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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 10 AUGUST 2019

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m0007dkv)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:30 A Woman of Firsts (m0007dkx)
Episode 5

The memoir of Edna Adan Ismail, a remarkable daughter, midwife and First Lady.

As the eldest child of an overworked doctor in 1950s Somaliland, Edna saw first-hand how poor healthcare, lack of education and ancient superstitions had devastating effects on the country’s people, especially women. When she suffered the trauma of FGM as an eight-year-old girl, Edna’s determination was born.

She became a nurse and midwife, a formidable teacher and a campaigner for women’s health. As her country was swept up in its bloody fight for independence, Edna also rose to become its First Lady and first female cabinet minister. But mixing with Presidents and Princes, she never forgot her roots and continued to train midwives – a role she has to this day.

In time, she built her own hospital, brick by brick, in the face of many obstacles - to ensure the training of future generations. The indomitable 82-year-old Edna still delivers babies. After all - as she puts it - she is 'simply a midwife'.

In the final episode, Edna’s marriage to Mohammed ends, following a military coup. But, undaunted and in the face of extraordinary obstacles, Edna achieves her life’s ambition - she builds her longed-for hospital. She also continues her passionate campaign against FGM.

Read by Cathy Tyson
Abridged by Anna Magnusson
Produced by Pippa Vaughan
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0007dkz)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0007dl1)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0007dl3)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m0007dl5)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0007dl7)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Canon Patrick Thomas, Vicar of Christ Church in Carmarthen


SAT 05:45 Four Thought (m0007bvx)
The Inside of Being

Bex Burch, who plays and composes for the Ghanaian xylophone, explores the difference between 'doing' and 'being' as a source of creativity, and shows how it works in her music.
"A great example of the difference between doing and being is that I don’t be, or become my teacher. I learn their way of doing something and still have to figure out who I am and what those tools are working with in me."
Recorded in front of a live audience at Womad, the World of Music, Arts and Dance festival in Wiltshire.

Presenter: Mark Coles
Producer: Sheila Cook


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m0007k81)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (m0007cvw)
Southwell's Workhouse

Helen Mark visits the last surviving workhouse, the minster and a very special apple tree to find out how these important landmarks in Southwell have impacted on the lives of those who live there.

Michael Perkins lived in the workhouse in 1948 with his mother and six siblings when they became homeless. Now aged 75 he goes back to the workhouse and revisits the room he lived in – he remembered “the pink brick walls and always feeling hungry“.
The workhouse was a place of last resort for the poorest and opened in 1824 and was built by Rev John Becher a resident and clergyman of Southwell Minster.
Robert Merryweather’s great grandfather was fortunate and didn’t need to turn to the workhouse as aged just seventeen it was him and his family who pioneered the 'Bramley apple' from the original 200 year old apple tree planted in Southwell .
But, Emma Rose a dancer, says she probably wouldn’t have escaped the workhouse had she been born a 100 years ago – last year the young single mum found herself homeless. After visiting the workhouse she choreographed a dance inspired by the stories of mums being separated from their children which was a common practice in the workhouse.

Today, the workhouse is owned by the National Trust and is one of the last remaining workhouses where visitors can get a glimpse of what life was like for those who lived there. This year for the first time the infirmary which was added onto the workhouse a few years later, has been restored and gives an insight into how the sick and dying were treated.

Presenter Helen Mark
Producer: Perminder Khatkar

Dance choreographed by Emma Rose.
Filmed by Artist & Filmmaker Benjamin Wigley from ARTDOCS with sound design by CJ Mirra.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m0007k83)
Social Media and Farming

More than 23 million of us in the UK are signed up to Instagram, 13 million have a Twitter account and half of the UK population now uses Facebook!

Those numbers mean social media can be a useful tool for farmers wanting to market their produce, or spread the message about what they do. But the digital world also has its pitfalls - online abuse and cyber-bullying are a real problem.

In this programme, Sybil Ruscoe is on a farm in Worcestershire to meet two self-confessed social media addicts. Rob Havard uses Twitter to share his passion for environmentally friendly farming and to get tips from farmers across the world. Will Evans set up the Rock and Roll Farming Podcast and the Eat Farm Now website to share the stories of ordinary farmers across the UK.

Presented by Sybil Ruscoe
Produced by Heather Simons


SAT 06:57 Weather (m0007k85)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (m0007k87)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m0007k89)
Joe McFadden

Joe McFadden joins Aasmah Mir and the Rev. Richard Coles. He started out in the detective series Taggart and went on to star in Take The High Road, The Crow Road, Heartbeat and Holby City. In 2017 he won Strictly, and he describes why he is donning sparkles again - to appear as Tick/Mitzi in Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.
Gelong Thubten grew up in London and found himself in New York making a career as an actor. He explains how he ended up as a monk and a spiritual teacher, teaching meditation to clients including: the United Nations, Google, Her Majesty’s Prison Service, and the actors Benedict Cumberbatch and Tilda Swinton.
Victoria Nixon was spotted in Bond Street in London by the photographer Helmut Newton. She reminisces about working as an international model while grieving the loss of her entire family by the age of 24 – two by suicide.
Colleen Blair became the first person to swim the Minch, the challenging stretch of water between the Inner Hebrides and the Scottish mainland. She also swam the English Channel when she was 20 and Loch Ness. She comes live from The Scottish National Open Water Championships at Loch Venachar.
Professor Hugh Montgomery is a distinguished physician, known for his pioneering genetic research. He’s also climbed mountains, run ultra-marathons, and he holds the world record for playing a piano underwater. He reveals how he came to write a novel after a late night drinking session with Lynda La Plante.
Susan Hill shares her Inheritance Tracks: The Sea Interludes from Benjamin Britten’s Peter Grimes, and Mozart’s Oboe concerto 3rd movement played by Nicholas Daniel.

Producer: Louise Corley
Editor: Eleanor Garland


SAT 10:30 Alex Edelman's Special Relationships (m0007k8c)
Public and Private

Alex Edelman encourages his guests from both sides of the Atlantic to think laterally about a diverse collection of special relationships in this loose limbed series of chat shows, recorded in London and the USA.

Inevitably, that special relationship surfaces - but in unexpected ways. In this episode, there are some surprising revelations about social life, social networking and what the panel would like to keep private. Recorded in London

Producer: Sophie Black
A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 The Origin of Stuff (m0005t5g)
High Heel

Katy Brand loves a high heel. Once known by friends and family for her ‘shoe fetish’, her dad even gave her a ceramic heel that could hold a wine bottle at a jaunty angle.

These days, Katy’s cherished heels from her torture days live in her cupboard. She has traded the pain for the statement trainer. But their art, history and construction still fascinate her.

So what is it about the high heel that has made it stand the test of time?

With the help of resident public historian, Greg Jenner, Katy explores the heel’s fascinating passage through time, finding a place on the feet of men, as well as women, in high and low places. Heels donned the feet of men on horseback in 17th century Persia, were adored by King Louis XIV, and gained an erotic currency with the invention of photography.

But how has science and engineering ensured the high heel’s survival?

Footwear Technologist, Mike George, shows us how the high heel is engineered, and how he can test if a particular design is teetering on the edge of safety. Social scientist, Heather Morgan, reveals the perceived benefits of wearing heels, as well as the risks when she fell foul to when fell in heels and broke her ankle.

Producer: Beth Eastwood


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m0007k8f)
Russia Burning

Fires are blazing in the far reaches of Siberia - an area the size of Belgium is on fire. Steve Rosenberg goes to have a look, a seventeen hour drive through forests of birch and cedar. But is Russia also burning socially and politically?

The Italian island of Lampedusa - halfway between Tunisia and Malta - has long been at the centre of the "migrant crisis"; a welcome haven for the occupants of leaky boats. Dr Pietro Bartolo has been working with migrants for many years but now, as Emma Jane Kirby reports, he's adopted a different approach.

The announcement from Delhi this week that Kashmir was losing its autonomous status took the world by surprise. The region has since been on lockdown, the residents left with few means of communication with the outside world. Rahul Tandon talks to young Kashmiris in Delhi, who oppose the new policy, and to those who support the government's move.

Sex is often a delicate subject. Norms are often very different from place to place – and the penalties for living outside the norm can be serious. Shereen El Feki has
been working with a team from BBC Arabic to survey and interview people across the Middle East about their attitudes and their desires.

A group of child orphans who survived the Nazi concentration camps and were resettled in Britain became known as The Boys, even though there were girls among them. They formed new communities in the UK and thrived. Hannah Gelbart, the grand daughter of one of them, reports on a special reunion in Prague.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m0007k8h)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 The Money Clinic (m0007k8k)
Fiona and James

Money is one of the top three strains on relationships and it’s a common cause of rift between family and friends too. You might be cautious and risk averse and hate to see your partner frittering their money away on new clothes and nights out; while they might think you should stop being so miserly with your cash and splash out once in a while.

