from stage. Glaswegian stand up Fern Brady has been forced to cope with depression, which is made far more difficult by her underlying anger issues that are provoked by the challenges of daily life.

A Dabster production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000x50g)
Today in Parliament

News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



TUESDAY 22 JUNE 2021

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m000x50j)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 00:30 Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez (m000x50l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000x50n)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000x50r)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000x50w)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m000x510)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000x514)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev'd Dr Craig Gardiner, a tutor at South Wales Baptist College.

Good morning.

Today is the day, when according to Tolkien’s legendary tale, Bilbo Baggins, the Hobbit, returns from his long adventure. He, along with Gandalf the wizard and a company of dwarfs have defeated the great dragon Smaug, and Bilbo has discovered a mysterious ring.

As he walks towards his house there is one more twist to be told. His neighbours believe he has died, and all his possessions are being auctioned away. While he eventually convinces them that he’s alive and well, he never really settles back to life as it was.

That scene reminds me of another man who was once thought to have died but hadn’t. Alfred Nobel was the Swedish inventor of dynamite and amassed a fortune manufacturing weapons of war. Mistakenly believing he had died, a newspaper printed his obituary, referring to him as the Agent of Death. Nobel was horrified and turned his life around, rewriting his will and leaving almost every penny to the Nobel Foundation, awarding an annual prize for Chemistry, literature, Medicine, Physics and most famously for peace.

Our lives may not offer such dramatic opportunities, but nonetheless every morning brings a second chance to be live life differently. The biblical prophet Jeremiah understood this when God sent him to a potter’s house and saw the craftsman working at the wheel. But the pot he was shaping, wobbled and mis-spun and turned out badly, so the potter simply used the same clay to start again and make another better pot.

Most of us have something that has wobbled and mis-spun in life, but nothing is beyond the potter’s hand. Today can be the day when our future is refashioned into something better.

Dear God
Thank you for this new day
And the opportunities to start afresh
You are the eternal potter,
and we are the clay
Mould us, fashion us
into your beauty
and for your purpose
Amen


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m000x518)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0378y3z)
Barred Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Michaela Strachan presents the barred warbler. With its glaring yellow eyes, banded chest and long white-tipped tail, the Barred Warbler is always an exciting find. Look out for them in late summer and autumn, when young Barred Warblers turn up here regularly as they migrate south.


TUE 06:00 Today (m000x69v)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Long View (m000x69z)
Violence against women in Public Spaces

Earlier this year the violent murder of Sarah Everard provoked an outpouring of grief and anger. A vigil marking her death descended into violence and thousands of social media-posts were shared detailing experiences of attack and threats against women in public spaces. Although the attempted rape of Kate Dickinson by the military officer Valentine Baker had a less tragic conclusion, the response to his assault on her in a railway carriage, which resulted in her hanging out of the train door for several miles until rescue came, provoked a very similar reaction across the nation. The ability for a woman to travel freely, to walk the streets without let or hindrance, was a topic of hot debate.
There were many men who felt that with women becoming increasingly emancipated, and more involved in walks of life traditionally the preserve of men only, they simply had to accept as inevitable, the fact that they were at greater risk.
Who was responsible for women's safety, and whether or not there were practical solutions like the re-design of railway carriages so that there was both access by way of a corridor and directly onto the platform, were discussed in newspapers and journals, just as they are today.
Jonathan and his team explore the debate back then and the anger now about what may or may not happen to insure what to most is a basic freedom - to walk the streets in safety.

Producer; Tom Alban


TUE 09:30 A Show of Hands (m000x6b1)
Gesture

We use our hands to explore the world around us; to manipulate and change it; to communicate; to signify aggression, submission or gratitude; to comfort or arouse; to make music, craft and create. We point, punch, tweak and text. We ball our fists, spread our palms, give someone the thumbs up and close our hands in prayer.

More than anything else, is it our hands which make us human?

In this series considers the human hand from five different angles: manipulation, creativity, gesture, communication and touch. In each programme we hear from people who have a very particular perspective on hands and the way we use them, including a surgeon, a massage therapist, a harpist, a blacksmith and the recipient of a hand transplant. Each of them takes a long look at their own hands, describes what they see and considers the relationship with the world which their hands give them.

As we encounter healing hands, steady hands, talking hands, holding hands and the laying-on of hands we come to understand just how much our hands identify and define us.

In the third episode we examine the importance of gesture, both in religious faith and in the performing arts. Sr. Gemma Simmonds of the Congregation of Jesus considers the different ways Christians use their hands in prayer and worship, while Fr. Christopher Hancock reflects on the way he uses his hands as a priest – from key moments in the Mass to the anointing of the sick and dying.

In Islam too the position of the hands in ritual prayer has particular significance. As Dr. Abdul-Azim Ahmed of the Muslim Council of Wales explains, there are also many references to the hands in the Qur’an - including the symbolism of the right and left hands.

Gesture is also an important part of the performing arts, particularly in South Asian classical dance. Acclaimed choreographer Shobana Jeyasingh considers the vocabulary of hand movements – mudras – which express meaning and emotion in the style of dance she trained in, Bharatanatyam, and how these have inspired her current work in contemporary dance.

Producer: Jeremy Grange

Photograph courtesy of Tim Booth


TUE 09:45 Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez (m000x6by)
Episode 2

Today in Episode 2 of Arctic Dreams Barry Lopez celebrates one of the few large mammals to have survived the ice-age, the muskox, with its sweeping curtain of guard-hair and preternatural vision, and considers how it has almost been hunted almost to extinction over the centuries.
In his breath-taking natural, social and cultural history of the Arctic, Lopez reveals the essential mystery and beauty of a continent that has enchanted man's imagination and ambition since time immemorial.
Written well over a quarter of a century ago, Lopez's visionary account of his journey across the polar caps is a celebration of the Arctic in all its guises. A hostile landscape of ice, freezing oceans and dazzling skyscapes, home to millions of diverse animals and people, it is also the backdrop to massive migrations by land, sea and air and the setting of epic exploratory voyages.

In timeless, prophetic prose, as meditative and memorable as the land it describes, Arctic Dreams poses fundamental questions about how we should cherish our ever more vulnerable planet.
Arctic Dreams was written by Barry Lopez.
It is read by Kyle Soller and abridged by Richard Hamilton
The producer is Karen Holden


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000x6b5)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


TUE 11:00 Detoxifying the Classics (m000x72t)
Why are white nationalists and the far right so fond of Ancient Greece and Rome? Katherine Harloe, Professor of Classics and Intellectual History at the University of Reading, looks at the ways in which the classical world is both used to lend respectability to the politics of hate, and distorted to give the false impression that it was an all-white space.

But this is not just a modern problem - from British colonial India to fascist Italy, Katherine delves into the last 300 years of history to explain how the ancient world and white supremacy became entwined, and asks what classicists today can do about it.

Produced by Nathan Gower
An Overcoat Media production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 11:30 Guide Books (m000x72w)
Lost and Found with Stella Duffy and Cathy Rentzenbrink

A new series about how books might help us navigate everyday life, presented by writer and broadcaster Damian Barr.

Each episode takes a life experience - such as grief - and talks to writers about they handle it through their own reading, writing and lived experience. We explore the fiction, non-fiction, memoir and poetry that might help us better understand our own stories.

In this episode, Damian is joined by Stella Duffy and Cathy Rentzenbrink to talk about the poetry, fiction and non-fiction books that have helped them navigate loss in their own lives, and support others in their grief. From the poetry of Mary Oliver and the fiction of Alice Walker, to the Buddhist teachings of Pema Chodron and the writings of psychotherapist Julia Samuel.

Stella Duffy is a novelist, short story writer and playwright, who has also worked in theatre for many years. She co-founded the UK-wide Fun Palaces campaign for community connection. A qualified yoga teacher, she is currently training in Existential Psychotherapy with a view to combining therapy, bodywork and creative practice.

Cathy Rentzenbrink is the author of The Last Act of Love, A Manual for Heartache and Dear Reader: The Comfort and Joy of Books. Her debut novel – Everyone is Still Alive – will be published in July 2021.

