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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 21 MARCH 2020

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m000gc62)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:30 Shakespeare in a Divided America, by James Shapiro (m000gc4b)
Episode 5

Leading scholar James Shapiro makes a timely exploration of what Shakespeare’s plays reveal about deep divisions in the United States - from revolutionary times to the present day.

The plays of William Shakespeare are rare common ground in the United States. They are read at school by almost every student, staged in theatres across the country, and valued by conservatives and liberals alike. For well over two centuries, Americans of all stripes - presidents and activists, writers and soldiers - have turned to Shakespeare’s works to explore the nation’s fault lines, including issues such as race, gender, immigration, and free speech.

In a narrative arching across the centuries, from revolutionary times to the present day, James Shapiro traces the unparalleled role of Shakespeare’s 400 year-old tragedies and comedies in illuminating the concerns on which American identity has turned.

Deeply researched, Shakespeare in a Divided America reveals how no writer has been more closely embraced by Americans, or has shed more light on the pressing issues in their history. Shapiro argues it is by better understanding of Shakespeare’s role in American life that Americans might begin to mend their bitterly divided land.

Written by James Shapiro
Read by Kerry Shale
Abridged by Kerry Shale and Jill Waters
Producer: Lizzie Davies
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000gc64)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000gc66)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000gc68)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m000gc6b)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000gc6d)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Father Jim O'Keefe


SAT 05:45 Profile (m000gksd)
Andrew Bailey

The Bank of England's new governor started work on Monday amid global turmoil. The world economy is in chaos as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. How will he handle the difficult decisions to come? Edward Stourton profiles Andrew Bailey, from his childhood in Leicester all the way to Threadneedle Street. This is not the first crisis in his long banking career, but it may well be the toughest.

Producers: Eleanor Biggs and Rosamund Jones


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m000gkr6)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (m000gbj6)
A brand new waymarked walking route in South Wales

In one of the rainiest Ramblings we've ever recorded, Clare Balding discovers a brand new waymarked walking route in South Wales which has been established on the path of an ancient pilgrimage. It's called the Penrhys Pilgrimage and connects Llandaff to Penrhys.

As Clare hears, while walking (and getting soaked) along the final five mile stretch from Trebanog to Penrhys, a huge amount of work from local volunteers has gone into making this project happen.

Penrhys is the site of an ancient well and a statue of Mary and already has a pilgrimage passing through from east to west (the Cistercian Way) but from March 25th 2020 this new route , running south to north, will be available to all comers, pilgrims or not. Please scroll down to the 'related links' box to find out more.

(Please note: the launch events mentioned in the programme have now been cancelled due to Covid-19)

Producer: Karen Gregor


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m000gkr8)
21/03/20 - Farming Today This Week

Farming Today continues to be brought to you from presenters' homes, in line with Government advice...although this time Sybil Ruscoe braves a trip into her allotment in the Cotswolds.

As Agricultural shows continue to get cancelled and pubs and restaurants close down, what impact is the coronavirus having the rural economy? We hear from farmers, land managers and employers.

A petition called for a ban on the use of cages in agriculture was debated in Parliament this week - we look into the details.

And with trial Environmental Land Management schemes underway all across the UK, we visit one of them, and hear concerns about the time frame for phasing out of Basic Payments.

Presented (from her allotment) by Sybil Ruscoe
Produced by Heather Simons


SAT 06:57 Weather (m000gkrb)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (m000gkrd)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m000gkrg)
Bob Geldof

Aasmah Mir and Richard Coles are joined on the line by Sir Bob Geldof, of The Boomtown Rats, who left Dun Laoghaire for London, became known for punchy hits and outspoken interviews, then creating Band Aid and Live Aid.
We also have Kelda Wood, who, in her mid twenties suffered a life changing injury and she has just become the first para athlete to row solo across the Atlantic.
Derrick Osaze is ‘the punching preacher’ – last year he became Ultimate Boxxer III middleweight champion and was ordained as a minister. He joins us.
Mary Wood, on her experience as a police officer of looking after a foundling for 24 hours, 25 years ago.
And the inheritance tracks of Martina Cole who chooses Galway Bay, performed by Ruby Murray and Word on a Wing by David Bowie
And your thank yous.

Producer: Corinna Jones
Editor: Eleanor Garland


SAT 10:30 The Patch (m000gkrj)
Croxteth, Liverpool

The random postcode generator takes us to Croxteth; a place with a reputation for gangs, shootings and violence.

Yet in the heart of L114 is a vibrant community centre providing a lifeline to residents. Over the course of one day, we hear the joyous, heartbreaking and brave stories of those who pass through Family Matters. This is the story of a community determined to contradict the negative news cycle.

Producer: Eliza Lomas
Exec Producer: Jolyon Jenkins


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m000gnwg)
Paul Waugh of the Huffington Post looks back at a sombre week in Westminster, dominated by the coronavirus crisis. He is joined by senior MPs Robert Halfon and Margaret Beckett to discuss the government's handling of events, including the changes to public advice and the emergency legislation presented to parliament.
Historian and author Sir Anthony Seldon discusses the scale of the challenge facing the British state with Alex Thomas from the Institute for Government.
And biographer Andrew Gimson and Sophie Pedder of the Economist discuss the different styles of leadership of Boris Johnson and Emmanuel Macron in the face of the crisis.
Editor: Leala Padmanabhan


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m000gkrl)
Italy's Invisible Enemy

Italy marked a grim milestone at the end of this week as its number of deaths from the coronavirus exceeded those in China. Yet most Italians are supportive of the country's struggling authorities says Mark Lowen who has covered the crisis from its outset.

Across the world ten of millions of people are having to adapt their way of life to avoid infection. Fergal Keane has spent decades reporting on conflicts and natural disasters across the globe. He reflects on what it means to be caught up in the universal war against a potentially fatal disease.

In New York all non-essential businesses have been ordered to close. For the army of low paid workers and small business owners in particular, this is an exceptionally difficult time says Laura Trevelyan.

Young men and women looking for love often turn to their phone and swipe through a gallery of faces. But the leaders of the Indonesia's anti-dating movement say casual relationships are expensive, get in the way of study, and go against religious teaching. Josephine Casserly met a pair of newly weds who have made not dating cool.

In these days of self-isolation and working from home, many turn to the comforting familiarity of favourite books – and memories of where we first encountered them. Forty years ago Kevin Connolly fell for a largely forgotten thriller. His love was rekindled by a recent trip to the Bulgarian capital, Sofia.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m000gkrn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m000gkrq)
The Coronavirus Effect

Money Box unpicks the Chancellor's announcement on support for wages and rents.

Investments have taken a massive hit over the last few weeks as the stock market has dived. We speak to one Money Box listener who thought his fund, which was nearing maturity, had been moved to a 'safer' account - only to discover it hadn't.

And the latest fraud statistics show that in 2019 fraud increased by 45%. We speak to Katy Worobec, Managing Director of Economic Crime at UK Finance, the collective voice of the banking industry.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Reporter: Dan Whitworth
Researcher: Darin Graham
Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Emma Rippon


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (m000gc5k)
Series 56

Episode 3

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present the week via topical sketches and chat, we don't have an audience but we do have stand-ups Rosie Jones and Andy Zaltzman (who will probably sit down for this one) and Gemma Arrowsmith. Caution: May contain humorous content about the Coronavirus.

Written by the cast, with additional material from Gareth Gwynn, Katie Storey, Charlie Dinkin and Mo Omar.

Producer: Julia McKenzie

A BBC Studios Production


SAT 12:57 Weather (m000gkrs)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News (m000gkrv)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m000gc5r)
Bim Afolami, Nick Chater, Tina McKenzie, Emily Thornberry

Chris Mason presents political debate from Broadcasting House with a panel including: Conservative MP Bim Afolami; professor of behavioural science, Nick Chater; Labour MP Emily Thornberry; Tina McKenzie, Northern Ireland policy chair of the Federation of Small Businesses


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m000gkrx)
Coronavirus

Coronavirus - What do you make of government measures this week? Are you affected by the cancellation of exams? What are your thoughts on panic buying?

Presenter: Anita Anand
Producer: Dianne McGregor


SAT 14:45 One to One (m000f5g1)
Lady Hale and Elsie Owusu on architecture & justice

Architect Elsie Owusu discusses the refurbishment of the Supreme Court building with Lady Hale.

The creation of the Supreme Court in 2009 was a defining moment in UK legal history. And in architectural history, too. It was decided to refurbish the century-old Middlesex Guildhall which stands in London's Parliament Square. At the time it housed seven Crown Courts and was, according to Lady Hale, 'cluttered and gloomy'. Lady Hale, who has recently retired as the first female President of the Supreme Court, was involved in the renovation process, and worked alongside Elsie Owusu who was one of the architects. Just over 10 years on, they get together to discuss what they wanted to achieve: a building of 'light and transparency' which would mirror the aims of the Supreme Court itself.

Producer: Karen Gregor


SAT 15:00 Drama (b0bcg1sw)
To the Ends of the Earth: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

by Jules Verne, dramatised by Gregory Evans

Jules Verne's science fiction classic brought vividly to life in this thrilling, fast-moving dramatisation, featuring the mysterious Captain Nemo and a ferocious giant squid.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m000gkrz)
Glenda Jackson; Tantrums; Women, decision-making and Covid-19

Glenda Jackson tells us about her latest work playing the poet, writer and critic Edith Sitwell and what books she would recommend during a period of isolation.

The Former Home Secretary Amber Rudd discusses why women need to be more involved in Covid 19 decision making with Caroline Criado Perez author of Invisible Women and Simone Schnall from Jesus College Cambridge.

The curator, writer and lecturer Bolanle Tajudeen tells us how black feminism has influenced the work of black female fine artists.

Last week’s budget saw a series of big public spending and investment projects announced, focusing on physical infrastructure. But what about social infrastructure? Diane Elson of the Women’s Budget Group and Caroline Abrahams of Age UK discuss.

The Scottish Government is currently consulting on a Bill to reform the Gender Recognition act – should transgender people be allowed to self-declare their gender or should it be a medicalised process? Rhona Hotchkiss a former governor of Cornton Vale prison in Stirling and James Morten of the Scottish Trans Alliance discuss

Why do some children have such ferocious tantrums and how should you as a parent deal with it? We hear from Emily Jones a Professor of infant neurodevelopment and autism at the Birkbeck Babylab.

Presented by: Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Lucinda Montefiore


SAT 17:00 PM (m000gks1)
Luke Jones with full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (m000gbjv)
Bonuses and Incentives

Bonuses, tips, profit share? What is the best way to incentivise your staff? Evan Davis and guests discuss

GUESTS

Kate Griffiths-Lambeth, HR Director, Charles Stanley Wealth Management

Ed Reeves, Co-Founder, Moneypenny

Martin Tiplady, Managing Director, Chameleon People Solutions Ltd.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000gks4)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m000gks6)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000gks8)
Private hospitals and their staff are to be made available to the NHS in England as part of a major new deal to boost the fight against coronavirus


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m000gksb)
Anneka Rice, Sebastian Barry, Conrad Murray, Niamh Algar, Yazmin Lacey, Ariel Sharratt & Mathias Kom, Scottee, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Scottee are joined by Anneka Rice, Conrad Murray, Sebastian Barry and Niamh Algar for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Yazmin Lacey, and Ariel Sharratt & Mathias Kom


SAT 19:00 Profile (m000gksd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (m000gksg)
The Nest, The Truth, The Bass Rock, Cranach at Compton Verney and Home Entertainment Recommendations

The Nest is the new Sunday night drama on BBC1 that raises questions around the ethics of surrogacy as a wealthy couple invite a young woman whose past is not known to them into their lives.
The Truth is a French/Japanese production directed by Hirokazu Kore-eda who won the Palme d'Or at Cannes in 2018 for his film Shoplifters. It stars Catherine Deneuve and Juliette Binoche in the story of an ageing actress who publishes her memoirs and is confronted by her daughter.
Evie Wyld was named as one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists in 2013. Her new novel, The Bass Rock, tells the story of three generations of women whose fates are linked.
Two exhibitions at Compton Verney that have sadly had to close because of coronavirus are kept alive by our critics: Cranach: Artist and Innovator and Fabric: Touch and Identity.
And we suggest some culture that might already be on your shelves or on a screen near you to enjoy if you're stuck indoors.
Tom Sutcliffe's guests this week are Charlotte Mullins, Bob and Roberta Smith and Laurence Scott.

Podcast Extra recommendations
Bob: Paul Klee, On Modern Art
Certain Blacks, album by The Art Ensemble of Chicago
The Letters of Van Gogh

Charlotte: The Gallery of Lost Art - as she explains, what's left of it can be found at galleryoflostart.com and via Tate website
The West Wing

Laurence: Star Trek: the Next Generation, all 7 seasons

Tom: Contagion and, as always, Call My Agent

Presenter: Tom Sutcliffe
Producer: Sarah Johnson

Image: Emily (SOPHIE RUNDLE) in The Nest
Credit: Mark Mainz / Studio Lambert / BBC


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m000gksj)
Lights, Camera, Inaction: An Existential Guide to the Movies

From Woody Allen to the Truman Show via Groundhog Day and Taxi Driver; Matthew Sweet examines the many and varied ways that cinema communicates existentialist ideas. Both in ways we expect and in ways that we don't (step forward Bridget Jones).

Cinema is very good at explaining Existentialism and capturing its various moods and feelings; but its deeper than that. The language of existentialism with its heroes, choices and crises sounds suspiciously like the language of screenwriting. They are, after all, both ways of trying to create meaning and narrative out of nothing. The blank page that confronts a screenwriter confronts all of us as we decide how to live. As Jean Paul Sartre, Simone De Beauvoir and Albert Camus would tell us - the blank page is us; the film of our lives is waiting to be made.

Films included in the program:

The Music Box (1932) directed by James Parrott, produced by Hal Roach

Groundhog Day (1993) directed by Harold Ramis; produced by Harold Ramis and ‎Trevor Albert

Play it Again Sam ((19792) directed by Herbert Poss; produced by Arthur P Jacobs.

Love and Death (1975) directed by Woody Allen; produced by Charles H Joffe

Bridget Jones Diary (2001) directed by Sharon Maguire; Produced by Tim Bevan, Jonathan Cavendish and Eric Fellner.

Taxi Driver (1976) directed by Martin Scorsese; produced By Michael Phillips and Julia Phillips.

Casablanca (1943) directed by Michael Curtiz; produced by Hal B. Wallis

The Rebel (1961) directed by Robert Day; produced by W.A Whittaker

The Truman Show (1998) directed by Peter Wier; produced by Scott Rudin, Andrew Niccol, Edward S. Feldman, Adam Schroeder.


SAT 21:00 Day Release (b075qjfp)
Safe Space

by Peter Jukes

Lenny Henry plays Frank Watt, who is getting ready to face life on the outside after 30 years in prison. Frank is looking forward to coming out, but things have changed a lot in 30 years and he’s institutionalised. He quite likes his bookish, monk-like life inside and the anger he was boiling over with when he went to prison is down to a manageable simmer. Frank has already had a few days out on day release and it was full on; almost unbearably intense compared to the quiet order of his cell.

Frank Watt ..... Lenny Henry
Geoff Hoagland ..... Ralph Ineson
Shudi Misir ..... Deeivya Meir
Haani Said ..... Danny Rahim
Barry Gibbons ..... Sargon Yelda
Solomon Dunn ..... Burt Caesar
Eileen O’Connor ..... Scarlett Brookes

Director ..... Mary Peate


SAT 21:45 Annika Stranded (m000700y)
Series 5

Convalescence

Eight new cases to challenge the detective wit of Chief Inspector Annika Strandhed, queen of the Oslo Police boat patrol.

Annika is still coming to terms with the death of her friend and long-time, long suffering forensic photographer Mikel. But life goes on, and so does police work on the Oslofjord. Annika must forge a new relationship with Mikel’s young replacement, Sigrid.

Episode 6: Convalescence
Recovering in hospital from a gunshot wound, Annika involves herself with a suspicious death on the ward.

Nick Walker is the author of two critically-acclaimed novels, Blackbox and Helloland. His plays and short stories have often featured on BBC Radio 4 - including the First King of Mars stories (2007 - 2010) and the plays Life Coach (2010) and Stormchasers (2012). The previous series of Annika Stranded were broadcast in 2013, 2014, 2016 and 2018.

Writer: Nick Walker
Reader: Nicola Walker
Sound Design: Jon Calver
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (m000gksl)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (m000gbgg)
Danger and Opportunity?

The coronavirus pandemic has given the world a smack in the face. Sporting events have been cancelled, national borders have closed, jobs and livelihoods hang in the balance, the over-seventies will soon be asked to self-isolate and families are having difficult conversations about whether grandparents can be allowed to see their grandchildren. It’s life, but not as we know it. A cynical politician once said that you should never let a serious crisis go to waste, and pundits are already suggesting that we now have an opportunity to re-think society. After all, in Chinese, the word for crisis is often interpreted as signifying both "danger" and "opportunity". Is it time to make changes that would not have been feasible without an existential threat hanging over us? Could we, for example, strengthen global partnerships, accelerate the shift to sustainable energy, think about a universal basic income or forge a new sense of community? Such ‘politicisation’ of the problem is appalling to those who just want to get through this ordeal and return to normal; they say it’s much too soon to conclude that free market liberal democracy has failed the stress-test. They are sure that, if we do the right things to protect the most vulnerable, it will soon be business as usual. Yet history shows that a major crisis can be a catalyst for crucial changes. Talk of re-purposing hotels as make-shift hospitals and manufacturing plants to make ventilators, invites comparisons with the Second World War, which gave us the welfare state as we know it today. We won’t get through the corona crisis without ceding a lot of our individual autonomy to the state, but is that an opportunity for greater collectivism in the future - or a danger to liberty? With Rachel Cunliffe, Laura Perrins, Rabbi Lord Sacks and Dr Jamie Whyte.

Producer: Dan Tierney.


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (m000gcwc)
Programme 10, 2020

(10/12)
Freya McClements and Paddy Duffy of Northern Ireland meet the Scots Val McDermid and Alan McCredie, for their last clash of the current series - with both sides needing a victory to shore up their position in the league table this year. Tom Sutcliffe asks the cryptic questions, and deducts points each time he has to rescue them from a blind alley or steer them round a red herring.

A knowledge of Pixar animation, European prog rock, the history of the Norman Conquest and Rodgers & Hammerstein musicals could prove useful to the panellists, as could an ability to spell.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 Conversations on a Bench (m000gd7s)
Ilford

Anna Scott-Brown hears more stories from the people who stop to sit beside her on benches around the country.

In this edition, she sits on a bench in Ilford. Throughout the programme, a specially commissioned work by the poet Hussain Manawer draws on the voices of those passing by – and sometimes pausing on – the bench beside Valentines Mansion in Valentines Park.

It creates a portrait of a diverse London borough built on farmland, and the constant flow of people arriving and moving on. From the first white middle class residents to the Jews and people of the Windrush generation, arrivals from Asia and latterly Somali - immigrants and refugees.

