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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 11 JANUARY 2020

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m000d234)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:30 State of the Nation (m000czyd)
State of the Nation - James Meek

In the last of a series of five talks by British novelists reflecting on the state of the nation, James Meek explores the definitions that shape our idea of home - is it our family, our neighbourhood, our borders or the wider world? - and offers a new approach to defining where we belong in a divided nation. The series also hears from Lionel Shriver, Nadifa Mohamed, Howard Jacobson and Jan Carson.

Producer: Jo Glanville
Editor: James Cook


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000d236)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000d238)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000d23b)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m000d23d)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000d23g)
A reading and a reflection to start the day, with the Rev Dr Craig Gardiner, a tutor at South Wales Baptist College.


SAT 05:45 Four Thought (m000czxq)
Tidying Up

Sarah Gristwood is worried that the vogue for tidying will make history harder to uncover.

Sarah is an historian herself, and in writing her books has relied heavily on documents which might easily have been discarded. But that's not all: she wonders, too, how her successors will access our digital clutter in 500 years' time.

Producer: Giles Edwards


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m000d72m)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (m000c4zb)
Planting Trees to Save the Planet in Cumbria

Helen mark meets teenage environmental campaigner Amy Bray in her native Cumbria as she plants trees to help halt climate change. Amy has inspired her community to take action with a no plastic shop and helped to raise awareness with a mass fell climbing. Helen helps her as she takes on her latest challenge - to plant more trees and help to create natural flood defences as well as absorb carbon


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m000d72p)
Farming Today This Week

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


SAT 06:57 Weather (m000d72r)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (m000d72t)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m000d72w)
Fay Ripley and Dr Zoe Williams

Rev Richard Coles and Aasmah Mir are joined by Fay Ripley. Most famous for playing Jenny, her northern counterpart, in TV’s Cold Feet, the series started 24 years ago and continues next week. The actor also cooks - she has written 3 cookbooks, drives fast, has had a chat show and likes to try her hand at anything she fancies.

Sam Jalloh, who left Sierra Leone to play tennis, which he learnt playing barefoot and with a plywood raquet.

Dr Zoe Williams played Amazon in TV's Gladiators, whilst studying to be a doctor. Now a GP, she is also a TV doctor and health educator.

Christabel Carlisle (now Lady Christabel Watson) was a motor-racing pioneer, racing Saloon cars in the sixties (1960-63), competing against men, including some of the big names in the sport - Graham Hill, Jim Clark and Jack Brabham - at tracks from Silverstone to the famous Nurburgring.

We have the inheritance tracks of Golden Globe winner Brian Cox, who chooses Sonny boy performed by Al Jolson, and God Only Knows performed by the Beach Boys. And a listener thanks someone they were unable to thank at the time.

Producer: Corinna Jones
Editor: Eleanor Garland


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (m000d715)
Series 26

Devizes

Jay Rayner and the team are in Devizes. Dr Zoe Laughlin, Tim Hayward, Jeremy Pang and Sophie Wright answer the hungry audience's questions.

This week, the panellists discuss how to make the perfect falafel, come up with ideas for livening up tired lunch boxes, and talk about pineapple - asking the big question, is it acceptable to put pineapple on a pizza?

And alongside the questions, we hear from local food producers Jessica Shepherd of Take a Bao and Guy Tullberg from Tracklements, who talks about mustard.

Producer: Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Rosie Merotra

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhuon

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m000d8gp)
Anushka Asthana of the Guardian looks at the first week of the 2020 parliament .
It's a very different parliament -a new government with a large majority and many new MPs, The Labour party has launched an inquiry into why it lost the election so badly and the contest of a new party leader has begun. So what can we expect?
The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m000d72y)
Iran's Divided Loyalties

The Iranian government held an official funeral on Tuesday for General Qassem Soleimani killed by a US airstrike in Baghdad. There were emotional speeches in the general’s home town of Kerman in southeast Iran and so many mourners turned out that at least 50 were killed in the crush. On Twitter the Iranian Foreign Minister had a message for President Donald Trump: "Have you seen such a sea of humanity in your life?... Do you still think you can break the will of a great nation and its people?" But were the huge crowds really a sign of national unity? Lois Pryce who wrote a book about crossing Iran on a motorbike and who has friends both inside the country and across the 2 million strong Iranian diaspora finds public opinion far from unanimous.

Ever since independence from the USSR almost three decades ago, there’s never been an Uzbek election which outsiders were willing to call free or fair. But this time was meant to be different. On the 22nd of December, Uzbekistan ran its first elections to the parliament and local councils since the country’s long-running authoritarian president Islam Karimov died three years ago. Uzbekistan has long been one of the world’s most repressive countries and under Karimov voting was more of a ritual than an exercise of choice. But some hoped that the man who took over, Shavkat Mirziyoyev, (Meer-zee Yoi -yev) might allow some real reform. A record 25 million dollars were earmarked to run the elections, and Ibrat Safo found a real buzz in the air but wondered what lay beneath.

Germany has long been considered a leader in renewable energy – a model even for others to follow with its subsidies for wind and solar. But its so-called “Energiewende” (Ener - GEE -vender ) or energy transition” from fossil fuels to renewables has stalled and it still relies on coal for 40 per cent of electricity generation. That will be phased out within the next eighteen years and nuclear energy will end too by 2022 and some worry whether there will be enough energy to heat homes and keep the lights on. Caroline Bayley has been to one former coal town in the industrial Ruhr region which is under-going its own energy transition.

The gargantuan Palace of the Parliament built by Romania’s communist-era dictator, Nicolae Ceaușescu, still looms over the centre of Bucharest. About one-fifth of the capital was bulldozed to make way for the so-called House of the People, its satellite buildings, and the grand avenue leading up to it which was supposed to be a longer, wider version of Champs-Élysee in Paris. Forty thousand residents were forcibly rehoused. The building was long reviled as an evil fortress, a symbol of oppression but it now houses the country’s parliament and Romanians are learning to love it and put it in their Instagram feeds says Tessa Dunlop.

More and more tourists are travelling to the Amazon rainforest to drink – and later vomit - a foul tasting liquid containing a natural hallucinogen called Ayahuasca [a-ya-wass-ka]. Indigenous people have been brewing the concoction for thousands of years, mostly for religious or spiritual purposes. It’s considered a medicine, a way to heal internal wounds and reconnect with nature. But, as Simon Maybin’s been finding out in a remote part of Peru, not all the plant’s traditional users are happy about the wave of Westerners in search of a slice of the psychedelic action.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m000d774)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m000d6t2)
The latest news from the world of personal finance plus advice for those trying to make the most of their money.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (m000czyz)
Series 101

Episode 2

A new series of news-wrangling begins with Nish Kumar in the chair and Mark Steel, Helen Lewis, Lucy Porter and Alun Cochrane dissecting news stories big and small.

Producer: Sam Michell
A BBC Studios Production


SAT 12:57 Weather (m000d732)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News (m000d734)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m000d22y)
Thangam Debbonaire MP, Stanley Johnson, Johnny Mercer MP, Ash Sarkar

Chris Mason presents topical discussion from Launceston Town Hall with Labour's Brexit Minister Thangam Debbonaire, Environmentalist Stanley Johnson, the Minister for Defence People and Veterans and Journalist Ash Sarkar.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m000d736)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:45 Drama (b054gxpb)
Unmade Movies

Harold Pinter's The Dreaming Child

The world premiere of Harold Pinter's unproduced film screenplay, based on Karen Blixen's elusive and mysterious short story of loive and loss.

It's Bristol in 1868 and Emily, married to wealthy Tom Carter, is haunted by her passionate first love affair with a young soldier who subsequently dies at sea. Seven years later and unable to have children themselves, they decide to adopt a boy from the slum. Jack however is not an ordinary child – and seems to know everything about his new home and family.

Cast:
Narrator - Anne Reid
Emily - Lydia Leonard
Tom - Bertie Carvel
Charlie - Joshua Silver
Mrs Jones - Joanna Scanlan
Miss Scott - Susan Woolridge
Jack - Jack Hollington
Peggy - Rose Leslie
Bess - Bryony Hannah
Mr Rudd - Karl Johnson
Mr Carter - Malcolm Sinclair
Children - Flynn Allen,Esme Allen-Quarmby,Isabella Blake-Thomas, Joey Price.

Adapted by Joanna Hogg and Laurence Bowen

Director: Joanna Hogg

Producer: Laurence Bowen

A Feelgood Fiction production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 16:15 Woman's Hour (m000d738)
Reappraising Christine Keeler, Snowplough Parents & Why women love reading fiction

What impact did the Profumo Affair have on the woman at its centre Christine Keeler? We hear an interview she did with Jenni in 2001 and Baroness Joan Bakewell and Professor Kate Williams discuss the attitudes to Christine Keeler at the time and how they have changed now.

We hear why women are at particular risk when it comes to experiencing a concussion. We hear from Dr Willie Stewart the Head of Glasgow Brain Indury Research Group and from Samantha Ainsworth who has post-concussion syndrome.

Professor Helen Taylor tells us why women are the main readers of fiction.

The government’s official advisers on youth justice are calling for a full review of the age of criminal responsibility. We hear why there are calls for it to be raised from ten years old to twelve. Dr Eileen Vizard a consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist and Louise King the Director of Policy and Campaigns for Just for Kids Law.

Are you a snowplough parent? Are you guilty of doing your child’s homework so that they don’t experience failure? Rebecca Glover is the Principal of Surbiton High School and Dr Angharad Rudkin is a child psychologist discuss.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Karen Dalziel


SAT 17:00 PM (m000d73b)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Inquiry (m000d73d)
How soon can we go carbon zero?

Activists all over the world have taken over city centres, demanding urgent action to halt climate change. They say we need to eliminate all carbon emissions by 2025. Most people think that’s impossible. But scientists are warning that if we want to stop global warming, we need to cut our CO2 emissions fast. So how soon can the planet achieve carbon zero?

Helen Grady speaks to:

Chukwumerije Okereke, Director of the Centre for Climate Change and Development, Alex Ekwueme Federal University, Nigeria
Mercedes Maroto-Valer, Director of the Research Centre for Carbon Solutions at Herriot Watt University, Scotland
Roger Pielke Jr, Professor at the University of Colorado, US;
Rachel Moncrief, Deputy Director at the International Council on Clean Transportation

Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000d73g)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m000d73j)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000d73l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m000d73n)
David Threlfall, Jodie Prenger, Angela Barnes, Bosh! Georgia, Nikki Bedi, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Nikki Bedi are joined by David Threlfall, Jodie Prenger, Angela Barnes and Bosh! for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Georgia.


SAT 19:00 Profile (m000d6sk)
Scott Morrison

The Australian Prime Minister feeling the heat over his response to his country’s bushfire crisis.

Pilloried for holidaying in Hawaii while his homeland burned then heckled on camera by angry victims, Scott Morrison has been making international headlines for all the wrong reasons. It’s not been good PR for someone with a background in marketing. Mark Coles unpicks the character of Australia’s man of the moment.

Producers: Simon Maybin & Diane Richardson
Editor: Penny Murphy


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (m000d73q)
1917, London International Mime Festival, King Gary, Ismail Kadare, Saad Qureshi,

Sam Mendes' film 1917 is set during the First World War and based on his Grandfather's experiences during the conflict. It's already won a Golden Globe and is touted for more awards glory. What do our reviewers make of it?
This Time is a show by the group Ockham's Razor and part of The London International Mime Festival 2020. It tells an inter-generational story through circus skills with a 4 person troupe whose member range from 13 to 60
Albanian author Ismail Kadare was the inaugural winner of the Man Booker International Prize and his latest novel to be translated into English is The Doll, It's the story of his mother and her difficulties when she married his father
British artist Saad Qureshi has an exhibition at The Chapel at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Something About Paradise considers the widely differing ideas of what paradise might look like
BBC1 has a new sitcom,King Gary, co-written by and starring Tom Davis as Gary King a builder and building entrepreneur. It was launched with a pilot episode last year and is now a six part series.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Sarah Crompton, Rajan Datar and Lynn Nead. The producer is Oliver Jones

Podcast Extra recommendations:

Sarah: Bombshell, Little Women and Top Hat
Lynn: Musicals at the BFI and her son's vegan Christmas cake
Rajan: Death Of A Salesman with Wendell Pearce, and In The Viper's Shadow by Prince Fatty and Play Well at the Wellcome Collection
Tom: Guys and Dolls

Photo by Nik Mackey


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m000d73s)
Questioning the Political Interview

The political interview is facing questions on many fronts. As is the case with every general election, journalists and broadcasters have come under intense scrutiny for the way they probe and challenge elected politicians. But something felt different for the December 2019 election. Prominent politicians refused to appear on certain programmes or face traditional one to one encounters that were the hallmark of previous elections. Many prefer to take to social media to deliver their key messages and soundbites rather than sit in a studio for an extended period. Politicians and interviewers sometimes seem increasingly unhappy with set-piece exchanges.

Have broadcasters changed their approach? Do interviewers believe a more combative approach is more effective or has that strayed into unpleasant exchanges that put off audiences? In this programme Andrew Marr and a panel of guests explore recent examples and discuss how the format should rise to the challenges it now faces.

Producer: Peter Snowdon


SAT 21:00 Sebastian Baczkiewicz - Pilgrim (m000d73v)
Series 2

Hope Springs

by Sebastian Baczkiewicz. Pilgrim is the most reluctant father of the bride. He struggles to balance the prospect of being the quarry in a savage hunt forever and a day with seeing his daughter Doris condemned to an eternity married to Puck.

Cast
William Palmer ..... Paul Hilton
Dexter ..... Lloyd Thomas
Hilda ..... Anna Wing
Doris ..... Judy Parfitt
Puck ..... Jamie Foreman
Mr Hazelbury ..... Sean Baker
Mrs Marsden ..... Leah Brotherhead
Legend ..... Agnes Bateman

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole


SAT 21:45 Book at Bedtime (b08n4db5)
Rabbit, Run

Episode 9

The post-war novel that summed up middle-class white America and established John Updike as the major American author of his generation. Rabbit, Run is the first in a virtuoso Pullitzer Prize-wining quintet featuring hapless Harry Angstrom, whom we meet as a 26 year old former high school basketball star and suburban paragon in the midst of a personal crisis.

Episode 9 (of 10):
Harry learns terrible news of his daughter, Rebecca. He becomes convinced, for the moment, that these are the wages of his sin.

Rabbit, Run established Updike as one of the major American novelists of his generation. In the New York Times he was praised for his "artful and supple" style in his "tender and discerning study of the desperate and the hungering in our midst's".

Radio 4 plans to broadcast all five novels in the series over the next few years.