In the Money Box Summer series Ruth Alexander introduces ‘The Money Clinic’. We eavesdrop on the conversations of three couples and a mother and son talking honestly about their finances with a relationship counsellor. We learn who they are, about their relationship with the other person, and what financial issues are coming between them. We hear practical tips on how each couple can better to manage their cash, and also how to manage the emotional side of money. We learn that individual attitudes to money are formed in early life, and how arguments about money are often about so much more than just money.

In this programme we meet Fiona, who is frustrated by her son James’ feckless attitude towards money. He’s 20-years-old but she feels like he sometimes acts like a two-year-old. How can she get him to change his ways?

Producer Smita Patel
Editor Emma Rippon


SAT 12:30 Lobby Land (m0007dkc)
Series 2

Sideways Moves

Tom Shriver MP decides the time is right to reap the benefits of a cash-in memoir, and Sam wants a piece of the action. But is there more to their relationship than meets the eye?

Starring Yasmine Akram, Charlie Higson, Cariad Lloyd, Dan Tetsell and Daniel Lawrence Taylor.

Written by Jon Harvey, Christopher Davies and Sarah Dempster.

Produced by Jon Harvey
A Naked production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 12:57 Weather (m0007k8m)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News (m0007k8p)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m0007dkk)
Nimco Ali, Shaun Bailey MLA, Luisa Porritt MEP, Lloyd Russell-Moyle MP

Ritula Shah presents political debate from the Radio Theatre at Broadcasting House, London, with the campaigner and writer Nimco Ali, the Conservative candidate for London mayor and London assembly member Shaun Bailey, the Deputy Leader of the Liberal Democrat MEPs Luisa Porritt, and the Labour MP Lloyd Russell-Moyle.
Producer: Emma Campbell


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m0007k8r)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Bad Faith (b00qx1mc)
Nothing Sacred

Lenny Henry stars as Jake Thorne, a police chaplain who's lost his faith and has decided, as a test for God, to behave appallingly towards those he’s supposed to help. Today, Jake counsels a policeman who has lost his memory of a fatal blaze, while Jake's father Isaac, slipping into dementia, seems intent on wreaking revenge on the whole world but particularly on his own son.

Jake Thorne ..... Lenny Henry
Michael ..... Danny Sapani
Ruth Thorne ..... Jenny Jules
Isaac Thorne ..... Oscar James
Juana ..... Sharon D Clark
Eamonn ...... Lloyd Thomas
Sienna ..... Wunmi Mosaku
Photographer ..... John Biggins

Producer ..... Mary Peate
Writer ..... Peter Jukes


SAT 15:15 One to One (m0001b05)
Lynne Truss on travel: Walk or Pilgrimage?

In the last of three programmes exploring our experiences of travel and why we do it, Lynne Truss joins Will Parsons, co-founder of the British Pilgrimage Trust on a short pilgrimage along the Old Way in East Sussex. They begin under the ancient Yew tree in Mary and St Peter’s Church in Wilmington and walk via the Long Man and Saint Peter of Vincula in Folkington to St Andrews’ Church in Jevington. The journey offers Lynne a chance to discover what a pilgrimage is and how it differs from a walk. Aided by her pilgrim’s staff it proves to be a journey of unexpected encounters and experiences for Lynne - unnerving, calming, reflective and enjoyable. Producer Sarah Blunt


SAT 15:30 From Luton Streets to Jersey Shores (m0007lf8)
For most of America, New Jersey was the “stinking state” – the densest, most polluted state in the USA. But for one Luton teenager listening to the music of Bruce Springsteen, it became impossibly glamorous.
More than a decade ago, while in his thirties, writer Sarfraz Manzoor made the pilgrimage to New Jersey, using Springsteen’s lyrics as his guide, to discover the landscape of his youthful imagination.
And he finds that, after decades in the doldrums and being the butt of so many American jokes, the “Garden State” is reinventing itself by capitalizing on the mythology Springsteen has created.


Producer: Mohit Bakaya


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m0007k8v)
Director and actor Kathy Burke on her new series of documentaries: All Woman

Director, actor Kathy Burke on her new series of documentaries for Channel 4 “All Woman” which are about appearance, motherhood, marriage and relationships.

We’ll be talking about women’s finances and the changes to income when women have a family.

There's music from the Scottish songwriter Karine Polwart. Dr Amy Kavanagh a disability campaigner tells us about her experiences of harassment in public spaces.

Plus a look at how to use the last few weeks of the holidays to prepare children for primary school and the wrestler Heather Bandenburg also known as La Rana Venenosa on why she thinks women’s wrestling is a feminist act.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Beverley Purcell

Guest; Sarah Pennells
Guest; Lucy Tobin
Guest; Fran Bennett
Guest; Helen Stroudley
Guest; Vibha Ghei


SAT 17:00 PM (m0007k8x)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Inquiry (m0007k8z)
Will China crack down on Hong Kong?

This summer Hong Kong has witnessed its largest ever protests, the most violent in decades. A proposed law to allow extradition of criminals to mainland China caused uproar. This bill exposed the cracks in relations between Hong Kong and the Beijing government. The current ‘one country, two systems’ arrangement gives the region some autonomy from Beijing. Pro-democracy protesters worry that this is being eroded as the Communist party is trying to bring it further under its influence. Complicating matters is Hong Kong’s significant but shrinking economic importance to China.

With this year being the 30th anniversary of the Tiananmen square massacre the international community is nervously watching to see how modern China will respond to the civil disobedience on such a large scale.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0007k91)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m0007k93)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0007k95)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m0007k5x)
Konnie Huq, Aisling Bea, John Finnemore, Terry Reid, Marika Hackman, Deborah Frances-White, Nikki Bedi

Nikki Bedi and Deborah Frances-White are joined by Aisling Bea, John Finnemore and Konnie Huq for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Terry Reid and Marika Hackman.

Producer: Sukey Firth


SAT 19:00 Four Thought (b03hwbs0)
Series 4

Ambivalence: For and Against

Mark O'Connell argues that in an age of strong opinions, we should embrace ambivalence.

As a child, Mark's constitutional ambiguity meant his mother considered printing the phrase 'I might and I mightn't' on a t-shirt. Today, Mark's job as a writer for Slate magazine is to take strong positions. In this fascinating look at the role of ambiguity in our society, he attempts to square the circle - or should that be circle the square - in his determination to have the courage of his own ambivalence.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (m0007k98)
At the Edinburgh Festivals, including The Secret River and the Pet Shop Boys Musical, Musik

We're at the Edinburgh Festivals, including the Pet Shop Boys musical with Jonathan Harvey and starring Frances Barber Musik. Also the stage adaptation of Kate Grenville's best-selling novel about the collision between settlers and Indigenous Australians, The Secret River. As well as the Bridget Riley retrospective at The National Gallery of Scotland and Blinded By The Light - the film of Safraz Mansoor's story about growing up in Luton and his love for the music of Bruce Springsteen

Tom Sutcliffe's guests Denise Mina, Louise Welsh and Don Paterson will also be talking about their highlights. The producer is Oliver Jones


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m0007k9b)
Beckett's Last Tapes

Robert McCrum explores the elusive Samuel Beckett’s astonishing literary career through rare audio tape recordings from the Samuel Beckett Research Centre at the University of Reading.

Housed in the unlikely spot of the Museum of English Rural Life, Beckett - the lifelong outsider - would have enjoyed the absurdity of finding his archives next to dairy farming data and combine harvester records. As a result, perhaps not unintentionally, Beckett's tapes have remained here as a well-kept secret.

Many of the tapes are interviews recorded by Beckett's friend, the scholar James Knowlson, while he was researching an official biography. The interviews they contain reveal fascinating insights into the way Samuel Beckett worked closely and collaboratively with his actors and friends - including Sian Phillips, Paul Daneman, Billie Whitelaw and Harold Pinter - and the respect they showed for him in return.

Taking Krapp's Last Tape as inspiration for this programme, Robert tells the story of the Samuel Beckett archive at Reading and invites surviving collaborators, friends and those who have found inspiration in Beckett's work - including Tom Stoppard, Edna O'Brian, Sian Phillips, Lisa Dwan, Lady Antonia Fraser and James Knowlson - to listen to extracts from the tapes and reflect on his unique method and the expression of his genius.

Robert aims to gain new insight into the mind of one of the 20th century's literary giants, while bringing out the poignancy and nostalgia involved in revisiting memories and life-events through the tapes.

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:00 Drama (b0b1hwwj)
Das Kapital

By Karl Marx
Dramatised by Sarah Woods

Starring David Threlfall

200 years since the birth of Karl Marx, this dramatization of his iconic work imagines what he would make of our 21st Century global economy. Sarah Woods updates the book to the present day and weaves its themes into a story. And, as with the book, the story begins with 'the commodity'.