Memories from childhoods in the park, and ones that go back to the Partition of India and Pakistan, illustrate the power of place and belonging and some of the barriers to full integration.

We hear the story of an abusive marriage against the background of the murder of sex-worker Marianna Popper on Ilford Lane, and of a young woman who counts members of the drugs gangs as her "family", but who has escaped.

Rising crime is pushing some people out, and the bench is dedicated to Levi Miller who took his own life. But what we learn from Ilford is that, if the same energy that depresses you can be used for living life, life can be different.

Hidden lives are revealed and common threads recur as Anna’s gentle but insistent, and sometimes extremely direct, questions elicit poignant and profound responses from those sitting on the bench.

An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4



SUNDAY 22 MARCH 2020

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m000gksn)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:30 Tips for the Barmaid, by Claire Powell (b0788bc8)
A 40-something single mum works behind the bar at the local sports club. The members of the veterans football team are her favourites, and one player in particular. What starts as smiles across the bar turns into something more.

Read by Lorraine Ashbourne.

Claire Powell was born and brought up in south-east London. She graduated from UEA's Creative Writing (Prose) MA in 2012, where she received the year's highest mark for a dissertation, and was awarded the Malcolm Bradbury Memorial Bursary and Malcolm Bradbury Continuation Grant. Her first radio story, Marathon, appeared as part of The Time Being (Series 6) in 2013.

Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000gksq)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000gkss)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000gksv)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m000gksx)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m000gksz)
The Church of St Michael, Southampton, Hampshire

Bells on Sunday comes from the Church of St Michael, Southampton, Hampshire. The eight heaviest bells were cast by the Croydon foundry of Gillett and Johnson in 1923. In 1940, Holy Rood Church - like many other buildings in Southampton - was destroyed by enemy bombing. Some of the metal salvaged from the ring of eight was used to cast two trebles by John Taylor of Loughborough and installed in 1948. The Tenor cast by Lester and Pack in 1758 weighs sixteen and a quarter hundredweight and is tuned to E. We hear them ringing Spliced Bristol and London Number 3 Surprise Royal.


SUN 05:45 Lent Talks (m000gbgj)
Anthony Reddie - Identity and Race

Lent Talks is a personal perspective on an aspect of the story leading up to Easter. This year’s theme is identity – losing and gaining identity; struggling with identity; accepting and owning identity. Anthony Reddie reflects on his journey of identity as a Black theologian and activist.

Producer: Dan Tierney.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (m000gm7z)
The latest national and international news headlines.


SUN 06:05 Reflection on Mothering Sunday (m000gzmb)
On Mothering Sunday, Dr Ruth Valerio looks to the cosmos, reflecting on how we care for the environment and nurture the natural world. She reflects on this in the context of the current global crisis with the Revd Prebendary Dr Isabelle Hamley who is chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury. Producer Andrew Earis.

Poems
It felt love – Hafiz, trans by Daniel Ladinsky
Primary Wonder – Denise Levertov
How surely gravity’s law – Rainer Maria Rilke
For Loneliness – John I’Donohue

Music

1. Norfolk Rhapsody No. 1 in E minor - Ralph Vaughan Williams
The New Queen's Hall Orchestra
CD: Vaughan Williams - Orchestral Works (Decca)

2. Seek him that maketh the seven stars - Jonathan Dove
Tenebrae
CD: Mother and Child (Signum)

3. Sospiri - Edward Elgar
Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields
CD: Adagio! Classics for Relaxation (Decca)

4. Peace - Paui Mealor
Tenebrae
CD: I saw eternity - Paul Mealor (Decca)

5. Morning has broken
Cat Stevens
CD: The very best of Cat Stevens (Universal)

6. Gabriel's Oboe (from 'The Mission') - Ennio Morricone
Yo-Yo Ma
CD: Yo-Yo Ma plays Ennio Morricone (Sony)


SUN 06:35 Living World (m000gm81)
My Living World

Woodcock

Wildlife filmmaker Hannah Stitfall and wildlife film researcher Dom Davies enjoy a close encounter with one of our most mysterious birds, the woodcock, when they review another selection from the LIVING WORLD archive. The woodcock is a wader which spends most of its life in woodland where its wonderful mottled plumage makes it very hard to see, especially as they are nocturnal so most active at night. The population swells in winter when over a million more migrate here from Scandinavia and Russia in search of earthworms and insects which they probe from the ground with their long bills. Hannah and Dom also discuss another remarkable feature of these birds which is their strange roding flight call. Producer Sarah Blunt.


SUN 06:57 Weather (m000gm83)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m000gm85)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m000gm87)
Response of Religions to Coronavirus; Worship Online; Mothing Sunday

The landscape for all faith communities has changed dramatically this week. The doors to churches, mosques, temples and cathedrals closed as communities do their bit to try and keep worshipers safe and reduce the spread of the coronavirus. But keeping those communities together and supporting them through a time of national crisis is proving to be challenging. Joining Edward Stourton to discuss how their faith communities are navigating the current crisis are the Rev Prof Gina Radford - a former Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England, Imam Abid Khan from the Cheadle Mosque and Community Centre in Manchester and Rabbi Laura Janner-Klausner - Senior Rabbi to Reform Judaism.

The main solution for many religions to the temporary closure of worship spaces, has been to start broadcasting services, prayers and devotional messages online. Sophia Smith-Galer has been taking a look at religion in the digital age and this week she took part in virtual reality Christian service in which the pastor was in the United States and the congregation was spread out all over the world.

Today will be a very different Mothering Sunday as many families will be unable to get together. So, The Mother’s Union is stepping up to support members who will be in insolation this Sunday because of the coronavirus. Their Chief Executive - Beverley Jullien - joins William to discuss some of the suggested activities that her organisation has come up with.

Producers:
Helen Lee
Louise Clarke-Rowbotham

Editor:
Amanda Hancox


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m000glnp)
Motor Neurone Disease Association

Matthew Bannister makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Motor Neurone Disease Association.

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Motor Neurone Disease Association’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘Motor Neurone Disease Association’.
- You can donate online at bbc.co.uk/appeal/radio4

Registered Charity Number: 294354


SUN 07:57 Weather (m000gm89)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m000gm8c)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m000gm8f)
The Archbishop of Canterbury from Lambeth Palace

For Mothering Sunday the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, reflects on this troubling time for our nation and the world in this service recorded in the Chapel of Lambeth Palace. The service is led by his chaplain, the Revd Prebendary Dr Isabelle Hamley, with music by St Martin's Voices. The producer is Andrew Earis.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m000gc5t)
Cause for Hope

"I have come to think of the virus as that monster from the ancient Norse legend of Beowulf, Grendel," writes Michael Morpurgo. "He's out there now, threatening my home, my village, my family and friends".

Michael talks about what it feels like to be hunkered down in his little cottage in Devon - waiting for coronavirus to pass.

Recorded by Hamish Marshall from Radio Devon.

Produced by Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b09tdr0p)
Chris Baines on the Goldcrest

In another of his TWEETS about the birds which visit his 'wildlife-friendly' garden, naturalist and environmentalist Chris Baines revels in the sight of tiny Goldcrests teasing out insects from between the needles of his much maligned Leyland cypress trees.
Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Sarah Blunt
Photograph: Jez Taylor.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m000gm8h)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m000gm8k)
Writer, Adrian Flynn
Director, Jessica Bunch
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Jill Archer..... Patricia Greene
Ben Archer..... Ben Norris
Kenton Archer.... Richard Attlee
Jolene Archer.... Buffy Davis
Brian Aldridge.... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge.... Angela Piper
Phoebe Aldridge.... Lucy Morris
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Harrison Burns .... James Cartwright
Emma Grundy ….. Emerald O'Hanrahan
Ed Grundy ….. Barry Farrimond
Alistair Lloyd ..... Michael Lumsden
Adam Macy .... Andrew Wincott
Kirsty Miller ….. Annabelle Dowler
Elizabeth Pargetter ….. Alison Dowling
Freddie Pargetter ….. Toby Laurence
Robert Snell ….. Graham Blockey
Oliver Sterling ….. Michael Cochrane
Roy Tucker ….. Ian Pepperell
Philip Moss ….. Andy Hockley
Gavin Moss ..... Gareth Pierce
Doctor ….. Jessica Turner


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (m000gm8m)
Dame Helena Morrissey, financier and campaigner

Dame Helena Morrissey is a former City fund manager and chief executive of a major investment company, who has also campaigned to boost the number of women in the boardroom. Newspapers regularly describe her as 'Superwoman', because alongside her many professional achievements, she's the mother of nine children.

Helena Morrissey is the daughter of two teachers, and her drive was evident from an early age. She was - by her own admission - a 'manic Brownie', striving to gain the maximum number of badges, and she also played the piano to a high standard. She won a place at Cambridge University from her comprehensive school in Chichester, and on graduating, joined an asset management company in their New York office. On her return to London, she felt that she was denied promotion because she had a young baby.

She moved to Newton Investment Management, and at the age of 35 she was appointed the CEO - a role she was not expecting to take. Under her leadership, the company's assets grew from £20 billion to £50 billion. In 2010 she established the 30% Club, campaigning for better female representation on the boards of British companies, and in 2017 she received a DBE for services to diversity in the financial sector.

She lives in London with her husband Richard, who gave up full time work to look after their many children.

DISC ONE: My Sweet Lord by George Harrison
DISC TWO: Polonaise in A Flat, Op. 53, Heroic, composed by Frédéric François Chopin and performed by Arthur Rubenstein
DISC THREE: We've Only Just Begun by The Carpenters
DISC FOUR: Being Boring by Pet Shop Boys
DISC FIVE: Moon River by Audrey Hepburn
DISC SIX: Calm Down by The Clementines
DISC SEVEN: Condolence by Benjamin Clementine
DISC EIGHT: God Is by Kanye West

BOOK CHOICE: Much Obliged, Jeeves by P. G .Wodehouse
LUXURY ITEM: A grand piano
CASTAWAY'S FAVOURITE: My Sweet Lord by George Harrison

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Cathy Drysdale


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m000gm8p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Nature Table (m000gcwr)
Series 1

Episode 6

Nature Table is comedian, broadcaster and writer Sue Perkins’ new comedy ‘Show & Tell’ series celebrating the natural world and all it’s funny eccentricities.

Taking the simple format of a ‘Show & Tell’, each episode Sue is joined by celebrity guests from the worlds of comedy and natural history. Each of the natural history guests brings an item linked to the wild world to share with the audience, be it an amazing fact or funny personal anecdote. Each item is a springboard for an enlightening and funny discussion, alongside fun games and challenges revealing more astonishing facts. We also hear from some of the London Zoo audience, a mix of London Zoo staff and members of the public, as they bring us their own natural history ‘show and tells’ for Sue and the guests to discuss.

Nature Table has a simple clear brief: to positively celebrate and promote the importance of all our planet’s wonderfully wild flora and fauna in an fun and easily grasped way... whilst at the same time having a giggle.

Episode 6

Recorded at London Zoo, this week Sue Perkins is joined by special guests zoologist Lucy Cooke, crustacean expert Miranda Lowe and actress and writer Sally Phillips.

Written by: Catherine Brinkworth, Kat Sadler & Jon Hunter

Researcher: Catherine Beazley

Music by Ben Mirin. Additional sounds were provided by The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Produced by: Simon Nicholls

A BBC Studios Production


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m000gkvr)
Coronavirus and Food: Your Questions Answered

As the government updates its plans for coronavirus, Dan Saladino answers your food questions.


SUN 12:57 Weather (m000gm8s)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m000gm8v)
News with Jonny Dymond including how one large hospital is preparing for the pandemic plus how other nations are coping with the disease.


SUN 13:30 From Our Home Correspondent (m000gm8x)
Mishal Husain presents pieces by writers and journalists across the UK presenting portraits of life today.
Garry Owen of BBC Radio Cymru visits Llanelli and Hospital Notes - an amateur choir there comprising hospital and care workers and members of the emergency services. He discovers how its members de-compress at times of stress - when social distancing restrictions permit it - and what benefits they derive from singing together.
The writer, Damian Barr, author of the Radio 4 Books of the Week, "Maggie & Me" and "You Will Be Safe Here", takes us to north Lanarkshire and the South Downs in his quest for glow worms. His search is part journey of discovery and part self-revelation. Along the way, he explains the enduring appeal of these elusive insects at this - or, indeed - any time.
Andrew Green has journeyed around England in search of the special memorials which are stained glass windows in parish churches commemorating the Fallen of the Great War. From Cornwall to Suffolk, Leicestershire to Devon, he has been speaking with those entrusted with the care of both old and new windows and has heard why they matter so much to local communities.
The Edwardian bandstand in the West Yorkshire town of Todmorden is sadly neglected. But, as Andy Kershaw has been discovering, there are plans afoot from local campaigners to restore it. Might they, though, be defeated by local bureaucracy or will this rare structure come to enjoy a new lease of life over a hundred years after it first came into use?
And the poet and broadcaster, Ian McMillan, considers how we mark out our lives. For him, it's the regular visit to the same place for a ritual that’s barely altered over the decades. But if the location hasn’t changed the people certainly have…

Producer Simon Coates


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000gc53)
Wrest Park: Postbag Edition

Peter Gibbs and the team answer horticultural questions sent in by listeners.

Matthew Wilson, Pippa Greenwood and Christine Walkden advise on reviving an ailing Camellia, what to grow in a difficult patch of a garden, and the best time to replant a Cherry Tree.

Andrew Luke, the Head Gardener at Wrest Park, shows the team around the garden.

Producer: Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Rosie Merotra

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (m000gm8z)
Becky and Bill - Try being me for a day

Two strangers talk about their lives and dreams and their passion for the performing arts. Fi Glover presents the Sunday edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moments of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


SUN 15:00 The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter (m000gm91)
Part Two

Set in a small mill town in the 1930s in the middle of the Deep South of America, Carson McCullers' The Heart is a Lonely Hunter is the story of Mick Kelly, a tomboyish girl who loves music and dreams of buying a piano. John Singer, is a lonely deaf-mute who comes to stay as a lodger in Mick's house. No-one knows where he's from. A disparate group of people who live in the town are drawn towards Singer's kind, sympathetic nature. The owner of the café where Singer eats every day, an angry socialist drunkard, a frustrated black doctor: each pours their heart out to Singer, their silent confidant. He in turn changes their disenchanted lives in ways they could never imagine.

Often cited as one of the great novels of twentieth-century American fiction, Carson McCullers' prodigious first novel was published to instant acclaim when she was just twenty-three. The Heart is a Lonely Hunter explores loneliness, the human need for understanding and the search for love.

Part Two

MICK KELLY ..... Coco Green
BUBBER ..... Aaron Gelkoff
JOHN SINGER ..... David Bower
BIFF BRANNON ..... Michael S. Siegel
JAKE BLOUNT ..... Andonis Anthony
PORTIA JONES ..... Anna Jobarteh
DR BENEDICT COPELAND ..... Delroy Brown
ETTA KELLY ..... Lily Green
WILLIE COPELAND/Deputy Sheriff ..... Tachia Newall
HARRY MINOWITZ ..... Eric Sirakian

Dramatised by Amanda Dalton
Directed by Susan Roberts
A BBC Drama North Production


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m000glnr)
Petina Gappah

Mariella Frostrup talk to Zimbabwean author Petina Gappah about her latest novel, Out of Darkness, Shining Light. A book that takes a fictional look at the life of explorer Dr David Livingstone.

As daily travel becomes more difficult reading will have to be a substiture for our frustrated wanderlust. The Wilbur Smith Adventure Writing Prize celebrates the best adventure novels of the year. Writer Henry Porter was last year's winner and also a judge at this year's awards. He talks about the allure of adventure writing and the importance of fictional journeys.

As part of the BBC's 100 Novels that shaped the world, writer Patrick Flanery hones his gaze on Ernest Hemmingway's Spanish Civil War novel, For Whom the Bell Tolls.


SUN 16:30 Four Seasons (m000gm93)
Poems for the Spring Equinox

A chance to hear all of the poems broadcast on Friday as part of Four Seasons day of poetry celebrating the Spring Equinox

Putting In The Seed by Robert Frost read by Anton Lesser began the day on Farming Today.
Christopher Eccleston read A Northern Morning by Alistair Elliot
Menna Elfyn was the guest poet on Woman's Hour reading her poems Growth Rings and Teaching Dylan Thomas' Muse To Speak Welsh
Manchester poet Louise Wallwein wrote and read her specially commissioned poem Equinox on Front Row
City Lilacs by Helen Dunmore was read by Tanya Moodie
Richard Harrington read Late March by Richard Schiffman
Instructions on Not Giving Up by Ada Limόn read by Tanya Moodie
Snail by Thom Gunn read by Anton Lesser
Begin by Brendan Kennelly read by Richard Harrington
A Little Madness in the Spring by Emily Dickinson read by Siobhan Redmond
RS Thomas’ A Blackbird Singing read by Simon Russell Beale
In Praise of Spring by Linda Gregg read by Richard Harrington
May by Kerry Hardie read by Tanya Moodie
Sixty by Philip Booth read by Anton Lesser

Producer: Maggie Ayre

‘Instructions on not giving up’ by Ada Limόn from ‘The Carrying’ published by Milkweed Editions.
‘Late March’ by Richard Schiffman was first published by Grey Sparrow Press and is available in the collection ‘What the Dust Doesn’t Know’ by Salmon Poetry.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m000gd0r)
Critical Condition: Allegations of failings at Great Ormond Street

Great Ormond Street Hospital in London has a global reputation for providing outstanding care to children with the most complex medical conditions who need expert help.
The hospital, known as GOSH, boasts more specialist services for children under one roof than any other and employs some of the country's leading doctors to staff them.
The vast majority of the 43,000 children who stay at GOSH every year receive care which befits its reputation.
But when things go wrong, is the hospital being transparent about its failings and does it do everything it can to prevent mistakes being repeated?
When serious mistakes happen hospitals are duty-bound to launch serious incident investigations to understand what exactly happened and report them to external bodies.
But File on 4 investigates claims that in some cases the hospital has failed to declare serious incidents despite evidence of harm.
Reporter Michael Buchanan began investigating how the hospital deals with errors after attending the inquest of 14-year-old Amy Allan, from North Ayrshire, who died following elective back surgery.
Michael returns to Scotland six months later to investigate how the hospital responded to Amy's death and meets other families who say they cannot get the answers they're seeking.

Producer: Ben Robinson
Reporter: Michael Buchanan
Editor: Carl Johnston


SUN 17:40 Profile (m000gksd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000gm97)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m000gm9c)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000gm9h)
Boris Johnson says the government will act if people ignore coronavirus advice


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m000gm9n)
Lindsey Chapman

In times of trouble and uncertainty we turn to the radio for companionship and escape, so come with us on a precarious ride on a cable car pursued by a disgruntled accountant, join Anneka Rice in a hunt for her missing waxwork head, journey along the interplanetary superhighway in search of aliens, probably, the size of polar bears, while Mark Watson continues his quest to make sense of life. We seek out the space between stories to find a more unified relationship with our world, and the people in it, with Charles Eisenstein and Michael Morpurgo, and meet a beat-boxing Monk in Japan. And we rejoice to know that in these days, the spring always comes finally.