Produced by Mair Bosworth

Details of organisations offering information and support with bereavement are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 08000 158 707.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m000x72y)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:04 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000x6bp)
Episode 2

Helen Dunmore’s prize-winning first novel is set in the late spring, early summer of 1917. War haunts the Cornish coast and ships are being sunk by U-boats, strangers are treated with suspicion, and newspapers are full of spy stories.

Into this uneasy landscape, to a hamlet just outside St Ives, come DH Lawrence and his German wife, Frieda. They are hoping to escape the war-fever that grips London and also to live as cheaply as possible in a rented cottage. The pacifist Lawrence is reeling from his latest novel, The Rainbow, having been banned for obscenity, and is struggling to finish and publish its sequel, Women in Love.

They befriend Clare Coyne, a young artist who has lived alone with her father since her mother died when she was a child.

Written by Helen Dunmore
Read by Louise Brealey
Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m000x730)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


TUE 12:57 Weather (m000x732)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m000x734)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


TUE 13:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sqw6c)
Pilgrims, Raiders and Traders (900 - 1300 AD)

Hedwig glass beaker

Neil MacGregor's world history as told through objects at the British Museum. This week he is looking at how objects moved around the medieval world in the context of war, trade and faith and the quite incredible degree of contact between Asia, Europe and Africa that existed around a thousand years ago. Today's object is a large glass beaker made at a time when Christians were warring with Muslims in the great crusades - a time, curiously enough, connected with a great flourishing of trade. This object was most likely made by Islamic glass workers but became associated with the miracles of a Christian saint, Hedwig. This glass container, or one of the few just like it, was what Hedwig famously used to turn water into wine! Neil describes the story of the Hedwig beaker with help from the economic historian David Abulafia and the historian of the Crusades Jonathan Riley-Smith. He also sees what happens when he pours water into this beautifully decorated vessel.

Producer: Anthony Denselow


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m000x503)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (m000x737)
Mr Waring of the BBC

A curated drama of archive documents and memoirs, by Freddie Phillips.

It's just after the Second World War and success beckons when a young entertainer with “a new line in comedy” lands the leading role in a BBC radio show. Freddie Fox and Robert Bathurst star in the true story of Peter Waring, whose desire for a better life brought him fame and infamy.

Mr Waring ….. Freddie Fox
Frank Muir ….. Robert Bathurst
Benny Hill/Booking Manager….. Clive Hayward
Redacted Letter Writer ….. Tony Turner
Charmian Innes ….. Elinor Coleman
Director of Variety ….. Simon Ludders
BBC Voice ….. Marilyn Nnadebe
LPR Roche ….. Stewart Campbell
Jack Fallon ….. Joshua Riley
Press Voice 1 ….. Jane Slavin

Pianist, Peter Ringrose
Directed by Gemma Jenkins
Photograph, The Magic Circle Archive


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (m000x739)
First Light

Josie Long presents short documentaries about illumination, the breaking of a new day, healing and hope.

Curatorial team: Alia Cassam and Andrea Rangecroft
Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
Executive Producer: Zakia Sewell
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:30 Made of Stronger Stuff (p09cz05k)
T Cells

Psychologist Kimberley Wilson and Dr Xand van Tulleken take a journey around the human body, asking what it can tell us about our innate capacity for change. In this episode, they zoom in on T cells: a type of white blood cell that forms a critical part of the body’s ability to fight off infection.

Xand and Kimberley discover how scientists are hacking into the immune system and hear the story of 5-year-old Zac, who has undergone an innovative form of immunotherapy for leukemia.

Producer: Dan Hardoon
Researcher: Emily Finch
Executive Producer: Kate Holland
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (m000x6wh)
E-scooting through the law

It’s illegal to ride a private e-scooter on public roads or pavements – but the rules for the new, council-run e-scooter rental schemes are different - they can and must go on roads or cycle-paths - but not pavements either. We navigate the maze of laws and regulations to ask what’s allowed, required or illegal.

Billionaires are about to fly into space, but what is the legal framework for this? What if your rocket hits my satellite? We boldly go into space law.

University campuses are in the spotlight over issues of freedom of speech and ‘cancel culture’ – will the new ‘Higher Education (Freedom of Speech)’ bill help matters or fan the flames?

And the changing face of the legal profession – criminal barrister Mark Robinson shows that lawyers come from a greater range of backgrounds now – he didn’t have any GCSEs, but a career as a DJ.

Presenter: Joshua Rozenberg
Producer: Arlene Gregorius
Researcher: Diane Richardson


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (m000x73c)
Janey Godley and Mel Hudson

Janey Godley's choice is a thriller Remember Me This Way by Sabine Durrant. It's a page turner with a neat twist and tackles coercive behaviour in an interesting way. And it features a dog called Howard. Janey says it has made her think differently about her own mother's relationship with a controlling man.
Mayflies by Andrew O Hagan is Harriett's choice. It's an 80s tale of male friendship through music set in Ayrshire and Manchester and following two of the young men into adulthood.
Mel Hudson chooses The Map & The Territory by Michel Houllebecq. To say it divides opinion is to put it mildly.

Producer: Maggie Ayre


TUE 17:00 PM (m000x73f)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000x6b9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Ed Reardon's Week (m000x6bc)
Series 14

The Jethro Tree

Episode 3: The Jethro Tree

Ed revisits an old haunt when his daughter, Eli, asks him to join her and her fellow protestors at The Blackstone Oak, an ancient tree threatened by the HS2 network. Things take a complicated twist when Jaz turns up to shoot a promotional film for the development, Ed is approached to be the face of the film, and the lead protestor turns out not to be who she says she is.

Cast list ep 3
Ed Reardon………..Christopher Douglas
Eli………………………Lisa Coleman
Ping…………….……..Barunka O’Shaughnessy
Spike………………….Kathryn Drysdale
Jaz Milvain…….……Philip Jackson
Frank…………………Simon Greenall
Geoff/Cliff ………….Dan Tetsell
Bernice………………..Nicola Sanderson

Written by Andrew Nickolds and Christopher Douglas
Produced by Dawn Ellis
Production Co-ordinator: Cherlynn Andrew-Wilfred
Sound Recordist and Editor: David Thomas
A BBC Studios Production


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m000x4w9)
Brian attempts to keep the peace and the Grundy’s hatch a plan


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m000x6bf)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 19:45 The Art of Innovation (m0009b3l)
Polaroid Perceptions

Sir Ian Blatchford and Dr Tilly Blyth continue their series exploring how art and science have inspired each other with a focus on the Polaroid snapshot.

Edwin Land’s invention of near instantaneous photographs without the need for a darkroom, opened up an exciting new chapter of artistic expression and turned the snapshot into a way of exploring human perception.

As Tilly reveals, Land’s pioneering research lab at Polaroid was a convergence of art and technology. It led to new insights into how we as humans perceive coloured objects under many different conditions.

Land’s experimentation closely paralleled artist David Hockney’s foray into Polaroid photography in the early 1980’s His “Sun on a Pool Los Angeles” is a composite of 77 Polaroid snaps from different close up positions of the same scene. As Ian illustrates, Hockney set out to manipulate time and space in an attempt to turn a scene captured instantaneously by a camera, into one which more realistically reflects how we see in real life.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Produced in Partnership with The Science Museum Group

Image reproduced permission of David Hockney Studios


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (m000x6bh)
Award-winning current affairs documentary series


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m000x6bk)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (m000x4wf)
Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind. Producer: Deborah Cohen.


TUE 21:30 The Long View (m000x69z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m000x6bm)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000x6bp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 Fortunately... with Fi and Jane (m000x6br)
194. Hot Hair Masks and Lasandwiches, with your Emails

This week on the podcast, Fi and Jane choose some of their favourite listener emails from the past few weeks. They coalesce in London's Regent's Park to catch up on exciting developments from the Euros and Jane's skip. The two of them then pick out a few choice emails before Fi has to head off the dental hygienist. Correspondence includes insights from the courtroom, a handsome Derek and divine delivery apps.

Get in touch: fortunately.podcast@bbc.co.uk


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000x6bt)
Today in Parliament

News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



WEDNESDAY 23 JUNE 2021

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m000x6bw)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


WED 00:30 Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez (m000x6by)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000x6c0)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000x6c2)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000x6c4)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m000x6c6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000x6c8)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev'd Dr Craig Gardiner, a tutor at South Wales Baptist College.

