Radio-Lists Home Now on R4 Contact

RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 15 JANUARY 2022

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m0013967)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:30 Islands of Abandonment by Cal Flyn (m001394l)
Episode 5

Islands of Abandonment, by Cal Flyn, explores the extraordinary places where humans no longer live - or survive in tiny, precarious numbers - to give us a glimpse of what happens when mankind’s impact on nature is forced to stop.

Flyn brings together some of the most desolate, eerie, ravaged and polluted areas in the world - and shows how, against all odds, they can offer remarkable opportunities for environmental recovery.

By turns haunted and hopeful, this luminously written and wide-ranging account shines a light in the direction of some of the answers to the big questions - what happens after we’re gone, and how far can our presence be erased and the damage be undone?

Written by Cal Flyn
Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel Creed
Read by Morven Christie
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0013969)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m001396c)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:33 Shipping Forecast (m001396f)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m001396k)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Dr Krish Kandiah

Good morning.

A picture of three pairs of skis. A child holding a sign saying, ‘Every Superhero needs a sidekick’. A blue – or pink – reveal cake. It seems we are getting quite creative about the way we announce the coming arrival of a new baby.

Thousands of years ago, another picture was sent out into space and time. An unmissable stellar event was carefully choreographed to announce the approaching birth of God’s son. A handful of Eastern scholars spotted it and decided this was too good not to be shared.

So it was that sometime after the nativity, wise men travelled to Bethlehem despite the great distance, and despite the despotic King Herod hijacking their mission for his own power mongering.

After they had found Jesus and worshipped him, they set off on the long, difficult journey home, and the Infant Jesus began a similarly long, difficult journey in the opposite direction. To avoid King Herod’s murder of the innocents, Jesus and his family became refugees.

Some 26 million people around the globe can relate to that. They understand tyranny and terror and poverty and destitution, and the uncertain journey towards what is supposed to be a fundamental human right: seeking safety and asylum.

King Herod and the wise men both verbalised a desire to worship Jesus, but their attitude and their ambitions could not have been more different. One brought gifts and bestowed honour. The other tried to wipe out all trace of Jesus’ existence and influence.

Maybe we recognise these tensions around us. Maybe we feel the time-old tug in our own hearts: to extinguish faith, or to explore it, to push strangers away, or to welcome them with honour. Which way will we choose?

Lord God, give us the wisdom of the Wise Men that is willing to forego the comforts of home and security of our national identity and move forward with generosity, honour and welcome to those who need it.

Amen.


SAT 05:45 The Death of Nuance (m000qlxd)
Twisting My Words

Oliver Burkeman explores how language may actually limit our capacity for nuanced thought - depending on how we choose to use it.

He dives into the world of ‘untranslatable words’ with Tim Lomas, a psychologist who collects unscramble words from different cultures, and discovers how expanding our vocabulary could change not only our view of the world, but our understanding of our own minds. And he speaks with Professor Naomi S. Baron, a Linguist who has studied how our relationship with language has changed as so much of our communication has shifted from the printed page to digital, and how that simple change in media has negatively impacted the way we think and learn in ways we do not even perceive.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m0013h8k)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (m00139pl)
Classic Rock

Jack's Rake is a famous diagonal groove up a Lake District rock face. It's tough, but not too tough - so can a newby climber manage it?

Helping Emily Knight up the face is Anna Fleming, author of Time on Rock, plus Langdale native Bill Birkett who's made a few first ascents in the Lakes. On the way they talk about the rock, the attitude, and the kit.

The producer for BBC audio in Bristol is Miles Warde


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m0013h8m)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside


SAT 06:57 Weather (m0013h8p)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 07:00 Today (m0013h8r)
Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m0013h8w)
Giovanna Fletcher

Author and podcaster Giovanna Fletcher trained as an actor, but with several bestselling novels under her belt and her hit podcast Happy Mum Happy Baby featuring guests stars such as the Duchess of Cambridge, she has had little time to take to the stage in recent years. Now she stars in the West End in Danny Robins's terrifying new play 2.22 A Ghost Story at London's Gielgud Theatre.

During lockdown, Femi Fadugba's debut novel, which combines his expertise in quantum physics with a thrilling time travel story set in Peckham, became a bestseller and was quickly snapped up by Netflix for a film adaptation.

Ben Norris combines his skills as a poet, actor and playwright in The Choir of Man, a new feelgood show in the West End, which uses hits by the likes of Sia and and Guns'n'Roses to celebrate the power of community.

After an incredible story from listener Helen Kirkham on last week's show about the devastating accident that almost took her life, we reunite Helen with someone very special.

Darling Buds of May, Matilda and Call the Midwife actor Pam Ferris chooses her Inheritance Tracks: You Are My Heart's Delight by Richard Tauber and Bonde by Ali Farka Toure with Ry Cooder.

And we have a Thank You from Topsy Kennedy.

Producer: Tim Bano


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (m0013h8y)
Series 35

Home Economics: Episode 49

Jay Rayner hosts the culinary panel show. Ready to answer questions sent in by hungry listeners are Andi Oliver, Paula McIntyre, Tim Hayward and Dr Annie Gray.

This week, the panellists help us stave off the winter cold with some delightfully warming drinks recipes. They also share their top tips for using up a glut of limes, and teach us how to smoke salmon at home.

Joining them is Georgian chef and author Tiko Tuskadze, who talks through her favourite recipe for khachapuri, a classic Georgian cheese bread.

Producer: Jemima Rathbone
Assistant Producer: Aniya Das

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m0013h90)
Radio 4's assessment of developments at Westminster


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m0013h92)
Serbia and Djokovic: More Than a Matter of Tennis

When Novak Djokovic landed in Melbourne, few could have imagined that his impending encounters on the tennis court would be upstaged by a legal battle, one which then prompted a row between his country and Australia. After immigration officials held the Serb player in a hotel, Djokovic’s father said his son was being “crucified”. Then Serbia’s Foreign Ministry claimed that the player had been deliberately lured to Australia in order to humiliate him, as part of a “political game.” Guy Delauney explains that the affair has touched a raw nerve in Serbia, with an importance way beyond the tennis court.

While the war of words was going on between Serbia and Australia, the government of Cameroon was trying to keep everyone’s attention focused on sport, and not on politics. The country is hosting the Africa-wide football tournament, the Africa Cup of Nations, a chance for the country to shine on the international stage. Like any contest, the Cup provides an opportunity for all countries to unite and rally behind their national team. However, there is a distinct shortage of unity among some people of this West African nation. Cameroon has suffered a long-running separatist insurgency in the English-speaking part of the country, and that was where James Copnall went to watch one of the games.

You might think Ukraine was used to conflict; it suffered some of the worst casualties of the Second World War, and previously lost millions to murder and starvation, as Stalin imposed communist rule on a population which often resisted it. Today, around a hundred thousand Russian troops are massed on the Ukrainian border, and when Zeinab Badawi visited the capital Kiev, she found a very different mood to what she experienced on previous trips.

What have sectarian murders in Northern Ireland got in common with the dawn of democracy in Czechoslovakia, and the start of negotiations to reduce carbon dioxide emissions? The answer is that all of them were reported on by Mary Hockaday, whose career of more than three decades at the BBC has just come to an end. Her departure has left her reflecting on time, and how the world changes with it.

The housing market has been rather perky this past year, so it might be a good time to sell your home, but not if you’re a princess, you don’t actually want to move out, and the property in question is a Seventeenth Century palace. Such though is the fate of one of Rome’s more unusual inhabitants, living in one of the city’s more distinctive buildings. The Villa Aurora will go under the auctioneer’s hammer next week, and is valued at more than four hundred million pounds. David Willey has been a regular visitor.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m0013hmv)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m0013h96)
Energy bills

In April households are likely to see an increase of up to 50% in the cost of their energy bills. Many people already struggle to pay for gas and electricity so the upcoming price hike is expected to push many more into debt with their suppliers. What can people – and the energy industry – do to try to minimise the impact on people’s finances?

Starling Bank has stopped paying for adverts on Facebook and Instagram until, it says, they do more to stop scam ads from being placed on their sites. We find out what Facebook parent company Meta has to say about the move and find out what action, if any, the other challenger and traditional banks are doing about it.

Individual Voluntary Arrangements to help people find a way out of debt have come under the microscope before for being mis-sold. Now there is a consultation about their use.

And after a huge response to a story about cheques on last week’s programme we hear from listener’s about their thoughts on them and take an alternative, historical look at those humble rectangular pieces of paper that stir so much passion.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Reporter: Chris Flynn
Producer: Dan Whitworth
Researcher: Drew Miller-Hyndman
Editor: Emma Rippon


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (m001395s)
Series 107

Episode 3

Andy Zaltzman presents a look back at the week's headlines, in a tough week for the Prime Minister.

Joined by a panel of Ayesha Hazarika, Paul Sinha, Kiri Pritchard-McLean and Simon Evans, Andy looks back over the events of 20th May 2020 with Sue Gray-like focus. As well as Downing Street parties, the panel discuss rising energy bills, pig heart transplants, space telescopes and Michael Gove being trapped in a lift.

Chair's Script: Written by Andy Zaltzman
Additional Material: by Alice Fraser, Mike Shephard, Celya AB and Rajiv Karia
Production Coordinator: Katie Baum
Sound Editor: Marc Willcox
Producer: Gwyn Rhys Davies.

A BBC Studios Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (m0013h98)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News and Weather (m0013h9b)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m001395x)
Nadra Ahmed, Wilfred Emmanuel-Jones, Preet Gill MP, Chris Philp MP

Chris Mason presents political debate and discussion from St Mary's Church, Handsworth with the Chair of the National Care Association Nadra Ahmed, the businessman and farmer Wilfred Emmanuel-Jones, Labour's Shadow International Development Secretary Preet Gill MP and Minister for Tech and the Digital Economy Chris Philp MP.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: Phil Booth


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m0013h9d)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:45 Drama (b0930dvl)
Crime Down Under: The Dragon Man

By Garry Disher, dramatised by D.J.Britton.

It's hot, it's nearly Christmas, and Hal Challis has a serial killer to catch. On the Mornington Peninsula near Melbourne, young women are being targeted and murdered and the perpetrator leaves no clues. A series of recorded messages taunting the police, along with a spate of deliberate fire-setting, increase the pressure on the team to make an arrest before the holiday. But they can't find anything to connect the crimes with their only suspect.

Crime Down Under showcases the best crime fiction from contemporary Australia. The Dragon Man is the first in Garry Disher's series of novels featuring detective duo Challis & Destry. It won the Deutsche Krimi Preis (German Crime Fiction Prize) and Disher has also twice won the Ned Kelly Award for Crime Writing.

BBC Cymru Wales production

Richard Dillane's multiple credits include recent appearances in Peaky Blinders, Poldark and Wolf Hall. Penny Downie is a leading actress for the RSC, including paying Gertrude to David Tennant's Hamlet. As a child, she appeared in The Sullivans, which was the last time she worked with fellow-Australian Mark Little. Mark is known as Joe Mangel from Neighbours as well as appearing in Emmerdale and as a presenter for The Big Breakfast.


SAT 16:15 Woman's Hour (m0013h9j)
Highlights from the Woman's Hour week


SAT 17:00 PM (m0013h9l)
Full coverage of the day's news


SAT 17:30 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (p0bh8tdz)
The Gary Neville One

Nick Robinson talks to Gary Neville about his footballing career, the state of English football and his own political ambitions


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0013h9q)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m0013h9s)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0013h9v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m0013h9x)
Samantha Morton, Armando Iannucci, Paul Nicholas, Simon Barnes, Scottee, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Scottee are joined by Samantha Morton, Armando Iannucci, Paul Nicholas and Simon Barnes for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Orlando Weeks.


SAT 19:00 Profile (m0013h9z)
Novak Djokovic

Adrian Goldberg profiles the life and career of World No. 1 tennis player Novak Djokovic.

We hear about him practicing in the streets of Belgrade as a child during the war in the former Yugoslavia, how his views on health and medicine were shaped and how he became the formidable and resilient competitor that he is today.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Researcher: Diane Richardson


SAT 19:15 Rethink (m001324g)
Rethink Population

The Great British Baby Bust

Amol Rajan and guests look at why British birth rates have declined so much. Can we - should we - try to reverse this and how will we pay for the health and care needs of our growing elderly population?

GUESTS

Prof Sarah Harper, Director and Clore Professor of Gerontology, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing

Miatta Fahnbulleh, CEO, New Economics Foundation

Robert Colvile, Director, Centre for Policy Studies

David Runciman - Professor of Politics, University of Cambridge

Presenter: Amol Rajan
Producer: Rob Walker
Editor: Kirsty Reid


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m0013hb1)
The Great Wall

50 years on from US President Nixon's historic visit to China, historian Rana Mitter rediscovers how the relationship blossomed - and withered.

That visit is commemorated in the opera Nixon in China. But Rana mines the archives to recover the importance of what happened next - like Deng Xiaoping's visit to America in 1979, culminating in a trip to a rodeo in Texas and the establishment of diplomatic ties. He traces the relationship through the visits that followed Nixon's - Ford in China, Reagan in China, Clinton in China. He talks to key players about the encounters that ensued, from anticommunist protestors throwing dead mice to Chinese visitors' enthusiasm for Disneyland - but horror at its haunted house.

The warming-up in relations took place in the shadow of the perceived threat of the Soviet Union; even the 1989 massacre of pro-democracy protestors in Beijing's Tiananmen Square did not bring it to an end. Rana explores how the US moved secretly to preserve its relationship with China, and how this led to an astonishing 1998 debate about the nature of democracy between Bill Clinton and Jiang Zemin, broadcast live on Chinese TV. He talks to Robert Zoellick, who played a key role in talks which brought China into the WTO.

Finally, we trace how China's rising economic power and its increasingly assertive geopolitical presence have led US administrations, under Trump and Biden alike, to question the Nixon project - even as Nixon himself remains highly-regarded in China. Rana asks General H.R. McMaster, US National Security Advisor 2017-18, why the Trump administration decided the whole engagement process was a mistake.

With: Jan Berris, General H.R. McMaster, Orville Schell, Susan Shirk, Wang Huiyao, Yu Jie, Robert Zoellick

Producer: Phil Tinline


SAT 21:00 Tumanbay (m0002g8b)
Series 3

Two Moons

As Tumanbay prepares for a royal wedding, the return of a certain prominent palace official offers hope for new alliances.

While the kite flyers of Tumanbay risk their lives for new adventure, Heaven (Olivia Popica), whose father was executed during the occupation, attempts to rebuild the family slave business and goes on a voyage to distant shores to purchase slaves, accompanied by one of her father’s business associates, the self-serving Bavand (Peter Polycarpou).