Presenter: Lindsey Chapman
Producer: Cecile Wright


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m000gkvk)
Kirsty wants Philip to take a break from agonising about the Grey Gables explosion but Philip has too much on his mind. Kirsty reminds him that he is a good man. She gets him out for a walk and suggests coming into the health club for a free massage. Gavin calls and annoyed Kirsty storms off. Philip hears that the police are interviewing Blake. He tells Gavin to sit tight until he gets there.

Phoebe tells Pip that Roy’s suffering with concussion and is under strict instructions to rest. While they discuss fencing for the boundary of their rewilding land, Justin unexpectedly joins them. He looks at their estimates and reckons he can get a better deal with the buying power of Borchester Land. Pip feels patronised but Phoebe tries to get her to see the positive.

Gavin is worried Blake won’t stick to the lines they’ve given him under police questioning. Philip admonishes Gavin again for supplying petrol to clean the Grey Gables kitchen floor. The police leave and Philip insists on going to see Blake without Gavin but a nurse turns him away. Gavin thinks Philip should demand to see Blake. Philip marches him out of the hospital and tells him to stay with his mum – he’s too much of a liability to have around at the moment. From now on they’re going to handle the situation Philip’s way.


SUN 19:15 Reluctant Persuaders (m0000xrp)
Series 3

The Appliance of Science

Hardacre’s ad agency are pitching to the University of Oxfordshire, an online-only institution dedicated to internet learning. Their efforts are complicated by the arrival at the agency of Elgin Hardacre (James Northcote), hired by his father (Nigel Havers) as a copywriter – despite having no relevant skills or experience.

While Hardacre shows no interest in his son and Amanda (Josie Lawrence) dismisses him as an idiot and resolves to fire him by the end of the week, Joe (Mathew Baynton) and Teddy (Rasmus Hardiker) take pity on Elgin and take him under their wing. In the process, they discover that however bad Hardacre might be as a boss, he’s infinitely worse as a father – and Elgin in turn reveals some peculiar beliefs.

Cast:
Hardacre....................................Nigel Havers
Joe...............................................Mathew Baynton
Amanda.....................................Josie Lawrence
Teddy.........................................Rasmus Hardiker
Laura..........................................Olivia Nixon
Elgin...........................................James Northcote

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 19:45 New Irish Writing (b03xgsw6)
Tickles

A series of new readings by some of Ireland's most exciting and talented writers. Clare Dwyer-Hogg, Michèle Forbes, Paul McVeigh and Martin Meenan bring us a range of stories where human emotions are tested, and memories are forged, forgotten or found, all the while taking a humorous and poignant look at how people withdraw, connect and reconnect with one another throughout the course of their lives.
In 'Tickles' by Paul McVeigh a son visiting his mother who is suffering from dementia, uncovers some long-lost memories and makes an unexpected connection. Read by Liam McMahon.

Writer Paul McVeigh
Reader Liam McMahon
Producer Heather Larmour.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (m000gc59)
In Feedback this week, the latest information on how the BBC is responding to the coronavirus crisis and making changes to its radio schedules.

Two listeners will venture well out of their comfort zones to listen to a very disturbing story on the World Service.

And is this the moment when slow radio comes into its own? The producer of Living National Treasures sings the praises of a sculptor’s chisel.

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Kate Dixon
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m000gc57)
Michel Roux, Sammy McCarthy, Lilian Mohin, Roy Hudd

Pictured: Michel Roux

Matthew Bannister on

Michel Roux, the French chef who, with his brother Albert, transformed the British restaurant scene in the 1970s

Sammy McCarthy, the British featherweight champion boxer who became an armed robber.

Lilian Mohin, the lesbian feminist activist who co founded the OnlyWomen Press.

Roy Hudd, the versatile entertainer whose career took him from the music hall stage to TV and radio stardom.

Interviewed guest: William Sitwell
Interviewed guest: John McDonald
Interviewed guest: Anna Marslen -Wilson
Interviewed guest: Tim Mohin
Producer: Neil George


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m000gkrq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m000glnp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (m000gcx0)
Command and Control?

When Sajid Javid resigned as Chancellor of the Exchequer in February rather than accept Boris Johnson's reported demand that he dismiss his own team of special advisers and accept a new one drawn up in 10 Downing Street, many saw the episode as a crude attempt by the Prime Minister to wrest control of economic policy from the Treasury. But would such a reform necessarily be a bad thing?

Edward Stourton considers the case for economic policy being driven from the very top of government. If decision-making, in arguably the most important government department, took place on the prime minister's terms rather than having to be negotiated with a powerful colleague leading a vast bureaucracy, would that make for quicker and more streamlined decision-making that gave clearer direction to the government overall? And has in any case the time come to clip the wings of the Treasury which too often determines policy on narrowly financial grounds rather than properly allowing for the potential benefits of government spending - and which has recently signed off such alarmingly over-budget projects as HS2 and London's Crossrail?

In seeking answers to those questions, Edward speaks to the former Chancellors, Alistair Darling and Norman Lamont; to former Chief of Staff to Tony Blair in Downing Street, Jonathan Powell; to former Treasury minister, David Gauke; and and to ex-officials, including former top Treasury civil servant, Nic Macpherson.

Producer Simon Coates


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m000gm9v)
Tonights guests are Andrew Bowie MP, vice chair, Conservative party; Liz Kendall MP, Labour; and Jasmine Whitbread, chief executive of London First. With columnist Sebastian Payne, Financial Times.


SUN 23:00 The Moth Radio Hour (b0b89kd4)
Series 7

In the Name of Love

True stories told live in in the USA: Meg Bowles introduces stories that celebrate things we do in the name of love.

The Moth is an acclaimed not-for-profit organisation dedicated to the art and craft of storytelling based in the USA. Since 1997, it has celebrated both the raconteur and the storytelling novice, who has lived through something extraordinary and yearns to share it. Originally formed by the writer George Dawes Green as an intimate gathering of friends on a porch in Georgia (where moths would flutter in through a hole in the screen), and then recreated in a New York City living room, The Moth quickly grew to produce immensely popular events at theatres and clubs around New York City and later around the USA, the UK and other parts of the world.

The Moth has presented more than 15,000 stories, told live and without notes, to standing-room-only crowds worldwide. The Moth podcast is downloaded over 27 million times a year.

Featuring true stories told live on stage without scripts, from the humorous to the heart-breaking.

The Moth Radio Hour is produced by Jay Allison and Atlantic Public Media in Woods Hole, Massachusetts and is distributed by the Public Radio Exchange.


SUN 23:50 A Point of View (m000gc5t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:48 today]



MONDAY 23 MARCH 2020

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m000gmb2)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b09ghmgd)
Politics and Emotion

A revolution in feeling: How the Enlightenment forged our understanding of human emotion and the ways in which this relates to the contemporary political world. Laurie Taylor talks to the literary historian, Rachel Hewitt; Russell Foster, political scientist at King's College London; and to Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, Director, Research Development and Environment, Cardiff School of Journalism, Cardiff University. Revised repeat.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m000gksz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000gmb6)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000gmbb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000gmbd)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m000gmbg)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000gmbj)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Father Jim O'Keefe


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m000gmbl)
23/03/20 Milk supplies and coronavirus; farm tourism and Covid19; conserving Shire horses.

As panic buying empties the supermarket shelves, we talk to two big dairies. Arla says its producing record amounts and can barely keep up with demand. Freshways has seen nearly all its demand dry up as airlines, pubs and restauants close. It's dropped the price it's paying farmers and is delaying their payments. Sybil Ruscoe asks the managing directors if they can co-operate to meet the demand?

As the coronavirus pandemic unfolds, we start the first in a series of audio diaries from rural communities. Caroline Millar describes how it's affecting the holiday lets on her farm in Scotland.

How a conservation centre in Yorkshire is helping to keep Shire horses alive and kicking. They're on the rare breed watchlist but Sledmere House has celebrated the birth on their first shire foal and is now expecting another.


MON 05:56 Weather (m000gmbn)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09tf2hj)
Chris Baines on the Song Thrush

In another of his TWEETS about the birds which are encouraged by his 'wildlife-friendly' garden, naturalist and environmentalist Chris Baines describes the wonderful song battles for territory and mates between Song Thrushes in his and his neighbours' gardens. His garden pond is also raided by these musical songsters for mud and wet leaves to line their nests.
Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Sarah Blunt
Photograph: Charles McKeddie.


MON 06:00 Today (m000gktw)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m000gkty)
Famous and Infamous

We think of our era as the age of celebrity. Billions of people follow the daily antics of the Kardashian family or the latest pop superstar. But celebrity obsession is centuries old, argues Horrible Histories writer Greg Jenner. He tells Tom Sutcliffe why we are captivated by famous - and infamous - figures, from the scandalous Lord Byron to the unwitting civilians who are hounded by paparazzi today.

The Italian Renaissance gave us the world's most famous images: the Mona Lisa, Botticelli's Venus and Michelangelo's David. But Catherine Fletcher argues that this era was far stranger, darker and more violent than we may realise. The real Mona Lisa was married to a slave-trader, and Leonardo da Vinci was revered for his weapon designs.

The artist Aubrey Beardsley shocked and delighted Victorian London with his drawings. A new exhibition at the Tate Britain, curated by Caroline Corbeau-Parsons, shows the range of Beardsley's black-and-white images. Some are magical, humorous, some sexual and grotesque; and together they helped Beardsley become so astonishingly famous that the 1890s were dubbed the 'Beardsley era', before he fell from grace, tainted by association with Oscar Wilde.

Producer: Hannah Sander


MON 09:45 Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash (m000gkww)
Ep 1 Heading Out to Sea

For twenty-two-year old Lamorna Ash Cornwall has always been an idyll, the place where her mother grew up, and where she spent her summer holidays. Now, Larmorna is travelling to the town of Newlyn, close to Land's End, with a view to finding out about its fishing community and its heritage. In today's episode, Lamorna is settling in and she sets out to secure a berth on a working trawler. The reader is Ell Potter.

Lamorna Ash is a writer and playwright. Dark, Salt, Clear is her first book.

Abridged by Julian Wilkinson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000gkv2)
Home Schooling, Reusable Products and Coronavirus

After school closures across the UK many parents will be at home trying to support their children do some school work whilst also working from home and 'social distancing' themselves. Are there lessons to be learned from those who already home educate?

Ten organisations across the UK including Rape Crisis and Ending Violence Against Women have issued a joint statement about the impact of Covid 19could have on the lives on women and children. Recent reports from China and Italy show an increase in domestic violence since the pandemic began. One Chinese province said reporting had increased threefold. Jane talks to Lucy Hadley Campaigns and Policy Manager for Women’s Aid about what action they would like to see taken.

We hear the story of Goli, an Afghan born refugee who used to live in Iran but is now settled in Denmark with her younger daughter Baran, now featured in Girl Taken, a Radio 4 series and podcast. In this Woman's Hour interview Goli talks about how her older daughter Bru came to be separated from her and the extraordinary lengths she has taken to see her again.

And with people reporting low stocks of nappies, sanitary products and other regular household items on supermarket shelves, we take a look at what reusable alternatives are available. Is this the time for cloth nappies to make a comeback? What about reusable sanitary protection? And what can vinegar, bicarb and beeswax do for you in the kitchen?
Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Beverley Purcell


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00qsw2h)
Absent

Separation

By Mark Davies Markham.

Tony, a self-employed electrician from Liverpool, has no idea that his wife of eleven years has had enough of him and wants him out of her and their children's lives for good.

Tony ...... Craige Els
Clare ...... Gillian Kearney
Nick ...... Robert Hitchmough
Aggy ...... Annabelle Dowler
Josh ...... Alfie Davies
Sean ...... Carl Prekopp

Directed by Claire Grove.


MON 11:00 The Battle for English (m000gkv4)
The English language has long been accustomed to global dominance. Once the language of Empire, it is now the language of business. politics, academia, technology and even popular culture and sport. Lexicographer Susie Dent leaves Countdown’s Dictionary Corner to investigate the global dominance of English in a rapidly changing world.

Teaching English as a second language is still a massive industry and Susie visits a college in London to find out why English is still the most popular language to learn. She also visits a primary school in Oxford where the curriculum includes Mandarin as an important global language of the future.

With an estimated 2.3 billion English speakers in the world, only one in five have spoken the language since birth. Susie explores the changes in the English used by non-native speakers including the development of technical versions in areas such as banking, science and technology, and the hybrid Englishes such as Hinglish when two languages come together.

Susie interviews leading linguists and academics including Professor David Crystal whose books include the Cambridge Encyclopedia of English and Nicholas Oster who predicts that English will eventually go the way of ancient lingua francas such as Latin, Greek, Persian. She hears from those who predict the main threats to English as the global lingua franca could be the rise of Mandarin across South East Asia and the dominance of Spanish in Latin America, as well as the use of machine translation.

Presenter: Susie Dent
Producer: Sara Parker and Louise Adamson
Executive Producer: Samir Shah
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m000gksb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m000gkxs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gkv9)
Episode 6: Rumours

Anton Lesser reads the long-awaited finale to Hilary Mantel's Booker-winning Thomas Cromwell series.

Summer 1536: Cromwell is fighting fires on all fronts – having just seen off the potentially disastrous betrothal of Henry’s niece, Margaret Douglas, rumours are now circulating about his intentions towards Mary, the king’s eldest daughter..

Writer: Hilary Mantel
Reader: Anton Lesser
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m000gkvc)
Shop closures, Restaurant staff, Coping with loneliness

We look at the possible closure of non-essential shops and whether this would include takeaways which were still trading in many parts of the UK over the weekend.
Pret already closed its shops on Saturday, this morning McDonald's announced that it's closing all 1,270 of its restaurants once today is done. Costa is closing and so is Nandos. We speak to Catherine Shuttleworth, the chief executive of the consultancy Savvy, about what counts as a non-essential shop under the current coronavirus restrictions.

We report on how the Coronavirus shutdown is having a massive impact on lots of sectors after cafes, pubs and restaurants and gyms were told on Friday night that they must close immediately. The government promised them help to carry on paying their staff. We speak to Brandon Stephens, the Chief Executive of Tortilla. It has 42 restaurants in the UK. It's shut five with the remainder now doing takeaways only.

With schools now shut for the foreseeable future, we have tips for parents on how to keep their children occupied and focussed. We hear from Elizabeth O'Shea, a parenting expert with advice for parents coping with poorly children at home, or just children who now have to stay off school.

After the first weekend of greater social distancing and older people, in particular, being advised to stay inside, our reporter, Samantha Fenwick, joins us live from one of the most deprived areas in the UK. She speaks to speaks to Rev Tracy Charnock, vicar at Holy Trinity Church in South Shore, in Blackpool where many people living there are older, a lot living alone. With religious services cancelled, clergy are worried about the people who rely on their worship communities for company and practical help.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Tara Holmes


MON 12:57 Weather (m000gkvf)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m000gkvh)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


MON 13:45 Girl Taken (m000glx7)
6. A Trap Is Set

BBC journalist Sue Mitchell and ex-soldier-turned- good-Samaritan Rob Lawrie thought they were involved in the heart-breaking, but straightforward story of an Afghan father and his motherless daughter as they struggled to get to Britain. The following four years saw Sue and Rob fall into a web of lies and life changing, mind changing events. Girl Taken is a 10 part hunt - across closed borders and broken promises - for the truth and to find a little girl, taken.

Producer: Sue Mitchell
Studio Production and Sound Design: Richard Hannaford


MON 14:00 The Archers (m000gkvk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 This Thing of Darkness (m000gkvm)
Part 5

Written by Anita Vettesse with monologues by Eileen Horne.

Dr Alex Bridges is an expert forensic psychiatrist, assessing and treating perpetrators of the most unthinkable crimes.
In this gripping drama, Alex charts the psychological impact of the murder of a young man on his family, and explores the long shadow of homicide through her therapy group for murderers.

Alex finds herself at an impasse with David. Elsewhere, things are beginning to unlock: Hannah makes a game-changing disclosure to Laura and in Group Frankie makes a break-through.

Cast:

Alex … Lolita Chakrabarti
Liam/Dougie … Simon Donaldson
Hannah … Jessica Hardwick
Tyler … Reuben Joseph
David … Robin Laing
Laura… Shauna Macdonald
Frankie … Brian Vernel

Series created by Audrey Gillan, Lucia Haynes, Eileen Horne, Gaynor Macfarlane, Anita Vettesse and Kirsty Williams.

Series consultant: Dr Gwen Adshead

Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane and Kirsty Williams

A BBC Scotland Production directed by Gaynor Macfarlane


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (m000gkvp)
Programme 11, 2020

(11/12)
Tom Sutcliffe welcomes the South of England and Midlands pairings for the last time in the current series. Victory for Marcus Berkmann and Paul Sinha of the South of England could give them an unassailable lead at this crucial stage in the season, while a win for Elizabeth-Jane Burnett and Stephen Maddock of the Midlands would secure them a solid mid-table finish.

Tom's questions cover as wide a spectrum of knowledge as ever, from Jason and the Argonauts to Snow Patrol. As so often, some of the most ingenious ideas come from RBQ listeners whose questions have poured into the programme office in the past few months. Tom will also have the solution to the teaser he left unanswered at the end of the previous edition.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m000gkvr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Only Artists (m000fvyg)
Series 10

Jess Gillam meets Gail Ann Dorsey

The saxophonist Jess Gillam meets the bass guitarist Gail Ann Dorsey.

In 2016 Jess Gillam became the first-ever saxophonist to reach the final of the BBC Young Musician competition, and in 2018 she was a soloist at the Last Night of the Proms. Her debut album Rise topped the UK classical charts. She also presents This Classical Life on BBC Radio 3.

Gail Ann Dorsey was a member of David Bowie’s band from 1995 until his death. She would often duet with him on stage, including taking the part originally performed by Freddie Mercury on Under Pressure. She has released three solo albums and has worked with a wide range of artists, including Tears for Fears, Boy George and Charlie Watts.

Producer Clare Walker


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (m000gkvt)
Series 19

Plenty

For decades, technologists, futurists and even our favourite science ficti has been predicting that technology will do away with the drudgery of work, take care of our basic day to day needs and create a world where scarcity will be a thing of the past.

The media has been focused on the economic impact of these new tech advances, but we should be asking a different question. Who will we be in an age of plenty?


MON 17:00 PM (m000gkvw)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000gkw0)
Ministers consider tightening of restrictions as some ignore social distancing advice


MON 18:30 Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! (m000gkw2)
Series 4

Police, Camera, Milton!

High drama in the line of duty when Milton is asked to form a Police Corruption Unit and takes it a little too literally.