Good morning on this United Nations International Widows Day. For over a decade, this day has raised awareness of grieving women around the world, especially the violations of human rights they often suffer following the death of their spouses.

In many countries, women can be plunged into poverty when their husband dies. Often, they are denied an inheritance, evicted from their property, left ostracized and abused. Their children can be equally affected. And things have only got worse since the Covid Pandemic.

Gender justice, especially for widows is at the heart of the UN’s Millennium goals, just as it was to the mission of Jesus. But sometimes we need more than seeking justice for widows, it’s important to work with them, releasing their potential to transform their world. The prophet Elijah was struggling during a time of great drought, when God sent him to a widow at Zarephath. When he finds her, she and her son are cooking the last of their food, a final meal before they die. But Elijah tells her that, if she shares this last meal with him, God will not allow her food to be used up.

And that is what happens. She, a widow in her weakness, is not only given food, but gives what she has in aid of the prophet. She, like others on the edges of our world, are not simply objects for our charity, or even a case for justice, they are their own dynamic agents of change, transforming the lives of others around them, inviting us to join them in their heavenly revolution.

God of the poor,
the weak and the oppressed
strengthen the lives of widows today
grant them justice
and challenge us all by their example
Until it is done for all upon the earth
As it is already done in heaven
Amen


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m000x6cb)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08tbqhb)
David Lindo on the Swift

Urban Birder David Lindo reflects on the arrival of the swift as a sign that summer is here. He marvels at the ability of this small bird to navigate its way to Britain across Africa and Europe.
Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Maggie Ayre.


WED 06:00 Today (m000x4vj)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 More or Less (m000x4vn)
Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics used in everyday life


WED 09:30 Four Thought (m000x4vq)
Climate Consultations

Dr. Tamsin Ellis is a GP who looks for ways to improve her patients' health and the environment.

Welcoming us into her consulting room to meet her patients, Tamsin describes her journey to climate activism, and why she's convinced that looking for 'double wins' is the way forward. From giving a lecture about the environment to a sea of faces all sipping coffee from plastic cups, to the challenges of winning over already hard-pressed colleagues, in this witty talk Tamsin describes the realities of climate activism on the NHS frontline. As she prescribes health interventions with positive side-effects for the planet, she offers a new way to talk about climate change.

Tamsin is introduced by host Olly Mann.

Producer: Giles Edwards


WED 09:45 Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez (m000x4xh)
Episode 3

Kyle Soller reads Episode 3 of Arctic Dreams in which Lopez reflects on animal survival strategies such as migration and hibernation which allow them to live in this harshest climate on earth. Of the seasonal mass movements of animals in the Arctic he says: ‘I came to think of the migrations as breath, as the land breathing.’ A meditation on the ancient tradition of hunting throws up the paradox of living in communion with these animals at the same time as living off them too.

In his breath-taking natural, social and cultural history of the Arctic, Lopez reveals the essential mystery and beauty of a continent that has enchanted man's imagination and ambition since time immemorial.
Written well over a quarter of a century ago, Lopez's visionary account of his journey across the polar caps is a celebration of the Arctic in all its guises. A hostile landscape of ice, freezing oceans and dazzling skyscapes, home to millions of diverse animals and people, it is also the backdrop to massive migrations by land, sea and air and the setting of epic exploratory voyages.

In timeless, prophetic prose, as meditative and memorable as the land it describes, Arctic Dreams poses fundamental questions about how we should cherish our ever more vulnerable planet.

Arctic Dreams was written by Barry Lopez.
It is read by Kyle Soller and abridged by Richard Hamilton
The producer is Karen Holden


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000x4vv)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


WED 11:00 Mitchell on Meetings (m000t4t4)
The Thing

David Mitchell investigates meetings from the ancient "thing" to Zoom. Also on the agenda: executive coach Sophie Bryan teaches David to chair a meeting; fellow comedian Russell Kane explores how different personality types behave in meetings; and Dutch sociologist Wilbert van Vree sums up several millennia of meetings history.

Producer: Chris Ledgard


WED 11:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b09k6pn3)
Series 8

Hull

Mark Steel visits Hull. He has a wonderful time exploring the 2017 City of Culture exhibits as well as all the other normal stuff like the world's smallest window and white phone boxes.

He talks to a man who painted himself blue and walked naked through the town as part of the Sea of Hull installation, samples the delights of Chip Spice and patties and gets to the bottom of why they call their aquarium a submarium.

Mark's 8th series of his award winning show that travels around the country visiting towns that have nothing in common but their uniqueness. After thoroughly researching each town, Mark writes and performs a bespoke evening of comedy for the local residents.

Written and performed by ... Mark Steel
Additional material by ... Pete Sinclair

Production co-ordinator ... Hayley Sterling
Sound Manager ... Jerry Peal
Producer ... Carl Cooper

Picture Credit ... Tom Stanier

A BBC Studio production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in February 2018.


WED 12:00 News Summary (m000x4zl)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 12:04 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000x4vz)
Episode 3

Helen Dunmore’s prize-winning first novel is set in the late spring, early summer of 1917. War haunts the Cornish coast and ships are being sunk by U-boats, strangers are treated with suspicion, and newspapers are full of spy stories.

Into this uneasy landscape, to a hamlet just outside St Ives, come DH Lawrence and his German wife, Frieda. They are hoping to escape the war-fever that grips London and also to live as cheaply as possible in a rented cottage. The pacifist Lawrence is reeling from his latest novel, The Rainbow, having been banned for obscenity, and is struggling to finish and publish its sequel, Women in Love.

They befriend Clare Coyne, a young artist who has lived alone with her father since her mother died when she was a child.

Written by Helen Dunmore
Read by Louise Brealey
Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m000x4w2)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


WED 12:57 Weather (m000x4w4)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m000x4w6)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


WED 13:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sqw6f)
Pilgrims, Raiders and Traders (900 - 1300 AD)

Japanese bronze mirror

The history of humanity as told through one hundred objects from the British Museum in London. This week Neil MacGregor is looking at objects from Tanzania, Britain, Java and central Europe, exploring the great arcs of trade that connected Africa, Europe and Asia around a thousand years ago. Today he arrives in Japan with an object that offers a dramatic twist on the week's theme. This small mirror from the bottom of a sacred pond comes from a time when the Japanese suddenly cut themselves off from the outside world and stopped all official contact with China, a country it had frequently borrowed ideas from. Neil tells the story of the Heian period of Japanese history, a moment of great cultural awakening in Japan, especially in literature. The object is a small mirror that was found at the bottom of a sacred pond. The writer Ian Buruma and the archaeologist Harada Masayuki help describe the Japan of this time.

Producer: Anthony Denselow


WED 14:00 The Archers (m000x4w9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (m000610r)
The Cyprus Missing

By Mario Theodorou

London, 2014. Althea, a Greek Cypriot who has spent her adult life in London, has always believed that her father was killed in action during the Cypriot conflict of 1974. But a chance discovery causes her to question her family history, and go in search of answers within London's Cypriot community.

Althea ..... Agni Scott
Gizem ..... Fisun Burgess
Eleni ….. Anna Savva
Constantine ..... Chris Pavlo
Young Althea ..... Christina Kyriakos
Young Gizem ..... Jeyda Mustafa
Mags ..... Catherine Cusack
Missing Persons Rep .... Helen Clapp
Wine Seller ….. Shaun Mason
Soldier ….. Jonny Holden

Director, Sasha Yevtushenko


WED 15:00 Money Box (m000x4wc)
Paul Lewis and a panel of guests answer calls on personal finance. Producer: Emma Rippon


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (m000x4wf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Sideways (m000x4wh)
Bonfire night, November 5th 2015, 9.30pm. An agent fires off an email. An author is accused of plagiarism. His new book lies ready to be pulped.

In the first of a new series of Sideways, Matthew Syed asks why we’re doomed to be unoriginal and why it hurts so much to be, well, not that special.

In 1998, Hollywood directors Matthew Bay and Mimi Leder went head to head with suspiciously similar disaster movies - Armageddon and Deep Impact. Allegations of late-night spying flew around. But could there have just been something in the air? Matthew reveals that, four years earlier, fragments of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 Comet smashed into Jupiter and right into the American consciousness.