Cast:
Gregor........Rufus Wright
Manel........Aiysha Hart
Cadali........Matthew Marsh
Grand Master, Amalric........ Anton Lesser
Bavand........Peter Polycarpou
Alkin........Nathalie Armin
Herod........Amir El-Masry
Selim........Farshid Rokey
Heaven........Olivia Popica
General Qulan........Christopher Fulford
Frog........Finn Elliot
Matilla........Humera Syed
Akiba........Akin Gazi
Balarac Sergeant........Alexander Arnold
Nurse........Annabelle Dowler
Slave Captain........George Georgiou
The Hafiz........Antony Bunsee
Spider........Yusuf Hofri
Martha........Marlene Madenge
Courtier........Vivek Madan
Prisoner........Nadir Khan

Tumanbay is created by John Scott Dryden and Mike Walker and inspired by the Mamluk slave rulers of Egypt.

Original Music by Sacha Puttnam

Sound Design by Eloise Whitmore
Additional Music by Jon Ouin

Produced by Emma Hearn, Nadir Khan and John Scott Dryden
Written by Mike Walker
Directed by John Scott Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:45 Sandi Toksvig's Hygge (m0012qgw)
Series 2

Andy Hamilton

Joining Sandi Toksvig in her cosy log cabin today is comedian and writer Andy Hamilton. Over a cup of Danish tea the old friends chat about Hygge and how to keep technology at bay, the sound of football supporters watching a match, hopeless DIY and eavesdropping.

Starring... Sandi Toksvig
Guest... Andy Hamilton
Additional material...Rajiv Karia and Tasha Dhanraj
Producer...Julia McKenzie
Production coordinator...Katie Baum
A BBC Studios Production


SAT 22:00 News (m0013hb3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (m00139l2)
Direct Action

The so-called Colston Four did not deny pulling down a statue of the slave trader Edward Colston, but last week in Bristol they were cleared of causing criminal damage. They argued that they were protesting for racial equality, “on the right side of history”, and a jury found in their favour. The four were celebrated by crowds outside the courthouse, part of a tradition, it seemed, of activists bringing social change by whatever means necessary. Their critics, on the other hand, say this is an invitation to vandalism since it sends a message that it is OK to take whatever action you choose to promote your cause. If your right to protest allows you to march against injustice should it also extend to the right to glue yourself to a road or topple a statue?

This is the latest in a series of cases where juries have cleared protestors, despite there being no dispute about the facts. When the co-founder of Extinction Rebellion was acquitted in case with many parallels, he said it showed that “ordinary people, unlike the judiciary, are able to see the broader picture.” While a jury decision cannot legally set a precedent or influence another case, several MPs have expressed anger and concern about the implications of this verdict. They argue that the case should have been tried somewhere neutral and that the ‘expert witness’ should not have been an historian but a specialist in property rights. Who is right? Is history a legitimate defence after protestors smash up something that offends them? Are the rules being bent? And if so, is that what juries are for? With Jeremy Black, Jen Reid, Steven Barrett and Kirsty Brimelow.

Produced by Olive Clancy


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (m00138hc)
Series 35

Heat 3, 2022

(3/13)
Paul Gambaccini puts another trio of music lovers through their paces in the eclectic music quiz. In today's programme Vaughan Williams, Dvorak, Duran Duran and Carole King all feature: can the competitors identify the extracts and win a place in the semi-finals? As always, as well as quickfire questions on all genres, the contenders will have to choose from a list of topics on which to answer individual questions - of which they've had no prior warning and no chance to prepare.

Taking part today are
John Durbin from Wiltshire
Frankie Fanko from Market Harborough in Leicestershire
Liz Walliker from Ely.

Assistant Producer: Stephen Garner
Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 Uncanny (m0013hb5)
Case 13: The Return of Elizabeth Dacre

A young family moves into a historic seaside house converted from a once famous hotel, but when they start to see an apparition who resembles the former owner, they begin to wonder if they are really welcome. Does she want them out of her house?

Written and presented by Danny Robins
Editor and Sound Designer: Charlie Brandon-King
Music: Evelyn Sykes
Theme Music by Lanterns on the Lake
Produced by Danny Robins and Simon Barnard

A Bafflegab and Uncanny Media production for BBC Radio 4



SUNDAY 16 JANUARY 2022

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m0013hb7)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:15 The East Coast Listening Post (m000611k)
Series 2

Pig

American reporters and sisters, Jenna and Dana Johnson, return to the UK to investigate the people of Great Britain. This week Jenna and Dana meet Ruby Thudd, a young woman who shares her apartment with an ex-micro pig called Cleopatra.

The East Coast Listening Post was written and performed by Celeste Dring and Freya Parker, with performances from David Elms and Jessie Cave. The original score was composed by Owain Roberts. The script editor was Matthew Crosby. The East Coast Listening Post was produced by Suzy Grant and is a BBC Studios production.


SUN 00:30 The Poet and the Echo (m001395g)
Lines, 1933

Writers choose poems as inspiration for new stories.

Episode 1/3

Lines, 1933

A young woman at the heart of her community weighs up the joys and perils of companionship.

A humorous story inspired by Orcadian poet Ann Scott-Moncrieff's bold declaration of independence. By Duncan McLean.

Credits

Writer ..... Duncan McLean
Reader ..... Eilidh Fisher
Producer ..... Eilidh McCreadie

A BBC Scotland Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0013hb9)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0013hbc)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:33 Shipping Forecast (m0013hbf)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m0013hbk)
St Margaret in Leicester.

Bells on Sunday comes from the medieval parish church of St Margaret in Leicester. In the 15th century, the Bishop of Lincoln ordered a “smoke farthing” tax, a tax on chimneys within a parish, to pay for rebuilding of the church. This included constructing the tower which today houses a ring of twelve bells with a tenor weighing nearly thirty three hundredweight in the note of C sharp. We hear them ringing Cambridge Surprise Maximus.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m0013h9z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Summary (m0013hbm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b008nbq8)
Library of Secrets

The Library of Secrets: US writer and broadcaster Dmae Roberts reflects on the enduring allure of secret places and the tension that can exist between the secret and the private.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (m0013hbq)
Windmill Hill City Farm, Bristol

In the second of three programmes marking the 50th anniversary year of the city farm movement, Ruth Sanderson visits Windmill Hill City Farm in Bristol.

Produced by Beatrice Fenton.


SUN 06:57 Weather (m0013hbs)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m0013hbv)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m0013hbx)
A look at the ethical and religious issues of the week


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m0013hbz)
The Outward Bound Trust

Broadcaster, journalist and author Clare Balding makes the BBC Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of The Outward Bound Trust.

To Give:
- UK Freephone 0800 404 8144
-You can donate online at bbc.co.uk/appeal/radio4
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘The Outward Bound Trust’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘The Outward Bound Trust’.
Please note that Freephone and online donations for this charity close at 23.59 on the Saturday after the Appeal is first broadcast. However the Freepost option can be used at any time.

Registered Charity Number: 1128090


SUN 07:57 Weather (m0013hc1)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m0013hc3)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m0013hc5)
A service of Choral Matins live from the church of St Mary le Tower, Ipswich, led by the Vicar, The Reverend Tom Mumford. Director of Music: Christopher Borrett. Producer: Ben Collingwood.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m001395z)
Etonian Lives Matter... but not as much as they used to.

David Goodhart rejects what he calls the 'Eton conspiracy myth' of a cabal of his old school's alumni at the top of politics and welcomes its declining influence as a sign of growing equality.

"The Eton obsession not only overlooks progress made in slowly detaching our elite institutions from privilege, it also distracts from a hard-headed discussion about what we want from our elite."

Producer: Sheila Cook


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b09by75m)
Paul Evans on the Carrion Crow

On the eve of Halloween, the silence of a graveyard is broken by the raucous calls of an inky black Crow "Throwing her voice as if coughing up a bone" as writer Paul Evans encounters a crow in a cemetery.

Producer: Sarah Blunt
Photograph: Derek Wood.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m0013hc7)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m0013hc9)
Writer, Tim Stimpson
Director, Julie Beckett
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Pip Archer ….. Daisy Badger
Josh Archer ….. Angus Imrie
Pat Archer ….. Patricia Gallimore
Tony Archer ….. David Troughton
Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Natasha Archer ….. Mali Harries
Brian Aldridge ….. Charles Collingwood
Phoebe Aldridge ….. Lucy Morris
Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Amy Franks ….. Jennifer Daley
Ed Grundy ….. Barry Farrimond
Mike Tucker ….. Terry Molloy
Roy Tucker ….. Ian Pepperell
Peggy Woolley ….. June Spencer
Hazel Woolley ….. Annette Badland
Stella ….. Lucy Speed


SUN 11:00 Desert Island Discs (m0013hcc)
Deborah Levy, writer

Deborah Levy is a writer whose novels Swimming Home and Hot Milk were both shortlisted for the Booker Prize. Last year she published the final instalment of her ‘living autobiography’ trilogy of memoirs, and her earlier work includes plays for the RSC as well as short story collections and poetry.

Deborah was born in South Africa in 1959, the eldest child of anti-apartheid activists Norman and Philippa Levy. Her father was arrested when she was five and was imprisoned for four years. During this time, Deborah became an almost silent child, but was encouraged by a teacher to write down her thoughts, sparking her love of creative writing. After her father’s release, the family relocated to the UK and first lived above a menswear shop in London. As a teenager Deborah worked as a cinema usher, and a chance encounter with the film-maker Derek Jarman inspired her to change her plans to take a degree in literature, and instead she headed to Dartington College of Arts, where she studied writing for the stage and performance.

Her first play, Pax, was commissioned in 1984, and was followed by more than a dozen dramas. Deborah then turned to writing novels in the late 1980s and 1990s. Swimming Home was shortlisted for the 2012 Booker Prize, although it initially struggled to find a publisher. Her trilogy of autobiographies, beginning in 2013 with Things I Don't Want to Know, have enjoyed considerable critical acclaim.

Presenter Lauren Laverne
Producer Sarah Taylor


SUN 11:45 New Year Solutions (m0001v7f)
Clothes

As global warming threatens the future of our society, Jo Fidgen explores the ways in which ordinary people can make a difference.

We're often told that we could help the environment by driving less, eating less meat, or using less water.

But in the face of a challenge as significant as global warming, how big a difference can small changes really make? And what would the world look like if we took those solutions to their logical extremes?

Our wardrobes are a surprisingly massive contributor to environmental damage and climate change, as fast fashion habits encourage more and more reckless consumption. But what would the world look like if we decided to stamp out fashion's carbon footprint?

Producer: Robert Nicholson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m0013hcf)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (m00138j0)
Series 27

Episode 1

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Alan Davies, Lucy Porter, Lou Sanders and Justin Edwards are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as pigs, underwear, camels and sausages.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m0013hch)
Keto: Diet fad or food fix?

Dan Saladino goes keto to discover why people are turning to this low carb way of eating.

Produced and presented by Dan Saladino.


SUN 12:57 Weather (m0013hck)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m0013hcm)
Radio 4’s look at the week’s big stories from both home and around the world.


SUN 13:30 The Listening Project (m0013hcp)
Tight Spaces

Fi Glover presents three conversations between strangers.

This week: Clare and Amy discuss what it’s like to work on the frontline - in a GP surgery; Joan and Joyce reflect on being healthy, intelligent and old, and how despairing they are of the stereotypes of old age; and Hannah and Tom share thoughts on his passion for caving and her dread of squeezing into tight spaces due to claustrophobia.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation lasts up to an hour and is then edited to extract the key moments of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in this decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m001395d)
GQT at Home: Horticultural Healing and January Dreaming

Kathy Clugston hosts the horticultural programme featuring a group of gardening experts. This week's panellists are the ever-knowledgeable Matt Biggs, Humaira Ikram, and James Wong.

Firmly embedded in the new year, the panellists share some motivating thoughts to get you back out into the cold with your secateurs in-hand, tips on looking after a young avacado tree, and design ideas for a high-rise garden.

Beyond the questions, Ashley Edwards, Head Gardener at Horatio’s Garden, London, chats to the Royal Horticultural Society’s first Therapeutic Gardener, Ozichi Brewster, and Chris Beardshaw shares his contribution to the GQT tree adventure - his favourite, the Hawthorn.

Producer - Jemima Rathbone
Assistant Producer - Bethany Hocken

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 The Seventh Test by Vikas Swarup (b04471l3)
The Choice

Sapna Sinha works as a sales assistant in a TV showroom in New Delhi. Being the only bread-winner in the family she works long hours to provide for her widowed mother and younger sister. But then a man walks into her life with an extraordinary proposition: pass seven "life" tests of his choosing and she will have wealth and power. At first the tests seem easy, but things are not quite as they seem.

2) The Choice

A thriller set in India from the author of "Slumdog Millionaire".

As Sapna struggles to support her widowed mother and sister, she decides to go ahead and sign a contract which will subject her to a series of "life tests". What the tests are and when they will come, she does not know.

Writers:
Vikas Swarup is an Indian diplomat and a best-selling novelist. His first novel "Q & A" was made into the Oscar winning film "Slumdog Millionaire" as well as Sony Award winning radio drama serial for BBC Radio .

Ayeesha Menon dramatized Vikas Swarup's other novels SIX SUSPECTS and Q & A, which won a Sony Award for Best Drama. She also wrote for Radio 4 THE MUMBAI CHUZZLEWITS, UNDERCOVER MUMBAI, THE CAIRO TRILOGY and MY NAME IS RED. Her stage play PEREIRA'S BAKERY AT 76 CHAPEL ROAD, which was developed with the Royal Court Theatre, was recently staged by the Curve Theatre, Leicester.

John Dryden wrote the original three-part dramas series SEVERED THREADS, THE RELUCTANT SPY and PANDEMIC, which won the Writer's Guild Award for best radio drama script. His dramatisation of BLEAK HOUSE won a Sony Award for Best Drama. Other dramatisations include A SUITABLE BOY, A HANDMAID'S TALE and FATHERLAND one of the most repeated dramas on R4 Extra.

Production:
Sound Design - Steve Bond
Editing Assistant - Varun Bangera
Script Editor - Mike Walker
Assistant Producer - Toral Shah

Music - Sacha Putnam

Dramatised by Ayeesha Menon and John Dryden from the novel "ACCIDENTAL APPRENTICE" by Vikas Swarup.

Director - John Dryden
Producer - Nadir Khan
A Goldhawk Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 15:00 Drama (m0013hcr)
Let Us Believe in the Dawn of the Cold Season

Maryam Zohdi introduces the life and work of Iran’s beloved iconoclastic feminist poet, Forugh Farrokhzad (1935 - 1967). Her work, her life and her tragic death aged just 32.

With contributions from Ebrahim Golestan, Farzaneh Milani and Ahmad Karimi-Hakkak.

Translations by Sholeh Wolpe, Farzaneh Milani and Ahmad Karimi-Hakkak.

Readings by Shahrbanou Nilou.

With thanks to Nasser Saffarian, BBC Persian and Fondazione Cineteca di Bologna.