Mention Milton Jones to most people and the first thing they think is "Help!". Each week, Milton and his trusty assistant Anton set out to help people and soon find they're embroiled in a new adventure. Because when you're close to the edge, then Milton can give you a push.

"Milton Jones is one of Britain's best gagsmiths with a flair for creating daft yet perfect one-liners" - The Guardian.

"King of the surreal one-liners" - The Times

"If you haven't caught up with Jones yet - do so!" - The Daily Mail

Written by Milton with James Cary (Bluestone 42, Miranda), and Dan Evans (who co-wrote Milton's Channel 4 show House Of Rooms), the man they call "Britain's funniest Milton," returns to the radio with a fully-working cast and a shipload of new jokes.

The cast includes regulars Tom Goodman-Hill (Spamalot, Mr. Selfridge) as the ever-faithful Anton, Josie Lawrence and Dan Tetsell (Peep Show, Upstart Crow).

With music by Guy Jackson

Produced and directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


MON 19:00 The Archers (m000gkw5)
Brian arrives at Brookfield to drill the oilseed. Josh tells him how he feels like he’s the only person who’s not busy at the moment – his arrest has brought his machinery business to a halt. Brian tells him he’ll put a word in for him with Adam. Josh goes to Adam before Brian which puts Adam’s back up. He refuses to employ Josh while Josh is being investigated by the police.

Rex, Pip and Phoebe take out the first piece of fencing on their rewilding land. They have nothing with them to toast the moment so Phoebe makes a speech and they agree they make a good team. They go to The Bull to celebrate and discover that Justin has provided them with champagne – none of them know how Justin knew they’d be celebrating – Justin moves in mysterious ways!

Philip hears from a scared Blake how the police interview went. Blake was on the streets before working for Philip. Philip presses Blake to stick to the story that he decided to use petrol to pocket a bit of cash for himself. Blake is scared and Philip promises to do everything in his power to keep him safe.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m000gkw7)
Rathbones Folio winner, Disney+, Malory Towers on TV, Live performance from National Theatre of Scotland

Front Row has announced Valeria Luiselli the winner of the 2020 Rathbones Folio book prize for her novel Lost Children Archive and John Wilson speaks live to Valeria from her home in New York.

This Tuesday sees the UK launch of Disney+, the new television streaming service from the second largest media company in the world. As well as all their classic releases, the service will include access to the full Star Wars franchise, the Marvel and Pixar back catalogues and National Geographic programming. Adam Satariano, technology correspondent for The New York Times, and TV critic Julia Raeside discuss the impact Disney+ is likely to have on the UK's TV landscape.

Malory Towers is a new 13-part TV drama series set in post-war Britain based on the bestselling children’s novels by Enid Blyton. Set in a girl's boarding school and packed full of midnight feasts, lacrosse games and mysteries to be solved, the books have been a beloved staple for generations of schoolchildren. Julia Raeside reviews the new CBBC adaptation.

John McGrath's The Cheviot, the Stag and the Black, Black Oil is one of Scotland’s most iconic plays, exploring the exploitation of the country’s natural resources from the Highland Clearances of the 18th century to the North Sea Oil Boom. Due to be revived by the National Theatre of Scotland in association with Dundee Rep Theatre and Live Theatre, Newcastle, the run has been cancelled due to Covid-19 guidelines. Two members of the cast, Billy Mack and Jo Freer, join us live to perform a scene and a song from the production.

Presenter : John Wilson
Producer : Dymphna Flynn

Image: Darrell (ELLA BRIGHT) in Malory Towers
Credit: Steve Wilkie/Queen Bert Limited/WildBrain/BBC


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01gvkw5)
Series 1

Episode 1

A dramatisation of Alexander McCall Smith's acclaimed series based on the residents of a fictitious tenement building in a real Edinburgh New Town street, inspired by Maupin's Tales of The City.

Anthropologist Domenica MacDonald observes the lives of her neighbours and the neighbourhood in Edinburgh's New Town. Pat, a new young tenant, arrives at 44 Scotland Street to flat share with Bruce. Bruce is a surveyor with more of an eye for the ladies than a sound property. We're introduced to five-year-old Bertie, who is controlled by his pretentious and intellectual mother Irene - he's learning the saxophone, speaks Italian, and is extremely knowledgeable about many subjects. And then there's Matthew, setting up the Something Special Gallery with little knowledge of artists or paintings!

With its multiple-occupancy flats, Scotland Street is an interesting corner of the New Town, verging on the Bohemian, where haute bourgeoisie rubs shoulders with students and the more colourful members of the intelligentsia.

One of McCall Smith's particular talents is his ability to portray archetypes without resorting to stereotype or cliche. In McCall Smith's hands such characters retain charm and novelty, simultaneously arousing both mirth and empathy, 44 Scotland Street is vintage McCall Smith.

CAST:
DOMENICA..........CAROL ANN CRAWFORD
RAEBURN TODD.........CRAWFORD LOGAN
BRUCE............JAMES MACKENZIE
IRENE..................ROSALIND SYDNEY
BERTIE.................EUAN LEE
MATTHEW..............SAMUEL KEEFE
Music by Tom Cunningham

Producer/director: David Ian Neville.


MON 20:00 The Book of Polyamory (m000gkw9)
Since its first publication 20 years ago, The Ethical Slut has informed and changed opinions about non-monogamous lifestyles. Comedian Sophie Duker traces its journey in challenging perceptions of polyamory and follows one specific copy that has travelled the world while being shared among enthusiastic readers.

Hearing modern stories of love and polyamory, Sophie questions opinions of openness and sees first hand the struggles and complications that non-monogamous groups face. She asks if society is yet ready for complete acceptance of their lifestyle.

Producer: Simon Jarvis and Lauren Armstrong Carter
Executive Producer: Anishka Sharma

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


MON 20:30 News (m000h34f)
BBC News Special

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, preceded by an update from the Prime Minister on the coronavirus epidemic.


MON 21:00 Analysis (m000gkwc)
The Roots of 'Woke' Culture

Barack Obama condemned it. Black American activists championed it. Meghan Markle brought it to the Royal Family. “Wokeness” has become a shorthand for one side of the culture wars, popularising concepts like “white privilege” and “trigger warnings” - and the idea that “language is violence”.

Journalist Helen Lewis is on a mission to uncover the roots of this social phenomenon. On her way she meets three authors who in 2017 hoaxed a series of academic journals with fake papers on dog rape, fat bodybuilding and feminist astrology. They claimed to have exposed the jargon-loving, post-modern absurdity of politically correct university departments - whose theories drive “woke” online political movements.

But is there really a link between the contemporary language of social justice warriors and the continental philosophy of the 1960s and 70s? And are critics of wokeness just reactionaries, left uneasy by a changing world?

Producer Craig Templeton Smith
Editor Jasper Corbett


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m000gkty)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m000gkwg)
Strict new limits on movement to try to control coronavirus

In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gkv9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 Lights Out (m000gkwl)
Series 2

The Saigon Tapes

A meditation on the events of one night in Saigon over 50 years ago and the aftershocks that are felt still - most strongly in the hearts of a 17 year old schoolboy in London and his American-born mother.

During the evening of March 31st, 1966, an Army Captain billeted in the Victoria Hotel, Saigon recorded a tape to send back to his wife Susie and his three young children in Seattle. David Davies had been in-country for seven months and was counting down each day until he could return home. While he recorded, the Overture to West Side Story started to play on the radio, with Davies singing along to Somewhere (There's a Place For Us).

In London, early in 2020, a London schoolboy is working on an essay project about the factors that shaped US policy in Vietnam. Aged 17, Charlie has inherited a family connection to the war - his grandfather's medals, including his Purple Heart. David Davies was killed in a bomb explosion shortly after finishing his tape-letter and retiring to bed - but ripples from that explosion play out over the decades through Captain Davies' daughter, Tricia, and her young son Charlie, who embark on a pilgrimage to the Vietnam Veterans' Memorial in Washington DC.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000glx9)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament.



TUESDAY 24 MARCH 2020

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m000gkwr)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 00:30 Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash (m000gkww)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000gkx2)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000gkx6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000gkxb)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m000gkxg)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000gkxl)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Father Jim O'Keefe


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m000gkxq)
Impact of coronavirus on the fishing industry

We hear about the effect the Covid-19 crisis is having on the fishing industry.
As exports dry up, restaurants and pubs are forced to close, and supermarkets shut their fish counters to free up staff, UK fishermen are struggling to find a market for their produce. The first impact was on crab and lobster because most of that was exported to China. Now the problems are affecting the whole of the industry. Anna Hill speaks to Barrie Deas, Chief Executive of National Federation of Fishermen's Organisations.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09w14nh)
Richard Jones on the Peregrine

Avian vet Richard Jones introduces the bird that inspired his career. A childhood trip to Anglesey led to an obsession with the fastest bird in the world, a love affair with falconry, and a career as a vet.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby
Photograph: Alan Williams.


TUE 06:00 Today (m000gl8g)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Patch (m000fwj9)
Torry, Aberdeen

The random postcode takes us to an extraordinary pet shop where something terrible has been happening to customers.

Torry is a deprived area of Aberdeen, known for addiction issues. It's also full of dog owners. In the local pet shop we discover Anna who says that a number of her customers have died recently from a fake prescription drug. We wait for her most regular customer, Stuart, to help us get to the bottom of it - but where is he?

Producer/presenter: Polly Weston
Exec producer: Jolyon Jenkins


TUE 09:30 New Storytellers (m000761f)
Beyond the Ballot

Fran De’ath is a retired UN Election Organiser who now lives on a houseboat in Bristol, but the voyage of her life is extraordinary - a true story of an ordinary person rising to meet extraordinary circumstances.

She was a peacekeeper in 1990s South Africa and, in the 2000s, she de facto wrote the election law in Afghanistan, despite a suicide bomber in her office. But the work Fran is most proud of is what she did in East Timor’s independence referendum. Along mountain passes and into a besieged UN-Compound, she tells the story of how she put herself in harm's way to help bring freedom to the region, the toll it took on her mental health and the road she walked back to wellness.

New Storytellers presents the work of radio and audio producers new to BBC Radio 4 and this first series features the five winners of this year's Charles Parker Prize for the Best Student Radio Feature. The award is presented every year in memory of pioneering radio producer Charles Parker who produced the famous series of Radio Ballads with Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger.

Beyond the Ballot was produced by Rosa Eaton who is studying for a Masters in Radio Documentary at the University of the West of England. This winning feature was praised by the Charles Parker Award judges as a “beautifully layered, well told and edited story, with a great talker at its heart - a worthy winner.”

Producer: Rosa Eaton
A Soundscape production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 09:45 Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash (m000gl8j)
Ep 2 The First Haul

In Lamorna Ash's vivid memoir about Newlyn, the fishing town near to Land's End, she is out on the high seas on board, the fishing trawler, the Filadelfia, where she experiences her first haul. Back on land, she takes in a shift at the fish auction where a quarter of a million freshly caught fish have just arrived. Ell Potter reads.

Lamorna Ash is a writer and playwright. Dark, Salt, Clear is her first book.

Abridged by Julian Wilkinson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000gl8l)
Women of Colour & Gardening; Free School Meals; Clear Communication in a Crisis

It’s the beginning of spring, and in more recent years, gardening is being seen as a therapeutic form of self-care. But for women of colour, planting is becoming a popular way to establish ownership and celebrate cultural heritage. Aimée Grant Cumberbatch is the founder of Grown, a gardening club for women of colour. Flo Headlam has been gardening professionally since 2012, and in 2017 she became BBC Two’s Gardeners’ World’s first black presenter.

Five years ago chef, Nicole Pisani gave up cheffing in a top London restaurant to make school dinners. Now working in Hackney she joins Jane with executive headteacher, Louise Nichols, who runs three schools in the borough. They tell Jane why have they set up a Free School Dinners campaign and their hopes to see it expand whilst schools are closed.

“Stay at home, save lives”, but is the message getting through and are other messages people are getting confusing it? The Chief Medical Officer for Scotland and the Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England have been widely praised for keeping it clear, concise and comprehensible. Is there anything that men can learn from women about crisis communications?

Dr Camilla Pang was diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder at the age of eight. She struggled to understand the world around her. Now aged 26, and with a PhD in biochemistry, Camilla has used her specialist scientific knowledge to examine society’s obscure customs, the strangeness of social norms and identify what it really means to be human in her new book, 'Explaining Humans' .

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Interviewed Guest: Louise Nichols
Interviewed Guest: Nicole Pisani
Interviewed Guest: Anne McElvoy
Interviewed Guest: Helen Lewis
Interviewed Guest: Dr Camilla Pang
Interviewed Guest: Aimée Grant Cumberbatch
Interviewed Guest: Flo Headlam


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00qxzb6)
Absent

Mediation

By Mark Davies Markham.

Tony has left his wife assuming that he can see his children whenever he wants to, but Clare has other ideas.

Tony ...... Craige Els
Clare ...... Gillian Kearney
Diane ...... Alison Pettitt
Paul ...... David Seddon
Sean ...... Carl Prekopp

Directed by Claire Grove.


TUE 11:00 The Cathedral Thinkers (m000gl8n)
The concept of cathedral thinking can be traced back to medieval times. Architects and stone-masons would begin construction on great cathedrals and places of worship, knowing they would never see work completed within their own lifetimes.

In our uncertain age of pandemic, global warming and exponentially accelerating technology, a new kind of cathedral thinking may be required to find solutions to some of our greatest challenges. Days after the 2019 fire at Notre Dame Cathedral, Greta Thunberg made an impassioned speech to the European Parliament where she implored leaders to tackle climate change by adopting the same long-term planning which had underpinned the original construction of Notre Dame. But in our quick-fix, sugar-rush world of market-driven economics, short-term election cycles and quarterly performance reviews, the idea of taking the long view and planning centuries - even millennia head - can seem deeply counter-cultural.

Ian Sansom meets the people daring to dream beyond their own lifespans and wonders how he might go about doing so himself. As he explores contemporary cathedral projects with the potential to shape the future of science, technology and environmental protection, Ian asks what we can learn from the original medieval cathedral thinkers and if cathedral projects are all voyages of discovery into uncharted territory.

Producer: Conor Garrett


TUE 11:30 Eighteen (m000gl8q)
Karabo Rabaloi & Kiarn Doyle

Unravelling the lives, dreams and creative worlds of six 18 to 21 year-old artists across the globe.

In today’s episode, we meet Karabo Rabaloi (19) - an aspiring opera soprano in Cape Town, South Africa, whose distinctive musical imagination is setting her apart from her peers.

Meanwhile, in New South Wales, Australia, the indigenous contemporary dancer Kiarn Doyle (21) is preparing for his end-of-year show - and considering his future. Will he make it into Australia's leading First Nations dance company and reconnect with his roots?

Musical excerpts from 2019 NAISDA show Ngoenakap.
Music and Lyrics: Dujon Niue
Musicians: Dujon Niue, Harry Newie, Norah Bagiri

Producer: Steven Rajam
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m000gl8s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gl8v)
Episode 7: Rejection

Anton Lesser reads the long-awaited finale to Hilary Mantel's Booker-winning Thomas Cromwell series.

Autumn 1536: Henry is still mourning the loss of his young son, and his Scottish niece Margaret is now in the Tower. During the summer Cromwell has been busy at work dissolving the smaller religious houses, but now he pays a visit to the convent where Cardinal Wolsey’s illegitimate daughter lives.

Writer: Hilary Mantel
Reader: Anton Lesser
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m000gl8x)
Call You and Yours: How has your day-to-day life changed because of coronavirus?

Call You and Yours: How has your day to day life changed because of Coronavirus?

A lot of us are now staying home but some are still working and lots are working harder than ever.

Whatever you're doing, tell us. How has your day to day life changed?

Email us at youandyours@bbc.co.uk.

At 11am our phone lines open, you can call 03700 100 444.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Lydia Thomas


TUE 12:57 Weather (m000gl8z)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m000gl91)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


TUE 13:45 Girl Taken (m000gmmy)
7. A Secret Plan

BBC journalist Sue Mitchell and ex-soldier-turned- good-Samaritan Rob Lawrie thought they were involved in the heart-breaking, but straightforward story of an Afghan father and his motherless daughter as they struggled to get to Britain. The following four years saw Sue and Rob fall into a web of lies and life changing, mind changing events. Girl Taken is a 10 part hunt - across closed borders and broken promises - for the truth and to find a little girl, taken

Producer: Sue Mitchell
Studio Production and Sound Design: Richard Hannaford


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m000gkw5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b09sqwfw)
Playing Dead

Written by Vivienne Harvey

When her father's remains are found in a mass grave in Iraq, Mancunian Roza Riley returns to the war torn country she fled as a child. The only survivor of her family who were killed in the Anfal genocide of Kurdish people, she is determined to give her beloved father the burial he deserves. Her journey unearths the secrets of her past and ends with a miraculous discovery.

Roza.....Nadia Emam
Liam.....William Ash
Ari.....Murat Erkek
Mama/Bayan/Nareen.....Shaniaz Hama Ali
Rojan/Car Hire Worker/Guard.....Shervin Alenabi
Guard/Papa/Shad.....Aso Sherabayani
Jenny.....Susan Twist

Cultural consultant.....Namak Khoshnaw

Directed by Nadia Molinari.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (m000gl93)
Series 22

Habitat

Growing up in a changing landscape, communicating disaster through a language barrier, a sonic illustration of the world’s dwindling animal populations and finding hope outside our windows. Josie Long presents short documentaries on the climate crisis.

Smoke Signals
Produced by Natalie Kestecher

Hearing Extinction
Produced by Mona Chalabi and Emmy the Great

Mother Earth
Produced by Alia Cassam

Terrace, Rome, Italy during the lockdown
Produced by Daria Corrias
Originally recorded for the Field Recordings podcast

Production Team: Eleanor McDowall and Alia Cassam
Produced by Andrea Rangecroft
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (m000gl95)
Turning Japan Green

Cherry blossom is a perfect symbol of Japan's relationship with nature and the broader environment. It's beautiful, flawless and disappears with the wind. The organisers of the Tokyo Olympics are keen to use the event to push the nation further toward a sustainable future. When the delayed Games finally go ahead they're promised to run on 100% renewable energy and use recycled rainwater. Even the medals and podiums will be made from old mobile phones and recycled shampoo bottles.

Peter Hadfield, a journalist based for many years in Japan, examines the efforts of the organisers and asks how far their efforts can push the Japanese people toward a greener future.

Producer: Alasdair Cross

Photo courtesy of @nickluscombe


TUE 16:00 The Hidden History of the Mantelpiece (m000gl97)
Run your eye along the mantelpiece with Dr Rachel Hurdley as she explores the story of this most revealing space in our homes.

As a sociologist, Rachel has long been fascinated by how we curate the objects on our mantelpieces to reflect how we see ourselves and how we would like to be perceived by others.

Even if you don’t have an actual mantelpiece, it’s likely you’ll use a shelf or a windowsill to display favoured ornaments, photos and other mementoes.