This is the thing... As Matthew discovers, our brains are wired for unoriginality, we evolve as a collective brain, absorbing our shared cultural cues and looking for what has worked in the past. But if that’s the norm, why do we feel so disappointed when our ideas seem unoriginal, when someone else beats us to it? And is there a way out of this - to rekindle our originality?

Presenter: Matthew Syed
Producer/Series Editor: Katherine Godfrey
Executive Producer: Max O'Brien
Music, Sound Design and Mix: Nicholas Alexander
Research and Development: Gavin Haynes and Madeleine Parr
Theme Music: Seventy Times Seven by Ioana Selaru
A Novel production for BBC Radio 4


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m000x4wl)
Social media, anti-social media, breaking news, faking news: this is the programme about a revolution in media.


WED 17:00 PM (m000x4wp)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000x4wt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Unite (m000x4ww)
Series 1

Russian Money

New sitcom series starring Radio 4 favourite Mark Steel (Mark Steel’s In Town, The News Quiz), Claire Skinner (Outnumbered), Elliot Steel and Ivo Graham.

When Tony (Mark Steel), a working class, left-wing South Londoner, falls in love and moves in with Imogen (Claire Skinner), an upper middle class property developer, their sons - disenfranchised Croydon rude boy Ashley (Elliot Steel) and Oxbridge-educated crypto currency king Gideon (Ivo Graham) - are forced to live under the same roof and behave like the brothers neither of them ever wanted.

In this episode, Ashley starts a job on a building site, Gideon becomes an activist, Imogen is closing in on a big deal, and Tony, desperate for a story to appease his publisher, decides to investigate a new housing development with possible links to Russian money.

Cast:
Tony - Mark Steel
Imogen - Claire Skinner
Ashley - Elliot Steel
Gideon - Ivo Graham
Rebecca - Ayesha Antoine
Mr Kropotkin/Mick - Simon Greenall
Christian/Derrick - Kevin Eldon
Eileen - Ruth Bratt
Alex - Susannah Fielding
Matthew - Milo McCabe
Shay - Barry Castagnola

Written by Barry Castagnola, Elliot Steel and Mark Steel (additional material from the cast and Sian Harries)
Executive Producer Marios Stylianides
Producer/Director Barry Castagnola
Sound Recordist and Editor Jerry Peal
Broadcast Assistant Sarah Tombling
Production Co-ordinator George O’Regan

A Golden Path and Rustle Up production for BBC Radio 4


WED 19:00 The Archers (m000x4wy)
Rex issues a warning and Neil comes to an arrangement


WED 19:15 Front Row (m000x4x0)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 19:45 The Art of Innovation (m0009cdv)
Protecting the Earth

The landmark BBC TV drama Edge of Darkness by creative screenwriter Troy Kennedy Martin, became a gritty but nuanced thriller, exploring many powerful themes that dominated cultural and political life in the early 1980’s - from the secrecy of the nuclear state, to the hopes and fears unleashed by the growing tide of global environmentalism.

As Tilly Blyth reveals, the spiritual and scientific inspiration that gives the drama its much lauded spiritual and mythical quality arises from the Gaia hypothesis by maverick scientist James Lovelock. His controversial concept of the Earth as a system in equilibrium, divided environmental scientists. But as Tilly discovers, through the Lovelock archives held in the Science Museum Group collections, Lovelock’s “Daisyworld” model of the Earth’s ability to regulate itself, gave the hypothesis a growing degree of credibility. Edge of Darkness would embrace this power of Gaia leading to a poignant and dramatic climax, and become one of the most critically acclaimed TV series of the decade.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Produced in partnership with The Science Museum


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m000x4x2)
Combative, provocative and engaging live debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Melanie Phillips, Ash Sarkar, Tim Stanley and Matthew Taylor. #moralmaze


WED 20:45 Four Thought (m000x4vq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 Made of Stronger Stuff (p09cz05k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 The Media Show (m000x4wl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m000x4x5)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000x4vz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 Twayna Mayne: Black Woman (m000x4x7)
8. I don't see race

Comedian Twayna Mayne, born to Jamaican parents and raised by a white parent, explores the phrase “I don’t see race” and how it can be used to silence conversations around identity and experience. Performing at the Radio Theatre with a virtual audience, Twayna also hears from chef and broadcaster Andi Oliver and academic and podcaster Chantelle Lewis. Series 1 was awarded Best Comedy at the BBC Radio and Music Awards 2020.

The extended roundtable conversation is also available on BBC Sounds.

Written and performed by Twayna Mayne
Roundtable guests, Andi Oliver and Chantelle Lewis
Production coordinator, Beverly Tagg
Producer, .Julia McKenzie
A BBC Studios Production


WED 23:15 The Skewer (m000x4x9)
Series 4

Episode 4

Returning to twist itself into - and remix - the news. Jon Holmes presents The Skewer.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000x4xc)
Today in Parliament

News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



THURSDAY 24 JUNE 2021

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m000x4xf)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


THU 00:30 Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez (m000x4xh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000x4xl)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000x4xn)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000x4xq)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m000x4xs)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000x4xv)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev'd Dr Craig Gardiner, a tutor at South Wales Baptist College.

Good morning.

Like many families during the pandemic, we welcomed a new puppy to our home. It was a joint decision: my son chose the furry friend he wanted, my wife picked the breed, and my daughter got to name her. So Amber, a fox-red Labrador came to stay, and I get to choose what walk we go on in the morning.

We like the nearby fields, where she can scamper up hills, plunge through the stream and cut through the buttercups which have grown taller in the last few weeks.

Watching Amber run reminds me of the film ‘Chariots of Fire’. There’s an iconic scene where the runner Eric Liddell, is criticized for wasting time in sport when his sister thinks he should be a missionary. In response Liddell says, “I believe God made me for a purpose, but He also made me fast. And when I run, I feel His pleasure.”

This is what we often call vocation. It is, as the poet Gerald Manley Hopkins writes, like when ‘kingfishers catch fire’ and ‘dragonflies draw flame’. Amber echoes the poet’s insight as she runs, ‘she acts in God’s eye what in God’s eye she is.’

I wish it were so simple for us to know who we should be, but by naming it ‘vocation’, we remind ourselves, that it is God who calls us into being, God who summons us for a purpose. Whatever that may be, there are surely glimpses of it close at hand, fragments to be enjoyed in every day, moments when we know we’ve felt God’s pleasure.

God who calls each of us into being:
You formed us,
fearfully and wonderfully

You search us and know us and give us purpose
Help us this day
To be in your eye what in your eye we are
To enjoy your presence and know your pleasure
Amen


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m000x4xx)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sbyzk)
Guillemot

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the Guillemot. Guillemots breed on cliff ledges and the chick is encouraged to make its first flight at the pointing of fledging by being encouraged to jump by its mother or father calling from the sea below.


THU 06:00 Today (m000x6tp)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (m000x6tr)
Shakespeare's Sonnets

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the collection of poems published in 1609 by Thomas Thorpe: Shakespeare’s Sonnets, “never before imprinted”. Yet, while some of Shakespeare's other poems and many of his plays were often reprinted in his lifetime, the Sonnets were not a publishing success. They had to make their own way, outside the main canon of Shakespeare’s work: wonderful, troubling, patchy, inspiring and baffling, and they have appealed in different ways to different times. Most are addressed to a man, something often overlooked and occasionally concealed; one early and notorious edition even changed some of the pronouns.

With:

Hannah Crawforth
Senior Lecturer in Early Modern Literature at King’s College London

Don Paterson
Poet and Professor of Poetry at the University of St Andrews

And

Emma Smith
Professor of Shakespeare Studies at Hertford College, Oxford

Producer: Simon Tillotson


THU 09:45 Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez (m000x6tt)
Episode 4

Kyle Soller reads Episode 4 of Barry Lopez’s modern classic of nature writing in which he continues to ponder the mystery and drama of the polar wilderness. Today icebergs, Arctic storms, the play of light on fresh meltwater and the astonishing spectacle that is the Northern Lights
In his breath-taking natural, social and cultural history of the Arctic, Lopez reveals the essential mystery and beauty of a continent that has enchanted man's imagination and ambition since time immemorial. .
Written well over a quarter of a century ago, Lopez's visionary account of his journey across the polar caps is a celebration of the Arctic in all its guises. A hostile landscape of ice, freezing oceans and dazzling skyscapes, home to millions of diverse animals and people, it is also the backdrop to massive migrations by land, sea and air and the setting of epic exploratory voyages.