"The commodity is, in the first place, an object outside us, a thing that by its properties satisfies human needs of whatever kind."

This is the story of the ultimate commodity: The smartphone. Today, at least half of the adult population owns one and by 2020 it's estimated around 70 per cent will - that's 6.1 billion people. It's a story that takes us from the cobalt mines of Africa to the tech firms of the UK. And what Marx's analysis reveals, is that the objects we each carry in our pockets aren't in fact phones at all...

Marx is a figure who divides opinion, but Das Kapital is one of the most influential books of the modern world. It informed and inspired a political movement that shaped the 20th Century and remains a key text in the study of modern economics. It's one of the few books that can claim to have changed the world.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production

The Writer

Sarah Woods works in collaboration with scientists, academics and charities to communicate current issues through innovative drama. For BBC Radio, she has written over thirty plays, series, adaptations and drama-documentaries. Recent Radio 4 projects range from a drama about our relationship with water (The State of Water) to a love story about the flu virus (My Life with Flu). Her most recent play for Radio 4 - Borderland - imagined a future UK, divided by borders. It won the Tinniswood Award for Best Audio Drama script at this year's BBC Audio Drama Awards.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (m0007k9d)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:15 Unreliable Evidence (m0007bx1)
Citizenship

Clive Anderson and guests discuss whether the Home Office should have the power to take away the citizenship of someone born and brought up in Britain.

If a British person travels to Syria and joins a proscribed terrorist group, should they be allowed to keep their British citizenship? The case of Shamima Begum, whose citizenship was revoked earlier this year, made headlines - but she’s far from the only British-born person to have her passport taken away. In 2017, the Home Office issued 104 deprivation of citizenship orders in cases where the Secretary of State believed that the deprivation was “conducive to the public good”.

Are these deprivations a vital tool in our fight against terrorism, or a worrying move towards turning citizenship into a privilege rather than an inalienable right.

Immigration lawyer Fahad Ansari argues that, by revoking citizenship from people who have the right to citizenship in another country, the government is creating a two-tier system, where someone with family ties outside Britain can be treated differently to someone without them. The former independent reviewer of terrorism legislation Lord Carlile says that we need to be able to protect the public from people who intend to carry out terror attacks and removing citizenship is one way to do that, particularly where there is not enough evidence for a criminal trial.

Clive’s guests will also explore what’s required to become a British citizen, attempting to answer some questions from the Life in the UK test with Professor Thom Brooks from Durham Law School – himself a dual British-US citizen.

Producer: Hannah Marshall
A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (m0007bk0)
Series 9

University of Plymouth

A funny and dynamic quiz show hosted by Steve Punt - this week from the University of Plymouth with specialist subjects including History, Geology and Human Biosciences and questions ranging from deadly jellyfish to glowing jellyfish via Jack Straw, Krishna and Planck’s Constant.

The programme is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in an original and fresh take on an academic quiz.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Ed Sheeran. In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds see students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offering plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

Other Universities featured in this series include Royal Holloway University of London, Aberdeen, St Catharine’s College Cambridge, Brighton and Oxford Brookes.

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 23:30 Windbreakers, Sea Eagles and Anthrax (m0007b4w)
Poet Richard Price relives his childhood summer holidays on a beach in the northwest highlands. But its a place with a shadow, in the form of Gruinard or Anthrax island the site of WWII biological weapons testing.



SUNDAY 11 AUGUST 2019

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m0007k9g)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:30 The Poet and the Echo (m0007djx)
Three Things Which Come Unasked

Writers choose poems as inspiration for new stories.

Iain Finlay Macleod takes an anonymous Gaelic poem as the inspiration for a witty contemporary story.

Writer, Iain Finlay Macleod
Reader, Fiona MacNeil
Producer, Gaynor Macfarlane

A BBC Scotland Production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0007k9j)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0007k9l)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0007k9n)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m0007k9q)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m0007k9s)
The Church of St Peter in Ropley, Hampshire

Bells on Sunday comes from the Church of St Peter in Ropley, Hampshire. In 2014 the 800 year old church was almost completely destroyed in a catastrophic fire and the village is still working to bring their historic building back to life. Two of the six bells cast by the Croydon Foundry of Gillet and Johnson in 1927 cracked in the fire, one irreparably. We hear a recording from 1979 of the bells ringing Double Oxford Bob Minor. .


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b03hwbs0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (m0007kcm)
The latest national and international news headlines.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b09bxjzh)
Cars

The poet Michael Symmons Roberts takes us on a journey to reveal our complex relationship with the car and how it means much more to us than simply getting from A to B.

"Cars have only been around for a century," he reminds us, "but in that short span of time they have not just become ubiquitous in our towns and cities, but a permanent fixture in our cultural and metaphorical landscape. Why has the car grown into such a potent symbol, and what does it point to in ourselves and in the world?"

In a search that includes fast cars, car crashes, sat navs and the car wash, Michael reveals that our vehicles have even entered our spiritual psyche - something he doesn't find that surprising. He explains, "It doesn't seem odd to me to find cars cropping up in mystical or religious stories or imaginings. There's something about the combination of the car as a sealed-off private space, like a monastic cell, and as a way of crossing great distances that lends itself to that treatment."

Illustrating his journey with the poetry of Colette Bryce, Les Murray and Seamus Heaney, along with the music of Schubert, Janis Joplin and Tracey Chapman, Michael celebrates the mystery and meditative quality of driving and wonders, with the help of playwright and screenwriter David Mamet, whether the second coming itself might be by means of a mid-sized sedan.

Presenter: Michael Symmons Roberts
Producer: Michael Wakelin
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (m0007kcp)
The Toughest Challenge

Sarah Swadling meets dairy farmer Becci Berry


SUN 06:57 Weather (m0007kcr)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m0007kct)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m0007kcw)
Sister Helen Prejean, Brexit and the Border, Hong Kong Protests

Sister Helen Prejean is known worldwide for campaigning against the death penalty in the US. She is the author of the bestselling ‘Dead Man Walking’ and joins Emily to talk about her latest book – a personal story of faith and spirituality.

This week marks the 50th anniversary of the start of The Troubles and although the Good Friday Agreement saw an end to the violence twenty years ago, many in Northern Ireland are feeling unsettled because of Brexit and the prospect of a hard border. The Rt Rev Dr William Henry, Moderator of the Presbyterian Church in Northern Ireland, and Father Martin Magill, a Catholic priest on the Falls Road, discuss the current situation.

Deacon John Lam, from the Catholic Chaplaincy at Hong Kong International Airport, talks about the protests currently underway there.

On the 14th August there is a performance of L’enfance du Christ by French composer Hector Berlioz at The Proms. Professor Barbara Kelly talks about this vividly dramatic oratorio (including the well-known Shepherds Farewell chorus) which tells the story of the Holy Family’s flight into Egypt.

Christian charity Home for Good says that church goers in the UK are still supporting overseas orphanages despite a UK government pledge to end its support of them. Emily is joined by the charity’s Head of Advocacy - Emily Christou.

Producers:
Helen Lee
Peter Everett

Editor:
Amanda Hancox

Photo credit: Scott Langley


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m0007kcy)
Family Action

TV presenter Sean Fletcher makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Family Action.

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Family Action’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘Family Action’.

Registered Charity Number: 264713


SUN 07:57 Weather (m0007kd0)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m0007kd2)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m0007kd4)
On St Peter's Field

On 16 August 1819 a crowd of around 60,000 protesters gathered in Manchester's St Peter's Fields. They sought more adequate parliamentary representation as a means of improving living conditions and working life. Several hundred militia armed with sabers charged at an entirely peaceful crowd in order to disperse them. It's thought that around 18 were killed - including four women and a child - and that almost 700 were seriously injured. Two hundred years on, the Bishop of Manchester, the Right Revd Dr David Walker, reflects on the impact the Peterloo Massacre had at the time on a nation that considered itself Christian. Not only did it change public opinion about extending the right to vote - but it also contributed a spiritual foundation for our contemporary understanding of human freedom, the alleviation of poverty, freedom from oppression, and the need to protect the vulnerable.

The service comes from St Ann's Church in Manchester, close to where the massacre took place, and is led by Alex Robertson. The Daily Service Singers are conducted by Andrew Earis, and the organist is John Hosking. Producer: Ben Collingwood.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m0007dkm)
To the Bathroom!

"Christianity has a lot to answer for," writes Will Self, "when it comes to our estrangement from our bodies - making our evacuations, quite as much as our sexual acts - an anathema in polite society".

Will argues that our infantilism in this regard detracts from our engagement with the world.