Read by Toby Jones
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (m000d73x)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:15 The Spark (m000czy6)
Roy Baumeister v negativity bias

Helen Lewis meets the writers and thinkers who are breaking new ground.

From politics to economics, from tech to the study of how we live, things are changing fast. Old certainties have not been under such challenge for decades.

So each week, we give the whole programme over to a single in-depth, close-up interview with someone whose big idea is bidding to change our world.

Helen’s challenge is to make sense of their new idea, to find out more about the person behind it – and to test what it has to offer us against the failures of the past.

This week, Helen meets social psychologist Roy Baumeister - co-author of The Power of Bad And How To Overcome It - who talks about our built-in negativity bias.

Producer: Emma Wallace


SAT 23:00 Quote... Unquote (m000czlb)
Dame Esther Rantzen, Steve Pemberton, Konnie Huq

Join Nigel as he quizzes a host of celebrity guests on the origins of sayings and well-known quotes, and gets the famous panel to share their favourite anecdotes.
Across forty years, Nigel Rees has been joined by writers, actors, musicians, scientists and various comedy types. Kenneth Williams, Judi Dench, PD James, Sir Ian KcKellen and Peter Ustinov... have all graced the Quote...Unquote stage.

Episode 6
Broadcaster Dame Esther Rantzen
Actor and comedy writer Steve Pemberton
TV presenter Konnie Huq

Quotes read by Sally Grace
Production Coordinator: Candace Wilson

Produced by Victoria Lloyd
A BBC Studios Production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 23:30 A Plague of Gratitude (m000cyvw)
Kaveh Akbar is a 30-year-old Iranian-American poet described as "one of the most exciting voices in American contemporary poetry."

Akbar's prizewinning debut collection, Calling a Wolf a Wolf, gave an unflinching account of his recovery from alcohol addiction.

But Kaveh has a new preoccupation. Gratitude. His collection was a resounding success both in the US and the UK, he's just got married to fellow poet Paige Lewis, he’s taken up a teaching post at Perdue University in Indiana - and he's suffering from survivor's guilt. He feels overwhelmed by this 'Plague of Gratitude' as he calls it. Even the salad spinner that sits in his kitchen haunts him - taunting him that he's been grossly overpaid because he can afford a salad spinner that nobody needs.

Recorded on location in Indiana, we follow Kaveh as he grapples with this new question - how can he, as a poet, write about gratitude and joy responsibly when there is so much violence and anger in the world? And how can he leverage his new-found fortune to give opportunities for others to feel gratitude? We hear selections of Kaveh's previous work in addition to a brand new poem.

Kaveh wants to live his life "in joyful service" to poetry. Teaching at Purdue and running his interview blog, DiveDapper, is part of his idea of sharing his gratitude. Fostering a thriving community is top of Kaveh’s agenda - we join him at a celebratory poetry festival he organises in Indianapolis and eavesdrop on his monthly poetry salon where students and teachers come together to share their work and enjoy each other’s company outside the classroom.

Produced by Victoria Ferran
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4



SUNDAY 12 JANUARY 2020

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m000d73z)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m000czyx)
98' 99'

"The guns began to grow late in the month. Tiny shoots pushed up, almost invisible at first. The autumn had been wet, the winter hard, then the sun crept closer to the land. These were the ideal conditions and the soil of Red Field had always been good for growing." An original short work for radio by Grahame Williams.

Grahame Williams was born in County Down and now lives and works in London. His work has appeared in the Stinging Fly, the Letters Page and he received an Arvon/Jerwood Mentorship for fiction writing. His current work in progress is a novel about a father, a son and the construction of a giant girl in the last of the Belfast shipyards.

Produced by Maggie Ayre and Mair Bosworth


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000d741)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000d743)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000d745)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m000d747)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m000d6t8)
Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Studley, in Worcestershire

Bells on Sunday comes from the Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Studley, in Worcestershire. The West Tower, completed in the fifteenth century holds a peal of eight bells, with the tenor tuned to the key of G. The five largest bells form a complete ring cast by Matthew Bagley of Evesham in 1688. A treble was added in 1957 by John Taylor of Lougborough and in 1998, the same foundry added two further trebles. We hear them ringing Grandsire Triples.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m000d6sk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (m000d6rb)
The latest national and international news headlines.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b03sr5qv)
The Call of the City

Are cities paved with gold or sinks of iniquity? Mark Tully examines the call of the city and contrasts its potential for energy, creativity and community with its traditional reputation for harshness and venality.

Progressively, city populations are swelling as rural communities dwindle. What is the draw of the big city, how does it affect the way we live and think?

Perhaps there is sometimes a knee jerk reaction that the city is a harsh, destructive, soulless place. But what about the energy of the city, the sense of purpose that it gives, the opportunities, the vibrant sense of community, the colour, the variety, the excitement?

This celebration of the urban ranges in scope from William Blake to Suzanne Vega and from New Orleans jazz to William Wordsworth and an interview with historian and urbanist Leo Hollis.

The readers are Robert Glenister and Julie Covington.

Producer: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (m000d6rd)
Dartmoor Beginners

When Lewis Steer was 16, his parents gave him three sheep for doing well in his GCSEs.

It was an unusual present but Lewis and his girlfriend Flora Searson had an unusual goal - despite coming from non-farming families, they dreamed of running their own farming business. Now in their mid-20s, they're rearing three flocks of rare-breed sheep on rented land in the tough conditions of Dartmoor.

Verity Sharp joins Flora and Lewis for a day on their farm.

Produced by Beatrice Fenton.


SUN 06:57 Weather (m000d6rg)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m000d6rj)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m000d6rl)
Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m000d6rn)
Buttle UK

Robert Rinder makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Buttle UK.

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Buttle UK’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘Buttle UK’.

Registered Charity Number: 313007 / Scotland - SCO37997


SUN 07:57 Weather (m000d6rq)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m000d6rs)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m000d6rv)
On this rock I will build my church

David Suchet reflects on the life of St Peter, the fisherman from the Sea of Galilee who was called by Jesus to be one of his first disciples, and who was the rock upon which the early church was built. He's also the apostle to whom the Chapel of St Peter ad Vincula in the Tower of London is dedicated, which this year celebrates 500 years since its foundation by King Henry VIII. The service is led by the chaplain, The Reverend Canon Roger Hall, and the choir is directed by the Chapel's Master of Music, Colm Carey. Producer: Ben Collingwood.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m000d230)
On Hypocrisy

Will Self explores what he sees as a growing sense of collective hypocrisy.

He looks at why we're often so reluctant to use the word "hypocrisy" and argues that we accept hypocrisy in part because "civilisation as currently constituted would be quite impossible without a whole panoply of carefully evolved rituals designed to elide incompatible acts and beliefs".

Producer: Adele Armstrong


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zbtzz)
Black Grouse

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the story of the black grouse. A black grouse lek is one of Nature's spectacles. Charged with testosterone, the males, known as 'black cocks', compete on 'jousting lawns' for the females or grey hens. Fanning their lyre-shaped tails and displaying a flurry of white undertail feathers, the males rush towards their rivals with harsh scouring sneezes and bubbling cries, known as 'roo-kooing'.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m000d6rx)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m000d6rz)
Writer, Simon Frith
Director, Kim Greengrass
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Ruth Archer ….. Felicity Finch
Pip Archer ….. Daisy Badger
Josh Archer ….. Angus Imrie
Kenton Archer ….. Richard Attlee
Jolene Archer ….. Buffy Davis
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Neil Carter ….. Brian Hewlett
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Justin Elliott ….. Simon Williams
Rex Fairbrother ….. Nick Barber
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Jim Lloyd ….. John Rowe
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Kate Madikane ….. Perdita Avery
Kirsty Miller ….. Annabelle Dowler
Hannah Riley ….. Helen Longworth
Oliver Sterling ….. Michael Cochrane
Philip Moss ….. Andy Hockley


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (m000d6s1)
Michael Lewis, writer

Michael Lewis is a best-selling non-fiction writer and journalist. He initially worked for an investment bank, and his experiences of Wall Street excess in the 1980s informed his acclaimed first book, Liar’s Poker. Three of his later books – Moneyball, The Blind Side and The Big Short – have been adapted into Hollywood feature films.

He was born in New Orleans in 1960, where his father was fond of quoting the family motto: 'Do as little as possible, and that unwillingly, for it is better to receive a light reprimand than perform an arduous task.' After studying at Princeton and the LSE, he joined an American bank in London, and wrote articles about the quirks of the industry under a pseudonym. In spite of his father’s opposition, he decided to quit his highly-paid job to become a writer.

In Moneyball, he examined how a struggling baseball team used intensive data analysis to find undervalued players overlooked by richer clubs. The Big Short focused on the sub-prime mortgage crisis, and his most recent book, The Fifth Risk, is about the Trump administration’s approach to government.

Michael lives in California with his wife, Tabitha Soren, and their three children.

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Sarah Taylor


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m000d6s3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (m000czlr)
Series 23

Episode 2

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Susan Calman, Graeme Garden, Sindhu Vee and Lloyd Langford are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as cheese, Winston Churchill, flowers and rappers.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m000d6s5)
Pints of progress: The brewers changing attitudes to learning disabilities

Brewer and broadcaster Jaega Wise visits breweries where a progressive approach to employing people with learning disabilities is pouring away preconceptions. Helping tell the story is Michaela Overton, a brewer at Ignition in Sydenham, South London, a brewery founded to create meaningful work for people with learning disabilities, which has gone from glorified homebrew to running two taprooms selling their beers. In this programme, we follow their collaboration with London brewer Gipsy Hill to make a beer as part the Social Brew Collective. Jaega joins in the project teams up with Spotlight Brewing in Goole in East Yorkshire. There she meets Neil, Michael and Kev and Ric who are making beers with names like Undiagnosed and Spectrum to raise awareness of learning disabilities.

Spotlight and Ignition are a taste of change to come but Jaega finds opportunities like these in the food industry are hard to come by for most people with learning disabilities so she meets Mencap's Natalie Duo to talk about her work training potential employers in the changes they can make to create a more accessible workplace.

Presenter: Jaega Wise
Producer: Tom Bonnett


SUN 12:57 Weather (m000d6s7)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m000d6s9)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 The World Turned Upside Down (m000d6sc)
Episode 2

In the plains of Andalusia, just outside Seville, a giant tower stands bathed in a supernatural glow. This futuristic spectacle is a solar power station generating enough electricity to power a town - by day, and extraordinarily by night. It is just one part of a technological movement with revolutionary political consequences.

For more than a century, the world has revolved around fossil fuels. Wars have been fought over them. The nations that had oil and gas had power. They controlled the price, they controlled the supply and could tell their customers what to do.

The BBC's Diplomatic Correspondent, James Landale, now explores what will happen as countries around the world develop enough renewable energy to end their dependence on hydrocarbons and assesses the geopolitical consequences of this energy revolution.

How long will the transition take? Will the powerful oil and gas producers in the Middle East reform in time or will their economies implode, leaving failed states, regional conflict and a population exodus? How will Russia respond if Europe no longer needs so much of its gas? And which countries will be the new energy superpowers? Who will control resources like lithium and cobalt that will be needed for new high tech batteries?

Above all, who will call the shots in this new renewable world order?

The energy revolution is coming and it could change our world forever.

Produced by Adam Bowen


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000czyv)
Langholm

Kathy Clugston and the team are in Langholm, Scotland. Christine Walkden, James Wong and Matthew Wilson answer the horticultural questions from the audience.

The panellists field questions on Kiwi vines, Bottlebrushes and Box trees. They also recommend grass alternatives for a lawn, advise on covering a hole in a Conifer and discuss how to graft multiple chillis onto a single root.

Away from the questions, Matthew Wilson meets Mark Hodgson of the Langholm Chilli Club to find out how this town on the Scottish borders is producing over 200 varieties of chilli.

Producer: Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Rosie Merotra

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (m0006t50)
Sunday Omnibus - Music, New Technology and Times Past.

Fi Glover presents the omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen with three conversations about the wonders of live music, new technology and times past.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


SUN 15:00 Riot Girls (m000203y)
Riot Days (Part 2)

Maria Alyokhina's account of her activism, trial and imprisonment, as part of Russian feminist punk protest group Pussy Riot. Dramatised by E V Crowe and starring Katie West, Kerry Gooderson and Kathryn Drysdale.

Part of BBC Radio 4's Riot Girls - provocative writing by women

Directed by Emma Harding

Maria.....Katie West
Nadya.....Kerry Gooderson
Katya.....Kathryn Drysdale
Beautician.....Saffron Coomber
Lena.....Alexandra Meyrick
Olga.....Roslyn Hill
Prosecutor.....Tony Turner
Defence Attorney Violetta.....Clare Corbett
Guard.....Carolyn Pickles
Oksana.....Lucy Doyle
Major.....Michael Bertenshaw
Judge.....Ronny Jhutti
Guard 2....Jeanette Percival
Prisoner....Alexandra Constantinidi

Guitarist....Lewis Turner

Additional material from Pussy Riot, A Punk Prayer for Freedom (Feminist Press) and Maria Alyokhina's closing courtroom statement translated by a collaborative team of translators, Marijeta Bozovic, Maksim Hanukai, and Sasha Senderovich, edited by Bela Shayevich, originally published on the website of n+1 magazine


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m000d6sf)
100 Novels That Shaped Our World

Through 2020 the BBC will be celebrating the novel, and Open Book will be looking at the power stories have to transform us.

BBC’s “100 Novels That Shaped Our World” ranges from popular page turners to literary classics under banners ranging from crime and conflict to love and romance. Mariella Frostrup discusses the place of "identity" in novels; the exploration of who we are and the writer's relationship with the story they tell.

She's joined by Ellah Wakatama OBE ,Chair of the Caine Prize for African writing and editor-at-large at Canongate. The novelist Charlotte Mendelson, whose novels span the complexity of women’s lives, her most recent Almost English was a Booker contender. Derek Owusu - a writer, poet and podcaster who has edited and contributed to Safe: On Black British Men Reclaiming Space and whose first work of fiction That Reminds Me has just been published.

The American novelist Jami Attenberg examines Sylvia's Plath's depiction of a young woman living with depression in The Bell Jar, and Mariella talks to An Ju author of "Braised Pork" which explores the journey of self discovery of a young widow in modern day Beijing.


SUN 16:30 John Clare's Scraping (m000d6sh)
John Clare's first book, Poems Descriptive of Rural Life and Scenery, was published in 1820. Clare describes the landscape and the poor who worked it so vividly because he lived and laboured in it. It was a literary sensation and Clare was hailed as the 'Northamptonshire Peasant Poet'. But Helpston, Clare's village, was far from a cultural desert. His father was a singer with a large repertoire. Clare appreciated the songs local people sang and collected many, hoping to make a song book.