In timeless, prophetic prose, as meditative and memorable as the land it describes, Arctic Dreams poses fundamental questions about how we should cherish our ever more vulnerable planet.
Arctic Dreams was written by Barry Lopez.
It is read by Kyle Soller and abridged by Richard Hamilton
The producer is Karen Holden


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000x6tw)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (m000x6v1)
Insight, and analysis from BBC correspondents around the world


THU 11:30 Written in Scotland (m000x6v5)
Episode 1: Nationalism and Unionism

A four-part series about the relationship that Scotland’s writers have with Scotland itself. Presented by Kirsty Wark. Episode 1 – Nationalism and Unionism.

How did the writers of Scotland respond to the Union with England? Kirsty looks at the way in which Scottish poets and novelists have uniquely and sometimes controversially reflected the political turmoil around them. She hears about James MacPherson, the poet who produced supposed translations of Ossian, claimed as an ancient Gaelic bard, which became a European sensation. Yet at the same time as the poems appeared, the Highland clan life the poems reflected was being destroyed as the Jacobite uprising of 1745 was put down, and James MacPherson himself ended his life as a wealthy Member of Parliament.

We also hear about Robert Burns, a proud Scottish nationalist, who castigated the 'powers that be of Scotland for being bought and sold for English gold' but who was also a government employee for the excise.

And on the other side of the coin, Sir Walter Scott was a proud supporter of the union with England who probably did more than anyone else to preserve Scotland’s distinctiveness in writing.

Producer: Brian McCluskey
A Whistledown Scotland production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:00 News Summary (m000x6vc)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


THU 12:04 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000x6vh)
Episode 4

Helen Dunmore’s prize-winning first novel is set in the late spring, early summer of 1917. War haunts the Cornish coast and ships are being sunk by U-boats, strangers are treated with suspicion, and newspapers are full of spy stories.

Into this uneasy landscape, to a hamlet just outside St Ives, come DH Lawrence and his German wife, Frieda. They are hoping to escape the war-fever that grips London and also to live as cheaply as possible in a rented cottage. The pacifist Lawrence is reeling from his latest novel, The Rainbow, having been banned for obscenity, and is struggling to finish and publish its sequel, Women in Love.

They befriend Clare Coyne, a young artist who has lived alone with her father since her mother died when she was a child.

Written by Helen Dunmore
Read by Louise Brealey
Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m000x6vm)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


THU 12:57 Weather (m000x6vr)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m000x6vw)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


THU 13:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sqw6h)
Pilgrims, Raiders and Traders (900 - 1300 AD)

Borobudur Buddha head

A history of the World in one hundred objects arrives on the Indonesian island of Java. This is the series that offers a new history of humanity through the individual objects that time has left behind. These items are all in the British Museum and the series is presented by the museum's director, Neil MacGregor. Throughout this week Neil is tracing the great arcs of trade linking Asia, Europe and Africa around a thousand years ago. Today he has chosen a stone head of the Buddha that comes from one of the world's greatest monuments, the giant Buddhist stupa of Borobudur. Borobudur rises from a volcanic plain in the middle of Java, built from one and a half million blocks of stone and devised as an architectural aid to spiritual practice. Neil MacGregor reports from the various levels of Borobudur and describes the trade routes that brought Buddhism to South East Asia. He also explores the impact the discovery of Borobodur had on the founder of Singapore, Sir Stamford Raffles and his ideas about the importance of Javanese civilization. The anthropologist Nigel Barley celebrates the life and work of Stamford Raffles while the writer and Buddhist teacher Stephen Batchelor sums up the spiritual significance of Borobudur

Producer: Anthony Denselow


THU 14:00 The Archers (m000x4wy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (m0005tpt)
Lighthouses

How do we find our way to happiness again after the worst happens? Composer Jennifer Bell's a-cappella songs are inspired by and threaded through the true stories of two people who've found their way back to the light after losing the loves of their lives.
Producer Beth O'Dea
With specially composed songs by Jennifer Bell. Interviewee Gary Andrews.
The singers are Ellie Showering, Andy Marshall, Harry Humberstone, Katy Tucker, Alice Kirby, Jack Adkins, Molly King and Jennifer Bell.
Additional singing on In A Town by Naomi Johnson, Tenisha Edwards, Luke Nederveen and Romaine Smith.
Gary Andrews' doodles of his life are at @GaryScribbler
Photo credit: Image of Wolf Rock Lighthouse by Colin Perry.
Made in solidarity with all who have felt grief.


THU 15:00 Open Country (m000x6vz)
An Obsession With Forsythia

Monique Gudgeon is on a mission to create a botanic garden. And what better way to get started than to build a new National Plant Collection. In creating a garden from scratch, one of her priorities is to bring in species which both work with the surrounding Dorset landscape and that are in need of conservation. There is a huge diversity of garden plants that need to be looked after so cultivars aren’t lost when they go out of fashion. National Plant Collections were created by the charity Plant Heritage to ensure these plants are preserved and documented for the future.

Of the plant groups that don’t currently have a custodian, Monique decided to choose forsythia - deciduous shrubs often overlooked as just a hedging plant which burst into vibrant yellow flowers in early spring. In the process of sourcing and propagating all the varieties needed for a collection, Monique has become utterly fascinated by them and their history.

Helen Mark hears the story of Monique’s successes and failures so far, and explores what it takes to build and maintain a National Plant Collection. We also meet people behind other collections and hear what drives their particular fascination with a group of plants, and how they fit in to their landscapes.

Presented by Helen Mark and produced by Sophie Anton


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m000x5zt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m000x6d0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (m000x6w1)
Film programme looking at the latest cinema releases, DVDs and films on TV.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m000x6w3)
A weekly programme that illuminates the mysteries and challenges the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (m000x6w5)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000x6w7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Talking Story (m000x6w9)
Episode 2

Sarah Kendall started her career as a stand-up comedian in the late 90's in Australia. After 15 years performing stand-up comedy in comedy clubs and at festivals around the world, Sarah moved away from the more traditional joke telling aspect of the job and transitioned into storytelling.

Sarah wanted to create something on stage that felt like the sort of films she loved to watch, so she wrote an hour-long show that was one single story as opposed to a series of jokes and routines. She reimagined her teenage years as though they had been directed by John Hughes, giving her memories a full, cinematic makeover.

She found, in telling these personal stories, that she was connecting with her audience in a way that was more meaningful to her and in a way that she wasn’t able to with the jokes and routines in her previous shows.

What is it about stories that brings people together. How do we use stories to make sense of life?

In this series, Sarah will be talking to three different storytellers about what ‘story’ means to them and about how they developed their own style of storytelling in their respective mediums.

Sarah’s live storytelling shows have been adapted for BBC Radio 4 and have formed two seasons of her series - ‘Sarah Kendall: Australian Trilogy’. The show went on to win numerous awards including the Writers’ Guild of Great Britain Award and the BBC Audio Drama Award. Since then, Sarah has gone on to write and star in the Royal Television Society award winning and BAFTA nominated sitcom ‘Frayed’.

Presenter - Sarah Kendall
Guest - TBC
Producer - Carl Cooper

This is a BBC Studios production


THU 19:00 The Archers (m000x6wc)
Writers, Sarah McDonald- Hughes & Nick Warburton
Director, Kim Greengrass
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Brian Aldridge … Charles Collingwood
Lee Bryce … Ryan Early
Alice Carter … Hollie Chapman
Neil Carter … Brian Hewlett
Susan Carter … Charlotte Martin
Ian Craig … Stephen Kennedy
Justin Elliott … Simon Williams
Rex Fairbother … Nick Barber
Clarrie Grundy … Heather Bell
Eddie Grundy … Trevor Harrison
Shula Hebden- Lloyd … Judy Bennett
Alistair Lloyd … Michael Lumsden
Adam Macy … Andrew Wincott
Lynda Snell … Carole Boyd


THU 19:15 Front Row (m000x6wf)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 19:45 The Art of Innovation (m0009bn4)
Patterns of Thought

Sir Ian Blatchford and Dr Tilly Blyth continue their series exploring how art and science have inspired each other, from the Enlightenment to Dark Matter. They examine whether the digital computer, that simply follows a series of logical steps, can produce original art without the creative and emotional intention of a human.