Producer: Adele Armstrong


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04mlmf8)
Blue Jay

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the North American blue jay. The loud warning screams of blue jays are just part of their extensive vocabulary. These birds are intelligent mimics. Blue jays are neat handsome birds; lavender-blue above and greyish below with a perky blue crest, black collar and white face. But the blue jay is not blue, but black. Its feather barbs contain a dark layer of melanin pigment; the blue we see is caused by light scattering through modified cells on the surface of the feather barbs and reflected back as blue. Common over much of eastern and central North America, blue jays will move in loose flocks to take advantage of autumnal tree mast. A single blue jay can collect and bury thousands of beechnuts, hickory nuts and acorns (in a behaviour known as caching) returning later in the year to retrieve these buried nuts. Any they fail to find, assist in the natural regeneration of native woodlands.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m0007kd7)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m0007kd9)
Writer – Liz John
Director – Rosemary Watts
Editor – Jeremy Howe

Ruth Archer ….. Felicity Finch
Pip Archer ….. Daisy Badger
Ben Archer ….. Ben Norris
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Harrison Burns ….. James Cartwright
Neil Carter ….. Brian Hewlett
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Ian Craig ….. Stephen Kennedy
Ruairi Donovan ….. Arthur Hughes
Eddie Grundy ….. Trevor Harrison
Clarrie Grundy ….. Heather Bell
Will Grundy ….. Philip Molloy
Ed Grundy ….. Barry Farrimond
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Tracy Horrobin ….. Susie Riddell
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Kate Madikane ….. Perdita Avery
Kirsty Miller ….. Annabelle Dowler
Lynda Snell ….. Carole Boyd
Oliver Sterling ….. Michael Cochrane
Philip Moss ….. Andy Hockley
Jakob Hakansson ….. Paul Venables


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (m0007kdc)
Jo Fairley, businesswoman

Jo Fairley is a businesswoman and writer. She co-founded the Green & Black’s chocolate company with Craig Sams, her husband, and has launched several other successful ventures since then.

Jo did not enjoy school, left at 16 with six O-levels and learned shorthand and typing at a secretarial college. She got a job with a magazine publisher and worked her way up through the features department to become the UK’s youngest magazine editor at the age of 23.

Her move into chocolate came when she happened to try a couple of squares of a sample sitting on the desk of her future husband, Craig Sams, a health foods entrepreneur. Jo decided that it was the best she had ever tasted. She bought two tonnes of chocolate for £20,000, using all of the proceeds from the flat she had just sold. She and Craig launched Green & Black’s in 1991 and sold the company to Cadbury’s in 2005.

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Sarah Taylor


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m0007kfx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (m0007bkc)
Series 85

Episode 1

First in the brand new series.

Graham Norton, Zoe Lyons, Jenny Eclair and Paul Merton join Nicholas Parsons for the panel game where the challenge is to speak without repetition, hesitation or deviation.

A BBC Studios Production.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m0007k6l)
Why did the chicken cross the road? How food became more than a comedy punchline

Food has been larking about in comedy since Charlie Chaplin first slipped on a banana skin and made bread rolls dance: but somewhere along the way, it's evolved from the slapstick sidekick to a much more significant comic entertainer...

From the disastrous duck at Fawlty Towers, to Fleabag’s calamitous catering efforts – via wry dinner ladies, caravan fry-ups, comedic fried chicken shops and dark food-blogger satire – food has come a long way, baby. It’s no longer a simple prop, but a much-loved theme at the very heart of modern entertainment.

In between performances at the renowned Edinburgh Festival Fringe, comedian and creative cook George Egg takes us on a journey down the Royal Mile and through the history of culinary comedy; discovering that, as with so much humour, the power of food lies in its normality. And that it’s this everyday appeal that allows food, and comedy, to conjure up safe settings in which to address much bigger issues.

Presented by George Egg, produced by Lucy Taylor.

Featuring clips from:

I'm Alan Partridge: 'A Room with an Alan'
Created and written by Peter Baynham, Steve Coogan and Armando Iannucci; performed by Steve Coogan.

Victoria Wood as Seen on TV: ‘Waitress’
Written by Victoria Wood; performed by Julie Walters.

The Return of Mr Bean: ‘Steak Tartare’
Created and written by Rowan Atkinson, Richard Curtis and Robin Driscoll; performed by Rowan Atkinson and Roger Lloyd-Pack.


SUN 12:57 Weather (m0007kdj)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m0007kdl)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 Gordon Brown on The Gospel of Wealth (m0007kdn)
“The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced.”

This is the radical conclusion of the world's greatest philanthropist, Andrew Carnegie, in The Gospel of Wealth.

On the centenary of Carnegie's death, Gordon Brown asks if the principles for philanthropic giving set out in this radical pamphlet are still relevant today.

In the hundred years since his death on 11th August 1919, Carnegie is perhaps at his most influential now, with initiatives such as the Giving Pledge, founded by Bill and Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett, seeing Silicon Valley billionaires sign up to give away half their wealth during their lifetimes.

But Andrew Carnegie set the bar high, saying you must give away all of your wealth before death and you should dedicate yourself to this duty, rather than delegate responsibility to others.

In the Gospel, he outlines the spheres he deems most worthy, with education at the top of his list. Carnegie invested heavily in libraries and universities, believing this was the best way to help people help themselves. As UN Special Envoy on Global Education, Gordon Browns asks why education is perhaps no longer viewed as the most important means of addressing the world's greatest challenges, and makes the case for reinvigorating the cause Carnegie stood for.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0007djv)
Country File Live at Blenheim Palace

Peter Gibbs chairs the show at Country File Live at Blenheim Palace. Christine Walkden, Bob Flowerdew and James Wong answer this week's questions from budding gardeners.

This week, the panellists discuss the best tree to plant in a pot, why parsnip seeds are so temperamental, and whether or not it is viable to grow turmeric in the UK.

Head of Gardens for Blenheim Palace Hilary Wood gives Peter a tour of the gardens.

Producer: Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (m0007kdq)
Sunday Omnibus - If You've Got it, Flaunt It

Fi Glover presents the omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen - with three conversations about Asperger's Syndrome; dressing the part; and the power of cabaret.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


SUN 15:00 Drama (m0007kds)
Inspector Chen Novels

Hold Your Breath, China

by Qiu Xiaolong dramatised by Joy Wilkinson

Inspector Chen has fallen from the Party's grace thanks to his anti-corruption investigations but he is back on the case when a serial murderer is on the loose in the ever-thickening smog of Shanghai.

Chief Inspector Chen ..... Jamie Zubairi
Detective Yu ..... Dan Li
Detective Qin ..... Liz Sutherland-Lim
Lou/Huang ..... Andrew Leung
Shanshan ..... Rebecca Boey
Zhao ..... David Hounslow
Qiang ..... Sean Baker
Bian ..... Chris Pavlo
Bei ..... Kenny Blyth
Neighbour ..... Debbie Korley

Director: David Hunter

HOLD YOUR BREATH, CHINA is the 10th of Qiu Xiaolong's Inspector Chen novels, all of which have been dramatised for BBC Radio 4. They have sold over 1 million copies and have been translated into 20 languages.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m0007kdv)
Colm Tóibín on Wilde, Yeates and Joyce, Mary Beth Keane, the best novels of 1979

Colm Tóibín tells Mariella Frostrup why he focused on the fraught paternal relationships experienced by Oscar Wilde, James Joyce and W.B. Yeats, in his latest book Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know.

Irish American writer Mary Beth Keane's discusses her third novel, the New York Times bestseller Ask Again, Yes. She explains her decision to set this sweeping family saga amongst the world of New York City police and why she wanted to subvert the stereotype of Irish immigrants to the US.

And to kick of a new series in which we spotlight the best fiction of a given year, novelist Tessa Hadley and critic Alan Taylor advocate for their favourite novels of 1979.


SUN 16:30 A Poet Laureate’s Peterloo (m0007kdx)
Poetry and song specially commissioned to commemorate The Peterloo Massacre - curated by the outgoing Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy and presented by Ian McMillan.

The Peterloo Massacre was the name given to a peaceful pro-democracy rally which took place on August 16th 1819, made up of around fifty thousand men, women and ‎children, who were attacked by an armed cavalry; eighteen people were killed, and hundreds injured. The ‎massacre inspired art and poetry at the time, including ‘The Masque of Anarchy’ by Percy Bysshe ‎Shelley. The aspirations of the protesters and the shock of their violent repression still resonate with writers and artists today.

Ian McMillan welcomes poets Carol Ann Duffy, Clare Shaw, Mark Pajak and singer-songwriter Kathryn Williams to perform their new commissions in front of an audience at Friends' Meeting House, Mount Street, Manchester (the wall on the southern side of the building is only piece of infrastructure that would have been at the site of the massacre, and is mentioned in witness accounts). He is also joined by Professor Robert ‎Poole - author of a new study of Peterloo: 'Peterloo: The English Uprising'.