Gypsy friends taught Clare to play the fiddle - he was, he wrote, 'a desent scraper' - and he learned tunes from Wisdom Smith. He gathered 263 tunes, noted dances and recorded country customs.

To explore the role of this culture on John Clare's life and work the musician Jon Boden) visits his home in Helpston, looks at his tune book, plays and sings. Jon talks to George Deacon, author of John Clare and the Folk Tradition, and hears from the poet David Morley who has written a collection inspired by Clare's friendship with Wisdom Smith. Mina Gorji reveals, too, that Clare was well-read and accumulated a sizable library. And we hear Clare's poems.

Jon Boden wanders into the fields, noting how enclosure altered the landscape that Clare loved. Clare laments this and it contributed to his mental fragility.

Clare describes an old village custom, ' to stick a piece of greensward full of field flowers and place it as an ornament in their cottages which ornaments are called Midsummer cushions'. A young Helpston man leads Jon to Clare's grave and describes bringing midsummer cushions to Clare's grave on his birthday with his primary school classmates. At the grave Jon plays one of the tunes Clare noted down and played himself.

Presenter: Jon Boden
Producer: Julian May


SUN 17:00 The Stem Cell Hard Sell (m000cz1l)
Lesley Curwen investigates the scientific promise of human stem cells, cells with superpowers that can become many different types of cells in our bodies from muscle cells to brain cells. Some can even repair damaged tissues and there is enormous excitement that stem-cell based therapies could, in the future, transform medicine.

One procedure which is showing great promise for some patients with highly-active Multiple Sclerosis is HSCT. Lesley talks to Anne, a patient with MS, while she has a transplant of stem cells taken from her own bone marrow at London Bridge Hospital. The aim is to 'reboot' her faulty immune system after it has been deliberately destroyed by intense chemotherapy. Her consultant Dr Majid Kazmi, chief of cancer services at Guys and St Thomas's Hospital and a consultant haematologist at HCA Healthcare, did the first UK stem cell transplant for an MS patient over ten years ago.

Treatments using stem cells for MS, spinal cord injury, blindness, cancer, heart disease and arthritis are being carefully tested in clinical trials but it is early days and they remain experimental. However, as Lesley discovers, the optimism around stem cells could mean practice is jumping ahead of the science, leading to patients being harmed.

In the USA there has been an explosion in private clinics which sell "stem cell therapies" and regenerative medicine as a new wonder cure for a range of diseases and conditions. Professor Paul Knoepfler from the University of California Davis School of Medicine tells Lesley that the evidence base for such treatments is thin to non existent and some risky procedures are putting lives at risk. Hartley Hampton, a lawyer from Houston in Texas, describes how six clients were given stem cell injections for arthritis but ended up 'at death's door' when a contaminated product led to near-fatal infections. Galen Dinning tells Lesley that ambulance staff said he 'wouldn't have made it through the night' if he had not been taken to hospital. And we hear how three elderly American women were blinded when their own fat cells were injected into their eyes as a cure, they were told, for their macular degeneration. Dr Sean Morrison, professor of paediatrics at the University of Texas South Western, argues there is a strong placebo effect when people pay for treatments at commercial stem cell clinics. Patients provide enthusiastic testimonials about "how they can stand up out of their wheelchairs for the first time in years". When the patient dies, he says, you don't hear any more.

The International Society for Stem Cell Research has long been worried about the increase in direct-to-consumer stem cell and regenerative therapies.. Its Ethics Committee Chair, Professor Megan Munsie from Melbourne University says no one knows what is in the 'unproven treatments that are frankly, flooding the marketplace'.

In the UK there is growing concern about the increase in private clinics offering regenerative therapies. Ian McDermott, a consultant orthopaedic surgeon in London, says that all procedures have the potential to cause harm and tells Lesley that claims that injecting 'this magic pixie dust' are unconvincing and unscientific.

Professor Fares Haddad is an NHS hip and knee surgeon at University College Hospitals London and editor in chief of the Bone and Joint Journal. He says there is a massive gap between 'real science' and 'inappropriate premature clinical advertising of unproven therapies'. He tells Lesley Curwen about three patients he's treated who've been harmed by such therapies. Two had serious blood clots and one has an infection in the hip.

Lesley also hears from several sources a previously untold story about a woman who went blind in one eye after a botched stem cell injection in London.

Imogen Swann, the former head of regulation at the Human Tissue Authority confirms that there is a loophole in regulation which applies to procedures where someone's own cells are removed and then re-injected into the body without being substantially changed. This means that most of the cell products being injected are not regulated.

And Lesley discovers a new stem cell clinic with a London address which offers to treat children with autism for 9,500 pounds a time. Professor Declan Murphy, a leading authority on autism research at Kings College Hospital in London says he is horrified that such treatment could be offered in this country. He told Lesley there was no justification for such a painful procedure, for which there is little to no evidence, to be carried out in the UK.

Producer: Fiona Hill


SUN 17:40 Profile (m000d6sk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000d6sm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m000d6sp)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000d6sr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m000d6st)
Sheila McClennon

We get off to a memorable start this week with a singing dog and not to be outdone a seal having a stab at the Star Wars theme. There’s drama marking the 400th anniversary of the voyage of the Mayflower, an old fashioned spook mystery, and we hear poignant stories of lost children and the mothers longing to see them again. According to our listeners – the first guest in the new series of The Life Scientific is “one of Jim’s finest” - pollen expert Professor Patricia Wiltshire. There are reflections on the state of our nation, and its not all gloom and doom. we've Joe Lycett, who can brighten up anyone’s week, plus music from South Africa - both traditional, and modern, with a joyous version of a cheesy 80s pop song.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m000d6sw)
Tom is on more than one mission and Jim remains focussed


SUN 19:15 The Skewer (m000czy8)
Series 1

Episode 1

A satirical river of sound and a platform for diverse new talent, this is topical satire like you’ve never heard it before. A new open-door comedy for a fresh generation of satirists who don’t write sketches, jokes and one liners, but instead channel their talents into playing around with sound.

Following an award-winning pilot and an award nominated Halloween Brexit special, the "disorentating, dizzying, dazzling" Skewer returns for a full series.

"A freeform assault on the senses.. deeply haunting..an eerily beautiful discombobulating mosaic of spin" - comedy.co.uk

Creator and producer Jon Holmes curates contributions from brand new and diverse talent in a show where the experience is enhanced through headphones, attaching the listener to a late night drip of current events as they melt into the brain, evoking a feeling of drifting off, but with the occasional uncomfortable sleep-twitch.

Sketch-writing has long been the way into radio comedy but, for the new generation of satirists who don’t put pen to paper and instead beaver away on laptops using self-taught skills to toy with the news-scape, The Skewer's guerrilla approach to satire is their new playground.

“If ever there was an audio version of Coldwar Steve, it might well be this! Incredible.”

“Cassette Boy meets Blue Jam. Superb.”

“A whole new genre of radio comedy programme invented right there. Clever, funny and scary all at the same time.”

“Weirdly, hypnotically funny. More please.”

“Pushes the boundaries of satirical radio into the murky depths. The world needs exactly this kind of creative commentary right now. Looking forward to more.”

“With this new show, Jon Holmes asserts his place as king of outsider radio art. Its woozy, punch drunk style operates as a perfect satire of our times. Headphones on and fall down it’s K-hole, friends. Exceptional stuff.” Rufus Hound

Producer: Jon Holmes
An Unusual production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 19:45 No One Called Her Angel (m000d6sy)
Episode 1

Unwelcome memories surface when a woman sees a face from childhood on television.
A series about perspective and truth specially written by Louise Welsh.
Read by Maryam Hamidi
Produced by Eilidh McCreadie


SUN 20:00 More or Less (m000d22p)
Australian Animal Deaths, Carbon Emissions, Election Mystery

Animal suffering has been a painful part of the story of Australia's bush fires. Headlines have claimed that more than a billion animals have perished. But some experts aren’t convinced. Tim Harford speaks to Professor Kate Parr of Liverpool University to see how these figures were calculated, how accurate they are and whether some animals are more likely suffer fatalities than others.

The UK’s CO2 emissions peaked in the year 1973 and have declined by around 38% since 1990 - faster than any other major developed country. Zeke Hausfather from the Carbon Brief explains how we have achieved this, and whether there's a catch.

There's been much talk of Labour voters switching to the Conservatives in the December election. But the vote share of the Conservatives increased by just over one percentage point. The BBC's election guru, Sir John Curtice, professor of politics at Strathclyde University, explains what's going on.

The Resolution Foundation, a think tank, has released a report that said more than 8% of people aged 16-64 – some 3.4m people in total - have never had a paid job. That is a large increase since 1998 when, about 5.5% of the working age population, or 2 million people, had never worked. Tim Harford asks the report’s author, Laura Gardiner, to tell us who these nearly 3.5 million people are who’ve never worked.

And...have we really entered a new decade?

Producer: Ruth Alexander
Editor: Richard Vadon


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m000d22m)
General Qasem Soleimani, M.C. Beaton, George Laurer, Dr Sidney Holt

Pictured: General Qasem Soleimani

Matthew Bannister on

Iranian General Qasem Soleimani, who was killed by an American drone strike. We try to uncover the motivation of the man who spread Iran's military influence throughout the Middle East.

M.C. Beaton who wrote more than 250 books which sold in their millions, including romantic fiction and murder mysteries featuring PC Hamish Macbeth and Agatha Raisin.

George Laurer, the American engineer who played a pivotal role in the invention of the barcode.

Dr. Sidney Holt, the biologist credited with saving the blue whale from extinction.

Interviewed guest: Kasra Naji
Interviewed guest: Mike Ripley
Interviewed guest: Chris Stokel-Walker
Interviewed guest: Vassili Papastavrou

Producer: Neil George

Archive clips from: Profile, Radio 4 08/03/2015; TV Eye, Thames TV 1979; September 11 Attacks, CNN 07/09/2011; President Trump on Soleimani, The Telegraph 05/01/2020; Soleimani on Trump, MEMRI TV 30/07/2018; Soleimani’s funeral, The Sun 06/01/2020; Front Row, Radio 4 16/08/2010; The Chocolate Debutante by MC Beaton, read by Patience Tomlinson, Hachette Audio UK 2019; Hamish Macbeth, BBC Four 23/03/2008; Agatha Raisin and the Quiche of Death by MC Beaton, read by Penelope Keith, Chivers Audiobooks 05/07/2012; Woman’s Hour, Radio 4; George Laurer: CSCMP Supply Chain Hall of Fame, CSCMPTube 02/10/2017; Sidney Holt: In His Own Words, Stephen Best May 2010; Britain's Whale Hunters: The Untold Story, BBC Four 27/10/2016; Newsnight, BBC Two 07/04/2000; Today, Radio 4 29/05/1995; Front Row, Radio 4 10/04/2006.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m000d6t2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m000d6rn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (m000czf6)
Zimbabwe's Food Crisis: Can Old Crops Fix New Problems?

Every day people dig into sadza, a maize based meal, but there’s a problem. Zimbabwe’s getting much drier and maize can’t cope. Crop failures have partly contributed to food shortages this year leading to more than 7 million people needing food aid. The economic crisis has made the situation more serious and things will only get worse as the climate heats up. How can Zimbabwe feed itself? It turns out grains like millet and sorghum could hold the key. Unlike maize, these small grains are indigenous to the region. For In Business, Charlotte Ashton meets the remarkable business people fighting to put them back on Zimbabwean plates. From convincing smallholder farmers that traditional crops are the way forward, to advertising the health benefits of small grains to busy parents, this is a campaign for hearts and minds as much as full bellies.

Producer: Phoebe Keane


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m000d6t4)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (m000d1rx)
The Man Who Invented British Cinema

With Antonia Quirke.

Chemical engineer Robert Paul was an unlikely film pioneer. But after a chance encounter in his chemist's shop, he went on to invent revolutionary movie cameras and projectors, as well as direct Britain's first fiction film, and a war movie filmed on Muswell Hill golf course. And now he has an exhibition in his honour. Antonia visits the National Museum Of Science And Media in Bradford and has a whirlwind tour in the company of curators Toni Booth and Ian Christie.

Uncut Gems is a thriller set in the secretive world of New York's Diamond District. Directors Josh and Benny Safdie reveal how they used family connections to get unparalleled access to this closed community.

In part one of her interview with legendary cinematographer Roger Deakins, Antonia finds out how he managed to make World War I drama 1917 seem as if it had been filmed in one continuous two hour shot.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b03sr5qv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 13 JANUARY 2020

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m000d6t6)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Rewinder (m000bm76)
Two: Rod, Clutter and Little Green Men

Greg James, host of the Radio 1 Breakfast Show and self-confessed 'proud radio nerd', rummages through the BBC's vast archives of audio, video and documents, using current stories and listener suggestions as a springboard into the vaults.

The recent news that NASA plans to send probes further into space than ever before leads Greg in search of extra-terrestrial life in the archives. He finds languages from distant planets, close encounters - and wonders why aliens heading to Earth chose Banbury, Oxfordshire, as their favourite destination.

As the domestic de-cluttering guru Marie Kondo makes headlines by opening an online shop, we hear earlier expert advice on how to free your home from junk, and Rod Stewart's current British tour prompts a return to a landmark documentary from the mid-1970s - including two devoted, patient fans waiting at Heathrow, and the moment when a French radio interviewer kept Rod waiting - and waiting.

As RuPaul's Drag Race UK reaches its grand finale, Greg's archive searches take him to performers catalogued as 'female impersonators', and eventually lead him to a series of programmes which won vast audiences and changed public opinion.

And a request from a listener introduces a sound now lost from Farming Today, with a lyricism which - according to our listener - rivals the Shipping Forecast.

Producer Paula McGinley


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m000d6t8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000d6tb)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000d6td)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000d6tg)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m000d6tj)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000d6tl)
A reading and a reflection to start the day, with the Rev Dr Craig Gardiner, a tutor at South Wales Baptist College.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m000d6tn)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


MON 05:56 Weather (m000d6tq)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcfq)
Stock Dove

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the stock dove. Perhaps 'stock pigeon' would be a better name, because they're like slightly smaller versions of the woodpigeon. Unlike their bigger relatives they have no white marks on their wings or neck and are more blue-grey in colour. When they fly, they look dumpier ...stockier you might say. Unlike woodpigeons, stock doves haven't taken to a life in town and they're mainly birds of wooded farmland.


MON 06:00 Today (m000d7n5)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m000d7n7)
No work, rest and play

The economist Daniel Susskind tells Tom Sutcliffe that the threat of technological unemployment is real and imminent. In A World Without Work he considers the economic, political and social impact. He questions what happens to those for whom work affords meaning, purpose and direction.