Original music by Roshi Nasehi with Graham Dowdall
Sound Design by Nigel Lewis
Directed by John Norton
Produced by Maryam Zohdi and John Norton for BBC Cymru Wales


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m0013hct)
Ulysses

Open Book takes a close look at Ulysses, by James Joyce which was first published in full in 1922. Chris Power and his guests share their love of the varied language and prose that make Ulysses unique and challenging, and offer tips on how to start reading it, in its centenary year.
Chris is joined by award winning Irish novelist Colm Toibin, by Merve Emre, literary critic and associate Professor at the University of Oxford, and by Daniel Mulhall, Ireland’s Ambassador to the United States and author of Ulysses: A Reader’s Odyssey.

Reader: Neil McCaul.

Book List – Sunday 16 January and Thursday 20 January

Ulysses by James Joyce
Ulysses Unbound by Terence Killeen
Ulysses: A Readers’ Odyssey by Daniel Mulhall
The New Bloomsday Book by Harry Blamires
Ulysses Unbound by Terence Killeen
Ulysses Annotated by Don Gifford and Robert Seidman
Re Joyce by Anthony Burgess
Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
The Magician by Colm Toibin


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (m0013hcw)
Sophie Hannah

Sophie Hannah chooses favourites from amongst listener requests, including works by Rupert Brook, Wilfred Owen, Wendy Cope and Stevie Smith. Sophie also reads some of her own poems, including one asking where people go when they storm out...
Producer Sally Heaven


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m00139cy)
Hunting the Darknet Dealers

The high stakes cat and mouse game between police and darknet drug dealers
Police say they are finally turning the tide on drug dealers selling on the darknet – a secretive part of the internet which has been described as like “online shopping for drugs.”
The UK’s National Crime Agency says recent international takedowns of so called dark markets and arrests in multiple countries are a result of new techniques in cyber policing that is giving them the upper hand.
However, BBC research suggests that police around the world have an uphill struggle on their hands as many dealers - known as vendors - have survived multiple market place collapses by operating across many different darknet sites.
The BBC’s cyber reporter Joe Tidy and BBC data journalist Alison Benjamin journey into this hidden world to speak to vendors and buyers and uncover secrets of the trade
The programme reveals the major role played by UK dealers in the global business which is estimated to be worth more than a billion dollars a year.
Reporter: Joe Tidy
Producer: Paul Grant
Editor: Maggie Latham


SUN 17:40 Profile (m0013h9z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0013hcy)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m0013hd0)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0013hd2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m0013hd4)
Anneka Rice

Join us as we'll be whizzing round the world from Chile to Afghanistan, taking in dance, drugs and desire along the way. There’s healing poetry, seaweed for breakfast and a nod to Bowie on what would be his 75th birthday. Does that all sound random enough? We hope so!

Presenter: Anneka Rice
Producer: Emmie Hume
Production Coordinator: Elodie Chatelain
Studio Manager: Sue Stonestreet


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m0013hd6)
Fallon puts her foot in it and Jazzer attempts to balance his books.


SUN 19:15 Now You're Asking with Marian Keyes and Tara Flynn (m0013gyj)
The Badly-Dressed Boyfriend Problem

In this week’s instalment, Marian and Tara tackle a badly-dressed boyfriend, a weighted blanket, the problem with noisy eaters and much more.

Marian Keyes is a multi award-winning writer, with a total of over 30 million of her books sold to date in 33 languages. Her close friend Tara Flynn is an actress, comedian and writer. Together, these two friends have been through a lot, and now want to use their considerable life experience to help solve your biggest - and smallest - of their listeners' problems.

From dilemmas about life, love and grief, to the perils of laundry or knowing what to say at a boring dinner, we’ll find out what Marian and Tara would recommend…which might not solve the problem exactly, but will make us all feel a bit better.

Recorded in Dublin with emails received from listeners around the world, the hosts invite you to pull up a chair at their virtual kitchen table as they read and digest their inbox.

Got a problem you want Marian and Tara to solve? Email: marianandtara@bbc.co.uk.

Producer: Steve Doherty.
A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds


SUN 19:45 Bright Lights, Dead City (m0013hd8)
Episode 2. War Stories

An American film crew descends on a Northern Irish city to make a lavish prestige drama series about the Troubles called ‘Dead City’, inspiring the locals to get involved in the production, only for filming to be halted by the mysterious disappearance of the lead actress.

The Writer
Séamas O'Reilly is a columnist for the Observer and has written about media and politics for the Irish Times, New Statesman, Guts, and VICE. His memoir 'Did Ye Hear Mammy Died?' was an Irish Times Number One Bestseller and was awarded the Dubray Biography of the Year Award at the 2021 An Post Irish Book Awards.

Reader: Dearbháile McKinney
Writer: Séamas O'Reilly
Producer: Michael Shannon
Exec Editor: Andy Martin

A BBC Northern Ireland production.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (m001395l)
Omicron, pandemic birth rates and boosters

The pandemic seems to be entering a new phase as Omicron has taken hold. Is it milder? And how might we make decisions based on the latest data?

Predictions that lockdowns might lead to a baby boom have proven wrong - in fact fertility is falling.

We re-examine a baffling claim about the number of children being abducted every year in the US after claims by a Republican politician on social media, and we run our statistical measuring tape up the inside leg of the government’s promise to give everyone a booster jab before New Year’s Day.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m001395j)
Sidney Poitier (pictured), EO Wilson, Sarah Weddington, Assunta 'Pupetta' Maresca

Matthew Bannister on

Sidney Poitier, the first black man to win a 'Best Actor' Oscar, known for his powerful performances in ‘In The Heat of The Night’, ‘Lilies of the Field’ and ‘To Sir, With Love’. His co-star in that film - Lulu - pays tribute.

E.O.Wilson, the American biologist and champion of biodiversity who some have compared to Charles Darwin.

Sarah Weddington, the lawyer who argued the landmark case of Roe v Wade before the US Supreme Court. The case, which is being challenged now, established the constitutional right for women to have abortions.

Assunta ‘Pupetta’ Maresca, the Italian mafia boss who served a prison sentence for shooting dead the man who killed her husband.

Producer: Neil George

Interviewed guest: Lulu
Interviewed guest: Barbie Latza Nadeau
Interviewed guest: Dr George McGavin
Interviewed guest: Paula Ehrlich
Interviewed guest: Joshua Prager
Interviewed guest: Mary Ziegler
Interviewed guest: Stephen Bourne

Archive clips used: The Mirisch Corporation, In The Heat Of The Night (1967); BBC News, Bonnie Greer tribute to Sidney Poitier 07/01/2022; Entertainment Tonight Canada, Philip Davis tribute to Sidney Poitier 07/01/2022; YouTube, Poitier 80; Twentieth Century Fox, No Way Out (1950); Oscars / YouTube channel, Sidney Poitier wins best Actor 36th Oscars (1964); Columbia British Productions, To Sir, With Love (1967); BBC Radio 4, The Life Scientific - E.O. Wilson 28/07/2015; Texas Tribune / YouTube channel, Sarah Weddington interview 22/01/2013; ITV News / YouTube channel, Protest of anti-abortion laws in America 21/05/2019; BBC TV, Everyman - The Politics Of Life 03/12/1989.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m0013h96)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m0013hbz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Short Cuts (m000ysv7)
Portals

Josie Long presents short documentaries about portals and gateways. A safe passage into the world, a scent which can take you somewhere else and a swim in the moonlight to heal a broken heart.

Eider
Produced by Rikke Houd

Portals
Featuring Courtney Rafuse
Produced by Aliya Pabani

To the Moon
Featuring Marta Medvesek
Produced by Marta Medvesek and Phoebe McIndoe

Curatorial team: Alia Cassam and Andrea Rangecroft
Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
Executive Producer: Axel Kacoutié
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m0013hdb)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 Think with Pinker (m00139pn)
Nudges and Noise

The way we think makes us vulnerable to bad decision making, but in his guide to thinking better, Steven Pinker explores how we can exploit our cognitive biases to make better choices.

Professor Pinker is joined by:

Daniel Kahneman, Professor Emeritus at Princeton University, Nobel Prize in Economics winner and author of “Thinking Fast and Slow” and “Noise A Flaw in Human Judgement”
Robin Scott, writer, entrepreneur and the founder and CEO of Apolitical, a peer to peer learning platform for public servants designed to make government smarter and more effective.

Producers: Imogen Walford and Joe Kent
Editor: Emma Rippon

Think with Pinker is produced in partnership with The Open University.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b008nbq8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 17 JANUARY 2022

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m0013hdd)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (m00139kp)
Strangers

Strangers: Laurie Taylor explores Xenophobia, the fear or hatred of those we do not know. Evolutionary psychologists often describe it as a natural and timeless phenomenon rooted in ancient history. But how accurate is that bleak assessment? George Makari, historian and Director of the DeWitt Wallace Institute, has authored a new study sparked by the resurgence of Xenophobia in 2016. He set out to explore the origins of the concept: Coined by late nineteenth-century medics and political commentators, it emerged alongside Western nationalism, colonialism, mass migration, and genocide. Can an understanding of its complex history offer a more hopeful vision of human co-operation in the future? They're joined by Jonathan Purkis, an independent academic and lifelong aficionado of hitchhiking culture. His history of hitchhiking argues that 'driving with strangers' can offer unique opportunities for cooperation, friendship and an openness to the feared 'other'.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m0013hbk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0013hdg)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0013hdj)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0013hdl)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m0013hdn)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0013hdq)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Dr Krish Kandiah

Good Morning.

It felt like trespassing on holy ground, but there I was: stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, looking out across the waters towards the striking Washington monument. Apart from a couple of tourists, it was relatively empty on that crisp January afternoon. The strongest evidence something world changing had happened there were four words etched into the stone steps: "I have a dream." In the stillness, I tried to imagine that sunny day when Martin Luther King Jr addressed a crowd of a quarter of a million people uttering what would become the most famous speech of the 20th century. With television and radio coverage, King's dream echoed around the world, not only that day but over and again for the following six decades and beyond.

King continues to inspire people around the world, but he himself drew inspiration from the book of Amos in the Bible. His most-quoted verse is the following:

“But let justice roll on like a river, righteousness like a never-failing stream!”

It’s a powerful message. Behind where King was delivering his speech millions of gallons of water would have been pouring from the Potomac River into the Tidal Basin and out into Chesapeake Bay. That’s hundreds of cubic metres per second. A force for good that powerful could surely wash away the injustices of our racially divided countries.

Martin Luther King would have been 92 today. Just as the Potomac river has continued to roll on each day, so does the hope that drove King’s dream, and the never-failing challenge to all of us of pursuing what is right and good.

Lord God, thank you that your love knows no borders or boundaries. You value each of us the same no matter what our circumstances or skin colour. Thank you for your call to pursue justice for all, until the day you return to take us home.

Amen.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m0013hds)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


MON 05:56 Weather (m0013hdv)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09sqgkp)
Helen Moncrieff on the Shetland Starling

Ever since childhood, Helen Moncrieff, Shetland Manager for RSPB Scotland has been fascinated by the ways in which Shetland Starlings can mimic not only other birds but other sounds including a squeaky toy belonging to her own dog!

Producer: Sarah Blunt
Photograph: John Dixon.


MON 06:00 Today (m0013hxc)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m0013hxf)
Old battles, new warfare

Are we heading into an era of unending low-level conflict, of foreign interference and buying of influence? In The Weaponisation of Everything, the security expert Mark Galeotti argues that traditional warfare is on the wane, replaced by hybrid wars, disinformation, espionage and subversion. He tells Adam Rutherford that this 21st century way of war often goes unnoticed and can be dangerously destabilising, but it also offers opportunities for those who are able to take full advantage of this new armoury.

The political philosopher Cécile Fabre explores the ethics of espionage and counterintelligence. In Spying Through a Glass Darkly she looks to answer a fundamental question: when is spying justified? In the context of war and foreign policy what actions are morally justified, and when? Fabre brings together philosophical arguments and historical examples to study the moral justification of state blackmail, mass surveillance, treason and bribery.

How far are the subversive techniques discussed uniquely human? It’s a question the primatologist Kirsty Graham considers as she studies the way bonobos and chimpanzees communicate in the field. Her research has shown that both groups share not only the physical form of the gestures but many of the same meanings.

Producer: Katy Hickman


MON 09:45 It's Always Summer Somewhere (m0013pq5)
Episode 1 - Lovely, Loopy Stuff

In this opening part of Felix White's abridged memoir about cricket, grief and life in The Maccabees he recalls falling in love with the sport for the first time - a love that was not immediately reciprocated.

Felix White is a musician, writer and broadcaster best known as a guitarist in The Maccabees. He subsequently co-founded independent record label Yala! and co-presents the BBC’s Tailenders podcast with Greg James. Here White reads his recollections of growing up, his mother's multiple sclerosis and slowly replacing an ambition to be a left arm spinner in his school cricket team with the dazzling realities of life in a world renowned band.

Abridger: Julian Wilkinson
Producer: Ciaran Bermingham


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0013hxh)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


MON 11:00 Consumed by Desire (m001325b)
Desire's a Desire

Psychotherapist and writer Philippa Perry attempts to unpick the tangled idea of desire.

We live in a world where we get what we want. Strawberries in January, the instant Uber, new clothes, all the music we could ever want, news in our pocket and constant connection via the digital world. And all to be easy and instant. However, we're also struggling to understand the world in which we live. It's not something we seem to enjoy. Sometimes we say it's 'inhuman'.

It may be that we could benefit from a clearer understanding of desire -- and our desires.

We live in an age of desire, but also an age of discontent. The gap between the urge and its fulfilment is now shorter than ever. But rather than making us more content, this short-circuit seems often to frustrate our capacity to understand and therefore control our desires.

A desire satisfied is often merely a desire reinforced or reinvented: in Freud's phrase, desire is always in excess of any item's ability to satisfy it. In times – technological, political, personal – when we are promised satisfaction, how does the inevitable falling short affect us, and what new and strange desires does it spawn?

Featuring Sara Banerji and Rev Kate Bottley.

Readings by Catherine Dyson

Producer: Martin Williams


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m0013h9x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m0013hxl)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


MON 12:04 Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah (m0013hxn)
Episode 6

Paradise is a historical novel by UK Zanzibar-born writer Abdulrazak Gurnah, first published in 1994. The novel was nominated for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Prize for Fiction and, this year, Gurnah was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature for his "uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the fate of the refugee in the gulf between cultures and continents."

The novel follows the story of Yusuf, a boy born in the fictional town of Kawa in Tanzania at the turn of the 20th century. Yusuf's father is a hotelier and is in debt to a rich and powerful Arab merchant named Aziz.

Early in the story, Yusuf is pawned in exchange for his father's debt to Aziz and must work as an unpaid servant for the merchant. Yusuf joins Aziz's caravan as they travel into parts of Central Africa and the Congo Basin that have not been traded with for many generations. Here, Aziz's caravan of traders meets hostility from local tribes, wild animals and difficult terrain.