Rachel explores the history of the mantelpiece from the grandeur of 16th-century overmantels to the confidence of the Victorian mantelpiece and Mass Observation’s detailed descriptions of what 1930s homes kept on their mantelpieces.

Along the way, Rachel finds out why symmetry matters on a mantelpiece, why our ancestors might have felt they needed to guard against something fearful coming through their fireplace, how to spot the signs of a "posh" mantelpiece and the crucial role of the mantelpiece in creating identity and memory.

Interviewees:
Jonathan Glancey, Architectural Writer and Historian.
Sonia Solicari, Director of The Museum of the Home
Patricia Ferguson, Writer and Historian, interviewed at Ham House
Mared McAleavey, St Fagans National Museum of History, Wales
Jessica Scantlebury, Mass Observation Archive
Peter York, Writer and Co-Author of The Sloane Ranger Handbook
Caroline Schofield, National Trust Curator at Tatton Old Hall and Little Moreton Hall

Presenter: Rachel Hurdley
Producer: Louise Adamson
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 16:30 PM (m000gl9c)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000gl9f)
Labour has urged the Government to provide unambiguous advice about who can go to work, saying it should be only those in key jobs.


TUE 18:30 Time Spanner (m0001p68)
The Dan in the High Castle

A new episode of the time-travelling adventure-cum-love story narrated by the first dog in space (played by John Finnemore) and starring Simon Kane as Martin Gaye, a man with the most powerful object in the universe stuck up his nose; David Mitchell as power-hungry reality TV star Daniel Kraken; Sally Phillips as an angel with very poor judgement; John Finnemore as Laika, the Russian space dog; London Hughes as Gabbie Hayes, the world's most optimistic charity worker; and Jeremy Limb as Mister Mergatroid, a love-sick talking robot.

Following on from last year's episode that went out as part of Radio 4's Day of Misrule, Martin Gaye is torn between using the Time Spanner to travel into the future to save humanity from certain destruction, and using it as a way to spend more time with the woman he met this morning. And the more the angel who gave him the Spanner tries to persuade him off the importance of his mission, the more he gets pre-occupied by Gabbie, who he is already sure she is the light-bulb in his lampshade.

Meanwhile Daniel Kraken will stop at nothing to get his hands on the Spanner, if only his private army of Yellowcoats were able to open a door without detailed step by step instructions, and there are sinister forces in Heaven getting ready to take back the Spanner for themselves...

Written by Simon Kane

Martin Gaye - Simone Kane
Daniel Kraken - David Mitchell
The Angel - Sally Phillips
Gabbie - London Hughes
Laika - John Finnemore
Mr Mergatroid - Jeremy Limb

Produced by Gareth Edwards


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m000gl9h)
Pip teases Ben about his new car, which is orange. Pip suggests a night out where she will buy all of Ben’s drinks and drive him home. Josh is up for it too and they decide on a student night in Felpersham tomorrow. Hopeful that he’ll get some work at Home Farm, Josh gets Pip to remind him what to do in the lambing sheds.

Kirsty rails at the news that Gavin has gone to live with his mum for a while. But Philip spins it as a much needed break he and his son need from one another. Kirsty believes that it was Blake who supplied the petrol instead of proper solvent. She wants to talk to Blake but Philip warns her off.

Kirsty bumps into Justin and thanks him for his support for Philip. Justin reveals he’s not sure he wants Philip’s firm doing the work at Berrow anymore and was relieved when Philip called to postpone it. Kirsty doesn’t feel like she’s doing enough to help Philip cope. Later, Philip returns home to find Kirsty looking through his business paperwork – she took a call about an invoice and is trying to help. Philip assures her he doesn’t need her to do that, he’s on top of everything. He thanks her for being a rock for him. He doesn’t know what he’d do without her.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m000gl9k)
Simon Armitage, Stephen Hough, Chris Riddell on Asterix creator Albert Uderzo

Poet Laureate Simon Armitage talks about his new poetry collection Magnetic Field: the Marsden Poems, which is inspired by the West Yorkshire village he grew up in.

As classical musicians struggle to cope with the loss of their income due to the cancellation of all concerts, Samira is joined by music critic Anna Picard, Deborah Annetts of the Incorporated Society of Musicians, and pianist Stephen Hough, who plays live from his home.

Former Children's Laureate Chris Riddell pays tribute to the French comic book artist Albert Uderzo, co-creator of Asterix, who has died aged 92.

Presenter: Timothy Prosser
Producer: Samira Ahmed

Main Image: Simon Armitage
Image credit: Robert Shiret/BBC


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01gyk32)
Series 1

Episode 2

A dramatisation of Alexander McCall Smith's acclaimed series based on the residents of a fictitious tenement building in a real Edinburgh New Town street, inspired by Maupin's Tales of The City. Bruce has his eye on Pat as his new tenant, and five-year old Bertie has issues!

Anthropologist Domenica MacDonald observes the lives of her neighbours and the neighbourhood in Edinburgh's New Town. Pat, a new young tenant, arrives at 44 Scotland Street to flat share with Bruce. Bruce is a surveyor with more of an eye for the ladies than a sound property. We're introduced to five-year-old Bertie, who is controlled by his pretentious and intellectual mother Irene - he's learning the saxophone, speaks Italian, and is extremely knowledgeable about many subjects. And then there's Matthew, setting up the Something Special Gallery with little knowledge of artists or paintings!

With its multiple-occupancy flats, Scotland Street is an interesting corner of the New Town, verging on the Bohemian, where haute bourgeoisie rubs shoulders with students and the more colourful members of the intelligentsia.

One of McCall Smith's particular talents is his ability to portray archetypes without resorting to stereotype or cliche. In McCall Smith's hands such characters retain charm and novelty, simultaneously arousing both mirth and empathy, 44 Scotland Street is vintage McCall Smith.

CAST:
DOMENICA................CAROL ANN CRAWFORD
DR FAIRBAIRN.................CRAWFORD LOGAN
BRUCE............................JAMES MACKENZIE
IRENE..............................ROSALIND SYDNEY
BERTIE.........................................EUAN LEE
PAT.........................................BELLE JONES
MATTHEW..............................SAMUEL KEEFE
STUART.................................TOM FREEMAN

Music by Tom Cunningham

Producer/director: David Ian Neville.


TUE 20:00 Universal Basic Income: Alaska Style (m000gl9m)
There is growing interest in the idea of giving every member of society a Basic Income, as a way of tackling extreme poverty and the loss of jobs caused by automation.

Pilot projects have been seen across the world - from India to Finland and Namibia to Canada - and there is talk of a one possibly happening here in the UK, in the city of Hull.

So, attention is being paid to the Alaskan model. The Arctic American state has been paying out an annual dividend to every one of its permanent residents - man, woman and child - for almost 40 years. They don’t have to do anything to get the money, and they can use it in any way they like.

The money comes from the state’s Permanent Fund, which invests a substantial share of the profits of oil production for the benefit of all its citizens. As a result of this dividend, arguably a form of Basic Income, its supporters say Alaska is the least unequal state in the whole USA.

But in the last three years, Alaskan politics has been dominated by an unresolved crisis. The State government has been trying to use money earmarked for the dividend for other purposes, and many claim that this is illegal.

Mark Whitaker reports from Alaska on a unique scheme, explaining its history and discovering why it has become so controversial.

A Square Dog Radio production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m000gl9p)
Job Prospects

In a special focusing on careers and the job market for blind and visually impaired people, we hear from young people first entering the world of work. Reporter Fern Lulham gives us her insights, and Jess Clements, workplace co-ordinator at Blind in Business, tells us about how attitudes to the workplace and the horizons of young blind people are changing. John Lynch from the Royal National College for the Blind tells us about their work and changes to the DWP system for helping VI people find a job.
Presented by Peter White
Produced by Kevin Core


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (m000gl9r)
COVID-19 PPE; Secondary Pneumonia; Viral Load; Trauma Care in Fort William

Margaret McCartney on COVID-19 and how the military has been deployed to get protective equipment supplies to critical care staff. Dean of the Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine, Dr Alison Pittard tells of the difficult ethical decisions staff are facing. And Professor Carl Heneghan - suffering from COVID-19 symptoms himself - explains the importance of fast action when treating secondary pneumonia in the elderly; while Deirdre Hollingsworth explains the term "Viral Load". Plus Margaret McCartney visits the famous Belford Hospital in Fort William - specialising in hostile environment trauma - and hears a story of intense mountain rescue.


TUE 21:30 New Weird Britain (m0006132)
Radical Rural

Music journalist John Doran travels across the country in search of an underground movement of musicians, blossoming in the margins of Britain.

Artists of all stripes have been driven out of the city centres by soaring rent prices and hit hard by the dwindling revenues of the digital economy. But untethered from the prospect of making any money and fueled by the current political turmoil, a new wave of musicians is splintering away from convention to stage bizarre one-off performances that fly in the face of austerity.

They are living off-grid in the countryside, building their own instruments out of electronic junk, staging strange rituals with priests smeared in clay or even performing with a team of dancers dressed as anatomically correct vaginas which squirt cream over the audience.

Rather than moving to the capital to seek out the crumbling infrastructure of the music industry, these musicians are self-releasing straight to the internet, teaching themselves how to edit via youtube or abandoning recording entirely.

Now that all you need to be a musician is a bit of spare time and reliable broadband, some musicians have sought out the space and isolation of the countryside for their creative practice. In this episode, John Doran heads to the rural areas of Britain to discover what musicians actually find when they go in search of England’s green and pleasant lands.

Contributors include Elizabeth Bernholz, aka Gazelle Twin, David Chatton Barker, Layla and Phil Legard from Hawthonn, Saxon Roach, Farmer Glitch and Richard Skelton.

Produced by Alannah Chance.
A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m000gl9t)
Health Secretary insists people CAN go to work if they are unable to work from home

Pic: An empty Kings Cross tube station in London, the day after Prime Minister Boris Johnson called on people to stay at home because of covid-19
Credit: Press Association


TUE 22:45 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gl8v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 Jack Rooke: Good Grief (b08j8yhw)
An adaptation of Jack's critically acclaimed debut Edinburgh show, Good Grief celebrates lost loved ones and finding happiness after tragedy.
At 15 years old Jack was an old man trapped in a child's body, he listened to Woman's hour, wrote poems and went to bingo with his Nan, whilst his Jack-the-lad dad encouraged him to go off road racing and live life. In the middle of his GCSEs Jack had to go from child to man overnight, when his dad unexpectedly died of cancer. Seven years on, Jack and his paternal grandmother take us on their funny poignant journey of good grief.

Producer: Paul Sheehan


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000gl9w)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster where the Health Secretary tells MPs the home is now the frontline in the battle against coronavirus and people must not to go out.
Matt Hancock stressed the need for people to only leave their home to shop for food, take daily exercise, looking after a medical need, or to travel to and from work when absolutely necessary.
And the Chancellor promises help for the self employed with an announcement due "in the coming days".



WEDNESDAY 25 MARCH 2020

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m000gl9y)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 00:30 Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash (m000gl8j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000glb0)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000glb2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000glb4)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m000glb6)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000glb8)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Father Jim O'Keefe


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m000glbb)
25/03/20 - Food chain flexibility during COVID-19, farming deer

Many farmers and food producers who supply restaurants and pubs are finding themselves with surplus stock. We've been contacted by a food producer who has 5 million pounds worth of unsold cheese that had been due to go to some of the big chains like Nando’s and Pret a Manger. And with McDonald's closing it's doors, we speak to one Cumbrian farmer who sells them 50-60 million eggs every year...and is looking for a new buyer.

Meanwhile supermarket shelves are being stripped bare. So can our famously complicated food supply chain shift in time, to feed people, and avoid massive waste? We speak to an expert.

Our series of Farming Today Audio Diaries continues with a goat farmer in Northern Ireland who normally sells through a farm shop and local farmers markets, via a street food trailer and direct to restaurants.

And according to the Scottish Venison Partnership, the UK produces 3,500 tonnes of venison each year - almost all from wild deer - and venison sales total 100 million pounds annually. What next for the industry?

Presented (from home) by Anna Hill
Produced (from home) by Heather Simons


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09w2tj8)
Richard Jones on the Gyr Falcon

Avian vet Richard Jones introduces a strange tale from his surgery, involving a runaway Gyr falcon, a black hat, and a peculiar mating habit.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby
Photograph: Joe Cox.


WED 06:00 Today (m000gmfc)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 More or Less (m000gwy8)
Coronavirus special

We’ve dedicated this special episode to the numbers surrounding the Coronavirus pandemic. Statistical national treasure Professor Sir David Spiegelhalter put the risks of Covid-19 into perspective. We ask whether young people are safe from serious illness, or if statistics from hospitalisations in the US show a high proportion of patients are under 50. We try to understand what the ever-tightening restrictions on businesses and movement mean for the UK’s economy, and we take a look at the mystery of coronavirus numbers in Iran.


WED 09:30 The Extinction Tapes (m0009zcb)
The Yangtze River Dolphin

Rob Newman tells the story of a species we've lost forever, and explores our role in their extinction.

The Yangtze River Dolphin, the "Goddess of the Yangtze", was blind, graceful, sociable, and... pink. As the river became a highway for international trade and commerce, the Goddess was pushed further and further from their ancestral home. Can the natural world and the advance of human progress ever march in step?

Produced in Bristol by Emily Knight


WED 09:45 Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash (m000gmfj)
Ep 3 A Hard Day

In her memoir, Lamorna Ash is in a reflective mood as she considers the life of the fishermen and their lives at sea. After four days at sea, Lamorna longs for the shore and has her hardest day yet. Ell Potter reads.

Lamorna Ash is a writer and playwright. Dark, Salt, Clear is her first book.

Abridged by Julian Wilkinson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000gmfl)
Women and homelessness, Louise Hare, Children, fake news and anxiety

More money has been made available across the UK to help rough sleepers during the Covid-19 pandemic. But is enough being done to help the thousands of women and children who are in temporary accommodation? What’s being done to protect the thousands of “hidden homeless” who find themselves in B&B’s. Jenni speaks to Tina who is “sofa-surfing” with her 5 year old daughter, and to Polly Neate, CEO of Shelter and Lindsay Cordery-Bruce, CEO of The Wallich, a homelessness charity in Wales about the particular difficulties women find themselves in.

Set in 1950s London, Louise Hare talks about her debut novel, This Lovely City about the Windrush generation.

How can parents help their children navigate the constant stream of information about Covid-19 online? And how can children learn to spot useful fact from dangerous fiction? Sonia Livingstone is a professor of social psychology at the London School of Economics and an expert in digital literacy in children, and Dr Radha Modgil is a GP who discusses how to reduce anxiety and keep trust alive in an era of non-expert influencers and fake news.

Presenter; Jenni Murray
Producer: Dianne McGregor


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b00qxzb8)
Absent

Assessment

By Mark Davies Markham.

Tony goes to a solicitor. He wants 50-50 access to his children, but his wife threatens to fight him all the way.

Tony ...... Craige Els
Clare ...... Gillian Kearney
Helen ...... Joanna Monro
Morley ...... Bruce Alexander
Sean ...... Carl Prekopp
Josh ...... Alfie Davies

Directed by Claire Grove.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (m000gmfn)
Capturing the nation in conversation, in partnership with the British Library.


WED 11:00 Le Divide (m000gmfq)
Le Divide - Fraternite

France's motto of "liberte, egalite, fraternite" - liberty, equality and fraternity - represents key challenges dividing the nation today. The BBC's Paris correspondent Lucy Williamson travels around the country to find out more about the issues and asks: are President Macron's policies helping to heal these divisions, or make them worse?

"Fraternite” requires French citizens to be treated with “brotherliness”, regardless of origin, background or religion. And laïcité – separation of state and religion – is seen today as a key tool to ensure that. But there are battles over where the line between state and religion, public and private, really is – and most of the time, it’s about the Muslim headscarf. With little of France's ethnic or religious diversity on display in public life, and a ban on the French state collecting this kind of data on its citizens, how is its model of integration working in modern-day France? Former World Cup-winning football player Lilian Thuram argues that some people are happy with the racist status quo. Lucy travels to the city of Marseille, famed as a "melting pot" for its diversity - and its football team - to look at what keeps the city together, and why divisions are appearing even there.

Producer: Arlene Gregorius


WED 11:30 The Price of Happiness (b060724p)
Series 1

A Big White Wedding

Stand-up poet Kate Fox explores some of the things she doesn't want and has cheerfully failed to achieve in life, despite feeling society constantly reminds her that, as a woman, she should.

This time, Kate looks at the subject of "A Big White Wedding". Is it every little girl's dream to be walked down the aisle feeling like a Disney Princess, looking like she's been swallowed by taffeta? What if you're more Lightwater Valley Lass than Disney Princess?

Kate got married in a lighthouse, with guests waiting to cross the causeway because the lighthouse keeper drew up the wrong tide times. The wedding cost under a thousand pounds and guests brought their own food. To Kate, it was perfect. But would this somewhat unconventional day cost other brides their wedding smiles?

Statistics show that males and females still divide domestic duties up in traditional ways, although in Kate's household these roles are almost completely reversed. Is there such a thing as the perfect formula for marriage or is it a tradition as outdated as Morris Dancing with only slightly fewer hankies and bells?

Kate Fox is a comedian and poet from the North East of England. She has contributed poems and comic pieces to many Radio 4 shows including Saturday Live, Wondermentalist Cabaret, From Fact to Fiction, Woman's Hour and Arthur Smith's Balham Bash.

Producer: Lianne Coop
An Impatient production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015


WED 12:00 News Summary (m000gmfs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gmfv)
Episode 8: Rebellion

Anton Lesser continues the long-awaited finale to Hilary Mantel's Booker-winning Thomas Cromwell series.

The winter of 1536 has seen violent uprisings in the North with rebel forces protesting against Henry’s break with Rome and Cromwell’s ruthless dealings with the monasteries. The rebels are finally brought to heal, but at great financial cost to Henry, and to Cromwell’s reputation.

Writer: Hilary Mantel
Reader: Anton Lesser
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m000gmfx)
Coronavirus; Online Deliveries; Dating Apart

The supermarkets are adjusting to a seismic shift in how we're shopping because of Corona virus. Demand has gone online as people stay at home and limit their visits to physical stores. But there are delays of up to a month for a delivery slot and many elderly and vulnerable people say they can't get access to food.

Today's usually a big day for landlords on the High Street - when all the shops, cafes and restaurants pay their rent. But there's a three month suspension because of Corona virus and landlords say they won't be able to pay their bills.

And people who were dating using apps and websites are having to come up with novel ways of finding love in the time of Corona virus, holding Facetime dates and simply chatting over the phone. So does it mark a return to old-fashioned 'courting'?