Journalist Anoosh Chakelian went behind the scenes at new magazines set up to rival the Big Issue, as she explored Britain's homelessness crisis. Like the Big Issue, these new journals enable rough sleepers to earn money rather than beg, and creates respectable employment opportunities. But Chakelian worries about a country with so many homeless people that it can create an industry around them.

The psychologist Suzi Gage looks at the science behind recreational drugs – debunking common myths and misconceptions. She also looks at how and why they work on the mind and body, and the associations between drug use and mental health.

A quarter of adults in England are taking potentially addictive prescription medicines, with half of them in long-term dependency, according to Public Health England. The epidemiologist Sir John Strang says there is greater dependency in areas of greatest deprivation. He also calls for greater action in stemming the rise in opioid-related deaths.

Producer: Katy Hickman


MON 09:45 Why Women Read Fiction (m000d7pp)
Episode 1

Women far outnumber men as buyers, borrowers and readers of most kinds of fiction. and make up the majority of festival attendees, reading group members and online book bloggers. In this wide-ranging book Helen Taylor draws on over five hundred interviews and questionnaires to explore what, when and how contemporary women read, and why fiction in particular is so precious to them. She looks at how women readers draw on their fiction reading to tell the stories and mark the milestones in their own lives, pass childhood favourites on to children and grandchildren, and forge and sustain friendships. She hears from women about their childhood memories of learning to read, often taught by women in their family or at school, and about how books have become an indispensable part of their adult lives. Her book analyses the special appeal and changing readership for genres like romance, erotica and crime, and looks in detail at the continuing appeal of lasting classic novels like Pride and Prejudice and Jane Eyre.

As a male author, Ian McEwan, once said: 'When women stop reading, the novel will be dead.'

Helen Taylor is Emeritus Professor of English at Exeter University, has taught and published widely on women's writing, is a regular chairperson at literary festivals and was the first Director of the Liverpool Literary Festival. Her books include 'Scarlett's Women: Gone With the Wind and its Female Fans', 'Circling Dixie: Contemporary Southern Culture Through a Literary Lens' and 'The Daphne du Maurier Companion'.

The reader, Lucy Briers, has recently appeared in the television shows Victoria and Gentleman Jack. She played Mary Bennet in the memorable 1995 television adaptation of Pride and Prejudice

Abridged and produced by Sara Davies


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000d7nc)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


MON 10:45 Exile (m000d7nf)
Episode 6

By Adrian Bean

Episode 6 in a new 10-part audio drama series marking the 400th anniversary of the sailing of the Mayflower. A gripping story about one family's journey into the unknown.

Elizabeth gives birth to a baby girl, Native Americans turn up at the compound to find out how long the colonists plan to stay, Sarah is released from the stocks and something is gnawing at Ben's conscience.

CAST

Sarah Hargreaves - Louise Brealey
Matthew Hargreaves - Trystan Gravelle
Ben - Joel MacCormack
Elizabeth - Megan McInerney
Saul Tregarron - Matthew Gravelle
Captain Jones - John Cording
Samoset - Daniel Taylor

Directed by John Norton
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


MON 11:00 The Untold (m000cn3p)
Four Months for Niyi

Niyi's eating disorder has stopped him coming home for Christmas. This year, after nearly losing his mother to a brain tumour, he wants to change that.

Niyi is a young, successful Cambridge student with a bright future ahead of him. But for the past few years, he has struggled with an eating disorder. It has made him very conscious of eating with others and the pressure of being around the family dinner table at Christmas has been too much. So he stayed away.

But this year is different. When his mother was taken to hospital with a brain tumour she nearly lost her life. Niyi was there for her when she was ill and he knows how much it would mean to her for him to make it home. He's starting a new course of therapy to help him work through his eating issues, it might give him the help he needs.

Amidst it all Niyi is trying to keep up with the rest of his life. He's deciding the next step in his academic career and attempting to negotiate the dating scene.

Produced by Sam Peach


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m000d73n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m000d84s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Coming Up for Air (m000d7nl)
Episode 1

An overweight, married, middle-aged insurance salesman surveys his life while reflecting on the country he finds himself living in. George Orwell's novel is read by Tim McInnerny.

Written in 1939, Coming Up For Air was published just before the outbreak of the Second World War and offers premonitions of the impending conflict with images of an idyllic Thames-side Edwardian-era childhood at the same time as taking a rather dim view of capitalism and its effects on the best of rural England.

The reviews were among the best that Orwell had received for a novel. It sold 3,000 copies - a considerable improvement on the response to his previous works.

Abridged by Ellin Stein
Read by Tim McInnerny

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m000d7nn)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


MON 12:57 Weather (m000d7nq)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m000d7ns)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


MON 13:45 Green Originals (m000d7nv)
James Lovelock

James Lovelock’s Gaia Theory, first put forward in the mid 1970s, was a ground-breaking hypothesis of how the earth works and one of the most influential ideas on 20th century environmentalism.

It proposed that the earth is one self-regulating system in which everything on the planet, living and non-living, interacts with each other to maintain the right conditions for life to exist. It’s quasi-spiritual sentiment captured the imagination of the New-Agers of the 1980s, sci-fi writers and philosophers, as well as a growing global environmental movement.

Lovelock’s idea has been a source of controversy within the scientific community. But many of his ideas about the impact of life, and humans in particular, on the environment have made their way into the scientific status quo.

Having recently celebrated his 100th birthday, the humble Lovelock continues to inspire. Environmental activist and filmmaker Jack Harries looks back on the career of this rare breed freelance scientist, and traces Gaia’s legacy across science and culture.

“As we discover more about humanities role in tipping the fragile balance of life on earth,” he says, “Lovelock’s Gaia theory becomes incredibly compelling.”

Producer: Emma Barnaby
Series Editor: David Prest
A Whistledown Production in association with The Open University.


MON 14:00 The Archers (m000d6sw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Behind Closed Doors: Series 4 (m000d7nx)
Life Chances

Behind Closed Doors Series 4
Life Chances
by Clara Glynn

A series of dramas set at legal hearings.

Today’s drama is set in the Court of Protection. Emily Cross has a history of anorexia. After collapsing at a Tube Station she has been admitted to an eating disorder unit for the third time. Emily is in a perilous state but refusing treatment. The hospital has come to court to argue that unless they are allowed to treat her she could die. Should she be force fed? Barrister Rebecca Nyman is in court acting for the Official Solicitor to look after the patient’s interests.

Life Chances
by CLARA GLYNN

Cast:
Barrister Rebecca Nyman ………… CLARE CORBETT
Jemima MacFadyen …………… … AMIERA DARWISH
Barnaby McNeish ………………… PETER FORBES
Judge …………………………….. … SUSAN JAMESON
Dr Hall/George Cross ……………… JACK KLAFF
Letitia Cross …………………….……JOANNA MONRO
Emily Cross …………………….…… LUCY WELLS
Dr Jude Meredith ……………….……DEBBIE KORLEY
Stella …………………………….……HELEN CLAPP

Producer/director: David Ian Neville


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (m000d7nz)
Programme 1, 2020

(1/12)
Radio's longest running quiz returns for its 72nd year, with Tom Sutcliffe asking the trademark cryptic questions. The teams representing Scotland and Wales kick off the new series as they try to unravel the clues and make the right connections. The more help Tom has to give them in arriving at the solutions, the more points he deducts.

Taking part are Val McDermid, Alan McCredie, Myfanwy Alexander and David Edwards.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m000d6s5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Natalie Haynes Stands Up for the Classics (m000d7p2)
Series 5

Homer: The Iliad

Natalie Haynes stands up for Homer's Iliad, in an extraordinary tour-de-force performance recorded in the BBC's Radio Theatre in Broadcasting House. The original epic story would most probably have been performed from memory, and Natalie does the same: her only prompt is the voice of Dr Adam Rutherford to number the twenty-four books.

It's a vivid, cinematic tapestry of extraordinary stories: of gods, Greeks and Trojans, men and women, mothers and fathers and lovers. There's fighting and trickery, and touching domestic detail (when Hector's wife Andromache and son Astynax bid a final goodbye to him). The great Greek hero Achilles spends quite a lot of time in a sulk, refusing to fight, because King Agamemnon forces him to give up his trophy girlfriend, Briseis. But his vengeance is merciless when he hears of the death of his beloved Patroclus at Hector's hands. There's a child frightened by the plumes on his father's helmet; a magic bra, which Hera uses to seduce Zeus (unnecessary encouragement, to be honest) and there's the reason why the phrase 'rosy-fingered dawn' is so-often repeated. It's a breathtaking story that echoes down the centuries, inspiring each generation with new interpretations of this epic work.

Natalie is a reformed comedian who is a little bit obsessive about Ancient Greece and Rome. Each week she takes a different figure from the ancient world and tells their story through a mix of stand-up comedy, extremely well-informed analysis, and conversation. Natalie picks out hilarious details and universal truths, as well as finding parallels with modern life, or those parts of life which are still influenced by ancient thought.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (m000d720)
Series 21

Science of Laughter

The Science of Laughter

Brian Cox and Robin Ince return for a new series of science/comedy chat. They are joined on stage, appropriately enough, by comedian Frank Skinner, as they look at the science of what makes us laugh, why we laugh at all, and whether humour and laughter are uniquely human traits. Joining the panel are experts in what makes us chuckle, Prof Sophie Scott and Professor Richard Wiseman. They look at why laughter is not only an ancient human trait that goes a long way to making us the social animal we are today, but that rats and apes also enjoy a good chuckle. They discover whether science can come up with the perfect joke and why a joke with the punchline "quack" is funnier than one with the punchline "moo".

Producer: Alexandra Feachem


MON 17:00 PM (m000d7p4)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000d7p8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (m000d7pb)
Series 23

Episode 3

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Marcus Brigstocke, Lou Sanders, Cally Beaton and Neil Delamere are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as chocolate, the human body, the Netherlands and rats.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


MON 19:00 The Archers (m000d711)
There’s an embarrassing misunderstanding for Alistair and the stress piles on Natasha


MON 19:15 Front Row (m000d7pd)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 19:45 Exile (m000d7nf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 My Name Is... (m000d7pg)
Natasha: Trying to find a black egg donor

Natasha is 38 and trying to have a baby. She's had four unsuccessful rounds of IVF and doctors have told her that it's highly unlikely she'll be able to use her own eggs. She needs an egg donor but her heritage is Caribbean and she can’t find anyone suitable. Natasha wants to find out why it’s so difficult to source a non-white egg donor and why there is such a taboo around egg donation within the black community.

Natasha talks with producer Ben Carter about her struggles as she embarks on a journey to try and find some answers. Along the way she meets Dr Edmond Edi-Osagie, a gynaecologist and reproductive medicine specialist, Helen George, a NHS psychotherapist and Yacoub Khalaf, a clinician and member of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) who regulate clinics in the UK.

Producer: Ben Carter
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound Engineer: Graham Puddifoot


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (m000czdn)
Belarus: The Wild World of Chernobyl

Ninety year old Galina is one of the last witnesses to the wild natural world that preceded the Chernobyl zone in southern Belarus. 'We lived with wolves' she says 'and moose, and elk and wild boars.' Soviet development destroyed that ecosystem. Forests and marshland were tamed and laid to farmland and industrial use. But when the Chernobyl reactor exploded in 1986, the human population was evacuated; their villages were buried beneath the earth as though they had never existed. A generation on, it seems that the animals Galina knew are returning. But how are they are affected by their radioactive environment? And what can we infer about the state of the land? Monica Whitlock visits the strange new wilderness emerging in the heart of Europe.

Produced and Presented by Monica Whitlock
Editor, Bridget Harney


MON 21:00 The Diagnosis (m000cz0y)
For most of her life, Janice Wilson suffered from strange and terrifying attacks at night. She would wake up, suddenly, feeling as though she was being choked or strangled. The next day, there would be blood on her pillow. Sometimes she’d have up to 50 of these attacks a night. It left her terrified and exhausted. For years, doctors put it down to psychological problems due to a trauma in her past. Then she met a doctor who found the astonishing, true cause.
In “The Diagnosis”, Janice and the doctor who diagnosed her come together in a studio, to tell this remarkable story.

The programme is presented and produced by Helena Merriman, who was inspired to tell other people’s stories of diagnosis after receiving her own surprise diagnosis a few years ago.

Editor: Emma Rippon


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m000d7n7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m000d7pk)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 Coming Up for Air (m000d7nl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (m000d1z9)
Metaphors

Michael Rosen returns to explore how metaphors shape our lives with author James Geary. We live, breathe and think in metaphors and communication would be impossible without them. In a far-reaching conversation, Michael and James tease out what they are, why they exist and why we need them in our language. And how it is that the Greek word from which the English word metaphor is derived is still in everyday use in its country of origin.

James Geary is the author of I Is an Other: The Secret Life of Metaphor and How It Shapes the Way We See the World.

Producer Beth O'Dea


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000d8ht)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



TUESDAY 14 JANUARY 2020

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m000d7pm)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 00:30 Why Women Read Fiction (m000d7pp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000d7pr)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000d7pt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000d7pw)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m000d7py)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000d7q0)
A reading and a reflection to start the day, with the Rev Dr Craig Gardiner, a tutor at South Wales Baptist College.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m000d7q2)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcgb)
Capercaillie

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the capercaillie. The bizarre knife-grinding, cork-popping display of the male capercaillie is one of the strangest sounds produced by any bird. The name 'Capercaillie' is derived from the Gaelic for 'horse of the woods', owing to the cantering sound, which is the start of their extraordinary mating display. These are the largest grouse in the world and in the UK they live only in ancient Caledonian pine forests.


TUE 06:00 Today (m000d703)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (m000d705)
Susannah Maidment on dinosaurs

Susannah Maidment tells Jim how she came to be a world authority on stegosaurs


TUE 09:30 One to One (m000d707)
Gerald Scarfe - bring back the news!

In 2015 Arabella Dorman hung a boat upside down in a Piccadilly church. The boat had been carrying refugees in the eastern Mediterranean, but now it was a piece of art, a symbol of 'exile and desperation' as well as courage and hope. Cartoonist Gerald Scarfe, who reported from Vietnam and Northern Ireland, wants to know if there is a different way to report the news, so here he talks to Arabella about whether her boat worked.
The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde


TUE 09:45 Why Women Read Fiction (m000d725)
Episode 2

Women far outnumber men as buyers, borrowers and readers of most kinds of fiction. and make up the majority of festival attendees, reading group members and online book bloggers. In this wide-ranging book Helen Taylor draws on over five hundred interviews and questionnaires to explore what, when and how contemporary women read, and why fiction in particular is so precious to them. She looks at how women readers draw on their fiction reading to tell the stories and mark the milestones in their own lives, pass childhood favourites on to children and grandchildren, and forge and sustain friendships. She hears from women about their childhood memories of learning to read, often taught by women in their family or at school, and about how books have become an indispensable part of their adult lives. Her book analyses the special appeal and changing readership for genres like romance, erotica and crime, and looks in detail at the continuing appeal of lasting classic novels like Pride and Prejudice and Jane Eyre.