It's both a coming-of-age story and a poetic and powerful portrait set against the backdrop of an Africa increasingly corrupted by colonialism and violence.

Abridged by Florence Bedell
Read by Paterson Joseph
Produced by Clive Brill

A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m0013hxq)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


MON 12:57 Weather (m0013hxs)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m0013hxv)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


MON 13:45 NatureBang (m0013hxx)
Octopuses and the Mind-Body Problem

What is this thing we call "consciousness"? It feels like a non-physical thing that somehow exists as a separate entity to our physical body. We might think of it as being located up in our brain where our internal chatter is generated, but the 'mind' still somehow feels separate to the 'brain'.

Then along comes an octopus to complicate the matter. Octopuses clearly have consciousness and high intelligence. But the last common ancestor between us and them is a flatworm that trawled the sea floor about 750 million years ago, so it's not surprising that their brains have evolved to be very different to ours. In fact, some people say they have nine brains. This is due to a complex neural network that runs throughout their body, meaning they have the ability to make different decisions from all eight arms without having to send messages back up to the central brain.

So how can the mind of an octopus be seperate to its body? And does this mean that our mind and body are also one and the same?

Featuring writer Sy Montgomery, author of 'The Soul of an Octopus', and philosopher Julian Baggini, author of 'How the World Thinks'.


MON 14:00 The Archers (m0013hd6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 United Kingdoms (m0013hxz)
Raging - United Kingdoms

A groundbreaking five part series celebrating and revealing life across the United Kingdoms in short, sharp dramas from exciting new writers.

This ambitious State of the Nations series about life outside London offers the audience a myriad of images through drama, comedy, interviews, song and poetic monologue. These are the stories, the lives and the voices we don't often hear.

The dramas are being made by production teams from Northern Ireland, Southern England, Scotland, Northern England and Wales. Each episode features five short dramas by different writers, bringing together a total of 50 writers and 100 actors.

Episode 3: Raging

• Downhill
A young woman traverses along the Northern Irish North Coast near its iconic Mussenden Temple. Women aren’t supposed to rage, but what happens when the tempest inside her no longer can be contained?

Written by Shannon Yee
Performed by Roísín Gallagher and Sabrina Wu
Sound design by Lucinda Mason Brown and David Chilton
Produced by Celia de Wolff

• Treorchy
Stephen wakes to the cold realisation that his girlfriend has left him. And that his life has spiralled out of control.

Written and performed by Samuel Bees
Sound design by Nigel Lewis
Produced by Emma Harding

• Slough

Iravat wouldn't describe herself as a particularly angry person. That is, until he walks onto the bus.

Written by Priyanka Jha
Performed by Preeya Kalidas
Sound design by Lucinda Mason Brown and David Chilton
Produced by Celia de Wolff

• Avoch
A woman remembers how a vicious attack drove her to make a realisation about her dad.

Written by Luke Sutherland
Performed by Molly Innes
Sound design by Joanne Willott
Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane

• Burnley
A woman, a Lancashire river and a rage that conquers everything.

Written by Clare Shaw
Performed by Clare Shaw and Rachel Austin
Sound design by Jon Nicholls
Produced by Polly Thomas and Yusra Warsama

Original music composed by Niroshini Thambar
Illustration by Eleanor Hibbert
Sound designer: Jon Nicholls.
Executive Producer: Eloise Whitmore.

Curated by Polly Thomas and Yusra Warsama for Naked Productions, BBC Scotland, BBC Northern Ireland, Pier Productions, and BBC Cymru-Wales for BBC Radio 4


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (m0013hy1)
Series 35

Heat 4, 2022

(4/13)
With tastes covering every aspect of music, the competitors facing Paul Gambaccini's questions in today's heat will be hoping the breadth of their knowledge can carry them through to the semi-finals. They'll need to know about Bach and Richard Strauss as well as Stevie Wonder, Led Zeppelin and Bacharach & David. There are plenty of musical extracts to identify and snippets of music trivia along the way.

Today Paul welcomes
Philip Beard from Twickenham
Lawrence Long from West Sussex
Rachel Thomas from Hertfordshire

Assistant Producer: Stephen Garner
Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m0013hch)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Night Watch (m00139p4)
At night women say goodbye, telling each other "text me when you're home". We carry keys between our knuckles, avoid dark streets, cross the road, then cross back again, keep looking over your shoulder.

In Night Watch, four women from different parts of Britain share stories of street harassment. Woven through this feature is a new, specially commissioned poem by Hollie McNish.

The murders of Sarah Everard and Sabina Nessa compounded the perception of city streets as male spaces- unwelcoming and unsafe for women, and other marginalised groups. Is this the way it's always been?

In these raw and unfiltered accounts women will hear their own experiences echoed back in others' words; stories of shouted insults, rejected come-ons, intimidation.

Featuring the voices Nosisa and Alison Majuqwana, Aggie Hewitt, Katie Cuddon, Alice Jackson the co-founder of Strut Safe, author Rebecca Solnit, author and moral philosopher at Cornell University Kate Manne and design activist Jos Boys.

If you've been impacted by any of the issues raised in this documentary contact details for support organisations can be found in this link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/2MfW34HqH7tTCtnmx7LVfzp/information-and-support-victims-of-crime

Producer: Caitlin Smith
Poetry: Hollie McNish
Sound Design: Joel Cox
Executive Producer: Peter McManus


MON 16:30 My Name Is... (m000sy1z)
My Name Is Josh

Joshua Styles finds the rest of us see weeds and moss. But its not only a beauty, he can see an environmental worth in them,that is being dangerously ignored.

Josh has loved weeds, mosses and other plants since he was a boy, turning his Mum's back garden into a haven for the type of growth the rest of us spend hours and lots of money trying to get rid of. His enthusiasm is infectious, Josh is desperate for us us all to appreciate the unloved bits of our natural world, not just because he does, but because it could help save the planet. These mosses and weeds play a massive role in sucking up carbon from the atmosphere and even provide the base for medicines used to treat some of our worst illnesses

But he argues that the Sphagnum Mosses that he talks so joyfully and passionately about arent as loved as the poster boys and girls of the environmental movement. like pandas and whales

In 'My Name Is', Josh asks whether the fauna below our feet can ever be taken as seriously if their worth to us isn't properly explained


MON 17:00 PM (m0013hy4)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0013hy6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (m0013hy8)
Series 27

Episode 2

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Pippa Evans, Geoff Norcott, Fern Brady and Simon Evans are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as shoes, beer, diets, and metal.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


MON 19:00 The Archers (m0013hr7)
Kenton unleashes his inner dragon and Phoebe has reservations.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m0013hyb)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 20:00 The Black and the Green (m0010gjl)
British-Jamaican audio artist and DJ Weyland McKenzie-Witter explores the sometimes uneasy relationship between the Black and the Green, as political movements and ideas.

It's the untold story of their longstanding relationship, first as political movements developing in the United States, a wariness that continues today between new organisations such as Black Lives Matter and Extinction Rebellion – the latter (along with the wider environmental movement) criticised for being overwhelmingly white, idealistic and middle-class. Climate activists meanwhile have sometimes dismissed what they’ve called ‘identity’ politics as too parochial in terms of looming global climate disaster. It’s a real tension, with very different emphases between local and global; material issues vs idealism.

As radical movements, both the Black and the Green have their roots in 1960s political consciousness and activism. But there were key cultural moments when they came together, around the release of Marvin Gaye’s classic 1971 album ‘What’s Going On’ and in the work of eco-conscious, Black Power spoken word group The Last Poets. Both artists addressed environmental racism within the ghetto and the promise of a new Black ecology.

By drawing on his Jamaican lineage, Weyland explores the deeper affinity between the Black and the Green, symbolically joined by the Jamaican national flag, the Black of the People and the Green of the land are inseparable, crossed by the Gold of the sun. But Jamaica and the Caribbean are also highly vulnerable to the devastation of climate change. Weyland writes: ‘As the climate catastrophe becomes worse, the effect it is having on our homelands is something affecting Black people uniquely. With the face of climate activism being so predominantly white, and with Black political attention elsewhere, which voices will be heard?"

This feature explores the differences and reasons for separation of the movements, but asks if there might be a growing alignment between the Black and the Green with new thinking around ‘climate justice’.

Contributors include founding member of the Last Poets Abiodun Oyewole, barrister and author Ulele Burnham, Professor Michael Taylor, a climate scientist at the University of the West Indies, theatre maker and actor Fehinti Balogun, co-founder of Extinction Rebellion Dr Gail Bradbury, Black Lives Matter organiser Adam Elliott-Cooper, journalist Greg McKenzie, author on climate justice Jeremy Williams and Kevin Le Gendre, who has written extensively on the history of Black music.

Produced by Simon Hollis
A Brook Lapping production for BBC Radio 4


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (m00139p2)
Montenegro’s Chinese Road

It’s been called the priciest piece of tarmac in the world. In 2014 the government of Montenegro signed a contract with a state-owned Chinese company to build part of a 170 kilometre-long highway – a road that would connect its main port with the Serbian border to the north. The price-tag on the first 42 kilometres of asphalt was a staggering $1 billion - most of which has been borrowed from a Chinese bank. In Montenegro, questions continue to be asked about why the project went ahead when some experts said that it was not viable. The River Tara – a UNESCO protected site – has been impacted by the building works, and allegations of corruption and kickbacks have hung around like a bad smell. Meanwhile, the economy has taken a massive hit as a result of the pandemic, and some Montenegrins worry about the country's ability to repay the loan. Worse still, a clause in the road contract states that Montenegro may relinquish sovereignty over unspecified parts of its territory if there is a default. But is everything as it seems? Crossing Continents investigates.

Presenter: Linda Pressly
Producer: Mike Gallagher
Editor: Bridget Harney


MON 21:00 The Coming Storm (m00139c3)
2. Sex, Lies, and… a Videotape

QAnon and the plot to break reality...

Gabriel Gatehouse discovers a real conspiracy called The Arkansas Project. The aim is to inject lurid tales about the Clintons into the mainstream American press in the 1990s. These stories spin off in different directions. Down one road lie sex scandals and eventually impeachment proceedings. But thanks to an Evangelical coalition the story goes off in another direction, involving Satan and a looming battle between good and evil. A dark fantasy has taken hold which bubbles away under the surface, ignored by the establishment.

Producer: Lucy Proctor


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m0013hxf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m0013hyf)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah (m0013hxn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (m00139cm)
Words from World War I

Doing your bit or shirking? Afflicted with ‘Belgian flush’? Don’t forget to BYOB.

Lynda Mugglestone, Professor of the History of English at the University of Oxford, joins Michael Rosen to talk about the new language that emerged from British experience in the First World War – from Zeppelinophobia on the Home Front to ‘watching the pyrotechnics’ in the trenches.

Jumping into an extraordinary archive put together by clergyman Andrew Clark at the time, they discover just how many words and phrases were coined to describe this brand new kind of warfare, and what they mean to us today.

Professor Lynda Mugglestone is the author of Writing a War of Words: Andrew Clark and the Search for Meaning in World War One.

Produced by Sarah Goodman for BBC Audio in Bristol.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0013hyh)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



TUESDAY 18 JANUARY 2022

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m0013hyk)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 00:30 It's Always Summer Somewhere (m0013pq5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0013hym)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0013hyp)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0013hyr)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m0013hyt)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0013hyw)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Dr Krish Kandiah

Good Morning.

These days I find myself getting increasingly frustrated when things don’t go quite the way I expect. When there’s no milk for my cereal. If the internet goes down for five minutes. Whenever my train is delayed and I miss the first half of the football match. You don’t want to see me in times like that. Even my cat avoids me.

That’s why I am so impressed by how Jesus deals with being without food, water and shelter for 40 whole days. Early on in Matthew’s gospel we read of Jesus’ experience in the desert, and it seems he has every reason to be short-tempered, to take things into his own hands, to do things he wouldn’t ordinarily do. But even facing the weakness and pain of hunger and thirst, the wrestling with loneliness, he still resists temptation. Matthew highlights three specific temptations and Jesus’s surprising response to each of them.

Jesus refuses to use his power to make food the determining factor in his life, although the time will come when he won’t hesitate to feed others who are hungry around him.

Jesus refuses to use his privilege and status as God’s son to save himself, although ultimately he will save everyone else, even though it means putting himself on the wrong side of God’s anger.

Jesus refuses to use his influence to gain control over the world around him, although he will one day use that influence and power in submission to God to help put the world right.

We all know what it is like to be tempted to live in a way that prioritises our own needs ahead of those of others. But the power, privilege, status and influence we have been given are not primarily for our own use. May we have the strength of mind and character to discern how best to use those things today for the sake of those around us.

Lord God, help us to follow your example, and consider the needs of others before our own. Help us to feed the hungry, empower the weak, and share all we have been given without hesitation, frustration or bitterness. For your name’s sake.

Amen.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m0013hyy)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dww4v)
Bar-tailed Godwit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the Bar-tailed Godwit. Bar-tailed godwits are waders which occur around the globe and are now known to make the longest non-stop journey of any migratory bird.


TUE 06:00 Today (m0013hqg)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 Room 5 (m0013hql)
2: Jon

‘It was unbelievably painful - I probably used a few Anglo-Saxon words.’
Jon is at Peppa Pig World with his family when he notices something very unusual about his body.

In Room 5, Helena Merriman interviews people who - like her - were changed by a diagnosis.

Written, presented and produced by Helena Merriman
Composer: Jeremy Warmsley
Sound Design: Steve Bond

Additional research: Ruby Gregory
Production Co-ordinator: Janet Staples
Editor: Emma Rippon
Commissioning Editor: Richard Knight

#Room5

End song: Miffed by Tom Rosenthal

If you have a story you’d like to share you can email: room5@bbc.co.uk


TUE 09:30 The Political Butterfly Effect (m0012s7z)
The Guardian's media editor, Jim Waterson, explores how different the world would look were it not for the occasional, well-timed flap of a butterfly's wings.


TUE 09:45 It's Always Summer Somewhere (m0013pw3)
Episode 2 - The Gates of Burnage

The second part of Felix White's abridged memoir read by the author. In this episode a young Felix tries to reconcile passions for cricket and Oasis against a backdrop of his mum's illness.

Felix White is a musician, writer and broadcaster best known as guitarist in The Maccabees. He subsequently co-founded independent record label Yala! and co-presents the BBC’s Tailenders podcast with Greg James. In It's Always Summer Somewhere he recalls growing up, coping with grief and slowly replacing an ambition to be a left arm spinner in his school cricket team with the dazzling realities of life in a world renowned band.

Abridger: Julian Wilkinson
Producer: Ciaran Bermingham


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0013hqq)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


TUE 11:00 The Coming Storm (m0013hqs)
3. The Basement

QAnon and the plot to break reality...