Ian visits Longplayer a piece of music created using an algorithm designed by ex Pogues musician Jem Finer. It will play for a millennium, without repetition, ending on December 31st 2999. The algorithm that defines Longplayer allows the music to be composed in real time according to simple rules. It’s music that plays with ideas of human and physical time

Over 100 years before the digital computer age, Ada Lovelace made a significant intellectual leap by suggesting a computing machine could be used not just for numerical expressions but to manipulate quantities other than number, such as musical notes. As Tilly reveals, it goes to the heart of questions about whether, in the future, anything as a mundane as a piece of computer code can generate music and art that’s genuinely creative without human input.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Produced in partnership with The Science Museum Group

Photograph (C) LongPlayer Trust


THU 20:00 Law in Action (m000x6wh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (m000x6wk)
Evan Davis chairs a discussion providing insight into business from the people at the top.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m000x6w3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (m000x6tr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m000x6wn)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000x6vh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 Rhysearch (m000x6wq)
Episode 3

Comedian Rhys James investigates topics that the rest of us are too busy to be bothered with.

3: Are They Watching us?

Has technology gone wacky doolally?

Rhys gets to the bottom of privacy issues, deep fakes, non-fungible tokens and whether technology will be the end of us all.

Written and presented by Rhys James
Guest... Samatha Yap
Guest... TBC

Produced by Carl Cooper

This is a BBC Studios Production


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000x6ws)
Today in Parliament

News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



FRIDAY 25 JUNE 2021

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m000x6wv)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 00:30 Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez (m000x6tt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000x6wx)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000x6wz)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000x6x1)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m000x6x3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000x6x5)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev'd Dr Craig Gardiner, a tutor at South Wales Baptist College.

Good morning.

Today in 1947 the diary of Anne Frank was published for the first time. The account of her teenage life, hidden in a secret annex, during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands was encouraged in part by a radio broadcast calling for the preservation of "ordinary documents—a diary, letters ... everyday material" to create a national archive of the suffering of civilians during the war.

There is much everyday mundanity in her writing, but there are also moments of sublime spiritual lucidity. One famous entry was written weeks before she and her family were sent to the concentration camp. She says:

It’s difficult in times like these: ideals, dreams and cherished hopes rise within us, only to be crushed by grim reality. Yet I cling to them because I still believe, in spite of everything, that people are truly good at heart.

By the time she makes this entry she’s seen enough evil to know that people can be consumed by it, and yet she holds on to hope.

The biblical story of Adam and Eve records why humanity first fell into these grim realities of evil, but it also affirms the belief, that the image of God is planted more deeply than anything that is wrong, and with that comes our capacity and desire to do good, to be good and to find the good in others.

Whether or not we record such moments in a diary, they are surely worth clinging to throughout the day.

Dear God
As another morning dawns
We know how fragile goodness can seem,
How delicate hopes might appear,
In the face of grim realities
But the story of Jesus allows us
To trust in him in whom
Love has already overcome hate
And life has forever overcome death.
Amen


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m000x6x7)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sbz0y)
Storm Petrel

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the European Storm Petrel. The storm petrels as a group are the smallest seabirds in the world and called "Jesus Christ birds" because they give the appearance they can walk on water as they flutter over the sea surface dangling their legs whilst looking for food.


FRI 06:00 Today (m000x7tf)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m000x6cj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez (m000x7w1)
Episode 5

In the last episode of Arctic Dreams, read by Kyle Soller, Lopez considers how man’s relationship with the frozen north has changed over time and exhorts us to rise to the ever more urgent challenges of climate change and to cherish and protect this most fragile of continents. As industry encroaches ever further into the polar regions Lopez insists we must not regard the Arctic merely as a resource for us to exploit.

In his breath-taking natural, social and cultural history of the Arctic, Lopez reveals the essential mystery and beauty of a continent that has enchanted man's imagination and ambition since time immemorial.
Written well over a quarter of a century ago, Lopez's visionary account of his journey across the polar caps is a celebration of the Arctic in all its guises. A hostile landscape of ice, freezing oceans and dazzling skyscapes, home to millions of diverse animals and people, it is also the backdrop to massive migrations by land, sea and air and the setting of epic exploratory voyages.

In timeless, prophetic prose, as meditative and memorable as the land it describes, Arctic Dreams poses fundamental questions about how we should cherish our ever more vulnerable planet.
Arctic Dreams was written by Barry Lopez.
It is read by Kyle Soller and abridged by Richard Hamilton
The producer is Karen Holden


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000x7tm)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


FRI 11:00 Descendants (p09jjqk1)
James Cleverly MP and Deadria Farmer-Paellmann

One year on from the toppling of the Colston Statue in Bristol, Descendants asks... how close is each of us to the legacy of Britain's role in slavery? And who does that mean our lives are connected to?

Yrsa Daley-Ward narrates seven episodes telling the stories of people whose lives today are all connected through this history and its legacy.

Government Minister, James Cleverly, the first British MP of Sierra Leone descent, takes us back through his family history and the way his experiences of Sierra Leone helped shape his perspective on Britain and colonialism. It's a history which is directly linked to Britain's role in slavery, and its aftermath. He understands he is descended from the Mende tribe. A few thousand miles away, Deadria Farmer-Paellmann has also discovered she is descended from the Mende tribe - but her ancestors were enslaved and trafficked to South Carolina. The discovery becomes part of her life's mission to try to get reparations for the descendants of the enslaved.

Producers: Polly Weston, Candace Wilson, Rema Mukena
Editor: Kirsten Lass
Academic consultants: Matthew Smith and Rachel Lang of the UCL Centre for the Study of the Legacies of British Slavery
Additional genealogical research is by Laura Berry


FRI 11:30 Prepper (m000x7tq)
Series 2

Making a Prepper

Preppers are a large and rapidly growing global community who have taken Armageddon readiness one step further than most. They’re actively skilling up, laying down supplies and readying themselves for ‘the end of the world’, in whatever form it comes. If people in south Manchester are prepping, it’s probably time to worry.

Sylvia Garrett, a cut-throat shop-managing baby boomer, and 27 year old Rachel Olende, self-obsessed and having a quarter-life crisis, continue their podcast for anyone interested in surviving the coming breakdown of society - Prepper.

In this week's episode, we find out exactly what happened to turn Sylvia from a mild-mannered shop assistant into the prepping demon that we know and love, today. On reflection - we're not sure she was ever mild-mannered, but she has a story about a trip across the Pennines that she will never forget. And neither will you. There's also news of the passing of Beryl Arbuthnot, another heroine of the north-western prepper community. The Vikings have nothing on prepper funerals. All this and a super-volcano, too.

The first series of Prepper won the Writers Guild of Great Britain Award for Best Comedy 2020.

On this new series: "A comic book and kitchen sink drama" - The Radio Times; "A timely return for the sharply written comedy" - The Guardian; "As enjoyably unhinged as the first series" - Daily Mail.

In this series, while Sylvia continues to broadcast from her well-appointed double garage in south Manchester, Rachel is banished to a duvet-lined gazebo in the garden.

Cast:
Sylvia is played by Sue Johnston OBE
Rachel is played by Lydia West

Written by Caroline Moran
Technical Presentation: Jerry Peal
Producer: Steve Doherty

A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m000x7xd)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:04 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000x7tv)
Episode 5

Helen Dunmore’s prize-winning first novel is set in the late spring, early summer of 1917. War haunts the Cornish coast and ships are being sunk by U-boats, strangers are treated with suspicion, and newspapers are full of spy stories.

Into this uneasy landscape, to a hamlet just outside St Ives, come DH Lawrence and his German wife, Frieda. They are hoping to escape the war-fever that grips London and also to live as cheaply as possible in a rented cottage. The pacifist Lawrence is reeling from his latest novel, The Rainbow, having been banned for obscenity, and is struggling to finish and publish its sequel, Women in Love.

They befriend Clare Coyne, a young artist who has lived alone with her father since her mother died when she was a child.

Written by Helen Dunmore
Read by Louise Brealey
Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m000x7tx)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


FRI 12:57 Weather (m000x7tz)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m000x7v1)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Jonny Dymond.