As a male author, Ian McEwan, once said: 'When women stop reading, the novel will be dead.'

Helen Taylor is Emeritus Professor of English at Exeter University, has taught and published widely on women's writing, is a regular chairperson at literary festivals and was the first Director of the Liverpool Literary Festival. Her books include 'Scarlett's Women: Gone With the Wind and its Female Fans', 'Circling Dixie: Contemporary Southern Culture Through a Literary Lens' and 'The Daphne du Maurier Companion'.

The reader, Lucy Briers, has recently appeared in the television shows Victoria and Gentleman Jack. She played Mary Bennet in the memorable 1995 television adaptation of Pride and Prejudice

Abridged and produced by Sara Davies


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000d70c)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


TUE 10:45 Exile (m000d70f)
Episode 7

By Adrian Bean

Episode 7 in a new 10-part audio drama series marking the 400th anniversary of the sailing of the Mayflower. A gripping story about one family's journey into the unknown.

Ben has disappeared - probably gone to the Wampanoag village to try and ease his conscience. A search party is formed and they plunge deep into the forest. When they find him, Saul rescues Ben from a waterfall and Matthew saves Sarah from the clutches of bear, but it's not enough to save their marriage.

Sarah Hargreaves - Louise Brealey
Matthew Hargreaves - Trystan Gravelle
Ben - Joel MacCormack
Elizabeth - Megan McInerney
Saul Tregarron - Matthew Gravelle
Captain Jones - John Cording

Directed by John Norton
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


TUE 11:00 Science Stories (b06vkkth)
How an eel sparked our interest in electricity

Naomi Alderman presents an alternate history of electricity. This is not a story of power stations, motors and wires. It’s a story of how the electric eel and its cousin the torpedo fish, led to the invention of the first battery; and how, in time, the shocking properties of these slippery creatures gave birth to modern neuroscience. Our fascination with electric fish and their ability to deliver an almighty shock - enough to kill a horse – goes back to ancient times. And when Alessandro Volta invented the first battery in 1800, the electric eel was a vital source of inspiration. In inventing the battery, Volta claimed to have disproved the idea of ‘animal electricity’ but 200 years later, scientists studying our brains revealed that it’s thanks to the electricity in our nerve cells that we are able to move, think and feel. So, it seems, an idea that was pushed out of science and into fiction, when Mary Shelley invented Frankenstein, is now alive and well and delivering insight once again into what it means to be alive.

Producer: Anna Buckley


TUE 11:30 Art of Now (m000d70k)
The Last Exposure

Photographer Garry Fabian-Miller has spent much of the last 30 years either in his dark room, or out walking on Dartmoor. That is about to end.

Fabian-Miller began his career in the 1960’s but quickly tired of the typical black and white verite’ style that was then so much in vogue.

Rejecting both the city streets, black and white film, and eventually the camera itself - his camera-less photography gives his work an utterly unique and other worldly quality - light pulses from deep yellow circles; the flicker of a naked flame peers through a slashed curtain of deep blue. His inspiration the moors he walks twice daily, passing through his eyes, his imagination and onto the photosensitive paper.

The result is a body of work which plays with light and dark, exposure and developing – producing an acclaimed body of work recognised by both buyers and museums as like no other - collectors range from Sir Elton John to the V & A.

But the onslaught of digital has signaled to him that things are changing – both the resources, and the techniques he has developed over time, are threatened, and with the near disappearance of dark rooms, he feels it time to make his last print and close his dark room for ever.

His photographs are unconventional, dazzling, and use techniques honed over decades. He abandoned using cameras long ago, opting instead to use techniques based on early 19th century prints - long exposures, tone, and images funneled into shapes made by the sun. Always dazzlingly coloured, he uses a developing substance which is no longer in production.

Occasionally he gets a phone call from a dealer in London…. “Garry, I’ve just been offered 11 litres of CibaChrome, you want it?

We join him as he uses up the very last of the chemistry which enable him to use the techniques he has spent a lifetime perfecting, before his dark room is closed forever. Reflecting a change out of his studio and in the world - in 2007 there were 204 professional dark rooms in London, by 2010 there were 8. We hear his story of printing - a physical, technical skill, as well as a dangerous and smelly one. We envisage the end of the analogue era of photography, and celebrate the alchemical eclipse.

Curator of photography from the V&A Martin Barnes salutes his work, and how it harks back to the very start of photography, just as this chapter is coming to an end.

From the spooky mists of Hound Tor to making pictures in the dark, Fabian-Miller takes us one step closer to the end of an era.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m000d7tc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Coming Up for Air (m000d70p)
Episode 2

Written by George Orwell in 1939, Coming Up For Air was published just before the outbreak of the Second World War and offers premonitions of the impending conflict with images of an idyllic Thames-side Edwardian-era childhood at the same time as taking a rather dim view of capitalism and its effects on the best of rural England.

The reviews were among the best that Orwell had received for a novel. It sold 3,000 copies - a considerable improvement on the response to his previous works.

Abridged by Ellin Stein
Read by Tim McInnerny

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m000d70s)
Call You and Yours

News and discussion of consumer affairs.


TUE 12:57 Weather (m000d70v)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m000d70x)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


TUE 13:45 Green Originals (m000d70z)
David McTaggart

Emma Shortis reflects on the influence of David McTaggart, founder of Greenpeace International.

Producer: Emily Williams
Series Editor: David Prest
A Whistledown production in association with The Open University.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m000d711)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Behind Closed Doors: Series 4 (m000d713)
Best Interests

Behind Closed Doors Series 4
Best Interests
by Clara Glynn

A series of dramas set at legal hearings.

Esti, a divorced Charedi Jewish mother, has come to the Family Courts to stop her ex-husband changing their children’s schools. Yossi, the father, has left the Charedi community and wants his children to go to a co-educational schools. Barrister Rebecca Nyman represents the mother in this highly emotional dispute.

Cast:
Barrister Rebecca Nyman ……... CLARE CORBETT
Esti Shieman ……………………………ORION BEN
Judge ……….……………………….....… DAVID ACTON
Yossi Shieman ………………………… DANIEL BEN ZENOU
Simon Frear ……………………………..ILAN GOODMAN
Mary Bates ………………………………KATE BARTON

Producer/director: David Ian Neville


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (m000d715)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Making History (m000d717)
High Flyers

Tom Holland and Iszi Lawrence continue to explore the historical connections behind today's headlines.

As the first electric commercial aircraft takes flight in Vancouver, Tom and Iszi look at the lengths people have gone to over the past millennium to reach for the skies.

Tom goes to the spot where Eilmer of Malmesbury, an 11th century English monk, made one of the earliest attempts at flight in the British Isles. Inspired by the Greek fable of Daedalus, he strapped wings to his hands and feet and jumped from the abbey tower. He broke both his legs.

And Iszi visits the Science Museum to find out about the first woman in space. At the age of 26, Valentina Tereshkova, orbited the earth 48 times over 3 days and parachuted out of the capsule to land safely in Siberia.

Producer: Kim Normanton
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (m000d719)
Communicating Climate Change

From the greenhouse effect, through global warming to climate chaos, Michael Rosen talks to George Marshall about the best ways to communicate what's happening to the planet. Producer Sally Heaven.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (m000d71c)
Series 50

Kurt Vonnegut and Josie Long

"I am a German American, a pure one, dating back to when German Americans were still marrying each other." Kurt Vonnegut was born in Indianapolis in 1922, but the most important event in his life happened in Dresden in 1945. He was a POW and underground in a meat locker during the firebombing. When he emerged he found the city totally destroyed. It took him another two decades to work out how to write his book, Slaughterhouse-Five.

Nominating Vonnegut is the comedian Josie Long, who says that finding a writer you love is like finding a friend. Because no expert was available for this recording, Kurt Vonnegut will be taking on this role himself. Kurt died in April 2007.

The presenter is Matthew Parris, the producer in Bristol Miles Warde.


TUE 17:00 PM (m000d71f)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000d71k)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (b0bfywgp)
Series 8

The Rubington's Doobrery 9000

The hit series returns for an eighth series with more shop based shenanigans and over the counter philosophy, courtesy of Ramesh Mahju and his trusty sidekick Dave. Written by and starring Donald Mcleary and Sanjeev Kohli.

Set in a Scots-Asian corner shop, the award winning Fags, Mags and Bags sees a return of all the shop regular characters, and some guest appearances along the way, from the likes of Moray Hunter, Lorraine McIntosh & Mina Amwar.

In this episode, Ramesh gets his fiancé Malcolm jealous when it's revealed that the Cash and Carry promotions manager, Helena (played by Lorraine McIntosh), fancies him.

Join the staff of Fags, Mags and Bags in their tireless quest to bring nice-price custard creams and cans of coke with Arabic writing on them to an ungrateful nation. Ramesh Mahju has built it up over the course of over 30 years and is a firmly entrenched, friendly presence in the local area. He is joined by his shop sidekick, Dave.

Then of course there are Ramesh's sons Sanjay and Alok, both surly and not particularly keen on the old school approach to shopkeeping, but natural successors to the business. Ramesh is keen to pass all his worldly wisdom onto them - whether they like it or not!

Producer: Gus Beattie for Gusman Productions.
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m000d71m)
Lilian garners opinion and Ruth looks set to fall at the first hurdle


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m000d71p)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 19:45 Exile (m000d70f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (m000d71r)
Separated Siblings

When Sophia was growing up, she had an imaginary friend. It was only later she learned that the little girl she played with in her mind was not imaginary at all, but a distant memory of an older sister.

The two had been separated when they were in care, and contact between them was soon lost.

It might sound like a Dickensian tale of misery, but it’s not rare for siblings to be forced apart whilst in the UK’s care system.

In England alone, there are currently more than 78,000 children living in foster care or children’s homes.

Many have brothers and sisters, but keeping them together is difficult.

File on 4 hears from the children and young people who have been split up, and hear how it has affected the rest of their lives.

When they can’t be placed together, experts agree that robust plans should be put in place to maintain contact between them. So why is it not happening?

If one child goes on to be adopted, maintaining contact with their brothers and sisters is far from straight forward.

And for the families who do adopt sibling groups, there’s concern that they’re not getting the right help to support those relationships.

Some experts argue that keeping siblings together shouldn’t always be the default intervention.

For some, placing them apart might be in their best interests but are the views of children always being taken into account when these decisions are being made and is the importance of sibling relationships sometimes being overlooked?

Reporter - Paul Kenyon
Producer - Emma Forde
Editor - Carl Johnston


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m000d71t)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (m000d71w)
Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (m000d705)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m000d71y)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 Coming Up for Air (m000d70p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (m000d720)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000d8x6)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



WEDNESDAY 15 JANUARY 2020

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m000d723)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 00:30 Why Women Read Fiction (m000d725)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000d727)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000d729)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000d72c)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m000d72f)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000d72h)
A reading and a reflection to start the day, with the Rev Dr Craig Gardiner, a tutor at South Wales Baptist College.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m000d72k)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrccd)
Little Owl

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the little owl. Little owls really are little, about as long as a starling but much stockier with a short tail and rounded wings. If you disturb one it will bound off low over the ground before swinging up onto a telegraph pole or gatepost where it bobs up and down, glaring at you fiercely through large yellow and black eyes. Today, you can hear the yelps of the birds and their musical spring song across the fields and parks of much of England and Wales.


WED 06:00 Today (m000d84y)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Soul Music (m000d850)
Series 28

Days

“It’s a goodbye song, but it’s also an inspirational song, It could also mean a new beginning" - Ray Davies

Written by Ray Davies and released by the Kinks in 1968 'Days' had a very different sound to the rest of their repertoire. Sorrowful but uplifting it's been embraced by listeners across the world who have found solace and hope in it's lyrics.

Having been covered by numerous artists (most notably Kirsty MacColl), it speaks to people of all generations and captures moments in their lives.

For Sim Wood it's an anthem to great friendships and discovery whilst for actor Gabriel Vick it's a song that has journeyed with him from a place of fond memories to heartfelt remembrance. John Slater, who was born the same year that it was released, has his own celebratory take on 'Days' and for Laura and John Mapes it's the song that gave them the words they so needed to express.

Produced By Nicola Humphries
With contributions from rock critic and writer Barry Miles


WED 09:30 Four Thought (m000d7l9)
Living With Gods

Anna Della Subin takes a journey with a man once worshipped as a living god.

Anna Della has been writing a book about people inadvertently turned into gods, and in this bewitching talk she describes a journey across Morocco with one of them. She discusses what prompts people to regard others as gods, and what it might tell us about our society.

Producer: Giles Edwards


WED 09:45 Why Women Read Fiction (m000d852)
Episode 3

Women far outnumber men as buyers, borrowers and readers of most kinds of fiction. and make up the majority of festival attendees, reading group members and online book bloggers. In this wide-ranging book Helen Taylor draws on over five hundred interviews and questionnaires to explore what, when and how contemporary women read, and why fiction in particular is so precious to them. She looks at how women readers draw on their fiction reading to tell the stories and mark the milestones in their own lives, pass childhood favourites on to children and grandchildren, and forge and sustain friendships. She hears from women about their childhood memories of learning to read, often taught by women in their family or at school, and about how books have become an indispensable part of their adult lives. Her book analyses the special appeal and changing readership for genres like romance, erotica and crime, and looks in detail at the continuing appeal of lasting classic novels like Pride and Prejudice and Jane Eyre.

As a male author, Ian McEwan, once said: 'When women stop reading, the novel will be dead.'

Helen Taylor is Emeritus Professor of English at Exeter University, has taught and published widely on women's writing, is a regular chairperson at literary festivals and was the first Director of the Liverpool Literary Festival. Her books include 'Scarlett's Women: Gone With the Wind and its Female Fans', 'Circling Dixie: Contemporary Southern Culture Through a Literary Lens' and 'The Daphne du Maurier Companion'.

The reader, Lucy Briers, has recently appeared in the television shows Victoria and Gentleman Jack. She played Mary Bennet in the memorable 1995 television adaptation of Pride and Prejudice

Abridged and produced by Sara Davies


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000d854)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


WED 10:41 Exile (m000d856)
Episode 8

By Adrian Bean

Episode 8 in a new 10-part audio drama series marking the 400th anniversary of the sailing of the Mayflower. A gripping story about one family's journey into the unknown.