A severely disabled boy from upstate New York is shocked when his online community of video game fans is flooded with porn. He gets sucked into a toxic world of mostly young men stuck in their parents’ basements, making memes out of snippets of popular culture and Nazi symbols. He becomes a major figure in a dark new counterculture germinating on a niche website called 4chan.

As the 2016 Presidential election approaches, a story grows on 4chan about Hillary Clinton’s campaign manager, paedophilia, and references to pizza. The story bursts out into the real world when a man walks into a pizza restaurant with a gun.

Producer: Lucy Proctor
Presenter: Gabriel Gatehouse


TUE 11:30 Lacrimosa (b065sx6w)
26-year-old, Proinsias O'Coinn, has spent most of his life thinking that something is wrong with him.

Ever since he was a teenager, he's been trying to find a song, a film, a poem *any* piece of art which has the power to make him cry.

When friends would be moved to tears by a weepy film or a sad song, Proinsias would look on in envy, wishing it could happen to him. You see in his head, being able to cry at a piece of art would let him engage with it and appreciate it like everyone else.

He's come close on a few occasions. Like when Jean Grey kills Professor X in X-Men 3 - or when listening to the Adele song 'One and Only'. But it's the sheer joy at these moments - that this could be it, this could be the time he's finally able to cry - that actually stops the tears from coming. It's like the sneeze that comes tantalisingly close but just never happens.

So Proinsias is on a mission to finally find a piece of art that can make him cry. But as he embarks on this very personal challenge, he finds himself facing up to much bigger questions about himself and who he is.

Producer: Conor Garrett


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m0013jk6)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:04 Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah (m0013hqx)
Episode 7

Paradise is a historical novel by UK Zanzibar-born writer Abdulrazak Gurnah, first published in 1994. The novel was nominated for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Prize for Fiction and, this year, Gurnah was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature for his "uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the fate of the refugee in the gulf between cultures and continents."

The novel follows the story of Yusuf, a boy born in the fictional town of Kawa in Tanzania at the turn of the 20th century. Yusuf's father is a hotelier and is in debt to a rich and powerful Arab merchant named Aziz.

Early in the story, Yusuf is pawned in exchange for his father's debt to Aziz and must work as an unpaid servant for the merchant. Yusuf joins Aziz's caravan as they travel into parts of Central Africa and the Congo Basin that have not been traded with for many generations. Here, Aziz's caravan of traders meets hostility from local tribes, wild animals and difficult terrain.

It's both a coming-of-age story and a poetic and powerful portrait set against the backdrop of an Africa increasingly corrupted by colonialism and violence.

Abridged by Florence Bedell
Read by Paterson Joseph
Produced by Clive Brill

A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m0013hqz)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


TUE 12:57 Weather (m0013hr1)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m0013hr3)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


TUE 13:45 NatureBang (m0013hr5)
Bull Elephants and the Importance of Dads

Becky Ripley and Emily Knight get to grips with fatherhood in the animal kingdom by way of the largest land animal on earth, a fully grown bull elephant. Like the majority of mammals, male elephants aren't directly involved in raising the youngsters - that's left to the matriarchal herd composed of grandmothers, mothers and daughters. But you'd be wrong to think that means they don't have an influence. Via an extraordinary physiological phenomenon unique to elephants, known as 'musth', elephant bulls have a huge role in helping the teenage males navigate their tricky teenage years. And when it goes wrong, tragedy can strike.

Back in the human world, dads play a major role in their children's upbringing. Human men are what's known as 'investing fathers', with powerful brain chemistry bonding them to their partners AND to their babies. The skills of fatherhood, which have evolved over millennia, are instinctive, biologically innate and hugely impressive, yet often get overshadowed by our culture's (perhaps understandable) focus on motherhood. Perhaps it's time for a rethink?

Featuring conservationist Gus Van Dyk, and evolutionary anthropologist Dr Anna Machin.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m0013hr7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Fault Lines: Money, Sex and Blood (m0013hr9)
Series 3: Blood

Entitled

Fault Lines: Blood ep1/5
Entitled by Becky Prestwich

Miles, Constance's only son has returned to the family home with a wife, Sarah, whom Constance adores. But all is not as it seems. The opening episode of the new series explores entitlement, betrayal and murder.

Constance - Glenda Jackson
Miles - Robert Glenister
Sarah - Pippa Nixon
Gabriel - Joseph Ayre
Maria - Christine Bottomley

Sound by Steve Brooke
Produced and directed by Pauline Harris


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (m0013h8y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Moving Pictures (m000pw7r)
The Sherborne Missal

Each episode of Moving Pictures is devoted to a single artwork - and you're invited to look as well as listen, by following a link to a high-resolution image on Google Arts & Culture. Zoom in and you can see the pores of the canvas, the sweep of individual brushstrokes, the shimmer of pointillist dots.

This episode takes a closer look at one of the treasures of the British Library collection, the Sherborne Missal. It's a titan of a manuscript, weighing as much as the average five-year-old child and containing more paintings than many art galleries, including numerous tiny portraits of the patrons who commissioned it and the monks who laboured over its decoration.

To see the high-resolution image, visit www.bbc.co.uk/movingpictures and follow the link to explore the Sherborne Missal.

Interviewees: Kathleen Doyle, Eleanor Jackson, Alixe Bovey, Paul Binski, Patricia Lovett

Producer and presenter: Cathy FitzGerald

Art consultant: Leah Kharibian
Executive producer: Sarah Cuddon
Mix engineer: Mike Woolley

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4.

Picture credit: a decorated initial ‘R’ containing a scene of the Resurrection of Christ, with a pheasant and the appearance of Christ to Mary Magdalene in the border. Detail from the page for Easter Sunday in the Sherborne Missal, British Library, Add. MS 74236, p. 216 © The British Library Board.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (m0013hrc)
When Words Fail Us

Kathryn Mannix, author and palliative care specialist, joins Michael Rosen to think about those discussions we would rather avoid. She calls them "tender" conversations.

In the moments that really count, how do we respond to someone sharing bad news or raw emotion? How do we listen well? What do we say – and what should we not say?

Kathryn and Michael talk about why we tell stories to help us process important moments and how silence is often the most caring response to someone in distress. They also talk about having conversations aloud or in our heads with loved ones who have died and how this can help us work through loss.

Kathryn Mannix is the author of Listen: How to Find the Words for Tender Conversations and With the End in Mind: How to Live and Die Well.

Produced by Sarah Goodman for BBC Audio in Bristol.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (m0013hrf)
Roma Agrawal on Mrinalini Sarabhai

Mrinalini Sarabhai was an Indian classical dancer specialising in Bharatanatyam and becoming the first woman to perform Kathakali. She was very successful and performed around the world, with one reviewer in Paris calling her the 'Hindu atomic bomb'. She married prominent scientist and industrialist Vikram Sarabhai and together they would rub shoulders with ambassadors and Presidents. Men would see her dance and fall in love with her. She performed for The Queen in India. Later on, she used dance as a means of addressing social issues such as the 'dowry deaths' where brides were being set-alight and killed, and as a result of her work the governmental order the first ever inquiry into the issue.

The engineer and author Roma Agrawal is best-known for her work on The Shard in London. She trained in Indian classical dance and for her Mrinalini provides a continuous thread back to her own Indian heritage in Mumbai. She's joined by Indian classical dancer Santosh Nair, with contributions from Mrinalini's daughter Mallika Sarabhai.

Presenter: Matthew Parris
Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Toby Field.


TUE 17:00 PM (m0013hrh)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0013hrm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 It's a Fair Cop (b0bkv4f5)
Series 4

Pass the Person

Another chance to hear this episode from 2018. Experienced police officer and comedian Alfie Moore with the fourth episode in the series. 'Pass the Person' deals with the very sensitive issue of how the police deals with people with mental health problems and what they can do if there's a possibility they may harm themselves. When does 'protection' become 'intrusion'. Few could manage to handle this very serious and troubling subject with humour, but Alfie's compassion and genuine concern for those involved means that he can.

As usual Alfie asks his audience what they would have done in his shoes and hears some of their own true stories.

Presenter and writer ….. Alfie Moore
Script Editor ….. Will Ing
Producer ….. Alison Vernon-Smith
A BBC Studios Production


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m0013hrp)
Alice causes concern and Leonard makes a pitch


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m0013hrr)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (m0013hrt)
Award-winning current affairs documentary series.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m0013hrw)
Drag Queens and Kings

Like many things in the art and performance sector, there isn't much that blind and visually impaired people haven't been involved in. And drag is no exception.
It is thought to have been around in the UK since Shakespearean times and the first recorded drag queen is thought to have been in 1732. It has a long and rich history here in the UK. Today, drag reaches far beyond just drag queens. There are drag kings, performers experimenting with androgyny, celebrity impersonators, and much more. We wanted to find out more about the art form of drag and how visually impaired people go about it, so we spoke to Jake Sawyers, aka drag queen Venetia Blind and Amelia Lander- Cavallo, aka drag king Tito Bone.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Beth Hemmings

Website image description: A group of drag humans. They are all waving and making faces at the camera. Everyone is in bright colours, fantastic make up and a lot of eco glitter. Picture taken by Christopher Andreou.

Audio clip of the RuPaul's Drag Race theme song is used by permission of World of Wonder Ltd.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (m0013hry)
A weekly quest to demystify the health issues that perplex us.


TUE 21:30 Room 5 (m0013hql)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m0013hs0)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah (m0013hqx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 Fortunately... with Fi and Jane (m0013hs2)
Fi and Jane kick off a new series with the actor and broadcaster Liza Tarbuck.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0013hs4)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



WEDNESDAY 19 JANUARY 2022

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m0013hs6)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


WED 00:30 It's Always Summer Somewhere (m0013pw3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0013hs8)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0013hsb)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0013hsd)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m0013hsg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0013hsj)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Dr Krish Kandiah

Good morning.

Many years ago, my neighbour and I appeared on a television show. Two interior designers took over our identical terraced houses and gave them makeovers. At the end of the show, the houses were judged and one was declared the winner. The £400 makeover budget stretched to a few tins of paint, the odd piece of furniture and a collection of houseplants, cushions and other finishing touches. Unfortunately, the superficial makeover did not tackle the more serious issues. Rugs covered frayed carpets, cleverly positioned furniture hid cracks in the walls and camera angles avoided where wires stuck out. However beautiful the houses looked to the audience, the true value of each lay beneath the surface.

Jesus once told a story along similar lines about two apparently identical houses with two similar owners, both of whom assumed they would be safe and dry in the houses they’d built. But when the storm comes the real difference is revealed. As the waters rise and the wind howls it becomes clear that one of the houses has shoddy foundations. One owner in one house finds himself in disaster.

However good our lives appear on the surface, it is what lies beneath that counts. A show of faith does not even count. Attendance at church, and attention during the sermon are nothing if we aren’t prepared to see its application in our life. According to Jesus we build strong foundations when we put into practice his commands to love God and love one another.

That can be done if you live in a huge mansion in the middle of the city or if you live in a one-room studio flat in the middle of nowhere. Let’s pray

Lord God, may what happens under our roof honour you. Make us more welcoming, more compassionate, more generous, for your name’s sake.

Amen.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m0013hsl)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qkfw)
Serin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the serin. Serins breed just across the English Channel but they are small finches that continue to tantalize ornithologists here in the UK. Hopes were raised that this Continental finch would settle here to breed, especially if our climate became warmer. However, something about our islands doesn't suit them. They do like large parks and gardens, so keep an ear out for the song of this visitor....a cross between a goldfinch and a goldcrest, and you may be rewarded.


WED 06:00 Today (m0013jcq)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 More or Less (m0013jbx)
Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics used in everyday life.


WED 09:30 The Death of Nuance (m000qlxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 on Saturday]


WED 09:45 It's Always Summer Somewhere (m0013pvv)
Episode 3 - The Storm

In this third part of Felix White's abridged memoir read by the author, he remembers his tempestuous teenage years and attempts to find escape through cricket as a storm brews for his family.

Felix White is a musician, writer and broadcaster best known as a guitarist in The Maccabees. He subsequently co-founded independent record label Yala! and co-presents the BBC’s Tailenders podcast with Greg James. In It's Always Summer Somewhere he recalls growing up, his mother's illness and slowly replacing an ambition to be a left arm spinner in his school cricket team with the dazzling realities of life in a world renowned band.

Abridger: Julian Wilkinson
Producer: Ciaran Bermingham


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0013jd2)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


WED 11:00 The Nuclear Priesthood (m000zdq9)
How do we send a warning a hundred millennia into the future?

Poet Paul Farley considers how we might warn people three thousand generations from now about the radioactive waste we’ve left in geological disposal facilities deep underground. As he does so he explores the essence of communication and storytelling and the elements of our language, art and culture which are truly universal.

In countries across the world, including the UK, USA, France and Finland, the hunt is on for underground sites which will survive shifting tectonic plates or passing ice ages and remain secure for tens of millennia - maybe a hundred thousand years - until the radioactive waste they contain is no longer a danger. And once it’s buried, how do we leave a clear, unambiguous warning message - that this site is dangerous and should not be disturbed - for a society which may be utterly different from our own?

Can we still use written language? Would pictures and symbols be more easily understood? Or could we construct a landscape of vast monuments to instil fear in anybody who saw them. Paul talks to writer Helen Gordon about her experience of visiting the Onkalo nuclear repository in Finland and the challenges of warning the future about what it contains.

He hears from Jean-Noël Dumont, Manager of the Memory for Future Generations programme for the French nuclear agency Andra. For several years Andra has asked artists to devise a warning of the existence of a nuclear repository. Stéfane Perraud and Aram Kebabdjian responded with the idea of a Zone Bleue – a forest of genetically-modified blue trees which act as a memorial rather than a warning.

In 1981 linguist Thomas Sebeok proposed the idea of a ‘nuclear priesthood’. The idea takes its inspiration from world faiths which have passed on their message for thousands of years. At an ancient Christian site in the shadow of Heysham nuclear power station Paul meets Robert Williams, Professor of Fine Art at the University of Cumbria who, with American artist Bryan McGovern Wilson, has brought to life the idea of a Nuclear Priest, imagining their vestments, their rituals and role.

There’s compelling evidence that oral traditions can carry memories of events not just for centuries but for thousands of years. Professor Patrick Nunn has been researching Indigenous Australian stories which appear to carry the folk memory of a time after the last ice age when sea levels were much lower – around ten thousand years.

So could a story, a poem or a song be the answer? As the programme unfolds, Paul devises a poem to carry a warning to distant generations.

Producer: Jeremy Grange

Programme image courtesy of Robert Williams and Bryan McGovern Wilson with Michael Coombs. It was taken during the Alchemical Tour of Archaeological Sites in Cumbria and North Lancashire, as part of the Cumbrian Alchemy Project.


WED 11:30 Oti Mabuse's Dancing Legends (m0013jd6)
Ballet dancer Raven Wilkinson

Professional dancer and twice winner of Strictly Come Dancing, Oti Mabuse, continues her journey into the dancers and choreographers who have made a huge impact on dance. In this episode, Oti sits down with one of the most recognisable faces of modern ballet – Misty Copeland.