WED 12:57 Weather (m000gmfz)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m000gmg1)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


WED 13:45 Girl Taken (m000gmg3)
8. On the Trail

BBC journalist Sue Mitchell and ex-soldier-turned- good-Samaritan Rob Lawrie thought they were involved in the heart-breaking, but straightforward story of an Afghan father and his motherless daughter as they struggled to get to Britain. The following four years saw Sue and Rob fall into a web of lies and life changing, mind changing events. Girl Taken is a 10 part hunt - across closed borders and broken promises - for the truth and to find a little girl, taken

Producer: Sue Mitchell
Studio Production and Sound Design: Richard Hannaford


WED 14:00 The Archers (m000gl9h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (m0000qqt)
My Little Eye

My Little Eye

The new UK Prime Minister appoints a former spook to control her untrustworthy spy network and protect a Russian dissident under threat. Bob Trench is a veteran of international undercover missions, cool under pressure, wise, wry and laconic. He's a loner determined to save his career and his reputation as he faces a terrible dilemma.

Cast:
Bob Trench ... Pip Torrens
Oliver Heywood ... Julian Rhind-Tutt
Prime Minister ... Siobhán Redmond
Dave Sefton ... Samuel Anderson
Julia Hapsgood ... Monica Dolan
Home Secretary ... Michael Cochrane
Inspector Farr ... Jonathan Bailey
Commander Barr ... Justin Edwards
Charlie McKenna ... Matthew Marsh

Written by Richard Stoneman
Directed by Marilyn Imrie
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4


WED 15:00 Money Box (m000gmg5)
Help for small businesses and the self employed

Announcements from the Government are coming thick and fast about the help available for small business in these difficult times.

An expert panel joins Adam Shaw to discuss and answer your questions on what assistance might be on offer.

We also look at issues facing the self-employed and discuss what support is currently out there for them. Get in touch by email: moneybox@bbc.co.uk or tweet: @moneybox.

Joining Adam:
Will Hadwen - rights adviser from Working Families
Sonali Parekh - Head of Policy at the Federation for Small Businesses
Alasdair Hutchison - Policy Development Manager from the Association of Independent Professionals and Self Employed

Producer: Darin Graham
Editor: Emma Rippon


WED 15:30 Inside Health (m000gl9r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 The Media Show (m000gmg9)
World locks down, media steps up

A global lock down means demand for media has never been higher - but making it has never been harder. Amol Rajan hears how TV producers and news providers are adapting. Also in the show, can esports fill the void left by the cancellation of live sport?

Guests: Carrie Brown, Chair of the Football Writers' Association, John McVay, chief executive Pact, Paul McNamee, editor The Big Issue, Luke Lambourne, creator of Ultimate QuaranTeam and Leyton Orient FC media manager, and Shona Ghosh, UK tech editor Business Insider.

Producer: Richard Hooper


WED 16:30 PM (m000gmgc)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000gmgf)
The Prime Minister has come under intense pressure over the lack of protective equipment for NHS staff -- and the number being tested for coronavirus.


WED 18:30 Mark Watson Talks a Bit About Life (m000gmgh)
Series 3

Episode Four: Winter

Multi-award winning comedian and author Mark Watson continues his probably doomed quest to make sense of the human experience. He's aided by the sardonic musical brilliance of Flo and Joan, and by a different comedy friend in each programme. This time, it's Jess Fostekew.

This new series examines the four seasons of the year and the seasons of a human life, as Mark - at the halfway point of his expected lifespan - considers what might come next. In this final programme in the series, Mark and his guests look at the pros and cons of Winter.

Pros - Christmas.
Cons - the end of the year reminds us that all things must die.

As always, there's a huge number of jokes, some songs, and an awful lot of other stuff crammed into each show as the much-loved comic and his guests make their way through life at dizzying speed.

Produced by Lianne Coop.
An Impatient production for BBC Radio 4


WED 19:00 The Archers (m000glnh)
Josh has a go at Ben when he finds him taking his pick of clothes from Josh’s wardrobe. Josh is cranky because there’s no work for him at Home Farm after all. Ben cheers him up with the prospect of their night out.

Robert visits Freddie to thank him for getting Lynda out of Grey Gables. Robert gives Freddie the Military Medal awarded to his father. Freddie is reluctant to accept it but Robert insists he honours Freddie’s brave actions. Lynda would like to see Freddie herself but Freddie’s not sure; he feels it’s not fair as he’s barely injured. But Robert says that doesn’t matter.

Pip’s car breaks down on the way to Felpersham. Ben has already started drinking. While Pip phones the breakdown service Ben gets out and flags down a passing car. Joy is behind the wheel; she agrees to give Ben a lift to Felpersham in her two-seater. Josh and Pip will catch up once Pip’s car is attended to. When Pip and Josh get to Felpersham they find Joy but no Ben. Joy says he found his friends and got chatting to a girl at the bar. Pip wants to leave but Josh insists they stay for at least one drink. Pip groans.


WED 19:15 Front Row (m000gmgk)
Eliza Carthy, Art galleries and coronavirus, Terrence McNally obituary

Singer and fiddle player Eliza Carthy, daughter of folk doyens Norma Waterson and Martin Carthy, is known as a folk musician but, while being steeped in traditional music, she has wide musical horizons. Her new album Through that Sound (My Secret was Made Known) is a collection of her own songs. It’s a collaboration with musician and producer Ben Seal, who provides arrangements for string quartet, bass clarinet and keys. Eliza and her band were all rehearsed and ready to tour this month, but that is of course cancelled. She joins Front Row live from the Waterson Carthy household in Robin Hood's Bay, to talk about being a single mother, part-time carer and professional musician, to play and sing, and offer some tips to people for whom self-isolation offers the opportunity to write songs.

As all galleries in the UK are ordered to close by the government as part of measures to prevent the spread of coronavirus we consider the financial impact, how much can realistically move online and if the government and arts bodies are doing enough to support galleries. Kirsty is joined by director of the National Gallery, Gabriele Finaldi, Director of Spike Island in Bristol, Robert Leckie and art critic Louisa Buck to give us the picture across the UK.

Novelist Armstead Maupin, author of the Tales of the City series, pays tribute to playwright Terrence McNally who has died of Coronavirus complications aged 81. The four-time Tony winner, was known for his thoughtful chronicles of gay life, homophobia, love and AIDS.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang
Producer: Simon Richardson
Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant

Image: Eliza Carthy


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01gyk57)
Series 1

Episode 3

A dramatisation of Alexander McCall Smith's acclaimed series based on the residents of a fictitious tenement building in a real Edinburgh New Town street, inspired by Maupin's Tales of The City. Pat's the centre of attention at home and work but there could be tears before bedtime.

Anthropologist Domenica MacDonald observes the lives of her neighbours and the neighbourhood in Edinburgh's New Town. Pat, a new young tenant, arrives at 44 Scotland Street to flat share with Bruce. Bruce is a surveyor with more of an eye for the ladies than a sound property. We're introduced to five-year-old Bertie, who is controlled by his pretentious and intellectual mother Irene - he's learning the saxophone, speaks Italian, and is extremely knowledgeable about many subjects. And then there's Matthew, setting up the Something Special Gallery with little knowledge of artists or paintings!

With its multiple-occupancy flats, Scotland Street is an interesting corner of the New Town, verging on the Bohemian, where haute bourgeoisie rubs shoulders with students and the more colourful members of the intelligentsia.

One of McCall Smith's particular talents is his ability to portray archetypes without resorting to stereotype or cliche. In McCall Smith's hands such characters retain charm and novelty, simultaneously arousing both mirth and empathy, 44 Scotland Street is vintage McCall Smith.

CAST:
DOMENICA................CAROL ANN CRAWFORD
BRUCE............................JAMES MACKENZIE
IRENE..............................ROSALIND SYDNEY
BERTIE.........................................EUAN LEE
PAT.........................................BELLE JONES
MATTHEW..............................SAMUEL KEEFE
BIG LOU...............................ANITA VETTESSE

Music by Tom Cunningham

Producer/director: David Ian Neville.


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m000gmgm)
Isolation

Some of the UK’s national parks saw visitor numbers soar to bank holiday levels over the weekend. The message about social distancing and self-isolation is taking time to sink in. "Life should not feel normal," said the Scottish First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon. If it does, she added, “You should ask if you are doing the right things." The public’s response to these unprecedented times has exemplified the best and the worst of humanity. What, then, does the coronavirus crisis tell us about the fundamental nature of our species? Your answer to that question will depend on whether you agree with the 17th century philosopher Thomas Hobbes that people are naturally disposed to ‘rapine and revenge’; or with the 18th century thinker Jean-Jacques Rousseau that humans are essentially good. The tussle between self-interest and altruism has been part of the human condition since we were decorating caves. Now an ever-tightening lockdown will make life-changing demands on all of us. We are social animals who evolved and adapted to survive in groups, so how well are we equipped to cope with extended periods of self-isolation? Some predict an epidemic of depression and suicides. Others argue that we are far more adept at developing our own inner life than were our ancestors in the ancient world, who saw exile as a fate worse than death. Are we right to be worried about the moral and psychological effects of a prolonged lack of human contact? Or are we more resilient than we think? With Hilda Burke, Andrew Colman, Julia Hartley-Brewer and Mark Vernon.

Producer: Dan Tierney.


WED 20:45 Lent Talks (m000gmgp)
Louise Pendry - Identity and Ageing

Lent Talks is a personal perspective on an aspect of the story leading up to Easter. This year’s theme is identity – losing and gaining identity; struggling with identity; accepting and owning identity. Psychologist Louise Pendry reflects on her previous attitude to her own ageing as a 'wilderness' period, and offers a more positive alternative.

Producer: Dan Tierney.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (m000gl95)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 More or Less (m000gwy8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m000gmgr)
UN begins huge humanitarian funding drive to help fight coronavirus

(Pic: Boys wearing protective and N95 masks play with a football outside their homes in Gaza City)
(Credit: MOHAMMED ABED/AFP via Getty Images)


WED 22:45 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gmfv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme (m000gmgt)
Series 5

Rome

By Tim Key

Comedy. Tim Key broadcasts live from his trailer in Rome, where he’s shooting a film directed by the legendary Sir Hayden Higgins. With Tom Basden, Katy Wix, Miles Jupp and Carlotta Morelli.

Key…. Tim Key
Lord…. Tom Basden
Megan…. Katy Wix
Sir Hayden…. Miles Jupp
Pamela…. Carlotta Morelli

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000gmgw)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament.



THURSDAY 26 MARCH 2020

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m000gmgy)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


THU 00:30 Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash (m000gmfj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000gmh0)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000gmh2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000gmh4)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m000gmh6)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000gmh8)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Father Jim O'Keefe


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m000gmhb)
26/03/20 - Walking on farmland during lockdown, deer stalking and the sound of silence...

Farmers are raising concerns about people using public footpaths through farm yards and close to farm buildings. Despite the lockdown, some have reported as many as 30 people walking on their land in just one day, and they’re worried walkers could spread coronavirus to at-risk farmworkers. The National Farmers Union is talking to Government about how to protect farmers - it says it recognises the importance of public footpaths for physical and mental wellbeing, but the health of those living and working in the countryside has to be safeguarded. We hear from a livestock farmer with concerns about what happens to his animals if the staff that look after them fall ill.

Of the 100 million pounds worth of venison sold in the UK each year, almost of all of it is from wild deer. Their numbers are managed through culling and many businesses combine deer management with tourism by organising stalking tours. Our reporter joined a stalk with Wiltshire Game, before the coronavirus outbreak.

Our series of Farming Today audio diaries continues with a trip to Wales to meet The Venerable Eileen Davies - Archdeacon of Cardigan and diary farmer.

And with roads and cities falling quite, we enjoy the sound of silence with wildlife expert, Mike Dilger.

Presented (from home) by Charlotte Smith
Produced (from home) by Heather Simons


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b097c82d)
Sue Patterson on the Great Spotted Woodpecker

Sue Patterson from BirdLife International has a story of introducing the Great Spotted Woodpecker to the next generation of birders, revealing the key to determining the bird's sex.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. In this latest series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Eliza Lomas
Photograph: Gareth Hardwick.


THU 06:00 Today (m000glms)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b09y6zfr)
George and Robert Stephenson

In a programme first broadcast on April 12th 2018, Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the contribution of George Stephenson (1781-1848) and his son Robert (1803-59) to the development of the railways in C19th. George became known as The Father of Railways and yet arguably Robert's contribution was even greater, with his engineering work going far beyond their collaboration.

Robert is credited with the main role in the design of their locomotives. George had worked on stationary colliery steam engines and, with Robert, developed the moving steam engine Locomotion No1 for the Stockton and Darlington Railway in 1825. They produced the Rocket for the Rainhill Trials on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway in 1829. From there, the success of their designs and engineering led to the expansion of railways across Britain and around the world.

with

Dr Michael Bailey
Railway historian and editor of the most recent biography of Robert Stephenson

Julia Elton
Past President of the Newcomen Society for the History of Engineering and Technology

and

Colin Divall
Professor Emeritus of Railway Studies at the University of York

Producer: Simon Tillotson.
This programme is a repeat


THU 09:45 Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash (m000glmx)
Ep 4 Things the Nets Pull Up

In Lamorna Ash's evocative memoir about Newlyn's fishing community, close to Land's End. Today,, extraordinary things are found among the fish in the trawler's nets, and the effects of climate change on the sea confront Lamorna. Ell Potter reads.

Lamorna Ash is a writer and playwright. Dark, Salt, Clear is her first book.

Abridged by Julian Wilkinson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000glmz)
Deputy Chief Medical Officer Dr Jenny Harries answers your questions

Dr Jenny Harries, the Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England has become a familiar face and reassuring voice at the regular press conferences from Number 10 over the last couple of weeks. Today she joins Jenni to talk about the latest advice and information about the coronavirus pandemic and answers questions posed by our listeners.

We've been hearing a lot from medical experts, politicians and commentators recently. But how is Covid-19 affecting regular Woman's Hour listeners? Over the coming weeks, we're going to be following a range of families and individuals and asking them for their take on the unprecedented situation we currently find ourselves in. Then - once it's all over - we'll have a unique social record of the coronavirus crisis from the perspective of women. To kick it all off, Jenni speaks to mum of two, Mercy Haruna.

Why do we choose the clothes we do? In her new book, ‘Dress Your Best Life’, the American fashion psychologist Dawnn Karen explains how our clothing is the ‘connective tissue’ between the physical and emotional. She joins Jenni to discuss how our clothes do the talking.

A lot of people suddenly have extra time on their hands, either from the lack of a commute because they're now working from home, the loss of a social life or from not being able to work at all. So once you've cast a critical eye over your bookshelf and binged on box-sets, why not take up that hobby you've always meant to start - or indeed return to. Jenni asks nature writer Emma Mitchell, journalist Almara Abgarian and Woman’s Hour listener Rhiannon Jenkins for their top picks of activities that can be easily accessed - from learning a language, to mastering macrame and drawing a leaf.

Presenter - Jenni Murray
Producer - Anna Lacey
Guest - Dr Jenny Harries
Guest - Mercy Haruna
Guest - Dawnn Karen
Guest - Emma Mitchell
Guest - Almara Abgarian
Guest - Rhiannon Jenkins


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00qxzbb)
Absent

Reality

By Mark Davies Markham.

Tony is outraged when his parenting skills are assessed during his children's visits. But his son Josh has a solution: that his parents spend half the week each in their house.

Tony ...... Craige Els
Clare ...... Gillian Kearney
Helen ...... Joanna Monro
Morley ...... Bruce Alexander
Sean ...... Carl Prekopp
Ryan ...... Michael Shelford
Nick ...... Robert Hitchmough

Directed by Claire Grove.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (m000gln1)
Indonesia: Not cool to date

Saying no to dating is part of a growing ultraconservative social movement in Indonesia being spread through Instagram and WhatsApp. “When I look at couples, I see my old self, how I used to be affectionate in public, holding hands, hugging,” says 23-year-old Yati, “and now I think that’s disgusting.” When Yati broke up with her ex, she didn’t just swear off dating; she joined Indonesia’s anti-dating movement - Indonesia Without Dating. Its leaders say dating is expensive, gets in the way of study, and - most importantly - is against religious teaching. For Crossing Continents, Simon Maybin discovers it is part of a wider youth-led surge in conservative Islam in the world’s most populous Muslim-majority country. Opponents see the phenomenon as a backwards step for women and a threat to Indonesia’s religious pluralism.

Presenter: Simon Maybin
Producer: Josephine Casserly
Editor: Bridget Harney
Music at the end of the programme was Tubuhku Otoritasku by Tika and The Dissidents.


THU 11:30 Only Artists (m0000qkv)
Series 6

Norman Ackroyd meets Robert Macfarlane

The landscape painter and print-maker Norman Ackroyd meets the writer Robert Macfarlane.

Norman, who celebrated his 80th birthday this year, invites Robert to his studio in Bermondsey, London. They discuss their fascination with wild landscapes and islands, and how they attempt to come to a deeper understanding of place. They also share their thoughts on their working methods: for Norman, printmaking is like writing music - trying to capture and fix light and weather. For Robert, writing is a strange and solitary process: he reflects on the rhythm of prose and reads his latest “selkie” or seal-folk song.

Norman has been etching and painting for seven decades, with a focus on the British landscape - from the south of England to the most northerly parts of Scotland. His works are in the collections of leading museums and galleries around the world.

Robert has written widely about the natural world: his book The Old Ways is a best-selling exploration of Britain's ancient paths. In 2017 he published The Lost Words, a collaboration with the artist Jackie Morris, in which they aimed to bring nearby nature – the animals, trees and plants from our landscapes – back into the lives and stories of Britain’s children.

Producer Clare Walker


THU 12:00 News Summary (m000gln3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gln5)
Episode 9: Bloody Chamber

Anton Lesser continues the long-awaited final book in Hilary Mantel's Booker-winning Thomas Cromwell trilogy.

August 1537: England is still healing from the wounds of the northern rebellions, but the queen’s pregnancy has held, so all hope is of an heir...

Writer: Hilary Mantel
Reader: Anton Lesser
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m000gln7)
Recruiting Carers; Lockdown after Flooding; DIY

‘From Air to Care" is one slogan being used by a care home hoping to attract airline staff laid off by the Coronavirus crisis. A huge recruitment drive is underway to attract airline and hospitality staff into the social care sector as it prepares to look after more and more older and disabled people during the outbreak. The Local Government Association is also calling for retired workers to rejoin the workforce. Shari Vahl speaks to the head of one of the UK's biggest care home businesses, Four Seasons Health Care, about how it plans to turn hospitality staff into carers.

Five weeks ago Storm Dennis swept across the UK, leaving flooding and transport disruption in its wake. Around 1400 homes were affected. One woman from Aberdulais in Neath Port Talbot says Storm Dennis was the second flood to devastate her home in 6 months. She says there's not been enough support, and the lockdown is only making things worse.

And as sales of DIY goods increase, we speak to interior designer Abigail Ahern about how to make the most of your time inside the home.