It's almost Easter. Elizabeth and Sarah brave the wrath of the community and bring the baby out on market day. Matthew is furious but they defy him and insist that she is baptised. Elizabeth names her Grace. Sarah is falling for Saul, and Ben has found out.

Sarah Hargreaves - Louise Brealey
Matthew Hargreaves - Trystan Gravelle
Ben - Joel MacCormack
Elizabeth - Megan McInerney
Saul Tregarron - Matthew Gravelle
Minister - Marc Danbury

Directed by John Norton
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (m0004sg8)
Vanessa and Niamh - Finding the Right Ingredients for the Future

Mother and daughter talk through classic some modern parenting conundrums. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


WED 11:00 My Name Is... (m000d7pg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Conversations from a Long Marriage (b09k1f9h)
Joanna Lumley and Roger Allam play a couple who have been married for over 40 years. Children of the Sixties, they’re still free spirits, drawn together by their passion for music – and each other.

The show follows their conversations that take them from the local café, to their kitchen table, taking in her resentment of new glasses - a symbol of ageing - and fury at being lectured by the dental hygienist. He has a dodgy knee and is on statins, and when they discuss the marriage break-up of their closest friends, Sally and Peter, there’s jealousy and talk of affairs. She suggests there are advantages to single beds, separate holidays and wants to go clubbing in Ibiza for her imminent ‘big’ birthday.

When a couple stop kissing each other, the marriage is in trouble, she believes. ‘What it says in the Shoop Shoop Song is so true. It IS in his kiss!’

Written for Joanna Lumley by award-winning comedy writer and journalist Jan Etherington, who herself has been married for 35 years. Jan has created and written many long-running radio and television series with her husband Gavin Petrie (Second Thoughts, Next of Kin, Faith in the Future) and has written sketches for Radio 4’s Ayres on the Air, but this is her first solo-scripted, half-hour comedy. She says: “Conversations from a Long Marriage will resonate with couples of any age but especially those who are still dancing in the kitchen, singing in the car and trying to keep the passion alive.”

Producer: Claire Jones
A BBC Studios production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:00 News Summary (m000d858)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Coming Up for Air (m000d85b)
Episode 3

Written by George Orwell in 1939, Coming Up For Air was published just before the outbreak of the Second World War and offers premonitions of the impending conflict with images of an idyllic Thames-side Edwardian-era childhood at the same time as taking a rather dim view of capitalism and its effects on the best of rural England.

The reviews were among the best that Orwell had received for a novel. It sold 3,000 copies - a considerable improvement on the response to his previous works.

Abridged by Ellin Stein
Read by Tim McInnerny

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m000d85d)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


WED 12:57 Weather (m000d85g)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m000d85j)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


WED 13:45 Green Originals (m000d85l)
Jacques Cousteau

A pioneer of the aqua lung and nature documentaries, Jacques Cousteau’s groundbreaking series The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau had an enormous impact on the 1970s, gripping an entire generation of children with its kaleidoscopic beauty. The stunning films of sea-life, coupled with Cousteau's natural history lectures in romantically accented English, are credited with spawning the environmental movement.

Cousteau spent more time filming underwater than probably anyone else and, as such, was alert to the devastating impact of over-fishing and pollution, particularly in the Mediterranean. Away from the camera, he lobbied tirelessly for tighter government regulations to protect the marine environment and biodiversity.

Champion free-diver Tanya Streeter reflects on the life and work of the explorer and film-maker turned oceanographer and considers the challenges that remain for the protection of our Oceans.

“Cousteau’s inventions opened up the underwater world to exploration,” she says. “He inspired us to see the planet in an entirely new way.”

Producer: Emily Williams
Series Editor: David Prest
A Whistledown production in association with The Open University.


WED 14:00 The Archers (m000d71m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Behind Closed Doors: Series 4 (m000d85n)
More Than Kissing

Behind Closed Doors Series 4
More Than Kissing
by Clara Glynn

The Court of Protection must decide if an eighteen year-old with learning difficulties should be allowed to have sex.

Harry is an eighteen year-old with learning difficulties who enjoys and wants to have sex. His parents think he's too vulnerable and could be put at risk. The Court of Protection must decide what is best for Harry.

Cast:
Barrister Rebecca Nyman …… CLARE CORBETT
Harry Grant ………………….......… RYAN WHITTLE
Joanna Grant ………………..… .....DEBRA BAKER
Charles Fenwick-Pagett QC..… OWEN OAKESHOTT
Judge …………………………........… DAN STARKEY
Ms Gill …………………………….......CAROLINE LAWRIE
Dr Theo Field ……………………....CHRIS PAVLO

Producer/director: David Ian Neville


WED 15:00 Money Box (m000d85q)
The latest news from the world of personal finance plus advice for those trying to make the most of their money.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (m000d71w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01s0dkm)
The Power of Oil

The Power of oil - Laurie Taylor presents a special programme which explores the role of oil in shaping our society, economy and environment. He talks to James Marriott of Platform, co-author with Mika Minio-Paluello of 'The Oil Road'. Their research took them from the oil fields of the Caspian Sea to the refineries and financial centres of Northern Europe.
They're also joined by Tim Mitchell whose work focuses on the relationship between democracy and oil and John Urry, whose latest book pioneers a sociology of energy, analysing our carbon addiction in the light of ever dwindling resources. Is an oil free society possible or desirable?

Producer: Jayne Egerton


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m000d85s)
The programme about a revolution in media with Amol Rajan, the BBC's Media Editor


WED 17:00 PM (m000d85v)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000d85x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Joe Lycett's Obsessions (m000d85z)
Series 2

Nina Wadia and Elis James

Joe Lycett returns to explore the nation's weird and wonderful obsessions by getting to know a selection of famous and not so famous guests. Joining Joe on the sofa this week, actress Nina Wadia shares her love of driving holidays, whilst comedian Elis James reveals his obsession with Welsh football shirts. Joe also welcomes members of the public to share their secret passions, as well as this week's VOP (very obsessed person), Paul Jordan, who has a PHD in Eurovision.

Joe Lycett's Obsessions was written and performed by Joe Lycett, with material from James Kettle and additional material from Catherine Brinkworth and Kat Sadler. The production coordinator was Damilola Mabadeje. The producer was Suzy Grant and it was a BBC Studios Audio production.


WED 19:00 The Archers (m000d861)
Shula is touched by some kind words and David has the rug pulled from under him


WED 19:15 Front Row (m000d863)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 19:45 Exile (m000d856)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 The Fix (m000d865)
Debt

Debt and Poverty

This is the third series of Radio 4's programme which tries to solve some of the UK's most difficult social problems. This year, The Fix spends three episodes looking at one issue: debt. Why is it such an intractable problem in the UK, where 15% of the population have no savings at all? Presenters Matthew Taylor and Cat Drew visit the borough of Barking and Dagenham in east London, where more than one in ten people there owe money to the council.
They speak to working people about how debt is affecting their lives, to the council about what they're doing to try to help, and ask why current solutions don’t go far enough.

Producer: Chloe Hadjimatheou
Researcher: Eleanor Biggs


WED 20:45 Four Thought (m000d7l9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 D for Diagnosis (m0006tyz)
What's in a Label?

Suzy built her life around a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, joining a support group, even writing a book about it, only to be given a completely different diagnosis not once, but twice. She lost her support group and a big part of her identity when her diagnosis was changed.

In this second programme in the series, Claudia considers the value and the accuracy of diagnoses in mental health. Unlike a broken wrist, diabetes or anaemia, where you can be fairly hopeful that the testing makes the diagnosis watertight, there is not a single x-ray, blood test or biopsy that can give a definitive diagnosis of a mental health problem. Instead the symptoms that a person describes are assessed and a diagnoses given based on how they cluster and fit with diagnostic categories. The whole process is much more fluid, with many symptoms shared or absent both within and between different disorders and conditions.

As Suzy describes, a mental health diagnosis can be seismic for the person concerned. In a positive way it can bring recognition, relief, treatment and recovery and in a negative way it can bring judgement, prejudice, discrimination and isolation. Because a diagnosis in mental health is above all, intensely personal. It can feel aimed at the very centre of you and your identity.

Claudia explains the backdrop to the classification of mental health conditions. She looks at the Psychiatrists' Bible, a.k.a. the DSM or the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual and considers the enormous growth in each of five volumes published over the past 70 years (it's said the last edition is big enough to stop a bullet). How does this American framework affect how we view, assess and treat mental health difficulties in this country?

There are some who disagree profoundly with formal classification framed by the DSM, describing it an inappropriate "medical model" for mental health problems. Claudia talks to clinical psychologist, Dr Lucy Johnstone, who has never, in her 30 year career, given a diagnosis and believes the starting point should be not "what's wrong with me?" but "what's happened to me?". But Claudia also hears from others, including the former President of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, Professor Sir Simon Wessely, who maintain diagnoses are accurate, valuable and flexible enough so that good clinicians can use them as the starting point for care.

Rose tells Claudia how her diagnosis for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder gave her the key to understanding years of troublesome and persistent thoughts and Jane, diagnosed with a developmental condition, Autism Spectrum Disorder, describes how getting a formal diagnosis gave her the knowledge and confidence to change careers and find work in a more supportive environment.

And Suzy, a peer researcher at the Institute of Health and Wellbeing at the University of Glasgow, whose diagnosis kept changing, gives tips about how to deliver and change diagnoses with compassion, care and understanding.

Producer: Fiona Hill


WED 21:30 Soul Music (m000d850)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m000d867)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 Coming Up for Air (m000d85b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 The Skewer (m000d869)
Series 1

Episode 2

From the mind of Jon Holmes comes topical satire like you've never heard it before.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000d8jl)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



THURSDAY 16 JANUARY 2020

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m000d86c)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


THU 00:30 Why Women Read Fiction (m000d852)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000d86f)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000d86h)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000d86l)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m000d86q)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000d86v)
A reading and a reflection to start the day, with the Rev Dr Craig Gardiner, a tutor at South Wales Baptist College.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m000d86z)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zr0qn)
Great Grey Shrike

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the great grey shrike. Great grey shrikes feed on small birds, which they can catch in flight. They also eat mice, voles and shrews and, as spring approaches, they'll include bees and larger beetles in their diet. Shrikes are also known as "butcher birds" because of their habit of impaling their prey on thorns, just as a butcher hangs his meat on hooks.


THU 06:00 Today (m000d8rs)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (m000d8rv)
The Siege of Paris 1870-71

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the siege of Paris during the Franco-Prussian war and the social unrest that followed, as the French capital was cut off from the rest of the country and food was scarce. When the French government surrendered Paris to the Prussians, power gravitated to the National Guard in the city and to radical socialists, and a Commune established in March 1871 with the red flag replacing the trilcoleur. The French government sent in the army and, after bloody fighting, the Communards were defeated by the end of May 1871.

The image above is from an engraving of the fire in the Tuileries palace, May 23, 1871

With

Karine Varley

Robert Gildea

And

Julia Nicholls

Producer: Simon Tillotson


THU 09:45 Why Women Read Fiction (m000d8rx)
Episode 4

Women far outnumber men as buyers, borrowers and readers of most kinds of fiction. and make up the majority of festival attendees, reading group members and online book bloggers. In this wide-ranging book Helen Taylor draws on over five hundred interviews and questionnaires to explore what, when and how contemporary women read, and why fiction in particular is so precious to them. She looks at how women readers draw on their fiction reading to tell the stories and mark the milestones in their own lives, pass childhood favourites on to children and grandchildren, and forge and sustain friendships. She hears from women about their childhood memories of learning to read, often taught by women in their family or at school, and about how books have become an indispensable part of their adult lives. Her book analyses the special appeal and changing readership for genres like romance, erotica and crime, and looks in detail at the continuing appeal of lasting classic novels like Pride and Prejudice and Jane Eyre.

As a male author, Ian McEwan, once said: 'When women stop reading, the novel will be dead.'

Helen Taylor is Emeritus Professor of English at Exeter University, has taught and published widely on women's writing, is a regular chairperson at literary festivals and was the first Director of the Liverpool Literary Festival. Her books include 'Scarlett's Women: Gone With the Wind and its Female Fans', 'Circling Dixie: Contemporary Southern Culture Through a Literary Lens' and 'The Daphne du Maurier Companion'.

The reader, Lucy Briers, has recently appeared in the television shows Victoria and Gentleman Jack. She played Mary Bennet in the memorable 1995 television adaptation of Pride and Prejudice

Abridged and produced by Sara Davies


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000d8rz)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


THU 10:45 Exile (m000d8s1)
Episode 9

By Adrian Bean

Episode 9 in a new 10-part audio drama series marking the 400th anniversary of the sailing of the Mayflower. A gripping story about one family's journey into the unknown.

Chickens are disappearing from the coop at night. Ben is beginning to accept his mum's love for Saul.
Sarah and Saul watch together at night to catch the chicken thief, and when it comes, it's not a fox - it's a boy - a half starved boy from the Wampanoag village. Saul and Ben decide to take him home, but when they arrive the village has been destroyed by "white mans disease" - and Saul's past begins to catch up with him.

Sarah Hargreaves - Louise Brealey
Matthew Hargreaves - Trystan Gravelle
Ben - Joel MacCormack
Elizabeth - Megan McInerney
Saul Tregarron - Matthew Gravelle
Captain Jones - John Cording
Blackbird - Ashleigh Haddad

Directed by John Norton
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (m000d8s3)
Ayahuasca: Fear and Healing in the Amazon

More and more tourists are travelling to the Peruvian Amazon to take ayahuasca, a traditional plant medicine said to bring about a higher state of consciousness. Foreigners come looking for spiritual enlightenment or help with mental health problems like trauma, depression, and addiction. But when Olivia Arévalo, a highly-regarded ayahuasca healer, was shot dead in 2018, light was thrown on a growing tension around the sacred medicine’s rising popularity. Her alleged killer - later lynched by a mob of locals - was a Canadian who had come to the region to take ayahuasca. Some locals saw Olivia’s death as an example of the malign influence of the commercialisation and globalisation of ayahuasca. Now a group of indigenous healers from Olivia’s Shipibo people are fighting back against what they see as the exploitation of their cultural heritage by foreigners - who run most of the ayahuasca retreats popular with tourists. This coming together of cultures has thrown up another serious problem too: vulnerable women being sexually abused while under the influence of charismatic healers and this powerful psychedelic.

Presenter: Simon Maybin
Producer: Josephine Casserly


THU 11:30 The End of the World Has Already Happened (m000d8s5)
3: Cue The Sinister Music

Writer and philosopher Timothy Morton continues to share his ideas about our psychological relationship with global warming. How could we cope better with our feelings about what’s happening, so we can get on with something better for our planet?