Misty became the first African American female Principal Dancer at the American Ballet Theatre company. She reflects on her inspiration, Raven Wilkinson, who danced fifty years before her during the time of the civil rights movement in America. Raven was a member of the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo company and routinely danced the waltz solo in Les Sylphides.

Misty and Oti explore Raven’s extraordinary story with archive clips and expert help from Dr Nya McCarthy Brown, Assistant Professor of Dance Pedagogy at Ohio State University.

Oti wants to capture Raven’s dancing style for herself, so she puts on ballet shoes and meets teacher Reena Bhattacharjee for a ballet tutorial.

Presenter: Oti Mabuse
Producers: Emily Knight and Candace Wilson
Production Team: Rema Mukena
Editors: Kirsten Lass and Chris Ledgard
A BBC Audio Bristol production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:00 News Summary (m0013jp5)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 12:04 Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah (m0013jdd)
Episode 8

Paradise is a historical novel by UK Zanzibar-born writer Abdulrazak Gurnah, first published in 1994. The novel was nominated for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Prize for Fiction and, this year, Gurnah was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature for his "uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the fate of the refugee in the gulf between cultures and continents."

The novel follows the story of Yusuf, a boy born in the fictional town of Kawa in Tanzania at the turn of the 20th century. Yusuf's father is a hotelier and is in debt to a rich and powerful Arab merchant named Aziz.

Early in the story, Yusuf is pawned in exchange for his father's debt to Aziz and must work as an unpaid servant for the merchant. Yusuf joins Aziz's caravan as they travel into parts of Central Africa and the Congo Basin that have not been traded with for many generations. Here, Aziz's caravan of traders meets hostility from local tribes, wild animals and difficult terrain.

It's both a coming-of-age story and a poetic and powerful portrait set against the backdrop of an Africa increasingly corrupted by colonialism and violence.

Abridged by Florence Bedell
Read by Paterson Joseph
Produced by Clive Brill

A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m0013jdg)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


WED 12:57 Weather (m0013jdj)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m0013jdl)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


WED 13:45 NatureBang (m0013jdn)
Cockatoos and the Power of the Beat

Rhythm is everywhere in the biological world. The rhythm of heartbeat, the rhythm of breathing, the rhythm of gait and walking. In fact, in 'The Descent of Man', Charles Darwin wrote that the perception of rhythm is "probably common to all animals and no doubt depends on the common physiological nature of their nervous system.” And yet, recent studies have shown that even our closest living relatives, the great apes, can't seem to keep a beat. Becky Ripley and Emily Knight investigate.

Enter YouTube sensation Snowball the Cockatoo. Much to the intrigue of evolutionary biologists, Snowball loves to dance to anything with a strong beat. Especially The Backstreet Boys. How is it that chimpanzees can't keep a beat and yet this parrot - which is more closely related to a dinosaur than a human - clearly loves to groove? What's going on in the brain of this bird? And how does that link to our own beat-keeping brains?

Back in the human world, there's serious neurological benefit to this beat-based research. The more we understand how and why people move to a beat, the more we can appreciate its powerful therapeutic effects. It unites our brains with our bodies, which can help to relieve symptoms of movement-based neurological disorders like Parkinson's, and it unites us to each other.

Featuring cognitive neuroscientist Aniruddh Patel and dance psychologist Peter Lovatt.


WED 14:00 The Archers (m0013hrp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Fault Lines: Money, Sex and Blood (m0013jdq)
Series 3: Blood

Between Two Worlds

Fault Lines: Blood, Ep 2/5
Between Two Worlds by Kathrine Smith

Constance is trying to find the murderer amongst her family. Could it be her twelve-year-old great-niece, Lily? A child capable of much destruction. But there's a new carer, Josie, a mystery figure whose presence causes ructions. A haunting drama of hidden shame and loss.

Constance - Glenda Jackson
Lily - Poppy O'Brien
Josie - Joy Richardson
Miles - Robert Glenister
Maria - Christine Bottomley

Sound by Sharon Hughes
Produced and directed by Pauline Harris


WED 15:00 Money Box (m0013jds)
Being a Guarantor

Felicity Hannah, listeners and experts discuss why people become a guarantor and the possible risks involved in signing up to a financial agreement for someone else.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (m0013hry)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (m0013jdv)
Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m0013jdx)
Social media, anti-social media, breaking news, faking news: this is the programme about a revolution in media.


WED 17:00 PM (m0013jdz)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0013jf3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Ellie Taylor's Safe Space (m000yv92)
Series 2

The News

Comedian and actor Ellie Taylor has for a long time thought there was too much news. It's on all the time on a million different channels. Enough is enough! It's not good for our health, and should be banned. But first she's got to convince her studio audience to come round to her way of thinking. With help from her ever-trusty sidekick Robin Morgan (Mock The Week), Ellie talks to members of the public about their own gripes and dislikes, and sits down with political journalist and assistant editor of The Spectator Isabel Hardman to discuss the logic of getting rid of the news entirely.

Written by Ellie Taylor and Robin Morgan.

Produced by Sam Michell for BBC Studios


WED 19:00 The Archers (m0013hjc)
Chris contemplates his future while tempers flare at The Bull.


WED 19:15 Front Row (m0013jf5)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m0013jf7)
Live debate examining the moral issues behind one of the week's news stories. #moralmaze


WED 20:45 Four Thought (m0012qxg)
Brain Matters

Beth Stevens talks about the brain cells most people have never heard of, and suggests what they might have to teach us.

Beth is a neuroscientist and associate professor at Harvard Medical School, who in 2015 was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship - the so-called 'genius grant' - for her work on microglial cells. In this talk she describes the connections between her research and her own family history, and explains why these cells - for so long overlooked in favour of neurons - may be the key to understanding much about the brain we don't yet know.

Producer: Giles Edwards


WED 21:00 Sketches: Stories of Art and People (m000c0bm)
Not Forgotten

Writer Anna Freeman presents true stories about the art of remembering. Featuring Nudrat Afza, a self-taught photographer documenting the dwindling congregation of Bradford's last synagogue. And Arek Hersh, a Polish holocaust survivor, whose visit to a secondary school in the Lake District inspired an incredible art project involving six million buttons, one for each person in the Holocaust.

Produced by Mair Bosworth and Becky Ripley


WED 21:30 The Media Show (m0013jdx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m0013jf9)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah (m0013jdd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 Bunk Bed (m0013jfc)
Series 9

Episode 2 with guest Harry Shearer

The Simpsons' Harry Shearer is on the pull-out bed, joining Patrick Marber and Peter Curran for late night musings in the dark. He relives working in show business at seven years old with Mel Blanc, the voice of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and scores of other cartoon characters.

Produced by Peter Curran
A Foghorn Company production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:15 Little Lifetimes by Jenny Eclair (b098n4vk)
Series 4

The Last Day

It's Miss Cavendish's last day at school and retirement looms But surely it can't go completely unmarked?

That's enough to send even the most sensible woman over the edge...

Vicki Pepperdine stars in Jenny Eclair's comic monologue.

Producer: Sally Avens

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2017,


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0013jff)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



THURSDAY 20 JANUARY 2022

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m0013jfh)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


THU 00:30 It's Always Summer Somewhere (m0013pvv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0013jfk)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0013jfm)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0013jfp)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m0013jfr)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0013jft)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Dr Krish Kandiah

Good Morning.

Thank you for inviting me to speak this morning. And for not subsequently disinviting me. I have been quite disheartened watching how University campuses have hit the headlines for inviting speakers and then disinviting them after student protests. "No platforming" and "cancel culture" have become part of our lexicon. But in fact the practice is nothing new. The ancient world had its own challenges with polarisation and division and silencing of unwanted voices.

In Jesus’ day the furore was not over who you invited to speak at an event but who you invited to share food with. Eating together was an indicator of who you considered acceptable and who you didn't, and Jesus frequently found himself caught up in a scandal over inappropriate guest choices.

Jesus refused to cancel appointments with people who are socially suspect. Jesus refused to “no platform” people with whom he disagreed. In fact he was more likely to draw near to them and engage lovingly with them in order to bring transformation. That's why Jesus is constantly criticised for spending time with the wrong kinds of people. Because the wrong kinds of people are exactly the right kind of people for Jesus to serve.

There are lots of people who could fall into today’s categories of ‘the wrong sort of people’. Which makes it all the more easy for us to cancel our part in cancel culture and invite the disinvited. We can fill our homes and lives and contact lists with those who others keep their distance from. We can show unconditional love and acceptance, just as we would like to be shown unconditional love and acceptance.

Lord God, thank you for Jesus’ example to us. He always put advocating for the marginalised above protecting his own reputation. Help us to welcome the outcast and include the forgotten, the shamed and the downtrodden. In your name.

Amen.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m0013jfw)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thwdy)
White-fronted Goose

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the white-fronted goose. Flocks of White-Fronted Geese return each year to their favourite wintering areas, the bogs and and saltmarshes of Ireland and the Severn Estuary as well as western Scotland, although smaller flocks are found elsewhere. John Aitchison recorded the musical yapping of white-fronted geese for Tweet listeners as they flew over his home in western Scotland.


THU 06:00 Today (m0013hh5)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (m0013hh7)
The Gold Standard

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the system that flourished from 1870 when gold became dominant and more widely available, following gold rushes in California and Australia. Banknotes could be exchanged for gold at central banks, the coins in circulation could be gold (as with the sovereign in the image above, initially worth £1), gold could be freely imported and exported, and many national currencies around the world were tied to gold and so to each other. The idea began in Britain, where sterling was seen as good as gold, and when other countries rushed to the Gold Standard the confidence in their currencies grew, and world trade took off and, for a century, gold was seen as a vital component of the world economy, supporting stability and confidence. The system came with constraints on government ability to respond to economic crises, though, and has been blamed for deepening and prolonging the Great Depression of the 1930s.

With

Catherine Schenk
Professor of Economic and Social History at the University of Oxford

Helen Paul
Lecturer in Economics and Economic History at the University of Southampton

And

Matthias Morys
Senior Lecturer in Economic History at the University of York

Produced by Eliane Glaser and Simon Tillotson


THU 09:45 It's Always Summer Somewhere (m0013prl)
Episode 4 - The Name of a Good Band

Felix learns guitar and joins his first band. But it's not - yet - The Maccabees. Meanwhile a fresher England team find a rockstar-like figure in Freddie Flintoff.

The fourth part of White's moving and funny memoir about cricket, music and grief, read by the author.

Felix White is a musician, writer and broadcaster best known as a guitarist in The Maccabees. He subsequently co-founded independent record label Yala! and co-presents the BBC’s Tailenders podcast with Greg James. In It's Always Summer Somewhere he recalls growing up, his mother's illness and slowly replacing an ambition to be a left arm spinner in his school cricket team with the dazzling realities of life in a world renowned band.

Abridger: Julian Wilkinson
Producer: Ciaran Bermingham


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0013hhb)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (m0013hhg)
Hunting Syria's War Criminals

Imagine walking down a street in a European capital and meeting your torturer. For many Syrian refugees fleeing war and human rights abuses, Europe was meant to be a sanctuary. So it was a shock when people began bumping into their torturers out shopping or in a cafe. In fact many of those involved in the Syrian government’s notorious interrogation facilities are hiding in plain sight in European cities having used the refugee wave as a “ratline” out of the country. More and more are now being investigated, arrested and put on trial in European courts. But with President Assad firmly in control in Syria the long arm of the state is reaching those willing to testify. For Crossing Continents, Chloe Hadjimatheou and Michael Ertl look at how the Syrian war is continuing to play out in Europe.

Presented and produced by Chloe Hadjimatheou and Michael Ertl
Editor, Bridget Harney


THU 11:30 Inventions in Sound (m000t4km)
[Sound of sky splitting]

[Sound of heart accelerating]

[Sound of shadows behind a door]

The poet Raymond Antrobus explores the art of translating sound for the eye, looking at the poetic possibilities of closed captions.

What can these captions - designed to illuminate the sound world of a film or TV show - reveal about how we conceive of sound itself?

Raymond speaks to fellow D/deaf poets and artists to explore their experiences navigating the spaces between the words. Are closed captions just a simple act of transcription - [Doorbell rings] - or a more subjective act of translation? How might we reimagine them?

[Sound of something invented]

Featuring the sound artist Christine Sun Kim, poet Meg Day, filmmaker and founding member of FWD Doc Lindsey Dryden and the captioner Calum Davidson from Red Bee Media. With poetic captions inspired by the work of Christine Sun Kim.

This documentary has been produced in three forms - as a radio broadcast, as a transcript with annotations from Raymond and as a subtitled video.

Produced by Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:00 News Summary (m0013hhl)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


THU 12:04 Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah (m0013hhp)
Episode 9

Paradise is a historical novel by UK Zanzibar-born writer Abdulrazak Gurnah, first published in 1994. The novel was nominated for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Prize for Fiction and, this year, Gurnah was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature for his "uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the fate of the refugee in the gulf between cultures and continents."

The novel follows the story of Yusuf, a boy born in the fictional town of Kawa in Tanzania at the turn of the 20th century. Yusuf's father is a hotelier and is in debt to a rich and powerful Arab merchant named Aziz.

Early in the story, Yusuf is pawned in exchange for his father's debt to Aziz and must work as an unpaid servant for the merchant. Yusuf joins Aziz's caravan as they travel into parts of Central Africa and the Congo Basin that have not been traded with for many generations. Here, Aziz's caravan of traders meets hostility from local tribes, wild animals and difficult terrain.

It's both a coming-of-age story and a poetic and powerful portrait set against the backdrop of an Africa increasingly corrupted by colonialism and violence.

Abridged by Florence Bedell
Read by Paterson Joseph
Produced by Clive Brill

A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m0013hht)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


THU 12:57 Weather (m0013hhy)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m0013hj3)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


THU 13:45 NatureBang (m0013hj7)
Cuckoo Chicks and the Supernormal Stimulus

Why do we want the things we want? What really drives us? And how in control of our instincts are we? All questions you might ask the humble cuckoo. This dastardly bird - a 'brood parasite' - famously leaves its eggs in another bird's nest and flies off, never to be seen again. The enormous chick hatches, kills all its nest-mates, then runs its adoptive parents ragged with round-the-clock feedings. But why on earth do the poor host-parents fall for the con?

To find the answer, Becky Ripley and Emily Knight delve into the history of animal behavioural research to uncover the 'Supernormal Stimulus', a curious phenomenon in which an animal's most basic instincts can be over-ridden, twisted and manipulated, to make them behave in extraordinary ways. Often against their own best interests.

And if you think humans are far too smart to be manipulated in this way, think again. Take a look at the things you like, and ask yourself why? Why do you like fast food when it's so bad for you? Why is porn so appealing, when it's so unrealistic? And why can't you put your smart-phone down? Perhaps just like the parasitised victims of the cuckoo chicks, you're not completely in control of what you want.