FRI 13:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sqw6k)
Pilgrims, Raiders and Traders (900 - 1300 AD)

Kilwa pot sherds

This week Neil MacGregor has been looking at objects from Japan, Britain, Java and central Europe, exploring the great arcs of trade that connected Africa, Europe and Asia a thousand years ago. Today he sifts through a selection of broken pots, found on a beach in East Africa, to see what they might tell us. Smashed pottery, it seems, can be astonishingly durable and can offer powerful historical insights. These ceramic bits - in a variety of glazes and decorations - were found on the island of Kilwa Kisiwani off Tanzania. Neil uses the fragments to tell the story of a string of thriving communities along the East African coast with links across the Indian Ocean and beyond. The historian Bertram Mapunda and the writer Abdulrazak Gurnah describe the significance of these broken pieces and help piece together the great cross-cultural mix that produced the Swahili culture and language.

Producer: Anthony Denselow


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m000x6wc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Limelight (p09h4wps)
The System

The System - Level 5: Kill the Past

By Ben Lewis.

A witty and propulsive six-part thriller about a group of young radicals and the hunt for their leader. Starring Siena Kelly, Jack Rowan and Iain de Caestecker.

Level 5: Kill the Past

The Past: Jake and Alex have a stand-off when Jake’s given a target dangerously close to home.
The Present: Maya’s TV habit, once described as her downfall, is about to become her greatest asset.

Cast:
Alex … Iain de Caestecker
Jerome… Don Gilét
Maya … Siena Kelly
Coyote…Divian Ladwa
Beau…Matthew Needham
DI Cohen / Jess …Chloe Pirrie
Jake …Jack Rowan

Original music and sound design by Danny Krass
Featuring tracks from Equiknoxx music collective

With thanks to Dr Joel Busher at the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations, University of Coventry.

A BBC Scotland Production directed by Kirsty Williams


FRI 14:45 Chinese Characters (b0b01rvk)
Wang Jingwei: Revolutionary Renegade

He is condemned as China's worst traitor. What made him do it? In 1938, as China was plunged into war, Wang Jingwei defected to the enemy, Japan. Yet in his early life, he had been one of the great figures of the Chinese revolution, second only to the legendary Sun Yat-sen. Wang's story is one of hope for a different Asia, liberated from imperialism, and the betrayal of those possibilities. Wang's decision to defect came at China's "darkest hour" when victory against a mighty enemy seemed impossible, and previously unthinkable political choices would tear China into many parts. Understanding why he chose to collaborate with Japan, and how he was in turn betrayed, illuminates one of the great tragedies of China's twentieth century.
Presenter: Rana Mitter
Producer: Ben Crighton
Researcher: Elizabeth Smith Rosser.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000x7v5)
GQT at Home

Kathy Clugston hosts the horticultural programme featuring a group of gardening experts. Bob Flowerdew, James Wong and Christine Walkden are on hand to answer questions sent in by green-fingered listeners.

Producer - Jemima Rathbone
Assistant Producer - Millie Chu

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 From Fact to Fiction (m000x7v7)
Award-winning writer Julia Blackburn creates a fictional response to a news story.

Julia has been described as one of the most original writers in Britain. Her work includes 'Timesong' a 'magical, mesmerising book that makes you feel giddy at the thought of the deep gulf of history hidden just beneath your feet'; the winner of the J R Ackerley Award for Memoir for the 'remarkable' 'The Three of Us', as well as innovative, imaginative and revelatory biographies of Goya, Napoleon and Billie Holliday.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m000x7v9)
Matthew Bannister tells the life stories of people who have recently died, from the rich and famous to unsung but significant. Prod: Eleanor Garland (Beverley Purcell Apr-July)


FRI 16:30 More or Less (m000x4vn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 on Wednesday]


FRI 17:00 PM (m000x7vc)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000x7vh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 Dead Ringers (m000x7vk)
Series 21

Episode 3

The writing squad for the series: Tom Jamieson and Nev Fountain, Laurence Howarth, Tom Coles & Ed Amsden, Jeffrey Aidoo, Simon Alcock, James Bugg, Sarah Campbell, Nastassia Dhanraj , Athena Kugblenu, Sophie Dickson, Rajiv Karia, Vivienne Riddoch & Jane Mccutcheon , Edward Tew.

Producer: Bill Dare
Production Coordinator: Sarah Sharpe
A BBC Studios Production for Radio 4.


FRI 19:00 Front Row (m000x7vm)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


FRI 19:45 The Art of Innovation (m0009d1h)
Imagining Matter

Sir Ian Blatchford, Director of the Science Museum, and the Science Museum’s Head of Collections, Dr Tilly Blyth, conclude their series exploring how art and science have inspired each other. As science has become more theoretical and conceptual, how can art explore scientific thinking in areas that exceed the limits of what we can conceive?

From photomicrographs of Einstein’s chalkboard used during his lecture on the Theory of Relativity , to blowing up a shed and suspending its charred remains around a lightbulb, inspired by the scientific concept of Cold Dark Matter, the imaginative art installations of artist Cornelia Parker are testament to the way artists can suggest ways of thinking about scientific ideas that in themselves seem abstract and complex.

As Ian and Tilly conclude - from the revelatory light at the centre of Joseph Wright’s Enlightenment painting of the orrery (in Episode 1) to Cornelia Parker’s central cosmological light on what is yet to be known, the ongoing dialogue between science and art is proof they are part of the same rich culture, driven by a curiosity, a creativity and an imagination that is common to both.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Produced in Partnership with The Science Museum


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m000x7vp)
Alastair Stewart, Emily Thornberry MP

Chris Mason presents political discussion from Christ Church in Winchester with a panel which includes the GB News presenter Alastair Stewart and the Shadow International Trade Secretary Emily Thornberry MP.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: Tim Allen


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m000x7vr)
Weekly reflections on topical issues from a range of contributors.


FRI 21:00 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tdxpw)
Pilgrims, Raiders and Traders (AD 800 - 1300)

Neil MacGregor, the director of the British Museum in London, continues his global history as told through objects that history has left behind.

This week Neil has chosen objects that bring to life the traders, pilgrims and raiders who swept across the vast expanse of Europe and Asia between the 9th and 13th centuries.

His quest takes him to a glass beaker that is believed to turn water into wine and a thorn said to be from Christ's crown of thorns, but he begins with a great Viking treasure hoard that was discovered by metal detectors in a field in North Yorkshire in Britain.

Producers: Paul Kobrak and Anthony Denselow.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m000x7vv)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000x7tv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (m000x73c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000x7vx)
Today in Parliament

News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (m000x73c)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (m000x73c)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 13:45 MON (b00sqw6p)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 13:45 TUE (b00sqw6c)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 13:45 WED (b00sqw6f)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 13:45 THU (b00sqw6h)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 13:45 FRI (b00sqw6k)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 21:00 FRI (b00tdxpw)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m000x1gv)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m000x7vr)

A Show of Hands 09:30 TUE (m000x6b1)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (m000x4wf)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (m000x4wf)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (m000wytt)

Analysis 20:30 MON (m000x507)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m000x65d)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m000x1gs)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m000x7vp)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b08gw91n)

Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez 09:45 MON (m000x50l)

Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez 00:30 TUE (m000x50l)

Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez 09:45 TUE (m000x6by)

Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez 00:30 WED (m000x6by)

Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez 09:45 WED (m000x4xh)

Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez 00:30 THU (m000x4xh)

Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez 09:45 THU (m000x6tt)

Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez 00:30 FRI (m000x6tt)

Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez 09:45 FRI (m000x7w1)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m000x6w3)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m000x6w3)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m000x60n)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m000x60n)

Blue: Pain and Pleasure 16:00 MON (m000x0y1)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m000x602)

Castle of the Hawk 15:00 SAT (b0b90xxd)

Chinese Characters 14:45 FRI (b0b01rvk)

DH Lawrence: Tainted Love 15:00 SUN (m000x6cx)

Dead Ringers 12:30 SAT (m000x1gn)

Dead Ringers 18:30 FRI (m000x7vk)

Descendants 11:00 FRI (p09jjqk1)

Desert Island Discs 11:00 SUN (m000x6cj)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m000x6cj)

Detoxifying the Classics 11:00 TUE (m000x72t)