Presented by Ian McMillan
Produced by Faith Lawrence


SUN 17:00 Can Facebook Survive? (m0007bdg)
David Baker, contributing editor of Wired, explores the challenges Facebook must meet and overcome in order to survive after a disastrous period which has seen the reputation and the business model of the social media giant questioned like never before.

Producer: Jonathan Brunert


SUN 17:40 Four Thought (b03hwbs0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0007kdz)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m0007kf1)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0007kf3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m0007kf5)
Mobeen Azhar

The best of BBC Radio this week with Mobeen Azhar.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m0007k6d)
Alice hatches a cunning plan and there's a crisis at Home Farm.


SUN 19:15 Cooking in a Bedsitter (b083mrvf)
Series 1

Beef Olives

Beattie Edmondson and Nikesh Patel star in Sue Teddern's new comedy, set in a 1960s' bedsitter, inspired by Katharine Whitehorn's cookery classic. In this episode, Trisha embarks on bedsit life, determined to make it as a get-ahead girl-about-town.

Trisha.....Beattie Edmondson
Deepak.....Nikesh Patel
June.....Alison Belbin
Len.....John Bowler
Tony.....John Dougall
Katharine Whitehorn.....Karen Bartke

Directed by Emma Harding


SUN 19:45 Stillicide (m0007kf7)
Episode 1: The Water Train

Cynan Jones' electrifying series set in the very near future - a future a little, but not quite like our own.

Water is commodified and the Water Train that feeds the city is increasingly at risk of sabotage. And now icebergs are set to be towed to a huge ice dock outside the capital city - a huge megalopolis that is draining the country of its resources.

Against this, a lone marksman stands out in the field. His job is to protect the Water Train...

From one of the most celebrated writers of his generation, Stillicide is a moving story of love and loss and the will to survive, and a powerful glimpse of the tangible future.

Reader: Richard Goulding
Writer: Cynan Jones is an award-winning Welsh writer, who has has been longlisted and shortlisted for numerous prizes and won a Society of Authors Betty Trask Award 2007, a Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize 2014 and the Wales Book of the Year Fiction Prize 2015. He won the BBC National Short Story Award in 2017.
Producer: Justine Willett
Music: Original music by Kirsten Morrison


SUN 20:00 Feedback (m0007dk1)
Roger Bolton asks the man who regulates what you listen to on BBC radio, Ofcom's Kevin Bakhurst, why the BBC needs an external regulator after years of regulating itself.

Two more listeners move out of their comfort zones to consider babies grown inside bags - science fiction or future science fact?

And one of the BBC’s comedy greats, Barry Cryer, tells Roger whether today’s new radio comedies can compare to those golden oldies like I’m Sorry I Haven’t a Clue - and says whether or not he is about to retire prematurely from the programme at the early age of 84.

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Alun Beach
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m0007djz)
Toni Morrison, Hal Prince, Dr Elizabeth Killick, Li Peng, Barrington Pheloung

Pictured: Toni Morrison

Matthew Bannister on

The Nobel Prize-winning author Toni Morrison, acclaimed for her novels which put the experience of black women centre stage.

Hal Prince, the successful theatre producer and director behind West Side Story, Phantom of the Opera and Evita.

The pioneering radar and sonar engineer, Dr Elizabeth Killick.

Li Peng, the Chinese Premier who ordered troops to fire on unarmed students in Tiananmen Square.

Barrington Pheloung, the TV and film composer who wrote the theme music for Inspector Morse.

Interviewed guest: Dr Tessa Roynon
Interviewed guest: Margaret Busby OBE, FRSL
Interviewed guest: David Benedict
Interviewed guest: Ed Gorman
Interviewed guest: Isabel Hilton OBE
Producer: Neil George

Archive clips from: Start The Week, Radio 4 08/12/2003; Toni Morrison reads Song of Solomon, Penguin / PRH Audio; World Book Club, Radio 4 Extra 12/06/2016; Toni Morrison’s Nobel Prize Lecture, 07/12/1993; Desert Island Discs, Radio 4 16/11/1986; Broadcasting House, Radio 4 04/08/2019; Elaine Paige on Sunday, Radio 2 04/08/2019; Workers Join Pro-Democracy Protests, BBC Sound Archive 23/05/1989; Tiananmen Square protesters battle Chinese troops, BBC News 04/06/1989; Today, Radio 4 08/11/1997; The Radio 2 Arts Show, 30/03/2016.


SUN 21:00 The Money Clinic (m0007k8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m0007kcy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (m0007cwd)
Berries Galore

Strawberries at Christmas? No problem! And as cheap as ever? Yes, of course! Many of us have become used to buying whatever fruit and vegetables we want, whenever we want, no matter the season. Strawberries, raspberries, blackberries and blueberries are available in supermarkets all year round. Until recently that was not the case. So what does it take for this to happen and what’s the cost? John Murphy peels back the layers of the berry industry, which has grown massively in recent years. Despite increasing production costs, prices have remained stable. Can that continue? Politics, economics and the environment could have a bruising impact on producers and on the price and availability of the fresh fruit we eat.

Presenter: John Murphy
Producer: Sally Abrahams


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m0007kfb)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (m0007cvy)
Where to Begin With... Quentin Tarantino

Raifa Rafiq, of the Mostly Lit podcast, hosts three summer specials called Where To Begin With...

In the first edition, she enlists the help of critics Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and Tim Robey to find out where she should begin with the films of Quentin Tarantino.


SUN 23:30 Peterloo: The Massacre That Changed Britain (m0007djb)
Episode 2 - the aftermath of Peterloo

Guardian Editor-in-Chief Katharine Viner charts the story of the infamous Peterloo Massacre - a devastating event 200 years ago in Manchester, which would have a huge impact on how Britain was run.

Up to 80,000 people had gathered in an area that was then known as St Peter's Field in the heart of what is now city centre Manchester. Many had walked from as far afield as Bolton, Stockport and even from over the hills in the West Riding of Yorkshire. Their mission - to peacefully demand more democracy and representation in parliament.

There was tremendous unrest in working-class communities at the time. In the cotton trade, technology had started to replace what was largely a cottage industry with huge mills. Life was hard and poverty was widespread. Areas like Manchester had no direct representation in parliament. An alliance of middle and working class people united in a common effort to find ways of raising these issues with the Government.

In the meantime, the authorities, aware of what had happened in the French Revolution, were nervous the same thing could happen in Britain. And so any sign of revolt or rebellion, however peaceful, was quashed where possible.

On August 16th 1819, troops charged the crowds in St Peter's Field - 18 people lost their lives and around 700 were injured. Within days, the press were referring to it as The Peterloo Massacre, after the battle of Waterloo just four years earlier.

In this second of two programmes, Katharine examines what happened in the immediate aftermath of Peterloo. She hears about those who lost their lives, the survivors, the press and public reaction and the attempts at a cover up. She also looks at the impact Peterloo had on British life and politics in subsequent years and decades – how the Government tightened controls on the people but how, gradually, things began to change and the franchise was extended. One of the direct outcomes of the massacre was the establishment of The Guardian newspaper - known then as the Manchester Guardian - just two years later.

A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4



MONDAY 12 AUGUST 2019

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m0007kfd)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 The Gamble Network (m0007bwl)
How gambling interests bought a country

The trail leads us to Curacao, a small island off the coast of Venezuela. This is where many of the offshore gambling sites that at least turn a blind eye to under-age gambling are licensed.

These Curacao licences have no validity in the UK, but they do allow operators to open bank accounts. According to the US State Department, Curacao is a major route for money laundering of drugs money from Latin America, with online gambling being one of the methods used. But who issues the licences? The plot thickens as it turns out that the licensing system is of doubtful legality, and could have been designed to encourage political corruption. In fact, we discover, one of Curacao’s top politicians was assassinated a few days after threatening to blow the gaff on gambling practices. The first prime minister of the newly autonomous island was jailed for political corruption, after it was shown that he had laundered money received by a major gambling operator alleged by the Italian police to have mafia connections.

So it appears that from the outset, organised crime set out to buy an island to facilitate gambling and drug money laundering. Could it be that the gambling your child is doing with video games is ultimately connected to organised crime and murder on the other side of the world?