Featuring evolutionary biologist professor Rebecca Kilner and evolutionary psychologist Becky Burch


THU 14:00 The Archers (m0013hjc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Fault Lines: Money, Sex and Blood (m0013hjh)
Series 3: Blood

Deception

Fault Lines: Blood, Ep 3/5
Deception by Fiona Evans
How has Sarah deceived Constance so completely? Constance discovers Sarah's illicit affair with Gabriel, and discovers darker secrets, and deception when Sarah is forced to return to her childhood home.

Constance - Glenda Jackson
Sarah - Pippa Nixon
Gabriel - Joseph Ayre
Mam - Charlie Hardwick
Amanda - Angela Lonsdale.

Sound by Steve Brooke & Sharon Hughes
Produced and directed by Pauline Harris


THU 15:00 Open Country (m0013hjm)
Goats on the Gun Batteries

Purdown is a large green hilly area on the edge of Bristol, and is one of the highest points of the city. It's marked out by two structures - the telecoms tower and the large yellow dower house, a familiar sight to anyone who regularly drives along the nearby M32. In this programme Helen Mark explores the area, finding out about its significance in World War II, and meeting the goats which are now helping to preserve the remains of the gun placements, put there to protect the city from bombing raids in the 1940s. She also learns about the history of the area, and goes on a hunt for hidden artwork in the woods.

Produced by Emma Campbell


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m0013hbz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m0013hct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 Think with Pinker (m0013hjp)
Professor Steven Pinker has spent his life thinking about thinking. Now he wants us to join him. For this series Professor Pinker has created a critical thinking toolkit which he hopes will help all of us make better decisions about – well, everything. Steven will be joined by some big thinkers, and people who have to deal with the consequences of irrationality, as he sets out to steer us away from common fallacies and logical traps set by our own animal brains.

Think with Pinker is produced in partnership with The Open University.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m0013hjr)
A weekly programme that illuminates the mysteries and challenges the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (m0013hjt)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0013hjw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (m000knwh)
Series 9

Episode 4

More shop based shenanigans and over the counter philosophy, courtesy of Ramesh Mahju and his trusty sidekick Dave.

Set in a Scots-Asian corner and written by and starring Donald Mcleary and Sanjeev Kohli, the award winning Fags, Mags & Bags returns for a 9th series with all the regular characters and some guest appearances along the way.

In this episode, Ramesh and Malcolm’s wedding day plans upset a few people, including Sanjay who wants to perform at the reception with his new horrible band.

Join the staff of Fags, Mags and Bags in their tireless quest to bring nice-price custard creams and cans of coke with Arabic writing on them to an ungrateful nation. Ramesh Mahju has built it up over the course of over 30 years and is a firmly entrenched, friendly presence in the local area. He is joined by his shop sidekick Dave.

Then of course there are Ramesh’s sons Sanjay and Alok, both surly and not particularly keen on the old school approach to shopkeeping, but natural successors to the business. Ramesh is keen to pass all his worldly wisdom onto them - whether they like it or not!

Cast:
Ramesh: Sanjeev Kohli
Dave: Donald Mcleary
Sanjay: Omar Raza
Alok: Susheel Kumar
Malcolm. Mina Anwar
Hilly: Kate Brailsford
Bishop Briggs: Michael Redmond
Cambus: Maureen Carr

Producer: Gus Beattie for Gusman Productions
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4


THU 19:00 The Archers (m0013hjy)
Writer, Nick Warburton
Director, Rosemary Watts
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Kenton Archer ….. Richard Attlee
Jolene Archer ….. Buffy Davis
Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Phoebe Aldridge ….. Lucy Morris
Leonard Berry ….. Paul Copley
Harrison Burns ….. James Cartwright
Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Chris Carter ….. Wilf Scolding
Tracy Horrobin ….. Susie Riddell
Jim Lloyd ….. John Rowe
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Lily Pargetter …. Katie Redford
Fallon Rogers ….. Joanna Van Kampen


THU 19:15 Front Row (m0013hk0)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (m0013hk2)
David Aaronovitch presents in-depth explainers on big issues in the news.


THU 20:30 Lights Out (m000nv68)
Series 3

From the Ashes of New Cross

The documentary series that invites a closer listen.

On 18th January 1981, Yvonne Ruddock was celebrating her 16th birthday party in the family home at 439 New Cross Road in south east London. What followed devastated countless families, scarred the community and shifted the position of black politics in British society. A fire broke out in a downstairs room and 13 young people were killed, including Yvonne and her elder brother Paul. A 14th young person died subsequently.

With the 40th anniversary of the fire approaching, Lights Out revisits the events of that night and their aftermath. The musician Johnny Osbourne encapsulated the official and media response to the fire in his song Thirteen Dead and Nothing Said.

At first, the police and local community suspected arson - a racist attack. After all, this was only a short time after the Battle of Lewisham in which black residents and activists had successfully confronted a National Front march just up the street. But no-one was ever charged and, at the Inquest, an open verdict was returned.

Survivors of the fire - including members of the Ruddock family and Wayne Haynes, who was DJ'ing that night, along with community activists such as Sybil Phoenix who were witnesses to it and the subsequent Black People's Day of Action - share their understanding of what happened and what the New Cross Fire has come to symbolise.

With a specially commissioned sequence of poems by unofficial Lewisham Laureate, Mark 'Mr T' Thompson.

Produced by Cherise Hamilton-Stephenson and Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m0013hjr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (m0013hh7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m0013hk5)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


THU 22:45 Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah (m0013hhp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 The Nether Regions (m0013kcj)
Series 1

Episode 3

Creators of the smash hit Radio 4 Sci Fi comedy, Quanderhorn, Rob Grant (Son of Cliché, Spitting Image, Red Dwarf) and Andrew Marshall (Burkiss Way, Whoops Apocalypse, 2point4children) invite you back for a deeper glimpse into the cobwebbed environs of their mildewed minds, known only as: The Nether Regions.

Manacled to the dripping walls are bright young talents Helen Cripps, Ed Rowett, and Holly Morgan.

The Nether Regions is our dystopian present – it’s Now, through the prism of Then, with nothing in between.

Past, present and future are crammed into a temporal Nutri-Bullet and emerge as an oozing smoothie of weirdness.

Scream in terror. Then listen to the show. Then scream in terror again as you witness:

Depressing Scandinavian Game Show, Nordic Celebrity Damaged Detective Mystery Squares.
Previously unheard auditions that didn’t make it to the movie, including Alan Bennett’s Hannibal Lecter and Sir John Gielgud trying out for Taxi Driver.
The perils of adopting a rescue boyfriend.
And a valuable boiled sweet.

These and other limbic system loppers await the imprudent audiophile.
Prepare your escape route now.

Created and Written by Rob Grant and Andrew Marshall
Performed by Rob Grant, Andrew Marshall, Helen Cripps, Edward Rowett and Holly Morgan
Studio Engineered and Edited by Jerry Peal
Original Music Composed by Pete Baikie
Programme Managed by Sarah Tombling
Recorded at The Shaw Theatre, London

Produced and Directed by Gordon Kennedy, Rob Grant and Andrew Marshall.
An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0013hk7)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



FRIDAY 21 JANUARY 2022

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m0013hk9)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 00:30 It's Always Summer Somewhere (m0013prl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0013hkc)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0013hkf)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0013hkh)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m0013hkk)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0013hkm)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Dr Krish Kandiah

Good morning.

Avoiding things was something I used to be rather good at. By keeping busy I found I could avoid stressful situations and difficult people. By getting up early and staying late at work I could avoid the frustrations of rush hour or looming deadlines. By doing enough exercise I could avoid lying awake at night and worrying. But avoidance as a coping mechanism has turned out to be rather ineffective. Stress, anxiety and frustration have a way of finding their way back in. And as for difficult people, well it turns out I may well be one of them.

Thankfully, Jesus worked in a very different way. I love the story of when Jesus went out of his way not to avoid someone everyone else did. It was the end of a busy day for him he but when he sees a man who was socially shunned, ceremonially unacceptable and deemed physically deformed, he reaches out to him.

The man had a contagious skin condition they called leprosy, but that didn’t stop Jesus touching him. We see both the fearlessness and the compassion of Jesus at play in this one action.

But Jesus’s action causes a supernatural and sociological revolution. Instead of the contamination spreading to Jesus, healing spreads to the man with leprosy.

Many of us are reluctant, fearful even, of offering hospitality to others. It comes with the possibility of rejection, of criticism, of physical discomfort, of embarrassment, of heartache. We can get very good at avoiding it. But what happens if we reach out today? Better, I think, an empty room of people that choose to avoid your invitation than an empty heart that refuses to show compassion to others.

Lord God, help us to be brave and wise, kind and courageous, untiring in our willingness to embrace others with hospitality. Help us to see people through your eyes and be willing to offer dignity and love where we can.

Amen.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m0013hkp)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02ty530)
Lesser Black-backed Gull

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the lesser black-backed gull.

These smart gulls are charcoal grey on top and white beneath. Like herring gulls, their close relatives LBBs have moved into urban areas and now breed on flat roofs in the centre of cities. It seems almost any flat surface will do. In just three hours, one bird in Gloucester built a nest on a car roof and laid an egg in.


FRI 06:00 Today (m0013j9j)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m0013hcc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 It's Always Summer Somewhere (m0013pwl)
Episode 5

Part five of White's memoir about cricket, music and loss, read by the author. In the wake of unprocessed grief, Felix's band takes off, as does the England team.

Felix White is a musician, writer and broadcaster best known as a guitarist in The Maccabees. He subsequently co-founded independent record label Yala! and co-presents the BBC’s Tailenders podcast with Greg James. In It's Always Summer Somewhere he recalls growing up, his mother's illness and slowly replacing an ambition to be a left arm spinner in his school cricket team with the dazzling realities of life in a world renowned band.

Abridger: Julian Wilkinson
Producer: Ciaran Bermingham


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0013j9q)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


FRI 11:00 Fungi: The New Frontier (m0013j9v)
Us and them

It all started with rumours of an 800-meter underground organism hidden under the streets of Cambridge and a plate of mushrooms on toast. With cream. In this three-part series, Tim Hayward falls down a rabbit hole into kingdom (or as some call it queendom) Fungi. Along the way he starts to question pretty much everything he thought he knew about the world, discovering scientists doing pioneering research that’s changing how we understand life on Earth and offering solutions to some of our biggest challenges.

In this final episode, Tim tries to grow a lion’s mane mushroom. He then finds out about a “body snatcher” fungus that hijacks ants and manipulates their behaviour - which makes him wonder about what the complex chemical compounds produced by fungi might do to humans. He investigates the new wave of research interest around psilocybin, an alkaloid found in many species of fungi - and the significant promise these compounds are showing as potential treatments for addiction, PTSD, anxiety and even dementia - and then gets a look at a cutting-edge research lab growing medicinal mushrooms in the forests of Finland.

Featuring:
Charissa de Bekker, Assistant Professor studying fungi that manipulate behaviour
Zoe Cormier, journalist and writer
Albert Garcia-Romeu, Assistant Professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Thomas Hartle, the first person to undergo psilocybin treatment legally in Canada
Eric Puro, CEO of KÄÄPÄ Biotech
Joette Crosier, Lab manager at KÄÄPÄ Biotech

Presenter: Tim Hayward
Producer and Sound Designer: Richard Ward
Executive Producer: Miranda Hinkley
Image courtesy of Carolina Magnasco
A Loftus Media production for Radio 4


FRI 11:30 The Train at Platform 4 (m0013j9z)
Bag

Episode Three of Punt and Dennis's new sitcom, set in the claustrophobic carriages of a cross-country rail service.

Sam and the rest of the crew struggle to contain an anarchic party of seditious school children. But Dev sees a golden business opportunity in profiting from the kids' snack money. Meanwhile a bag falls from the luggage rack, injuring a passenger, who turns out to work for the rail regulator. Sam struggles to appease him, in order to avoid a damning report.

Our heroes are the long-suffering train crew who manage to scrape through every shift like a dysfunctional family – Train Manager, Sam (Rosie Cavaliero; Inside No. 9) First Class Steward, Gilbert (Kenneth Collard; Cuckoo), Catering Manager, Dev (Ali Shahalom; Muzlamic) and Trolley Operator Tasha (Amy Geldhill; Life). The passengers are made up of a rolling roster of guest stars, which includes the odd cameo from Punt and Dennis themselves.

Sam…. Rosie Cavaliero
Gilbert…. Kenneth Collard
Dev….. Ali Shahalom
Tasha….. Amy Gledhill
Mr Bagnall.... Steve Brody
Teacher.... Katy Wix
Passenger.... Hugh Dennis

Written by....Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis
Producer… James Robinson
A BBC Studios Production


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m0013jd9)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:04 Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah (m0013jb3)
Episode 10

Paradise is a historical novel by UK Zanzibar-born writer Abdulrazak Gurnah, first published in 1994. The novel was nominated for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Prize for Fiction and, this year, Gurnah was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature for his "uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the fate of the refugee in the gulf between cultures and continents."

The novel follows the story of Yusuf, a boy born in the fictional town of Kawa in Tanzania at the turn of the 20th century. Yusuf's father is a hotelier and is in debt to a rich and powerful Arab merchant named Aziz.

Early in the story, Yusuf is pawned in exchange for his father's debt to Aziz and must work as an unpaid servant for the merchant. Yusuf joins Aziz's caravan as they travel into parts of Central Africa and the Congo Basin that have not been traded with for many generations. Here, Aziz's caravan of traders meets hostility from local tribes, wild animals and difficult terrain.

It's both a coming-of-age story and a poetic and powerful portrait set against the backdrop of an Africa increasingly corrupted by colonialism and violence.

Abridged by Florence Bedell
Read by Paterson Joseph
Produced by Clive Brill

A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m0013jb5)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


FRI 12:57 Weather (m0013jb7)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m0013jb9)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Jonny Dymond.


FRI 13:45 NatureBang (m0013jbc)
Mongooses and the Magic of Trust

As our global society becomes ever more mobile, with people migrating across borders and making new homes among strangers, how do we figure out how to fit in? Trust is the glue that holds society together, but trust - as we all know - must be earned. Becky Ripley and Emily Knight take a trip to the African savanna, to see what a mob of dwarf mongooses can teach us about migration, integration, and making friends across cultural divides.

Featuring behavioural biologist professor Andy Radford, and political scientist Marc Hooghe.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m0013hjy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Limelight (p0b8cgb9)
SteelHeads

Steelheads – Episode 4: Break Point

When young British tennis pro, Joleen Kenzie (Jessica Barden), is diagnosed with a rare terminal illness, she has herself cryogenically frozen at an experimental lab in Seattle, in the hope that one day – perhaps hundreds of years into the future - there will be a cure and she can be revived.

She wakes up to a world divided...