Presented by Shari Vahl
Produced by Natalie Donovan


THU 12:57 Weather (m000gln9)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m000glnc)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


THU 13:45 Girl Taken (m000glnf)
9. A Time for Answers

BBC journalist Sue Mitchell and ex-soldier-turned- good-Samaritan Rob Lawrie thought they were involved in the heart-breaking, but straightforward story of an Afghan father and his motherless daughter as they struggled to get to Britain. The following four years saw Sue and Rob fall into a web of lies and life changing, mind changing events. Girl Taken is a 10 part hunt - across closed borders and broken promises - for the truth and to find a little girl, taken.

Producer: Sue Mitchell
Studio Production and Sound Design: Richard Hannaford


THU 14:00 The Archers (m000glnh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (m000glnk)
The Blackrock Girl (Part 1)

The Blackrock Girl is Lucy Gannon’s two part drama about Finn, who appears in a quiet rural village in Ireland, bringing with her the assumed (the locals assume) glamour of the big city. She comes from Blackrock but sometimes she doesn’t sound as if she does. But, she explains, she spent a few years as a child over the border in Omagh and so her accent has become a bit strangled and anyway, after a lifetime nursing overseas, in Africa and India, devoting herself to the poor and needy, it’s not surprising her accent is slightly off kilter sometimes. Exhausted she returns to Ireland deciding to start a new life and this is how she finds herself in this charming friendly rural Irish village of Bridesway. Approaching life with an air of entitlement and yet warmth she is, very definitely, likeable. She has charisma, and makes friends easily. She’s interested in people, tolerant, helpful. She’s just plain NICE.

But Finn is broke. She’s never nursed a single person in her whole life, although she has often held the hands of the dying. Her name used to be Moira, then Eileen, then Mary, Frances and now Theresa. She’s wanted in England, Scotland and Cyprus, for fraud, theft and extortion.

Episode One
Theresa Finn (The Blackrock Girl) arrives in the small rural village of Bridesway moving into the dilapidated Manse House with a view to doing it up and starting a new life. She befriends the whole village, effortlessly and quickly gets Evie Bourne, the local post mistress on her side. She particularly forges a friendship with the wealthy OAP Charles and appears to be doing him the world of good. Only the retired policeman Martin is suspicious of her. She arranges a tea party to celebrate her old and new friends (Her old friends don’t turn up) and in order to do this she relies on the locals to do all the work, promising to pay them handsomely after the event……

Finn is played by Fenella Woolgar
Ellen ….. Marion O’Dwyer
Evie ….. Pauline McLynn
Martin ….. Des McAleer
Charles ….. Jonathan Coy
Dave ….. Jamie Beamish

Produced by Celia DeWolff for BBC Northern Ireland


THU 15:00 Ramblings (m000glnm)
Herefordshire Interfaith Group on the Malverns

Clare Balding walks across a section of The Malverns, from Hollybush car park towards British Camp, with members of the Herefordshire Interfaith Group. In a world that feels increasingly divided, this group draws together Muslims, Quakers, Buddhists, Bahá’ís, Methodists and more. It's a leisurely stroll, with many pauses to reflect and share readings on the themes of Pilgrimage and Nature. Note: when we walked this route, in early March 2020, it was affected by flooding in the lower lying sections.

In this series, Clare has walked with people and groups of many faiths and none to discover how being in the natural world can affect our inner lives.

Producer: Karen Gregor


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m000glnp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m000glnr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 BBC Inside Science (m000glnw)
Coronavirus - Lockdown efficacy; viral testing; surface survival; dog walking safety

Last week, we promised we’d tackle your coronavirus and associated Covid 19 questions and you came up trumps. So this week we’re be talking about the latest from the lockdown, why there are bottlenecks in the testing system, how long the virus lives on your door handles and whether your dog can spread coronavirus. Joining us to answer your questions are Jonathan Ball, Professor of Virology at the University of Nottingham, and BBC Radio Science presenter and reporter Roland Pease.

On Monday evening, Prime Minister Boris Johnson told the British people to ‘stay at home’. How stringent is the UK’s lockdown compared to other countries, and is it likely to be effective?

The only real way we can know about the incidence and prevalence of the coronavirus is to test. Listener Andrew in Didcot wants to know more about testing and when antibodies appear in us. We discuss how the current testing system works, and why there are limitations on testing.

One question that lots of scientists have been asking is: can people with mild or no symptoms spread the coronavirus? And so we delve into the evidence for asymptomatic spreading.

Listeners Eleanor and Andy have been wondering about passing the virus from person to surface to person. Roland Pease looks into the virus’ survival on surfaces and elsewhere, and asks how that might be affecting spread.

Finally, reporter Geoff Marsh tackles a quandary facing dog owners: Is it safe to walk your pet? Can dogs spread the virus?

Presenter: Marnie Chesterton
Producers: Fiona Roberts and Jennifer Whyntie


THU 16:30 PM (m000glny)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000glp0)
The Chancellor, Rishi Sunak, has announced what he says is a "fair and deliverable" package of support for the self employed workers because of the coronavirus outbreak.


THU 18:30 The Break (b0b6htgg)
Series 2

The Last Farewell

The death of Frank's rival, Frank, causes Frank mixed emotions - glee and joy. Starring Philip Jackson, Tom Palmer, Alison Steadman, Mark Benton, Shobna Gulati and Rasmus Hardiker.

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (m000glp2)
Ruth quizzes Josh about her children’s night out. Ben didn’t come home and Josh says he crashed with college friends. Josh and Pip agree to maintain this cover story for Ben. Jill is also worried about Ben’s whereabouts but then he sends Ruth a message telling her to chill out.

Peggy visits Lynda in hospital and likens Lynda’s spirit to that of her mother’s. Lynda asks Peggy to call for a nurse. When she can’t find anyone Peggy offers to help but Lynda insists on a nurse; she needs help to go to the toilet.

Ben surprises Jill when he gets back to Brookfield. Jill can see through the muddled cover story of where he stayed last night. She agrees not to say anything to anyone else. Ben then meets Josh and gives a fuller account of how he spent last night. He met a woman called Chloe who’s gorgeous. Ben plans to go out again next Saturday and reckons he won’t be home again. Josh shudders at Ben’s sudden confidence in going out and meeting women. He feels they may have unleashed a monster.


THU 19:15 Front Row (m000glp4)
Owen Sheers, Nikita Lalwani, Writing in isolation

The bestselling children’s book series The Snow Spider has been adapted for TV by award-winning writer, poet and playwright Owen Sheers. It is a fantasy drama that follows nine-year-old Gwyn as he discovers his magical powers and his family connection to the Welsh myths of the Mabinogion. Owen tells us how he adapted a much-loved classic.

Booker longlisted author Nikita Lalwani discusses her new novel You People, which tells the story of a London pizzeria that employs and supports refugees and illegal immigrants. But what happens when moral decisions are left at the hands of a man beyond the law? Nikita reveals the inspiration behind the story and her research into the refugee crisis and Britain’s hostile environment.

With book festivals cancelled, Amazon book stocks about to run out and self-employed authors facing difficult financial circumstances, book publicist Georgina Moore joins us to discuss how the literary world is adapting to the challenges of Coronavirus.

Looking for a creative project while self-isolating? Writers Nikita Lalwani and Owen Sheers give us a masterclass in how to write a novel. As well as being award-winning authors, Nikita and Owen also teach creative writing – Nikita is a Senior Lecturer on the MA Creative Writing course at Royal Holloway and Owen is a Professor in Creativity at Swansea University.

Presenter: Shahidha Bari
Producer: Edwina Pitman and Lucy Wai

Main image: Fflynn Edwards as Gwyn Griffiths in The Snow Spider
Image credit: Leopard Pictures


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01gym86)
Series 1

Episode 4

A dramatisation of Alexander McCall Smith's acclaimed series based on the residents of a fictitious tenement building in a real Edinburgh New Town street, inspired by Maupin's Tales of The City. Pat's on a desperate search for a lost masterpiece, and Dr Fairbairn just needs peace.

Anthropologist Domenica MacDonald observes the lives of her neighbours and the neighbourhood in Edinburgh's New Town. Pat, a new young tenant, arrives at 44 Scotland Street to flat share with Bruce. Bruce is a surveyor with more of an eye for the ladies than a sound property. We're introduced to five-year-old Bertie, who is controlled by his pretentious and intellectual mother Irene - he's learning the saxophone, speaks Italian, and is extremely knowledgeable about many subjects. And then there's Matthew, setting up the Something Special Gallery with little knowledge of artists or paintings!

With its multiple-occupancy flats, Scotland Street is an interesting corner of the New Town, verging on the Bohemian, where haute bourgeoisie rubs shoulders with students and the more colourful members of the intelligentsia.

One of McCall Smith's particular talents is his ability to portray archetypes without resorting to stereotype or cliche. In McCall Smith's hands such characters retain charm and novelty, simultaneously arousing both mirth and empathy, 44 Scotland Street is vintage McCall Smith.

CAST:
DOMENICA................CAROL ANN CRAWFORD
DR FAIRBAIRN.................CRAWFORD LOGAN
IRENE..............................ROSALIND SYDNEY
PAT.........................................BELLE JONES

Music by Tom Cunningham

Producer/director: David Ian Neville.


THU 20:00 The Battle for English (m000gkv4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Monday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (m000glp6)
TV Streaming

There's a battle for our eyeballs in the market for video on demand. Who will win? 20 years ago Netflix was a company that rented DVDs to its customers. Now its a billon-dollar enterprise streaming its own content and movies. But new challengers are entering the market, like Disney Plus, Apple TV and the UK's Britbox. So what does it take to grab the viewers? Evan Davis and guests discuss.

GUESTS

Richard Broughton, Ampere Analysis

Reemah Sakaan, Group Director ITV SVOD (Britbox)

Jane Turton, CEO, All3Media


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m000glnw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 today]


THU 21:30 The NHS Front Line (m000h5jx)
Week 1 on the Coronavirus Wards

A senior NHS doctor has been recording on the wards for BBC Radio 4 – starting on March 16th, the day the Prime Minister gave his first televised address about the danger of COVID-19.

These recordings with frontline NHS staff at all levels, take you behind the scenes on the wards as they plan for what is to come and then cope as the patients arrive. They let us share in the pressures, personal and professional, and in the decisions being made in the face of this unprecedented threat.

Professor John Wright is helping Bradford Royal Infirmary to get ready for COVID-19. He’s looked after patients all over the world – cholera and HIV in southern Africa, Ebola in Sierra Leone. He thinks it’s important we should all know what we are facing.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Sue Mitchell
Sound Design by Richard Hannaford


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m000glp9)
Chancellor unveils new support scheme for self-employed

(Pic: A self-employed builder works on a property in Billericay, Essex)
(Credit: Nick Ansell/PA Wire)


THU 22:45 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gln5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 Mark Watson and Matt Winning: Seriously, Though, The Planet (m000glpc)
Like almost everyone, multi-award winning comedian Mark Watson has addressed the global climate crisis by dithering and hoping for the best.

Now he teams up with comic and actual environmental scientist Dr Matt Winning, in a last-ditch bid to stave off emergency and save the planet with a mixture of jokes and useful advice.

Mark is coached by Matt on environmental economics. In this episode, the focus is on food - what we should buy, how we can reduce waste and whether broccoli will save us all in the end.

Produced by Lianne Coop.
An Impatient production for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:30 The Digital Human (m0003jst)
Series 16

Haven

On New Year's Eve in 2015 Vicky Schaubert, a journalist from Norwegian broadcaster NRK heard a story that was to stay with her for many years prompting her to research and write an article about a young man called Mats Steen from Oslo.

At the age of four he was diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, a muscular disease which was to drastically shorten his life expectancy. His father, Robert introduced Mats to gaming hoping it would help substitute all the things he was not able to do. Mats spent the last ten years of his life before his death in 2014 rarely going out of the apartment he lived in. He spent the majority of his time gaming online. After Mats passed away his parents mourned what they thought was a very lonely and isolated life, that was until Robert decided he needed to reach out to the gaming community to tell them Mats would no longer be logging on.

Robert was not prepared for what happened next. He received many, many emails from people around the world shining a new light on the life of his son. Mats' story had a profound effect on Vicky Schaubert who reached out to Mats’ family to tell his story. After learning about Mats she apologised to her sons for her attitude towards the time they have spent gaming. Vicky attached no value to gamming and shamed them for wasting their time until she learned about Mats. Exploring Mats' story, Aleks discovers how easy it is to make assumptions about something you can't see - whether it’s inside the mind of another person, or inside the computer where connections and community offer a new opportunity for someone to find their people.

Produced by Kate Bissell
Researched by Laurence Cook



FRIDAY 27 MARCH 2020

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m000glph)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 00:30 Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash (m000glmx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000glpk)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000glpm)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000glpp)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m000glpr)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000glpt)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Father Jim O'Keefe


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m000glpw)
27/03/20 Farmers markets and coronavirus; A veg grower's life under lockdown; Disease in deer.

One of the country's biggest farmers markets has decided to shut, for the first time in its 20 year history.
Hundreds of people flock to Stroud in Gloucestershire every week to get fresh local meat, veg and other farm produce.
Traders persevered with the market last week, but tomorrow customers will have to collect their shopping instead. Other farmers markets, like Kendal in Cumbria are staying open, but they're having to find different ways of doing business to comply with Covid19 distancing rules.

As the coronavirus lockdown continues to affect all our lives, we're asking people in rural communities around the UK to give us an idea of how they're bearing up. The latest in our series of Farming Today diaries comes from farmer George Bennett in Thame in Oxfordshire.

The number of deer in the UK is growing: more farmers are keeping them for venison and wild deer populations are increasing. Despite this, very little is known about disease in the deer population. In recent years outbreaks of E. coli in people (causing gastroenteritis) have been linked to venison products. Sam Pearce from the University of Bristol has started investigating disease in the deer population to identify the potential role deer may play in the transmission of enteric disease.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (m0000sst)
James Henry: Yellowhammer and Beethoven

Detective Jack Frost prequel author James Henry picks the yellowhammer, whose song is believed to have influenced one of the world’s greatest composers Ludwig Van Beethoven..

Although many think the yellowhammer is a symbol of English farmland, it is in reality very much a European bird, famous for it's song. The natural world provided Ludwig Van Beethoven with a constant source of ideas and a number of his works are often attributed to the yellowhammer’s song. Many critics cite the dramatic first four bars of Beethoven's fifth symphony but for James and many others the more gentle first movement of Beethoven's fourth piano concerto is a more fitting celebration and for James it is that which he listens to during the winter months to remind him of the summer, and his favourite farmland bird.

In addition, all this week James will be choosing five of his favourite episodes from the Tweet of the Day back catalogue.

Producer Andrew Dawes


FRI 06:00 Today (m000gn5s)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m000gm8m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash (m000gn5v)
Ep 5 Returning to Shore

In Lamorna Ash' evocative and vivid memoir about the Cornish fishing community of Newlyn, near Land's End, there is one last wonder on board the fishing trawler. First of all, Lamorna recounts a tragedy on the high seas which still reverberates along Cornwall's coast. Ell Potter reads.

Lamorna Ash is a writer and playwright. Dark, Salt, Clear is her first book.

Abridged by Julian Wilkinson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000gn5x)
Exercise at home, Safe access to abortion during Covid-19, Lauren Gunderson, Jessica Moor

Keeping up fitness when you're isolated at home. Jenni talks to fitness instructor Rosemary Mallace of Over Fifty Fitness and Professor Janet Lord, an expert in muscle health and immunity from the University of Birmingham, about why keeping moving is particularly important as you get older and what you can do to exercise at home.

Earlier this week the Government published advice that women could be prescribed both abortion pills for a medical abortion, which they would be able to take at home, without attending a hospital or clinic. It has since said that this was published in error. With women trying to observe instructions to stay at home – some self-isolating – trying to reduce the spread of Coronavirus the British Pregnancy Advisory Service says that 500 women a day must make unnecessary journeys, with services and clinic closures forcing them to travel greater distances. So, how can those women who need an abortion access one safely and legally? Jenni speaks to Professor Lesley Regan, Past President RCOG and Co-Chair National Women’s Health Task Force and to Stella Creasy, Labour MP for Walthamstow.

Hampstead Theatre in London is currently streaming on Instagram, ‘I and You’ a play they produced in 2018 starring Maisie Williams in her first stage role. It looks at the struggle a teenager finding herself restricted to her home. The playwright, Lauren Gunderson, currently the most produced living playwright in the US, tells us about her play and what it says about the struggles of youth confined across the globe.

Keeper by Jessica Moor is a novel set in a women’s refuge. Katie, an employee there, has died. As the women in the refuge insist Katie didn’t take her own life the police are forced to investigate. Jenni talks to debut novelist Jessica Moor and to Natasha Saunders who has experience of domestic abuse and of life in a refuge. What can fiction do to shed light on domestic abuse?

Presented by Jenni Murray
Produced by Jane Thurlow

Interviewed guest: Stella Creasy
Interviewed guest: Lesley Regan
Interviewed guest: Lauren Gunderson
Interviewed guest: Jessica Moor
Interviewed guest: Natasha Saunders
Interviewed guest: Rosemary Mallace
Interviewed guest: Janet Lord


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00qxzbd)
Absent

Departure

By Mark Davies Markham.

Tony has proved himself as a father but his access to his children remains the same. His wife wants a new start 200 miles away.

Tony ...... Craige Els
Clare ...... Gillian Kearney
Miss Farrow ...... Alison Pettitt
Josh ...... Alfie Davies
Ryan ...... Michael Shelford
Nick ...... Robert Hitchmough

Directed by Claire Grove.


FRI 11:00 The Science of Dad (m000gn5z)
Whilst most men become fathers, and men make up roughly half the parental population, the vast majority of scientific research has focused on the mother.

But studies have started to reveal the impact of fatherhood on both dads themselves and on their children. We're seeing how fathers play a crucial role in children's behaviour, happiness, and even cognitive skills.

Oscar Duke, a doctor, new dad and author of How To Be A Dad, discovers how pregnancy, birth and childcare affect the father, bringing about profound physiological and hormonal changes. Only 5% of mammal fathers invest in their offspring, and human males have evolved to undergo key changes when their children are born.

Involved fathers can expect their levels of the 'love hormone' oxytocin to rise, nature's way of helping parents bond with their children. At birth, a dad's testosterone levels dramatically fall, increasing affection and responsiveness, and discouraging polygamy.

With more fathers taking on a hands-on role in bringing up their children, how can these new discoveries about the science of dad help support them, and inform social and healthcare policies?

Presented by Dr Oscar Duke and produced by Melanie Brown and Cathy Edwards


FRI 11:30 It's a Fair Cop (m000gn61)
Series 5

Police Complaints

There were over 30,000 complaints against the police last year. Some extremely serious, some trivial but all needed to be recorded. In this week's real case, Alfie finds himself the somewhat reluctant copper in charge of the station front desk as a procession of members of the public present him with their pressing problems.

Written and presented by Alfie Moore
Script Editor: Will Ing
Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m000gn64)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gn66)
Episode 10: Portrait

Anton Lesser continues the long-awaited finale to Hilary Mantel's Booker-winning Thomas Cromwell series.