In this final episode, he finds sources of hope for the future.

There are no solutions to the climate crisis in this programme. But by opening up different ways of relating to other humans, and non-humans, might we then find it easier to act?

Tim spends time in a cat cafe and a nightclub, and listens to a children’s story, the worldview of the Lakota people and a hacked nature documentary, as well as the voices of young people engaged in climate protests.

The aim? To liberate humans from the ‘patriarchal, hierarchical, heteronormative possibility space’, and to relearn our connectedness to everything on the planet.

With contributions from environmental scientist and writer Liam Heneghan, artist Amy Cutler, activists Sarah Eagleheart, Colibrí Sanfiorenzo Barnhard, George Monbiot and Hilton Kelley, and psychotherapist Caroline Hickman, as well as a reading by Laurie Anderson.

Produced by Chris Elcombe
A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4.

Featured music:
Alexandra Spence - Immaterial (Longform)
Anna Peaker - Realm of Perfume and Lights (Longform)
Dawn of Midi - Nix & Io (Thirsty Ear)
Felicity Mangan - Stereo’frog’ic (Longform)
Ondness - Malta Inquieta (Discrepant)
Siavash Amini - A Recollection of the Disappeared (Room40)
Tomoko Sauvage - Making of a Rainbow


THU 12:00 News Summary (m000d8s7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Coming Up for Air (m000d8s9)
Episode 4

Written by George Orwell in 1939, Coming Up For Air was published just before the outbreak of the Second World War and offers premonitions of the impending conflict with images of an idyllic Thames-side Edwardian-era childhood at the same time as taking a rather dim view of capitalism and its effects on the best of rural England.

The reviews were among the best that Orwell had received for a novel. It sold 3,000 copies - a considerable improvement on the response to his previous works.

Abridged by Ellin Stein
Read by Tim McInnerny

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m000d8sc)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


THU 12:57 Weather (m000d8sf)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m000d8sh)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


THU 13:45 Green Originals (m000d8sk)
Sunderlal Bahuguna

In the early 1970s, village women in the foothills of the Indian Himalayas resisted deforestation by literally hugging the trees that loggers came to chop down. These original tree-huggers became known as the Chipko movement, from the Hindi word meaning “to embrace”.

At the heart of the movement was the Gandhi-inspired activist Sunderlal Bahuguna, who spread Chipko’s message of forest conservation by undertaking an almost 5,000km foot march across the Himalayas. In 1981, Bahuguna successfully persuaded India’s Prime Minister Indira Gandhi to ban the felling of all trees in the region above an altitude of 1,000 metres.

The Chipko movement inspired similar tree-hugging movements around the world, from Switzerland to the USA. In the 1990s, Bahuguna campaigned against the construction of India’s tallest dam in the state of Uttarakhand – this time without success.

The environmental activist Vandana Shiva, herself an early volunteer with the Chipko movement, assesses Bahuguna’s legacy. She considers what his campaign against Tehri Dam teaches about what happens when environmental activism fails.

“Bahuguna was a natural politician,” she says. “He pioneered the use of non-violent tactics – including marches, fasts and roadblocks – to draw attention to environmental issues.”

Producer: Dan Hardoon
Series Editor: David Prest
A Whistledown production in association with The Open University.


THU 14:00 The Archers (m000d861)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Behind Closed Doors: Series 4 (m000d8sm)
Mediation

Behind Closed Doors Series 4
Mediation
by Clara Glynn

A series of dramas set at legal hearings.

Maud and Martin's widower father has died and left his whole estate to a twenty-two year-old dog walker. Why would he do such a thing? Can they challenge the will? Going to court could be expensive and there are no guarantees, so they and the dog-walker have agreed to try mediation as a first step. Can Rebecca Nyman use her skill and diplomacy to help all three come to a satisfactory outcome? One can only try.

Cast:
Barrister Rebecca Nyman …….…… CLARE CORBETT
Martin Armstrong……………………… STEPHEN RASHBROOK
Maud Armstrong………………..……… SAMANTHA SPIRO
Hope James ……………………….....…… SARAH OVENS

Producer/director: David Ian Neville


THU 15:00 Open Country (m000d8sp)
The Chilterns - a new National Landscape?

Ian Marchant visits the Chilterns to test out some of the ideas for new ‘National Landscapes’ in the recent government-commissioned Glover Review into England’s National Parks. What barriers do some people face when it comes to visiting the countryside? (Hint: it’s not just owning a pair of wellies). And why does spending a night under the stars for every child matter for the protection of the countryside?

Ian meets the author of the new review, Julian Glover, in a wet wood above Wendover, just a stone's throw from the Prime Minister's country residence, Chequers. Julian is confident that the government will support his recommendations, one of which is to improve access to the countryside for people from diverse backgrounds. This includes High Wycombe born-and-bred Sadia Hussain, who loves the countryside but understands some of the barriers faced by people like her parents, who settled here from Pakistan. To them, the countryside has a different meaning and set of associations. And it also includes Layla Ashraf-Carr, a Chiltern Ranger. Born in Singapore, Layla suspects the Malay side of her family might have preferred her to be a lawyer or a doctor rather than a custodian of the natural landscape.

Ian also meets farmer Ian Waller, who loves his worms and his flock of Herdwick sheep, and historian and teacher Stuart King, who can explain how the landscape of the Chilterns allowed the local furniture making industry to flourish.
Producer Mary Ward-Lowery


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m000d6rn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m000d6sf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (m000d8sr)
The latest releases, the hottest stars and the leading directors, plus news and insights from the film world.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m000d8st)
Dr Adam Rutherford and guests illuminate the mysteries and challenge the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (m000d8sw)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000d8sy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Elephant in the Room (m0006lbh)
Episode 3

Sarah Millican hosts a new panel show using surveys to discover who is the most Average Jolene, and who is the most Maverick Matilda. This week's sparkling panel features Sandi Toksvig, Angela Barnes, Harriet Dyer and Phil Wang.

Surveys on subjects including childhood, daily rituals and favourite cheese are the basis for Sarah's questions to the panellists, discovering who is the closest to, and furthest from, the average. Surprising quirks, hilarious insights and unexpected anecdotes are revealed along the way.

The winner will be the most average. But joint winner will be the most different, the furthest from the norm.

A little bit like a dinner party, but one where you know all of the spoons.

A Chopsy production for BBC Radio 4


THU 19:00 The Archers (m000d7jy)
Kate attempts to practice what she preaches and tensions flare amongst the Grey Gables staff


THU 19:15 Front Row (m000d8t0)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 19:45 Exile (m000d8s1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (m000d8t2)
Combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.


THU 20:30 In Business (m000d8t4)
Is Britain up for sale?

Jaguar Land Rover, Cadbury, Weetabix are but some of the many British brands now owned by foreign corporations., Britain has one of the highest rates of company takeovers by new overseas owners. Sometimes these deals rescue a struggling business and save jobs. And sometimes they provide welcome investment for fast growth, such as with top technology company Arm, whose products are in most smartphones. Arm is headquartered in Cambridge, and now Japanese-owned.
But there is also the risk of Britain suffering a permanent loss of technology and know-how, or even a threat to national security, such as when the company targeted for takeover is in the defence industry.
And that's just the business side. What about the emotional side of takeovers? They can be a huge burden for executives, and staff may be reluctant to cooperate with previous competitors, jeopardising the sales targets of the new owners.

Ruth Alexander asks if the UK is selling its family silver, and whether this matters in a globalised world. Is Britain for sale, or inviting investment? Or has Britain already been sold, with 54% of shareholdings of UK public companies now foreign-owned? She talks to current and former CEOs and to academics, to find out why so many British companies are being bought, what this says about Britain, and what impact it has on jobs and the future of the economy.

Producer: Arlene Gregorius


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m000d8st)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (m000d8rv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m000d8t7)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 Coming Up for Air (m000d8s9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 Relativity (m0001w39)
Series 2

Episode 1

Drawing on his own family, the second series of Richard Herring’s comedy drama, Relativity, builds on the warm, lively characters and family dynamics of the first series. His affectionate observation of inter-generational misunderstanding, sibling sparring and the ties that bind will resonate with anyone who has ever argued with their dad about who the current Pope is.

Amid the comedy, Richard broaches some more serious highs and lows of family life.

Richard Herring is a comedian, writer, blogger and podcaster and the world's premier semi-professional self-playing snooker player.

Episode 1:
The funeral of beloved grandmother Doris brings the family together in sorrow. Chloe thinks this is the perfect time to share her and Ina’s forthcoming baby news - until she is unexpectedly pipped at the post.

Cast:
Margaret…………….Alison Steadman
Ken……………..Phil Davis
Jane…………….Fenella Woolgar
Ian……………….Richard Herring
Chloe…………..Emily Berrington
Pete………………..Gordon Kennedy
Holly………………...Tia Bannon
Mark………………Fred Haig
Nick………………..Harrison Knights
Billy………………..Danny Kirrane

Written by Richard Herring
Sound Design by Eloise Whitmore

Produced by Polly Thomas
Executive Producers: Jon Thoday and Richard Allen Turner

An Avalon Television production for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000d8t9)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



FRIDAY 17 JANUARY 2020

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m000d8tc)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 00:30 Why Women Read Fiction (m000d8rx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000d8tf)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000d8th)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000d8tk)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m000d8tm)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000d8tp)
A reading and a reflection to start the day, with the Rev Dr Craig Gardiner, a tutor at South Wales Baptist College.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m000d8tr)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zr00f)
Bittern

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the bittern. As the first shoots of spring appear in the reed-beds, you might hear the booming sound of a bittern. The bittern's boom is lower pitched than any other UK bird and sounds more like a distant foghorn than a bird. Today these birds are on the increase, thanks to the creation of large reed-beds.


FRI 06:00 Today (m000d7j5)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m000d6s1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Why Women Read Fiction (m000d7j7)
Episode 5

Women far outnumber men as buyers, borrowers and readers of most kinds of fiction. and make up the majority of festival attendees, reading group members and online book bloggers. In this wide-ranging book Helen Taylor draws on over five hundred interviews and questionnaires to explore what, when and how contemporary women read, and why fiction in particular is so precious to them. She looks at how women readers draw on their fiction reading to tell the stories and mark the milestones in their own lives, pass childhood favourites on to children and grandchildren, and forge and sustain friendships. She hears from women about their childhood memories of learning to read, often taught by women in their family or at school, and about how books have become an indispensable part of their adult lives. Her book analyses the special appeal and changing readership for genres like romance, erotica and crime, and looks in detail at the continuing appeal of lasting classic novels like Pride and Prejudice and Jane Eyre.

As a male author, Ian McEwan, once said: 'When women stop reading, the novel will be dead.'

Helen Taylor is Emeritus Professor of English at Exeter University, has taught and published widely on women's writing, is a regular chairperson at literary festivals and was the first Director of the Liverpool Literary Festival. Her books include 'Scarlett's Women: Gone With the Wind and its Female Fans', 'Circling Dixie: Contemporary Southern Culture Through a Literary Lens' and 'The Daphne du Maurier Companion'.

The reader, Lucy Briers, has recently appeared in the television shows Victoria and Gentleman Jack. She played Mary Bennet in the memorable 1995 television adaptation of Pride and Prejudice

Abridged and produced by Sara Davies


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000d7j9)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


FRI 10:45 Exile (m000d7jc)
Episode 10

By Adrian Bean

The final episode in a new 10-part audio drama series marking the 400th anniversary of the sailing of the Mayflower. A gripping story about one family's journey into the unknown.

The crew of the Mayflower are preparing for a return voyage to England.
Sarah makes a plan with Elizabeth to escape from Matthew and his "New Jerusalem" and sail back to England with Saul. But there's something Saul hasn't told her. He's married to a woman from the Wampanoag tribe, and the boy they found helping himself to chickens is his son.

CAST

Sarah Hargreaves - Louise Brealey
Matthew Hargreaves - Trystan Gravelle
Ben - Joel MacCormack
Elizabeth - Megan McInerney
Saul Tregarron - Matthew Gravelle
Captain Jones - John Cording
Blackbird - Ashleigh Haddad

Directed by John Norton
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


FRI 11:00 Curating the Future (m000d7jf)
Origins

Museums have never been more popular around the world or faced such sustained criticism. While the Louvre enjoys record-breaking visitor numbers, Abu Dhabi's Saadiyat Island builds a new museum campus for the Middle East and blockbusters from Leonardo to Van Gogh to David Bowie circle the globe, museums are also under challenge. Critics questions historic claims to neutrality, call for the repatriation of colonial-era artefacts and protest over the origins of sponsors' money.

V&A Director Tristram Hunt begins the series by looking back at the origins of some of the world's oldest museums and galleries, including those founded to tell the story of a nation, to display a royal or colonial collection or to promote technical and educational improvement.

At the Tokyo National Museum, the Ashmolean in Oxford and in conversation with the Director of the Rijksmuseum, Tristram asks how foundational ideals can be managed in the post-colonial contemporary world.

Producer: Julia Johnson


FRI 11:30 Unite (m000d7jh)
Part of the Radio 4 Comedy Playhouse season, Unite is a new sitcom starring Claire Skinner (Outnumbered), Radio 4 favourite Mark Steel (In Town With Mark Steel, The News Quiz), Mark’s son Elliot Steel (Roast Battles, Comedy Central At The Comedy Store) and rapidly rising comedy star Ivo Graham (Dave’s Edinburgh Comedy Award nominee 2019, Have I Got News For You)

When Tony (Mark Steel) a working-class, left wing South Londoner, falls in love and moves in with Imogen (Claire Skinner), an upper middle-class property developer, their respective millennial sons Ashley (Elliot Steel), a disenfranchised Croydon 'rude boy', and Gideon (Ivo Graham), Eton and Oxbridge-educated and crypto-currency literate, are forced to live under the same roof and behave like the brothers neither of them ever wanted.

Class, compromise, hope, desolation, love, identity, step-sibling rivalry and Crystal Palace FC are all explored in this fresh comedy.

Characters of the show Unite! You have nothing to lose but your prejudices, formed over a lifetime of living within the British class system'

Also starring:
Susannah Fielding (This Time with Alan Partridge)
Annette Badland (Man Down)
Simon Greenall (I’m Alan Partridge)
Naz Osmanoglu (Horrible Histories)

Written by Barry Castagnola, Ivo Graham, Elliot Steel and Mark Steel
Producer/Director: Barry Castagnola
Executive Producer: Mario Stylianides

A Golden Path production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m000d7jk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Coming Up for Air (m000d7jm)
Episode 5

Written by George Orwell in 1939, Coming Up For Air was published just before the outbreak of the Second World War and offers premonitions of the impending conflict with images of an idyllic Thames-side Edwardian-era childhood at the same time as taking a rather dim view of capitalism and its effects on the best of rural England.