Presenter/Producer: Jolyon Jenkins


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m0007k9s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0007kfg)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0007kfj)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0007kfl)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m0007kfn)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0007kfq)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Canon Patrick Thomas, Vicar of Christ Church in Carmarthen


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m0007kfs)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


MON 05:56 Weather (m0007kfv)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04mlpgv)
Vegetarian Tree Finch

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the vegetarian tree finch on the Galapagos Islands. These streaky sparrow-like birds found on the Galapagos Islands may look rather plain, but belong to the evolutionary elite, having attracted the attention of Charles Darwin on his visit there in 1835. Darwin noticed that the fourteen or so species of finches, which he concluded were derived from a common ancestor on this isolate archipelago, had evolved bills adapted to the type of food available. The Vegetarian finch has a bill rather like a parrot's, with thick curved mandibles and a biting tip which also allows it to manipulate seeds, similar to a parrot or budgie. Vegetarian finches are especially fond of the sugar-rich twigs of certain shrubs and are use the biting tip of their bills to strip off the bark to reach the softer sweeter tissues beneath: a niche that other finches on Galapagos haven't exploited yet.


MON 06:00 Today (m0007k5f)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Reflections with Peter Hennessy (m0007k5h)
Series 7

12/08/2019

In this series, the historian Peter Hennessy asks senior politicians to reflect on their life and times. Each week he invites his guest to explore their early formative influences, their experiences and their impressions of people they’ve known. In this programme Peter Hennessy’s guest is Norman Lamont, Lord Lamont of Lerwick, the former Chancellor of the Exchequer, and supporter of Britain's departure from the European Union.
Norman Lamont was born and brought up in the Shetland Islands, the son of a language teacher and a surgeon, and still regards Shetland as home. After attending school in Edinburgh, he read English and Economics at Cambridge, He was first elected to Parliament in 1972, and recalls having supported British entry into the European Economic Community. However, he became increasingly sceptical about British membership and recalls his insistence as Chancellor of the Exchequer in 1990 that Britain should opt out of the proposed European single currency. His time as Chancellor is probably best remembered for one of the most vivid and debated moments in British political and economic history since the Second World War, when a serious sterling crisis produced 'Black Wednesday', 16th September 1992, and the pound was forced out of the European Exchange Rate Mechanism. Norman Lamont has since been brutally honest about the collapse of government policy and the humiliation at the time for the government, for its Prime Minister, John Major, and for himself as Chancellor. Yet, for some, the enforced change in economic policy laid the foundations for a period of sustained recovery and economic growth. In the 2016 referendum Norman Lamont campaigned for Britain to leave the European Union.

Producer: Rob Shepherd


MON 09:45 Mudlarking, by Lara Maiklem (m0007k5k)
Episode 1

Lara Maiklem shares the delights of mudlarking on the foreshore of the River Thames.

Lara has scoured the banks of the Thames for over fifteen years, in pursuit of the objects that the river offers up from its muddy depths - from Neolithic flints to Roman hair pins, medieval buckles to a Tudor shoe, along with Georgian clay pipes, Victorian toys and semi-precious stones. These objects tell her about the people who lived in or visited London and how they ate, drank, dressed, worked and loved.

Moving from the river's tidal origins in the west of the city to the point where it meets the sea in the east, Mudlarking is a search for urban solitude and history on the River Thames, a place Lara describes as the longest archaeological landscape in England. And, as she has discovered, it is often the tiniest objects that tell the most surprising and enthralling stories.

Written and read by Lara Maiklem
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0007k5n)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


MON 10:45 The Latvian Locum (m0007k5q)
Series 2

Episode 1

Second series of the drama following the working life of a Latvian locum doctor in Britain. When her surgery in Blackpool is closed, Dr Dace Zake finds herself relocating to a practice in deprived rural Cornwall, and facing a whole new set of medical and personal challenges.

Dace's first working day in Cornwall is a complete contrast to her earlier life in Blackpool. When a patient doesn't turn up she and District Nurse Pippa take to the roads to track him down.

Cast:

Dace Zake ..... Dolya Gavanski
Pippa ..... Alex Tregear
Noah ..... Gerard Horan
Jodie ..... Helen Clapp
Muriel ..... Pippa Haywood
Dylan ..... Ed Browning
Romanian woman ..... Olivia Popica
Ruth ..... Elaine Claxton
Jenny ..... Victoria Cansfield

Writer Ben Cottam
Director Alison Crawford


MON 11:00 Scotland’s Justice Warrior (m0007k5v)
After cleaning up Glasgow's reputation as 'murder capital of Europe' and seeing her blueprint copied in London and elsewhere, Karyn McCluskey, the driving force behind the city's Violence Reduction Unit, has earned a reputation as a criminal justice trailblazer.

Now, as head of Community Justice Scotland, Karyn has taken on an even more complex task. She is set on nothing less than shifting the nation’s perception of justice.

A cornerstone of her argument is making the case that the people who get locked up are as much victims of society as they are wicked perpetrators of crime. Born into disadvantage, they arrive, in a sense, imprisoned already.

Against the backdrop of a populist political landscape, a skeptical media and a public who want to see criminals serve the longest possible sentence, can Karyn change hearts and minds?

Producer: Caitlin Smith


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m0007k5x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m0007k5z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Ulverton (m0007k61)
Shutter (1859) 1/2

Adam Thorpe's ground-breaking Ulverton was published in 1992. Although it was a first novel, the reviews heralded a "masterpiece" (Peter Kemp, Sunday Times) and it was also celebrated in the American press - "as encompassing a portrait of what it means to be British as I have ever read" (Seattle Times) and "One of the great British fictional works of our time" (LA Times).

It's a novel which has long been celebrated for the way it employs all the lyrical agility of the English language as it evolved down the centuries to give us a narrative that is shaped by time and character and born of a particular landscape - the chalk downlands of West Berkshire. A succession of different voices offer brief glimpses of life in Ulverton at roughly a generation's interval.

Shutter (1859) Part 1 of 2:
A photographer captions her photographic plates, which stirs memories of the circumstances of each image.

Written by Adam Thorpe
Read by Deborah Findlay
Abridged by Sara Davies and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m0007k63)
Care abuse, Food waste, Romance fraud

We investigate how the pressure to free up hospital beds is forcing families to accept places in care homes that have been rated as inadequate or requiring improvement by the Care Quality Commission. We hear from the grandaughter of a 90-year-old woman who was discharged to a home known for poor care despite her family being deeply unhappy with the decision. The woman says she was then sexually abused by a male member of staff in the home which has since closed. The Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman has criticised both Birmingham City Council and Birmingham Community Healthcare NHS Trust for the decisions they took that led to the woman being put in the home. Both the council and the NHS Trust have apologised to the woman and her family.

An estimated quarter of a million tons of food goes to waste each year - at home, in shops and restaurants and in food processing plants. There's a lot of new technology being developed to help reduce some of the food that would otherwise go to waste. It works by connecting the people who might want to eat it with businesses that a selling it at a knockdown price. Our reporter, Simon Hoban, tries out an App that claims to do this. We also hear from Lindsey Boswell, Chief Executive of Fairshare, the UK's largest distributor of food waste to charities.

We speak to the detective behind the recent conviction of a criminal gang which targeted women on dating websites and then conned them into handing over hundreds of thousands of pounds. DC Becky Mason from Surrey Police tells us how the gang operated, recruited members and hired a real person to pose for photos and make video calls to victims from beautiful locations.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer:


MON 12:57 Weather (m0007k65)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m0007k67)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague.


MON 13:45 Breakdown (m0007k69)
Episode 1

There's no definitive account of the week in August 1969 when Northern Ireland erupted into the full-scale violence of the troubles. But the powerful,largely forgotten testimonies heard soon after by the Scarman Tribunal can help bring us close. Chaired by distinguished judge, Lord Leslie Scarman, the tribunal compelled witnesses from all sides to testify to their experience of the events which led to the breakdown of law and order and the British Army being deployed.

Ruth Sanderson grew up in Northern Ireland and recently moved back there. While she wasn't born when the Troubles started, she thinks they continue to cast a long shadow. Now, expecting her first child, Ruth tries to unravel the events of August 1969 and ask whether their legacy can ever be lifted.

Episode One:

As the Battle of the Bogside rages in Derry, calls come for the British Army to be deployed. Meanwhile in Belfast, a crowd of protestors has gathered on the streets of Belfast and the mood is turning ugly...

Actors: Peter Balance, Ian Beattie, Kieran Lagan, Tara Lynne O’ Neill, Patrick FitzSymons and Frankie McCafferty.

Music: David Holmes featuring Gerry Diver on violin

Photo credit: Fondation Gilles Caron / Clermes

Access to Violence and Civil Disturbances in Northern Ireland in 1969 - Report of Tribunal of Inquiry was kindly provided by Special Collections, Queen’s University Belfast.

Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0

Producers: Conor Garrett & Ophelia Byrne


MON 14:00 The Archers (m0007k6d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (m0007k6g)
Father's Land in Mother Tongue

A lyrical and atmospheric drama set in Bangladesh. After the death of her mother, Bradford born Mya travels with her father to her parents' village in Bangladesh for the first time. She longs to re-connect to her mother's past. What Mya doesn't anticipate is the discovery of dark family secrets tracing back to the Liberation War of 1971, when Bangladeshis fought for independence from Pakistan.