Luther offers Joleen a chance of life, but in return she must agree to live in hiding and be companion to his grand-daughter, Kit. But Kit reveals that they are both in danger and must escape to find the resistance.

From the creators of The Cipher and Passenger List, a chilling new medical thriller inspired by true events starring Jessica Barden.

Cast:
JOLEEN – Jessica Barden
KIT – Symera Jackson
LUTHER – Bruce Lester Johnson
REMI – Khalid Laith
HUGO – Christopher Ragland
THE MOD – Andrew Byron
IZZY – Lizzie Stables
ESMERELDA – Annabelle Dowler

All other parts played by: Earl R Perkins, Kerry Shale, Gianna Kiehl, Jason Forbes and Laurel Lefkow

Original theme composed by Pascal Wyse

Written and Created by Brett Neichin and John Scott Dryden
Script Editing by Mike Walker
Sound Design by Steve Bond
Sound Editor: Adam Woodhams
Assistant Producer: Eleanor Mein
Additional casting by Janet Foster
Trails by Jack Soper
Produced by Emma Hearn
Director and Executive Producer: John Scott Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 14:45 New Year Solutions (m0001vl0)
Water

As global warming threatens the future of our society, Jo Fidgen tackles the ways in which ordinary people can make a difference.

We're often told that we could help the environment by driving less, eating less meat, or using less water.

But in the face of a challenge as significant as global warming, how big a difference can small changes really make? And what would the world look like if we took those solutions to their logical extremes?

Britain may be wet and rainy a lot of the time, but our water supply is more fragile than many realise, especially as global warming starts to kick in. By borrowing the ingenuity of those who live in hotter, drier weather, can we find ways that we can cut out pointless water waste?

Producer: Robert Nicholson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0013jbk)
Horticultural programme featuring a group of gardening experts.


FRI 15:45 The Poet and the Echo (m0013jbp)
Jubilate Agno

Writers choose poems as inspiration for new stories.

Episode 2/3

Jubilate Agno

A young woman, surrounded by silence, finds solace in the freedom of the outdoors.

A moving story inspired by Christopher Smart’s ‘Jubilate Agno’, by Jessie Greengrass.

Credits
Writer ..... Jessie Greengrass
Reader ..... Jessica Hardwick
Producer ..... Claire Simpson

A BBC Scotland Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m0013jbt)
Matthew Bannister tells the life stories of people who have recently died, from the rich and famous to unsung but significant.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (m0013jbx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 on Wednesday]


FRI 17:00 PM (m0013jbz)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0013jc3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (m0013jc5)
Series 107

Episode 4

Andy Zaltzman presents a look back at the week's headlines.


FRI 19:00 Past Forward: A Century of Sound (m0013296)
Christmas 1945

Greg hears an archive clip from 24th December 1945 – when people in Bethnal Green were interviewed by Wynford Vaughan-Thomas about their plans for Christmas that year - for many, the first celebration with their families for several years.

Marking the centenary of the BBC, Past Forward uses a random date generator to alight somewhere in the BBC's vast archive over the past 100 years. Public historian Greg Jenner hears an archive clip for the first time at the top of the programme, and uses it as a starting point in a journey towards the present day. The archive captures a century of British life in a unique way - a history of ordinary people’s lives, as well as news of the great events. Greg uncovers connections through people, places and ideas that link the archive fragment to Britain in 2022, pulling in help from experts and those who remember the time – and sometimes the speakers themselves, decades later - along the way. What he discovers are stories, big and small, that reveal how the people we were have shaped the people we have become.

Featuring historian Martin Johnes -- and Vi Davis, Gloria Lacey and Juliet Middleton.

Thanks to Dail Francois and all at the Sundial Centre, Bethnal Green.


FRI 19:15 Screenshot (m0013jc7)
Boiling Point and the one-take film

Ellen E Jones and Mark Kermode explore the one-take movie, from high-octane restaurant drama Boiling Point to Sam Mendes' WW1 epic 1917.

Producer: Marilyn Rust
A Prospect Street production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m0013jc9)
Louis de Bernières, Robert Jenrick MP, Nadia Whittome MP

Chris Mason presents political debate and discussion from Gedney Hill and District Memorial Hall in Lincolnshire with a panel which includes the author Louis de Bernières, the Conservative MP and former Cabinet Minister Robert Jenrick and the Labour MP Nadia Whittome.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: Sharon Hughes


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m0013jcc)
Weekly reflections on topical issues from a range of contributors.


FRI 21:00 Ingenious (m0013k4v)
The Fat Gene

Many of us have got a bit chunkier over the last difficult year, but can you blame your genes if you no longer fit into your jeans? Or is it all about willpower?
Dr Kat Arney finds out with the help of eating experts Professors Giles Yeo and Theresa Marteau… and some irresistible cookies.

Presenter: Kat Arney
Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton
Sound mix: James Beard
Editor: Penny Murphy


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m0013jcf)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah (m0013jb3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (m0013hrf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0013jch)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m001395z)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m0013jcc)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m0013h9d)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m001395x)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m0013jc9)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m0013hb1)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m0013hjr)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m0013hjr)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m0013hbk)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m0013hbk)

Bright Lights, Dead City 19:45 SUN (m0013hd8)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m0013hc7)

Bunk Bed 23:00 WED (m0013jfc)

Consumed by Desire 11:00 MON (m001325b)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (m00138hc)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (m0013hy1)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (m00139p2)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (m0013hhg)

Desert Island Discs 11:00 SUN (m0013hcc)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m0013hcc)

Drama 14:45 SAT (b0930dvl)

Drama 15:00 SUN (m0013hcr)

Ellie Taylor's Safe Space 18:30 WED (m000yv92)

Fags, Mags and Bags 18:30 THU (m000knwh)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m0013h8m)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m0013hds)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m0013hyy)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m0013hsl)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m0013jfw)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m0013hkp)

Fault Lines: Money, Sex and Blood 14:15 TUE (m0013hr9)

Fault Lines: Money, Sex and Blood 14:15 WED (m0013jdq)

Fault Lines: Money, Sex and Blood 14:15 THU (m0013hjh)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (m00139cy)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (m0013hrt)

Fortunately... with Fi and Jane 23:00 TUE (m0013hs2)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (m0012qxg)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m0013h92)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m0013hyb)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m0013hrr)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m0013jf5)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m0013hk0)

Fungi: The New Frontier 11:00 FRI (m0013j9v)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m001395d)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m0013jbk)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (m0013hrf)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (m0013hrf)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (m0013hh7)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (m0013hh7)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m0013hrw)

Ingenious 21:00 FRI (m0013k4v)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (m0013hry)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (m0013hry)

Inventions in Sound 11:30 THU (m000t4km)

Islands of Abandonment by Cal Flyn 00:30 SAT (m001394l)

It's Always Summer Somewhere 09:45 MON (m0013pq5)

It's Always Summer Somewhere 00:30 TUE (m0013pq5)

It's Always Summer Somewhere 09:45 TUE (m0013pw3)

It's Always Summer Somewhere 00:30 WED (m0013pw3)

It's Always Summer Somewhere 09:45 WED (m0013pvv)

It's Always Summer Somewhere 00:30 THU (m0013pvv)

It's Always Summer Somewhere 09:45 THU (m0013prl)

It's Always Summer Somewhere 00:30 FRI (m0013prl)

It's Always Summer Somewhere 09:45 FRI (m0013pwl)

It's a Fair Cop 18:30 TUE (b0bkv4f5)

Lacrimosa 11:30 TUE (b065sx6w)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m001395j)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m0013jbt)

Lights Out 20:30 THU (m000nv68)

Limelight 14:15 FRI (p0b8cgb9)

Little Lifetimes by Jenny Eclair 23:15 WED (b098n4vk)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m0013h9x)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m0013h9x)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m0013967)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m0013hb7)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m0013hdd)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m0013hyk)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m0013hs6)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m0013jfh)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m0013hk9)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m0013h96)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m0013h96)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m0013jds)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (m00139l2)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (m0013jf7)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (m001395l)

More or Less 09:00 WED (m0013jbx)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (m0013jbx)

Moving Pictures 15:30 TUE (m000pw7r)

My Name Is... 16:30 MON (m000sy1z)

NatureBang 13:45 MON (m0013hxx)

NatureBang 13:45 TUE (m0013hr5)

NatureBang 13:45 WED (m0013jdn)

NatureBang 13:45 THU (m0013hj7)

NatureBang 13:45 FRI (m0013jbc)

New Year Solutions 11:45 SUN (m0001v7f)

New Year Solutions 14:45 FRI (m0001vl0)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m0013hdn)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m0013hyt)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m0013hsg)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m0013jfr)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m0013hkk)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m0013hmv)

News Summary 06:00 SUN (m0013hbm)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m0013hcf)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m0013hxl)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m0013jk6)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m0013jp5)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m0013hhl)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m0013jd9)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m0013h8k)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m0013hbv)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m0013hc3)

News and Weather 13:00 SAT (m0013h9b)

News 22:00 SAT (m0013hb3)

Night Watch 16:00 MON (m00139p4)

Now You're Asking with Marian Keyes and Tara Flynn 19:15 SUN (m0013gyj)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (m0013hbq)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m0013hct)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m0013hct)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (m00139pl)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m0013hjm)

Oti Mabuse's Dancing Legends 11:30 WED (m0013jd6)

PM 17:00 SAT (m0013h9l)

PM 17:00 MON (m0013hy4)

PM 17:00 TUE (m0013hrh)

PM 17:00 WED (m0013jdz)

PM 17:00 THU (m0013hjt)

PM 17:00 FRI (m0013jbz)

Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah 12:04 MON (m0013hxn)

Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah 22:45 MON (m0013hxn)

Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah 12:04 TUE (m0013hqx)

Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah 22:45 TUE (m0013hqx)

Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah 12:04 WED (m0013jdd)

Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah 22:45 WED (m0013jdd)

Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah 12:04 THU (m0013hhp)

Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah 22:45 THU (m0013hhp)

Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah 12:04 FRI (m0013jb3)

Paradise by Abdulrazak Gurnah 22:45 FRI (m0013jb3)

Past Forward: A Century of Sound 19:00 FRI (m0013296)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m0013hd4)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (m0013hcw)

Political Thinking with Nick Robinson 17:30 SAT (p0bh8tdz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m001396k)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m0013hdq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m0013hyw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m0013hsj)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m0013jft)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m0013hkm)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m0013h9z)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m0013h9z)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m0013h9z)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m0013hbz)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m0013hbz)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m0013hbz)

Rethink 19:15 SAT (m001324g)

Room 5 09:00 TUE (m0013hql)

Room 5 21:30 TUE (m0013hql)

Sandi Toksvig's Hygge 21:45 SAT (m0012qgw)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m0013h8w)

Screenshot 19:15 FRI (m0013jc7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m001396c)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m0013hbc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m0013hdj)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m0013hyp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m0013hsb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m0013jfm)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m0013hkf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m0013969)

Shipping Forecast 05:33 SAT (m001396f)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m0013h9q)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m0013hb9)

Shipping Forecast 05:33 SUN (m0013hbf)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m0013hcy)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m0013hdg)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m0013hdl)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m0013hym)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m0013hyr)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m0013hs8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m0013hsd)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m0013jfk)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m0013jfp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m0013hkc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m0013hkh)

Short Cuts 21:30 SUN (m000ysv7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m0013h9v)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m0013hd2)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m0013hy6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m0013hrm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m0013jf3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m0013hjw)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m0013jc3)

Sketches: Stories of Art and People 21:00 WED (m000c0bm)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b008nbq8)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b008nbq8)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (m0013hxf)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (m0013hxf)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m0013hc5)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m0013hbx)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m0013hc9)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m0013hd6)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m0013hd6)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m0013hr7)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m0013hr7)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m0013hrp)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m0013hrp)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m0013hjc)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m0013hjc)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m0013hjy)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m0013hjy)

The Black and the Green 20:00 MON (m0010gjl)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (m0013hk2)

The Coming Storm 21:00 MON (m00139c3)

The Coming Storm 11:00 TUE (m0013hqs)

The Death of Nuance 05:45 SAT (m000qlxd)

The Death of Nuance 09:30 WED (m000qlxd)

The East Coast Listening Post 00:15 SUN (m000611k)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m0013hch)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m0013hch)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (m0013h8y)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (m0013h8y)

The Listening Project 13:30 SUN (m0013hcp)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m0013jdx)

The Media Show 21:30 WED (m0013jdx)

The Nether Regions 23:00 THU (m0013kcj)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (m001395s)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (m0013jc5)

The Nuclear Priesthood 11:00 WED (m000zdq9)

The Poet and the Echo 00:30 SUN (m001395g)

The Poet and the Echo 15:45 FRI (m0013jbp)

The Political Butterfly Effect 09:30 TUE (m0012s7z)

The Seventh Test by Vikas Swarup 14:45 SUN (b04471l3)

The Train at Platform 4 11:30 FRI (m0013j9z)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (m00138j0)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (m0013hy8)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (m0013h90)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m0013hcm)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m0013hyf)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m0013hs0)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m0013jf9)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m0013hk5)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m0013jcf)

Think with Pinker 23:00 SUN (m00139pn)

Think with Pinker 16:00 THU (m0013hjp)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (m00139kp)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (m0013jdv)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (m0013hyh)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (m0013hs4)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (m0013jff)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (m0013hk7)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (m0013jch)

Today 07:00 SAT (m0013h8r)

Today 06:00 MON (m0013hxc)

Today 06:00 TUE (m0013hqg)

Today 06:00 WED (m0013jcq)

Today 06:00 THU (m0013hh5)

Today 06:00 FRI (m0013j9j)

Tumanbay 21:00 SAT (m0002g8b)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b09by75m)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b09sqgkp)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03dww4v)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b038qkfw)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03thwdy)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b02ty530)

Uncanny 23:30 SAT (m0013hb5)

United Kingdoms 14:15 MON (m0013hxz)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m0013h8p)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m0013h98)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m0013h9s)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m0013hbs)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m0013hc1)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m0013hck)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m0013hd0)

Weather 05:56 MON (m0013hdv)

Weather 12:57 MON (m0013hxs)

Weather 12:57 TUE (m0013hr1)

Weather 12:57 WED (m0013jdj)

Weather 12:57 THU (m0013hhy)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m0013jb7)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m0013hdb)

Woman's Hour 16:15 SAT (m0013h9j)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m0013hxh)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m0013hqq)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m0013jd2)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m0013hhb)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m0013j9q)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (m00139cm)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (m0013hrc)

World at One 13:00 MON (m0013hxv)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m0013hr3)

World at One 13:00 WED (m0013jdl)

World at One 13:00 THU (m0013hj3)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m0013jb9)

You and Yours 12:18 MON (m0013hxq)

You and Yours 12:18 TUE (m0013hqz)

You and Yours 12:18 WED (m0013jdg)

You and Yours 12:18 THU (m0013hht)

You and Yours 12:18 FRI (m0013jb5)