Autumn 1539. Henry finally has a legitimate heir, but has lost his beloved wife Jane. With England in need of allies, Cromwell’s attentions are now turned to Germany to secure an alliance in the shape of a new wife for Henry. Anne of Cleves is a likely candidate.

Writer: Hilary Mantel
Reader: Anton Lesser
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m000gn68)
Student Rents, House Moves and Peak Lockdown

Students protest against paying rent for rooms they'll never use

The view from the high street as the government's plan to help the self employed sinks in

The home hiatus- can you still move house in the current crisis?

You can't look after a lion at home! So, how is Britain's second most popular paid attraction, Chester Zoo, coping with the lock down and no visitors?

How is the home of Keep Calm and Carry on Coping?

POlice move to enforce lock-down rules at UK beauty spots that have been overwhelmed with visitors despite pleas to stay at home


FRI 12:57 Weather (m000gn6b)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m000gn6d)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 Girl Taken (m000gn6g)
10. An End in Sight

BBC journalist Sue Mitchell and ex-soldier-turned- good-Samaritan Rob Lawrie thought they were involved in the heart-breaking, but straightforward story of an Afghan father and his motherless daughter as they struggled to get to Britain. The following four years saw Sue and Rob fall into a web of lies and life changing, mind changing events. Girl Taken is a 10 part hunt - across closed borders and broken promises - for the truth and to find a little girl, taken.

Producer: Sue Mitchell
Studio Production and Sound Design: Richard Hannaford


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m000glp2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (m000gn6j)
The Blackrock Girl (Part 2)

The Blackrock Girl is Lucy Gannon’s two part drama about Finn, who appears in a quiet rural village in Ireland, bringing with her the assumed (the locals assume) glamour of the big city. She comes from Blackrock but sometimes she doesn’t sound as if she does. But, she explains, she spent a few years as a child over the border in Omagh and so her accent has become a bit strangled and anyway, after a lifetime nursing overseas, in Africa and India, devoting herself to the poor and needy, it’s not surprising her accent is slightly off kilter sometimes. Exhausted she returns to Ireland deciding to start a new life and this is how she finds herself in this charming friendly Irish rural village of Bridesway. Approaching life with an air of entitlement and yet warmth she is, very definitely, likeable. She has charisma, and makes friends easily. She’s interested in people, tolerant, helpful. She’s just plain NICE.

But Finn is broke. She’s never nursed a single person in her whole life, although she has often held the hands of the dying. Her name used to be Moira, then Eileen, then Mary, Frances and now Theresa. She’s wanted in England, Scotland and Cyprus, for fraud, theft and extortion.

Episode Two
Local OAP has been lured by Theresa Finn and he is now a changed man. He is clean and tidy and he is happy with his relationship with Finn. The Postmistress Evie Bourne is growing slightly concerned however that Charles has withdrawn a large amount of cash recently but puts it down to the fact that he is happy with Finn and she is sprucing up. Retired Policeman Martin, still unsettled by the fact that Finn has not yet paid anyone for the works done on the Manse house or for the catering and arrangements for the Garden Party she decided to hold to get to celebrate both old and new friends (the old never turned up!), Martin gets in touch with a former colleague to do a bit of enquiring…

Finn is beginning to get restless and decides she needs to go away for a few days to Dublin on her own and whilst she is gone The Manse catches fire…….
Was it deliberate, was it arson………. Martin finds out the truth.

Martin eventually convinces Evie that Finn is a bad ‘un and she in turn convinces the rest of the village. They together defend Charles (against his will) and thwart Finn, but she makes a last desperate attempt to get Charles’ money, and Evie and Martin link arms to destroy her plan and to run her out.

Finn has never nursed a single person in her whole life, although she has often held the hands of the dying. Her name used to be Moira, then Eileen, then Mary, Frances and now Theresa. She’s wanted in England, Scotland and Cyprus, for fraud, theft and extortion.
Charles is left broken hearted.

Evie and Martin fall in love and Bridesway is back to how it should be.

Finn is played by Fenella Woolgar
Ellen ….. Marion O’Dwyer
Evie ….. Pauline McLynn
Martin ….. Des McAleer
Charles ….. Jonathan coy
Dave ….. Jamie Beamish
Beth ….. Ell Potter

Produced by Celia DeWolff for BBC Northern Ireland


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000gn6l)
North Guildford

Peter Gibbs is joined by Pippa Greenwood, Matthew Pottage and Matt Biggs in North Guildford, Surrey, in a programme recorded before the current situation with the coronavirus..

The panellists answer questions on getting Strelitzia to flower, how frequently to change the soil in large containers and planting suggestions for a narrow, shady passage by a house. They also identify some garden pests and recommend how to deal with them.

Away from the questions, Matt Biggs meets Geoff Simmons in Tooting to find out about Peter Barr - or as he's more fondly known - the Daffodil King.

Producer: Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Rosie Merotra

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 Short Works (m000gnln)
Worth

Nikesh Patel reads Ben Hall's original story for BBC Radio 4.

It is late at night, and a young man is doing the graveyard shift in his father's convenience store. He doesn't mind working nights, but customers can often be unpredictable...

Writer: Ben Halls is the author of the acclaimed debut collection, The Quarry, based on a fictional working-class West London estate.
Reader: Nikesh Patel
Producer: Justine Willett


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m000gn6n)
Betty Williams, Dr Fuad Nahdi, Sol Kerzner, Kenny Rogers

Picture Betty Williams

Matthew Bannister on:
Fuad Nahdi, the journalist, commentator and campaigner named as one of the world’s 500 most influential Muslims.
Sol Kerzner, the South African businessman who made a fortune from hotels and casinos and built the controversial Sun City resort under apartheid.
Betty Williams, the office receptionist from Belfast who teamed up with Mairead Corrigan to campaign for peace and won the Nobel Peace Prize.
Kenny Rogers, one of America’s greatest country singers known for hits like “Lucille” and “Ruby Don’t Take Your Love To Town.”

Interviewed guest: Abdul-Rehman Malik
Interviewed guest: Bishop Toby Howarth
Interviewed guest: Paul Martin
Interviewed guest: Chris Ryder
Interviewed guest: Garth Cartwright
Interviewed guest: Bob Harris

Producer: Neil George


FRI 16:30 PM (m000gn6v)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000gn6x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (m000gn6z)
Series 56

Episode 4

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis get to grips with the continuing COVID-19 disruption with sketches and guests

With comedians Ellie Taylor, Kai Samra, and Dominic Frisby.

Written by the cast, with additional material from Jenny Laville, Robin Morgan, Hannah Fairweather and Simon Alcock

Producer Julia McKenzie

A BBC Studios Production


FRI 19:00 Front Row (m000gn73)
Disco legend Gloria Gaynor made headlines last week when her TikTok video encouraging people to wash their hands to her hit I Will Survive went viral. She joins us from her home in South Carolina, to discuss winning a Grammy for her latest album Testimony, and how she's keeping busy in self-isolation.

As galleries and art centres close their doors many organisations are turning to digital platforms to reach audiences, but what about the 5 million people in the UK that don’t have access to the internet? Front Row speaks to Stella Duffy, co-director of Fun Palaces and Sally Shaw, Director of Firstsite Gallery in Colchester about the initiatives they’re setting up to reach those that are not online.

Maggie O’Farrell’s latest novel is named after Shakespeare’s only son Hamnet, who died of the Plague. It has been almost universally acclaimed as her finest work.
And a new film – Vivarium – is a study in claustrophobia and enforced closeness for a young couple who have to live in a house they can’t leave. Starring Imogen Poots and Jesse Eisenberg it has an eerie resonance in the current world of social isolation and lockdown. Jenny McCartney and Barb Jungr join John to review the book and the film.

And Shahidha Bari joins Front Row for our Cultural Clinic. She'll be answering questions on the cultural significance of clothes - especially when we're at home and tempted to stay in our PJs all day.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Sarah Johnson


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01h01wr)
Series 1

Episode 5

A dramatisation of Alexander McCall Smith's acclaimed series based on the residents of a fictitious tenement building in a real Edinburgh New Town street, inspired by Maupin's Tales of The City.

Anthropologist Domenica MacDonald observes the lives of her neighbours and the neighbourhood in Edinburgh's New Town. Pat, a new young tenant, arrives at 44 Scotland Street to flat share with Bruce. Bruce is a surveyor with more of an eye for the ladies than a sound property. We're introduced to five-year-old Bertie, who is controlled by his pretentious and intellectual mother Irene - he's learning the saxophone, speaks Italian, and is extremely knowledgeable about many subjects. And then there's Matthew, setting up the Something Special Gallery with little knowledge of artists or paintings!

With its multiple-occupancy flats, Scotland Street is an interesting corner of the New Town, verging on the Bohemian, where haute bourgeoisie rubs shoulders with students and the more colourful members of the intelligentsia.

One of McCall Smith's particular talents is his ability to portray archetypes without resorting to stereotype or cliche. In McCall Smith's hands such characters retain charm and novelty, simultaneously arousing both mirth and empathy, 44 Scotland Street is vintage McCall Smith.

CAST:
DOMENICA................CAROL ANN CRAWFORD
DR FAIRBAIRN.................CRAWFORD LOGAN
IRENE..............................ROSALIND SYDNEY
BERTIE.........................................EUAN LEE
PAT.........................................BELLE JONES
MATTHEW..............................SAMUEL KEEFE
IAN RANKIN.......................JAMES MACKENZIE

Music by Tom Cunningham

Producer/director: David Ian Neville.


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m000gn75)
Silkie Carlo, Baroness Professor Ilora Finlay, Andy McDonald MP, Nadhim Zahawi MP

Chris Mason chairs political debate from Broadcasting House London with the Director of the pressure group Big Brother Watch Silkie Carlo, Palliative care expert Baroness Professor Ilora Finlay, the Shadow Transport Secretary Andy McDonald, and the Business Minister Nadhim Zahawi.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m000gn77)
Fighting infection with imagination

"As our physical reality is reduced down to a few rooms or a view from a window," writes Sarah Dunant, "our ability to conjure up things we're not able to experience is going to be vital to feed our imaginations."

Sarah argues that - given social distancing - imagination is going to be an exceedingly powerful inner muscle when it comes to our mental survival.
She offers us a few of her stand out images to get us started.

Producer: Adele Armstrong


FRI 21:00 Girl Taken (m000gn79)
Omnibus (6-10)

BBC journalist Sue Mitchell and ex-soldier-turned-good-Samaritan Rob Lawrie thought they were involved in the heart-breaking, but straightforward story of an Afghan father and his motherless daughter as they struggled to get to Britain. The following four years saw Sue and Rob fall into a web of lies and life-changing, mind-changing events. Girl Taken is a 10-part hunt - across closed borders and broken promises - for the truth and to find a little girl, taken.

Producer: Sue Mitchell
Studio Production and Sound Design: Richard Hannaford


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m000gn7c)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gn66)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (m000gl99)
Helen Lederer & Angela Barnes

Comedians Helen Lederer and Angela Barnes and presenter Harriett Gilbert nominate books they consider to be a good read. We're taken to London's theatreland in David Nichols' The Understudy, Muriel Spark's Italy in Alan Taylor's Appointment in Arezzo and the former East Germany in Stasiland by Anna Funder. Please follow us on Instagram at @agoodreadbbc. Producer Sally Heaven.


FRI 23:25 The Digital Human (b09tcvnw)
Series 13

Visage

The human face is quintessential part of our identity - crucial for communication, expressing emotion and understanding our place in the world.

So what happens when that most human of interfaces is placed over what boils down to a cluster of motors and a few lines of code? Aleks Krotoski explores how we will be psychologically affected by machines that can look us in the eye and smile back at us.

Producer: Elizabeth Ann Duffy.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (m000gn7h)
Capturing the nation in conversation, in partnership with the British Library.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b00qsw2h)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b01gvkw5)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b00qxzb6)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b01gyk32)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b00qxzb8)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b01gyk57)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b00qxzbb)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b01gym86)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b00qxzbd)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b01h01wr)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (m000gl99)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m000gc5t)

A Point of View 23:50 SUN (m000gc5t)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m000gn77)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (m000gcx0)

Analysis 21:00 MON (m000gkwc)

Annika Stranded 21:45 SAT (m000700y)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m000gkrx)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m000gc5r)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m000gn75)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m000gksj)

BBC Inside Science 16:00 THU (m000glnw)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m000glnw)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m000gksz)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m000gksz)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m000gm8h)

Conversations on a Bench 23:30 SAT (m000gd7s)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (m000gl95)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (m000gl95)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (m000gln1)

Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash 09:45 MON (m000gkww)

Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash 00:30 TUE (m000gkww)

Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash 09:45 TUE (m000gl8j)

Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash 00:30 WED (m000gl8j)

Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash 09:45 WED (m000gmfj)

Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash 00:30 THU (m000gmfj)

Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash 09:45 THU (m000glmx)

Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash 00:30 FRI (m000glmx)

Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash 09:45 FRI (m000gn5v)

Day Release 21:00 SAT (b075qjfp)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (m000gm8m)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m000gm8m)

Drama 15:00 SAT (b0bcg1sw)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b09sqwfw)

Drama 14:15 WED (m0000qqt)

Drama 14:15 THU (m000glnk)

Drama 14:15 FRI (m000gn6j)

Eighteen 11:30 TUE (m000gl8q)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m000gkr8)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m000gmbl)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m000gkxq)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m000glbb)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m000gmhb)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m000glpw)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (m000gc59)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (m000gd0r)

Four Seasons 16:30 SUN (m000gm93)

From Our Home Correspondent 13:30 SUN (m000gm8x)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m000gkrl)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m000gkw7)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m000gl9k)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m000gmgk)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m000glp4)

Front Row 19:00 FRI (m000gn73)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m000gc53)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m000gn6l)

Girl Taken 13:45 MON (m000glx7)

Girl Taken 13:45 TUE (m000gmmy)

Girl Taken 13:45 WED (m000gmg3)

Girl Taken 13:45 THU (m000glnf)

Girl Taken 13:45 FRI (m000gn6g)

Girl Taken 21:00 FRI (m000gn79)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b09y6zfr)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m000gl9p)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (m000gl9r)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (m000gl9r)

It's a Fair Cop 11:30 FRI (m000gn61)

Jack Rooke: Good Grief 23:00 TUE (b08j8yhw)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m000gc57)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m000gn6n)

Le Divide 11:00 WED (m000gmfq)

Lent Talks 05:45 SUN (m000gbgj)

Lent Talks 20:45 WED (m000gmgp)

Lights Out 23:00 MON (m000gkwl)

Living World 06:35 SUN (m000gm81)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m000gksb)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m000gksb)

Mark Watson Talks a Bit About Life 18:30 WED (m000gmgh)

Mark Watson and Matt Winning: Seriously, Though, The Planet 23:00 THU (m000glpc)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m000gc62)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m000gksn)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m000gmb2)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m000gkwr)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m000gl9y)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m000gmgy)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m000glph)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m000gkrq)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m000gkrq)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m000gmg5)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (m000gbgg)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (m000gmgm)

More or Less 09:00 WED (m000gwy8)

More or Less 21:30 WED (m000gwy8)

Nature Table 12:04 SUN (m000gcwr)

New Irish Writing 19:45 SUN (b03xgsw6)

New Storytellers 09:30 TUE (m000761f)

New Weird Britain 21:30 TUE (m0006132)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m000gc6b)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m000gksx)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m000gmbg)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m000gkxg)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m000glb6)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m000gmh6)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m000glpr)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (m000gm7z)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m000gkrn)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m000gm8p)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m000gkxs)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m000gl8s)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m000gmfs)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m000gln3)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m000gn64)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m000gkr6)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m000gm85)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m000gm8c)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (m000gksl)

News 13:00 SAT (m000gkrv)

News 20:30 MON (m000h34f)

One to One 14:45 SAT (m000f5g1)

Only Artists 16:00 MON (m000fvyg)

Only Artists 11:30 THU (m0000qkv)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m000glnr)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m000glnr)

PM 17:00 SAT (m000gks1)

PM 17:00 MON (m000gkvw)

PM 16:30 TUE (m000gl9c)

PM 16:30 WED (m000gmgc)

PM 16:30 THU (m000glny)

PM 16:30 FRI (m000gn6v)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m000gm9n)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m000gc6d)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m000gmbj)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m000gkxl)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m000glb8)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m000gmh8)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m000glpt)

Profile 05:45 SAT (m000gksd)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m000gksd)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m000gksd)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m000glnp)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m000glnp)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m000glnp)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (m000gbj6)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (m000glnm)

Reflection on Mothering Sunday 06:05 SUN (m000gzmb)

Reluctant Persuaders 19:15 SUN (m0000xrp)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (m000gcwc)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (m000gkvp)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m000gkrg)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (m000gksg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m000gc66)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m000gkss)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m000gmbb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m000gkx6)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m000glb2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m000gmh2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m000glpm)

Shakespeare in a Divided America, by James Shapiro 00:30 SAT (m000gc4b)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m000gc64)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m000gc68)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m000gks4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m000gksq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m000gksv)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m000gm97)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m000gmb6)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m000gmbd)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m000gkx2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m000gkxb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m000glb0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m000glb4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m000gmh0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m000gmh4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m000glpk)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m000glpp)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (m000gl93)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (m000gnln)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m000gks8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m000gm9h)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m000gkw0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m000gl9f)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m000gmgf)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m000glp0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m000gn6x)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (m000gkty)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (m000gkty)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m000gm8f)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m000gm87)

Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! 18:30 MON (m000gkw2)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m000gm8k)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m000gkvk)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m000gkvk)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m000gkw5)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m000gkw5)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m000gl9h)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m000gl9h)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m000glnh)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m000glnh)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m000glp2)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m000glp2)

The Battle for English 11:00 MON (m000gkv4)

The Battle for English 20:00 THU (m000gkv4)

The Book of Polyamory 20:00 MON (m000gkw9)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (m000gbjv)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (m000glp6)

The Break 18:30 THU (b0b6htgg)

The Cathedral Thinkers 11:00 TUE (m000gl8n)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (m000gkvt)

The Digital Human 23:30 THU (m0003jst)

The Digital Human 23:25 FRI (b09tcvnw)

The Extinction Tapes 09:30 WED (m0009zcb)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m000gkvr)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m000gkvr)

The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter 15:00 SUN (m000gm91)

The Hidden History of the Mantelpiece 16:00 TUE (m000gl97)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (m000gm8z)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (m000gmfn)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (m000gn7h)

The Media Show 16:00 WED (m000gmg9)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 12:04 MON (m000gkv9)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 22:45 MON (m000gkv9)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 12:04 TUE (m000gl8v)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 22:45 TUE (m000gl8v)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 12:04 WED (m000gmfv)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 22:45 WED (m000gmfv)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 12:04 THU (m000gln5)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 22:45 THU (m000gln5)

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The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 22:45 FRI (m000gn66)

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