The reviews were among the best that Orwell had received for a novel. It sold 3,000 copies - a considerable improvement on the response to his previous works.

Abridged by Ellin Stein
Read by Tim McInnerny

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m000d7jp)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


FRI 12:57 Weather (m000d7jr)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m000d7jt)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 Green Originals (m000d7jw)
Margaret Thatcher

Margaret Thatcher might seem to some like an unlikely pioneer of the need for climate action but, in the late 1980s, she made a series of remarkable speeches and interventions on the subject and catapulted the issue to the foreground of media and public attention.

In 1988, at a Royal Society dinner, she gave a speech warning of the dangers of what was then known as the greenhouse effect, and the need for action. Tellingly, a key paragraph setting out practical suggestions for global action was struck out by the then Chancellor of the Exchequer, Nigel Lawson.

She encouraged discussion of the subject at Cabinet level, inviting leading climate scientists into Downing Street to educate her Ministers, and described the urge to protect the environment as a key plank of Tory philosophy.

In 1989, she addressed the UN General Assembly on the subject of climate change and called for immediate and urgent action to address it.

Alice Bell is co-director at climate change charity, Possible, and is writing a book about the history of climate change. She reflects on Margaret Thatcher’s brief and vigorous engagement with the question of climate change.

Contributors include Lord Debden, Sir Crispin Tickell, Professor Sir Brian Hoskins and Jonathan Porrit.

Producer: Natalie Steed
Series Editor: David Prest
A Whistledown production in association with The Open University


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m000d7jy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Behind Closed Doors: Series 4 (m000d7k0)
The Balance of Probabilities

Behind Closed Doors Series 4
The Balance of Probabilities
by Clara Glynn

A series of dramas set at legal hearings.

Daniel and Scarlett's baby son was rushed to hospital in the middle of the night and died two days later. Did Daniel cause the baby's injuries, albeit by accident? The local authority have taken the couple's baby daughter into care for her protection. Barrister Rebecca Nyman has been engaged to represent Daniel in Court. Where lies the truth? And will the couple be allowed to keep their baby daughter?

Cast:
Barrister Rebecca Nyman …… CLARE CORBETT
Daniel ……………………..…… SAMUEL HARRIS
Scarlett …………………….……GEORGIA BURNELL
Dr Bukhari ...……………….....…SAIKAT AHAMED
Henry Neil…………………………… DAVID HOUNSLOW
Thomas Marengo.…………….…SEAN BAKER
Sarah Maitland…………..… MELISSA WOODBRIDGE
Judge…………………………… CHRISTOPER HARPER
Health Visitor......…………. HELEN CLAPP

Producer/director: David Ian Neville


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000d7k2)
Nailsworth, Cotswolds

Peter Gibbs and the team are in Nailsworth, Cotswolds.

Producer: Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 Short Works (m000d7k4)
A Proper Couple by Naomi Ishiguro

A specially commissioned new work for Radio 4 about love, masochism and cake.

Writer ..... Naomi Ishiguro
Reader ..... Olivia Ross
Producer ..... Ciaran Bermingham


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m000d7k6)
Radio 4's weekly obituary programme, telling the life stories of those who have died recently.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (m000d7k8)
Tim Harford explains - and sometimes debunks - the numbers and statistics used in political debate, the news and everyday life.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (m0004sjd)
Saranne and Neil - Judging a Book by the Cover

Mother and daughter’s boyfriend talk about how first impressions can often be so wrong. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


FRI 17:00 PM (m000d7kb)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000d7kd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (m000d7kg)
Series 101

Episode 3

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Miles Jupp


FRI 19:00 The Archers (m000d7kj)
Writer, Paul Brodrick
Director, Gwenda Hughes
Editor, Jeremy Howe

David Archer ….. Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ….. Felicity Finch
Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Natasha Archer ….. Mali Harries
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Justin Elliott ….. Simon Williams
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Tracy Horrobin ….. Susie Riddell
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Jim Lloyd ….. John Rowe
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Kate Madikane ….. Perdita Avery
Kirsty Miller ….. Annabelle Dowler
Freddie Pargetter ….. Toby Laurence
Lynda Snell ….. Carole Boyd
Roy Tucker ….. Ian Pepperell
Peggy Woolley ….. June Spencer
Gavin ….. Gareth Pierce
Stephanie ….. Kerry Gooderson
Megan Miller ….. Susan Twist


FRI 19:15 Front Row (m000d7kl)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


FRI 19:45 Exile (m000d7jc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m000d7kn)
Chris Mason chairs topical debate from Belfast's Assembly Buildings Conference Centre.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m000d7kq)
A weekly reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 Green Originals (m000d7ks)
From James Lovelock to Margaret Thatcher

Reflections on the modern pioneers of the environmental movement.

A Whistledown production in association with The Open University.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m000d7kv)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 Coming Up for Air (m000d7jm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (m000d71c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000d8j3)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (m0004sp4)
Baz and Jay - Life as BAME Policemen

Two former colleagues compare notes on their working lives as BAME policemen in the South Wales Police - which is celebrating 50 years as a Force. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Plague of Gratitude 23:30 SAT (m000cyvw)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m000d230)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m000d7kq)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (m000d71w)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (m000d71w)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m000d736)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m000d22y)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m000d7kn)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m000d73s)

Art of Now 11:30 TUE (m000d70k)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m000d8st)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m000d8st)

Behind Closed Doors: Series 4 14:15 MON (m000d7nx)

Behind Closed Doors: Series 4 14:15 TUE (m000d713)

Behind Closed Doors: Series 4 14:15 WED (m000d85n)

Behind Closed Doors: Series 4 14:15 THU (m000d8sm)

Behind Closed Doors: Series 4 14:15 FRI (m000d7k0)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m000d6t8)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m000d6t8)

Book at Bedtime 21:45 SAT (b08n4db5)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m000d6rx)

Coming Up for Air 12:04 MON (m000d7nl)

Coming Up for Air 22:45 MON (m000d7nl)

Coming Up for Air 12:04 TUE (m000d70p)

Coming Up for Air 22:45 TUE (m000d70p)

Coming Up for Air 12:04 WED (m000d85b)

Coming Up for Air 22:45 WED (m000d85b)

Coming Up for Air 12:04 THU (m000d8s9)

Coming Up for Air 22:45 THU (m000d8s9)

Coming Up for Air 12:04 FRI (m000d7jm)

Coming Up for Air 22:45 FRI (m000d7jm)

Conversations from a Long Marriage 11:30 WED (b09k1f9h)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (m000czdn)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (m000d8s3)

Curating the Future 11:00 FRI (m000d7jf)

D for Diagnosis 21:00 WED (m0006tyz)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (m000d6s1)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m000d6s1)

Drama 14:45 SAT (b054gxpb)

Elephant in the Room 18:30 THU (m0006lbh)

Exile 10:45 MON (m000d7nf)

Exile 19:45 MON (m000d7nf)

Exile 10:45 TUE (m000d70f)

Exile 19:45 TUE (m000d70f)

Exile 10:41 WED (m000d856)

Exile 19:45 WED (m000d856)

Exile 10:45 THU (m000d8s1)

Exile 19:45 THU (m000d8s1)

Exile 10:45 FRI (m000d7jc)

Exile 19:45 FRI (m000d7jc)

Fags, Mags and Bags 18:30 TUE (b0bfywgp)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m000d72p)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m000d6tn)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m000d7q2)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m000d72k)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m000d86z)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m000d8tr)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (m000d71r)

Four Thought 05:45 SAT (m000czxq)

Four Thought 09:30 WED (m000d7l9)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (m000d7l9)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m000d72y)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m000d7pd)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m000d71p)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m000d863)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m000d8t0)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (m000d7kl)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m000czyv)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m000d7k2)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (m000d71c)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (m000d71c)

Green Originals 13:45 MON (m000d7nv)

Green Originals 13:45 TUE (m000d70z)

Green Originals 13:45 WED (m000d85l)

Green Originals 13:45 THU (m000d8sk)

Green Originals 13:45 FRI (m000d7jw)

Green Originals 21:00 FRI (m000d7ks)

In Business 21:30 SUN (m000czf6)

In Business 20:30 THU (m000d8t4)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (m000d8rv)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (m000d8rv)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m000d71t)

Joe Lycett's Obsessions 18:30 WED (m000d85z)

John Clare's Scraping 16:30 SUN (m000d6sh)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m000d22m)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m000d7k6)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m000d73n)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m000d73n)

Making History 15:30 TUE (m000d717)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m000d234)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m000d73z)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m000d6t6)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m000d7pm)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m000d723)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m000d86c)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m000d8tc)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m000d6t2)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m000d6t2)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m000d85q)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (m000d22p)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (m000d7k8)

My Name Is... 20:00 MON (m000d7pg)

My Name Is... 11:00 WED (m000d7pg)

Natalie Haynes Stands Up for the Classics 16:00 MON (m000d7p2)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m000d23d)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m000d747)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m000d6tj)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m000d7py)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m000d72f)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m000d86q)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m000d8tm)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (m000d6rb)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m000d774)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m000d6s3)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m000d84s)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m000d7tc)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m000d858)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m000d8s7)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m000d7jk)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m000d72m)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m000d6rj)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m000d6rs)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (m000d73x)

News 13:00 SAT (m000d734)

No One Called Her Angel 19:45 SUN (m000d6sy)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (m000d6rd)

One to One 09:30 TUE (m000d707)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m000d6sf)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m000d6sf)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (m000c4zb)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m000d8sp)

PM 17:00 SAT (m000d73b)

PM 17:00 MON (m000d7p4)

PM 17:00 TUE (m000d71f)

PM 17:00 WED (m000d85v)

PM 17:00 THU (m000d8sw)

PM 17:00 FRI (m000d7kb)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m000d6st)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m000d23g)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m000d6tl)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m000d7q0)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m000d72h)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m000d86v)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m000d8tp)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m000d6sk)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m000d6sk)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m000d6sk)

Quote... Unquote 23:00 SAT (m000czlb)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m000d6rn)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m000d6rn)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m000d6rn)

Relativity 23:00 THU (m0001w39)

Rewinder 00:15 MON (m000bm76)

Riot Girls 15:00 SUN (m000203y)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (m000d7nz)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m000d72w)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (m000d73q)

Science Stories 11:00 TUE (b06vkkth)

Sebastian Baczkiewicz - Pilgrim 21:00 SAT (m000d73v)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m000d238)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m000d743)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m000d6td)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m000d7pt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m000d729)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m000d86h)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m000d8th)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m000d236)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m000d23b)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m000d73g)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m000d741)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m000d745)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m000d6sm)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m000d6tb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m000d6tg)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m000d7pr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m000d7pw)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m000d727)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m000d72c)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m000d86f)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m000d86l)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m000d8tf)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m000d8tk)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (m000czyx)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (m000d7k4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m000d73l)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m000d6sr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m000d7p8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m000d71k)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m000d85x)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m000d8sy)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m000d7kd)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b03sr5qv)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b03sr5qv)

Soul Music 09:00 WED (m000d850)

Soul Music 21:30 WED (m000d850)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (m000d7n7)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (m000d7n7)

State of the Nation 00:30 SAT (m000czyd)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m000d6rv)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m000d6rl)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m000d6rz)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m000d6sw)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m000d6sw)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m000d711)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m000d711)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m000d71m)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m000d71m)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m000d861)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m000d861)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m000d7jy)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m000d7jy)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (m000d7kj)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (m000d8t2)

The Diagnosis 21:00 MON (m000cz0y)

The End of the World Has Already Happened 11:30 THU (m000d8s5)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (m000d1rx)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (m000d8sr)

The Fix 20:00 WED (m000d865)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m000d6s5)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m000d6s5)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (m000d720)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (m000d720)

The Inquiry 17:30 SAT (m000d73d)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (m000d715)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (m000d715)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (m000d705)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (m000d705)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (m0006t50)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (m0004sg8)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (m0004sjd)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (m0004sp4)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m000d85s)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (m000czyz)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (m000d7kg)

The Skewer 19:15 SUN (m000czy8)

The Skewer 23:00 WED (m000d869)

The Spark 22:15 SAT (m000czy6)

The Stem Cell Hard Sell 17:00 SUN (m000cz1l)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (m000czlr)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (m000d7pb)

The Untold 11:00 MON (m000cn3p)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (m000d8gp)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m000d6s9)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m000d7pk)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m000d71y)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m000d867)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m000d8t7)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m000d7kv)

The World Turned Upside Down 13:30 SUN (m000d6sc)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b01s0dkm)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (m000d8ht)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (m000d8x6)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (m000d8jl)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (m000d8t9)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (m000d8j3)

Today 07:00 SAT (m000d72t)

Today 06:00 MON (m000d7n5)

Today 06:00 TUE (m000d703)

Today 06:00 WED (m000d84y)

Today 06:00 THU (m000d8rs)

Today 06:00 FRI (m000d7j5)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03zbtzz)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03zrcfq)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03zrcgb)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03zrccd)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03zr0qn)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03zr00f)

Unite 11:30 FRI (m000d7jh)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m000d72r)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m000d732)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m000d73j)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m000d6rg)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m000d6rq)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m000d6s7)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m000d6sp)

Weather 05:56 MON (m000d6tq)

Weather 12:57 MON (m000d7nq)

Weather 12:57 TUE (m000d70v)

Weather 12:57 WED (m000d85g)

Weather 12:57 THU (m000d8sf)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m000d7jr)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m000d6t4)

Why Women Read Fiction 09:45 MON (m000d7pp)

Why Women Read Fiction 00:30 TUE (m000d7pp)

Why Women Read Fiction 09:45 TUE (m000d725)

Why Women Read Fiction 00:30 WED (m000d725)

Why Women Read Fiction 09:45 WED (m000d852)

Why Women Read Fiction 00:30 THU (m000d852)

Why Women Read Fiction 09:45 THU (m000d8rx)

Why Women Read Fiction 00:30 FRI (m000d8rx)

Why Women Read Fiction 09:45 FRI (m000d7j7)

Woman's Hour 16:15 SAT (m000d738)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m000d7nc)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m000d70c)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m000d854)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m000d8rz)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m000d7j9)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (m000d1z9)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (m000d719)

World at One 13:00 MON (m000d7ns)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m000d70x)

World at One 13:00 WED (m000d85j)

World at One 13:00 THU (m000d8sh)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m000d7jt)

You and Yours 12:18 MON (m000d7nn)

You and Yours 12:18 TUE (m000d70s)

You and Yours 12:18 WED (m000d85d)

You and Yours 12:18 THU (m000d8sc)

You and Yours 12:18 FRI (m000d7jp)