Drama 14:00 MON (m000x6pk)

Drama 14:15 TUE (m000x737)

Drama 14:15 WED (m000610r)

Drama 14:15 THU (m0005tpt)

Ed Reardon's Week 18:30 TUE (m000x6bc)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m000x647)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m000x611)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m000x518)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m000x6cb)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m000x4xx)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m000x6x7)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (m000wz0j)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (m000x6bh)

Fortunately... with Fi and Jane 23:00 TUE (m000x6br)

Four Thought 05:45 SAT (m000wz41)

Four Thought 09:30 WED (m000x4vq)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (m000x4vq)

From Fact to Fiction 15:45 FRI (m000x7v7)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m000x64w)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (m000x6v1)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m000x505)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m000x6bf)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m000x4x0)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m000x6wf)

Front Row 19:00 FRI (m000x7vm)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m000x1gb)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m000x7v5)

Guide Books 11:30 TUE (m000x72w)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:04 SUN (m000wz2p)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (m000x501)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (m000x6tr)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (m000x6tr)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m000x6bk)

It's Funny and It's True 23:00 MON (b08z9mhl)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m000x1gg)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m000x7v9)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (m000x6wh)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (m000x6wh)

Limelight 14:15 FRI (p09h4wps)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m000x660)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m000x660)

Made of Stronger Stuff 15:30 TUE (p09cz05k)

Made of Stronger Stuff 21:00 WED (p09cz05k)

Mark Steel's in Town 11:30 WED (b09k6pn3)

Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious 19:45 SAT (b08nl6c1)

Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious 11:45 SUN (b08nq5wq)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m000x1h2)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m000x666)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m000x60l)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m000x50j)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m000x6bw)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m000x4xf)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m000x6wv)

Mitchell on Meetings 11:00 WED (m000t4t4)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m000x60g)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m000x60g)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m000x4wc)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (m000wz56)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (m000x4x2)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (m000wz3z)

More or Less 09:00 WED (m000x4vn)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (m000x4vn)

Natural Histories 06:35 SUN (b05w99rp)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m000x1hb)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m000x66g)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m000x60x)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m000x510)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m000x6c6)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m000x4xs)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m000x6x3)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m000x650)

News Summary 06:00 SUN (m000x5zj)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m000x6cl)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m000x6p8)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m000x72y)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m000x4zl)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m000x6vc)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m000x7xd)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m000x643)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m000x5zp)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m000x5zy)

News and Weather 13:00 SAT (m000x658)

News 22:00 SAT (m000x664)

One to One 14:45 SAT (m000vp31)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m000x6d0)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m000x6d0)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (m000x0yg)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m000x6vz)

Our Souls So Knit 23:30 SAT (m000wywx)

PM 17:00 SAT (m000x65n)

PM 17:00 MON (m000x6ps)

PM 17:00 TUE (m000x73f)

PM 17:00 WED (m000x4wp)

PM 17:00 THU (m000x6w5)

PM 17:00 FRI (m000x7vc)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m000x608)

Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz 21:00 SAT (b071v5rz)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (m000x6d2)

Political Thinking with Nick Robinson 17:30 SAT (m000x65r)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m000x1hd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m000x60z)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m000x514)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m000x6c8)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m000x4xv)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m000x6x5)

Prepper 11:30 FRI (m000x7tq)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m000x662)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m000x662)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m000x662)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m000x5zt)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m000x5zt)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m000x5zt)

Rhysearch 23:00 THU (m000x6wq)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m000x64l)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m000x1h6)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m000x66b)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m000x60s)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m000x50r)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m000x6c2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m000x4xn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m000x6wz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m000x1h4)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m000x1h8)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m000x65t)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m000x668)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m000x66d)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m000x6d4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m000x60q)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m000x60v)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m000x50n)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m000x50w)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m000x6c0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m000x6c4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m000x4xl)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m000x4xq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m000x6wx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m000x6x1)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (m000x739)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (m000x1gd)

Short Works 19:00 SUN (b07w6kn9)

Sideways 16:00 WED (m000x4wh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m000x65y)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m000x6d8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m000x4zz)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m000x6b9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m000x4wt)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m000x6w7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m000x7vh)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b04lp626)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b04lp626)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (m000x4zq)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (m000x4zq)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m000x600)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m000x5zr)

Tainted Money 11:00 MON (m000w9v6)

Talking Story 18:30 THU (m000x6w9)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (m000wz2d)

The 3rd Degree 15:00 MON (m000x6pm)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m000x604)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m000x503)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m000x503)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m000x4w9)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m000x4w9)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m000x4wy)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m000x4wy)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m000x6wc)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m000x6wc)

The Art of Innovation 19:45 MON (m00099zp)

The Art of Innovation 19:45 TUE (m0009b3l)

The Art of Innovation 19:45 WED (m0009cdv)

The Art of Innovation 19:45 THU (m0009bn4)

The Art of Innovation 19:45 FRI (m0009d1h)

The Blind Astronomer 21:00 MON (m000wyzg)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (m000x6wk)

The Chronicles of Burke Street 19:45 SUN (m000x60d)

The Confessional 19:15 SUN (m000x60b)

The Devil You Know by Gwen Adshead and Eileen Horne 00:30 SAT (m000x1fc)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (m000x6pq)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (m000x0yj)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (m000x6w1)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m000x6cn)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m000x6cn)

The Hotel 21:45 SAT (m000n4yl)

The Listening Project 13:30 SUN (m000x6cv)

The Long View 09:00 TUE (m000x69z)

The Long View 21:30 TUE (m000x69z)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m000x4wl)

The Media Show 21:30 WED (m000x4wl)

The New Deal - A Story For Our Times 20:00 MON (m000n70z)

The Skewer 23:15 WED (m000x4x9)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (m000x64s)

The Why Factor 14:45 MON (b0680lxv)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m000x6cs)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m000x50b)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m000x6bm)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m000x4x5)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m000x6wn)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m000x7vv)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (m000wz4r)

Thought Cages 14:45 SUN (m0001b0w)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (m000x50g)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (m000x6bt)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (m000x4xc)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (m000x6ws)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (m000x7vx)

Today 07:00 SAT (m000x64h)

Today 06:00 MON (m000x4zn)

Today 06:00 TUE (m000x69v)

Today 06:00 WED (m000x4vj)

Today 06:00 THU (m000x6tp)

Today 06:00 FRI (m000x7tf)

Twayna Mayne: Black Woman 23:00 WED (m000x4x7)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (m0003631)

Tweet of the Day 10:54 SUN (m000x6cg)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b09d3p60)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b0378y3z)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b08tbqhb)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b01sbyzk)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b01sbz0y)

Unite 18:30 WED (m000x4ww)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m000x64c)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m000x654)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m000x65w)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m000x5zm)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m000x5zw)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m000x6cq)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m000x6d6)

Weather 05:56 MON (m000x613)

Weather 12:57 MON (m000x6pd)

Weather 12:57 TUE (m000x732)

Weather 12:57 WED (m000x4w4)

Weather 12:57 THU (m000x6vr)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m000x7tz)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m000x60j)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m000x65j)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m000x4zv)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m000x6b5)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m000x4vv)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m000x6tw)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m000x7tm)

Women Talking About Cars 19:15 SAT (m0001fdq)

World at One 13:00 MON (m000x6pg)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m000x734)

World at One 13:00 WED (m000x4w6)

World at One 13:00 THU (m000x6vw)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m000x7v1)

Written in Scotland 11:30 THU (m000x6v5)

You and Yours 12:18 MON (m000x6pb)

You and Yours 12:18 TUE (m000x730)

You and Yours 12:18 WED (m000x4w2)

You and Yours 12:18 THU (m000x6vm)

You and Yours 12:18 FRI (m000x7tx)

You're Dead To Me 10:30 SAT (p08qg3xl)

Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore 12:04 MON (m000x50d)

Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore 22:45 MON (m000x50d)

Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore 12:04 TUE (m000x6bp)

Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore 22:45 TUE (m000x6bp)

Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore 12:04 WED (m000x4vz)

Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore 22:45 WED (m000x4vz)

Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore 12:04 THU (m000x6vh)

Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore 22:45 THU (m000x6vh)

Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore 12:04 FRI (m000x7tv)

Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore 22:45 FRI (m000x7tv)