Mya ..... Bhavna Limbachia
Zain ..... Richard Sumitro
Lovely / Nani ..... Ayesha Dharker
Zahid / Train Guard / Police Officer ..... Ikky Elyas
Written by Kamal Kaan
Producer/Director, Pauline Harris


MON 15:00 The 3rd Degree (m0007k6j)
Series 9

St Catharine’s College, Cambridge

A funny and dynamic quiz show hosted by Steve Punt - this week from St Catharine's College, Cambridge, with specialist subjects including Geography, French and Veterinary Medicine and questions ranging from French gender to horse teeth via James Bond and Dick Dastardly.

The programme is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in an original and fresh take on an academic quiz.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Ed Sheeran. In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds see students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offering plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

Other Universities featured in this series include Royal Holloway University of London, Aberdeen, Plymouth, Brighton and Oxford Brookes.

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m0007k6l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 A Surrealist's Map of Ireland (m0007k6n)
The French avant-garde playwright and surrealist Antonin Artaud came to Ireland in 1937 with a wooden staff he believed once belonged to St Patrick. Artaud penned numerous postcards to leading cultural figures back home in Paris - including Andre Breton - as he wandered desolately from Cobh to Galway and on to the remote island of Inishmore. His self-imposed mission: to return St Patrick's staff to its rightful home while locating the original source of the great and ancient tradition of surrealism.

He was eventually deported.

But as writer, actor, composer and all round strange sort, Reggie Chamberlain-King discovers, Artaud was not the first to be drawn to Ireland's distinctive brand of weirdness. On Paul Eluard's celebrated 'Surrealist map of the World' published in 1929, the island features in gargantuan scale, looming over its little Britain brother. Why is Eluard's Ireland so disproportionately large? Why did the country so captivate him and other Surrealist artists?

We join Reggie as he charts an improbable path through an untold, alternative Ireland.

In Belfast, he meets comedian Paul Currie, who says his Dadaesque performances are a natural by-product of a post-conflict society.

In Dublin, Reggie finds Irish language writer, Gabriel Rosenstock, chanting a whale-song inspired sound poem while lamenting the loss of Irish place names.

Acclaimed contemporary composer Jennifer Walsh has created an imaginary archive of Irish Surrealist Music. Walsh shares her theory about the strange brew of paganism, folklore and Christianity which she thinks made Ireland so appealing to the Surrealists.

Basically like Ireland...but weirder.

Written and presented by Reggie Chamberlain-King

Produced by Conor McKay

Sound Design by John Simpson


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (m0007k6q)
Relationship Education

“You say we are homophobic, we say you are Islamophobic”. These were the words of a protester outside a primary school in Birmingham which has found itself on the front line of a culture war. Parents, many of them Muslim, have been protesting against a programme called, “No Outsiders.” According to the school’s website the programme teaches that “Everyone is welcome, regardless of their race, religion, gender, gender identity, disability, sexual orientation and age.” The protesters claim that the “No Outsiders” curriculum is pushing a pro LGBT agenda and that this contradicts their religious beliefs. The school rejects their claim.

The issue is not going to go away. From September next year, all primary schools are compelled to teach Relationship Education and parents at a number of other schools have raised concerns. At the heart of the matter is a clash of rights, a tension between the need to protect LGBT rights while accommodating certain religious convictions. How do you adjudicate between competing rights? In a plural, liberal democracy how do get along with respect and difference?

Joining Ernie Rea to discuss those questions are Yusuf Patel, Founder of SRE Islamic, an organisation which provides advice, support and training to parents concerned with how Sex and Relationship Education is taught in schools; Dr David Landrum, Director of Advocacy at the Evangelical Alliance; and Andrew Copson, Chief Executive of Humanists UK.

Producer:
Catherine Earlam

Series Producer:
Amanda Hancox


MON 17:00 PM (m0007k6s)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0007k6v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (m0007k6x)
Series 85

Episode 2

Tony Hawks, Phil Wang, Sheila Hancock and Paul Merton join Nicholas Parsons for the panel game where the challenge is to speak without repetition, hesitation or deviation.

A BBC Studios Production.


MON 19:00 The Archers (m0007k6z)
Susan struggles to put things right and the pressure is on for Freddie.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m0007k71)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 19:45 The Latvian Locum (m0007k5q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Courage of Ambivalence (m0007k73)
In an age of certainty, of assertions without facts, and sometimes assertions with facts, Mark O’Connell makes the case for a different virtue – ambivalence. Six years on from his thought-provoking, witty and charming Four Thought, he returns to make the case for ambivalence.

In those six years almost every trend in public life has been away from ambivalence rather than towards it. Populist movements from the left and the right are about certainty, and even the idea of balance often ends up sharing single, entrenched views, just neatly arrayed on either side.

Yet in real life few decisions are truly clear-cut, there is often a case on both sides, and a reasonable person could easily reach a different conclusion with the same evidence. Most of us, much of the time, have complex and mutually contradictory views on issues small and large. And that's also true in public life: the arts and business, politics and the military are all properly in the realm of ambivalence, with complicated, messy and marginal decisions.

Mark begins this programme in Dublin, speaking to a philosopher, a psychologist, an essayist and an art critic about what ambivalence is, how central it is to the human experience, and how we might embrace it. Then he travels to London, to examine areas of public life, and issues, where ambivalence feels less comfortable, more challenging. But as someone who is profoundly ambivalent about most things, much of the time, can he sustain the courage of his own ambivalence?

Producer: Giles Edwards


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (m0007cvc)
Genoa's Broken Bridge

An icon of Italian design; a centrepiece of a community; a tragedy waiting to happen? When the Morandi bridge opened in 1967, it was one of the longest concrete bridges in the world, connecting the port of Genoa with the rest of Italy and Italy with northern Europe. Built during the post-war economic boom, it was the centrepiece of Italy’s plans to modernise its roads and was a proud symbol of the country’s engineering and architectural expertise. But all that came to a tragic end in August last year when a section of the bridge collapsed killing 43 people and leaving 600 people without a home. Helen Grady speaks to people whose lives have been touched by the bridge from the moment it was built to the moment it collapsed. And she asks how such a vital piece of infrastructure, carrying thousands of cars and lorries every day, could be allowed to fail.

Producer Alice Gioia

Translations by Rachel Johnson, Alice Gioia and Helen Grady

Voiceovers by:
Shaun Mason (Davide Capello)
Gemma Ashman (Mimma Certo)
Greg Jones (Emmanuel Diaz)
Neil Koenig (Remo Calzona)
Jim Frank (Alessandoro Campora)
Jonathan Griffin (Carmelo Gentile)
Will Kirk (Danilo Toninelli)
Andrew Smith (Paolo d'Ovidio)


MON 21:00 The Power of... (m0007bck)
Power of Deceit

Lucy Cooke sets out to discover why honesty is almost certainly not the best policy, be you chicken, chimp or human being. It turns out that underhand behaviour is rife throughout the animal kingdom, and can be a winning evolutionary strategy. From sneaky squid, to cheating cuckoos, some species will resort to truly incredible levels of deception and deviousness to win that mate, or get more food. And when it comes to social animals like we humans, it turns out that lying, or at least those little white lies, may be the social glue that binds us all together.

Lucy heads to the RSPB cliffs at Bempton, with Professor Tim Birkhead to discover why so many bird species appear to be such proficient deceivers, as well as visiting the very crafty ravens at The Tower of London. She speaks to psychologist Richard Wiseman about how to spot when someone is lying, and finds out whether she is any good at it. In fact, can we trust any of what she says in this documentary at all?

Presenter Lucy Cooke
Producer Alexandra Feachem


MON 21:30 Reflections with Peter Hennessy (m0007k5h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m0007k76)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 Ulverton (m0007k61)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (m0007bd0)
Philosophy in English

Michael Rosen looks at philosophy in English, from 17th century ideas to modern corporate slogans, via the daffodils of William Wordsworth. With historical linguist Laura Wright and philosopher Jonathan Rée

Producer: Melvin Rickarby


MON 23:30 The Untold (b0b7ddjx)
If the Dress Fits

Down a side street in Weston-super-Mare, a tailor is working at his sewing machine. This is Vaughan. "I'm alright, it's everyone else that's the problem." Born in Lancashire, he doesn't mince his words. And he's the go-to for any alteration you might need - particularly prom dresses. He works with the dress shop across the road, making any dress work for any girl. Last year he altered and modified 130 dresses for prom season - but it landed him in hospital with a heart attack, so this year he's afraid of the sequin busts as they start to come through the door.

He's disparaging of many of the dresses on the rail - "females have no taste" - except one. The black dress. "That... Is this season's challenge. It'll take a brave girl to carry that off."

As prom fast approaches, no one has chosen the black dress. Until Carmen walks in...

Produced in Bristol by Polly Weston.



TUESDAY 13 AUGUST 2019

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m0007k78)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 00:30 Mudlarking, by Lara Maiklem (m0007k5k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0007k7b)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0007k7d)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0007k7g)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m0007k7j)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0007k7l)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Canon Patrick Thomas, Vicar of Christ Church in Carmarthen


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m0007k7n)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04mlvwz)
Purple Martin

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the purple martin from eastern North America. Every spring, across the land from Chicago to St Louis, you can hear couples squabbling over the best real estate. But these aren't human house-buyers, they're purple martins. Purple Martins are the largest North American swallow, glossy blue-black rather than purple and much chunkier than the well-known barn swallow. They spend the winter in insect-rich places in South America and return to their North American breeding colonies each spring. In the west, they nest in holes in trees or even in giant saguaro cacti, but in the east where they're much more common, they almost exclusively rely on people to provide them with nest-sites. Visit almost any city, town or homestead and you'll see multi-story nest-boxes, the home of a score of purple martin families. Around 1 million people are thought to erect housing each year. Their human landlords take a personal pride in their martin colonies, listening each spring for those first pebbly calls which are a sign that their protégés have made it back from the tropics, once again.


TUE 06:00 Today (m0007khm)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 Fry's English Delight (m0007khp)
Series 10

You Must Remember This

It’s a story of the past - but is it true or false? With the help of Professor Steven Pinker, the actor Sir Simon Russell Beale and Swedish-Mongolian-triple-world-record-holding memory athlete Yanjaa Wintersoul, Stephen Fry discovers how strange, fluid and sometimes false memory can be - like several competing voices merging and babbling over one another.

When it comes to articulating memory and turning it into words, it’s a slippery process - as Stephen discovers when he tries to recall details from the day he was arrested and taken to prison as a teenager, more than 40 years ago.

Stephen learns how suggestive language and leading questions from others can produce false memories which nonetheless feel real. He turns to the work of Psychologist Dr Julia Shaw whose research into false memory led her to conduct an experiment in which she successfully planted false memories of breaking the law as a teenager into the minds of 60 people.

Memory athlete Yanjaa Wintersoul explains how she committed the entire IKEA catalogue to memory, using ancient Greek mnemonic techniques. And Simon Russell Beale describes his methods for memorising many of the great Shakespearean roles he’s played, including King Lear and Hamlet.

When it comes to language that scans and rhymes, our memories are much more likely to work reliably. Professor Usha Goswami, a neuroscientist explains why our exposure to nursery rhymes and rhyming songs as children is crucial to our language development and to a healthy and accurate memory in later years.

Producer: Sarah Cuddon
A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 09:30 Classified Britain (m0007khr)
Series 2

Hampshire Advertiser, 9 August 1856

James Naughtie finds the heartbeat of history in the front page small ads of old UK newspapers.

The classified ads of the Hampshire Advertiser, Saturday August 9th 1856. Trustees are advertising for survivors and dependents of those who died when the troopship, HMS Birkenhead, went down and introduced "women and children first" into the culture. Steam is replacing sail at sea, there's back breaking labour in the fields and an ad for corsets reveals unexpected aspects of lacing.

Front page news is a relatively late addition to the newspaper business. For most of their first couple of centuries, British newspapers carried classified ads rather than news on their front page. They transformed the hustle and bustle of the marketplace into newsprint, so you could take it home or to the inn to pore over at your leisure.

James Naughtie travels the country discovering how these front page ads give us a snapshot of time and place, exploring how they weave national and local life together - the heartbeat of history rolling daily or weekly off the presses.

The ads tell us what people were eating, drinking and wearing, what was on stage and what people were playing at home. They mark the mood of the time through notices for public meetings held to stoke up or damp down public fears of crime and political unrest. They are a record of the notices placed for houses and public buildings to be built, licenses applied for and subscriptions raised for publications and commemorations. They show the latest labour saving gadgets "trending" as technology arrived, and they track jobs and trades on the way up and down as the British Empire waxed and waned. The ever present ads for patent medicines record our most popular ailments.

Produced by John Forsyth.
Assistant Producer: Alexandra Quinn.
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 09:45 Mudlarking, by Lara Maiklem (m0007kht)
Episode 2

Lara Maiklem shares the delights of mudlarking on the foreshore of the River Thames.

Lara has scoured the banks of the Thames for over fifteen years, in pursuit of the objects that the river offers up from its muddy depths - from Neolithic flints to Roman hair pins, medieval buckles to a Tudor shoe, along with Georgian clay pipes, Victorian toys and semi-precious stones. These objects tell her about the people who lived in or visited London and how they ate, drank, dressed, worked and loved.

Moving from the river's tidal origins in the west of the city to the point where it meets the sea in the east, Mudlarking is a search for urban solitude and history on the River Thames, a place Lara describes as the longest archaeological landscape in England. And, as she has discovered, it is often the tiniest objects that tell the most surprising and enthralling stories.

Written and read by Lara Maiklem
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0007khw)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


TUE 10:45 The Latvian Locum (m0007khy)
Series 2

Episode 2

By Ben Cottam. Dace meets a young mum anxious about being summoned for jury service but discovers a deeper source of her problems.

Writer: Ben Cottam
Director: Alison Crawford


TUE 11:00 The Power of... (m0007kj0)
Power of Petite

Bigger is better, right? An ancient lore in biology, Cope’s rule, states that animals have a tendency to get bigger as they evolve. Evolution has cranked out some absolutely huge animals. But most of these giants are long gone. And those that remain are amongst the most threatened with extinction. Scientists now believe that while evolution favours larger creatures, extinction seems to favour the small.
If you look at mammals, at the time of the dinosaurs, they were confined to rodent-sized scavengers living on the periphery. But 66 million years ago, the dinosaurs went and allowed the mammals to evolve into some really big creatures - 30 metre long blue whales, the ten tonne steppe mammoth and a giant ground sloth that looked a bit like a hamster but was the size of an elephant with enormous hooks for hands. Now, only the blue whale remains and these have been shown to have shrunk to half the size of their Pleistocene ancestors. So is it better to be small? Smaller animals need fewer resources and smaller territories. With the planet in such peril – are more animals going to start shrinking? Well, perhaps…new research shows that in 200 years’ time, the largest mammal might be the domestic cow. And of course the most successful organisms, in terms of biomass, on the planet are the smallest. Zoologist, Lucy Cooke examines the science of being small, and why size matters.


TUE 11:30 Art of Now (m0007kj2)
Hairy Art

Whether it is denounced as trivial, celebrated, or declared pornographic and disgusting, the presence of body hair on women always elicits strong reactions. It's a topic that poet and performer Keisha Thompson explored in her one-woman theatre show 'I Wish I Had A Moustache'. In this programme Keisha goes in search of other artists who have examined the complicated issues around women and body hair in their work to ask what art can do to help us come to terms with the feelings of guilt and shame that so many women have internalised around their own body hair?

Along the way Keisha visits the National Portrait Gallery with academic and author of 'The Last Taboo: Women and Body Hair', Karin Lesnik-Oberstein, discovering how body hair is most glaring defined in our visual culture by an absence, and meets artists who are bringing it back into view, Kerry Howley who makes delicate, sculptural hair necklaces, Alix Bizet whose work uses hair to ask questions about identity and representation, and Leena McCall, whose 'Portrait of Mrs Ruby May Standing' proved just how controversial depicting female body hair can be. Finally, Keisha visits the 'Kiss My Genders' exhibition at the Hayward Gallery to find out how art is moving the conversation forward.

Presenter: Keisha Thompson
Producer: Jessica Treen


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m0007kj4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Ulverton (m0007kj6)
Shutter (1859) 2/2

Adam Thorpe's ground-breaking Ulverton was published in 1992. Although it was a first novel, the reviews heralded a "masterpiece" (Peter Kemp, Sunday Times) and it was also celebrated in the American press - "as encompassing a portrait of what it means to be British as I have ever read" (Seattle Times) and "One of the great British fictional works of our time" (LA Times).

It's a novel which has long been celebrated for the way it employs all the lyrical agility of the English language as it evolved down the centuries to give us a narrative that is shaped by time and character and born of a particular landscape - the chalk downlands of West Berkshire. A succession of different voices offer brief glimpses of life in Ulverton at roughly a generation's interval.

Shutter, Part 2 of 2:
As the photographer continues to catalogue her photographic plates, we gain further insight into the past lives of Ulverton's villagers.

Written by Adam Thorpe
Read by Deborah Findlay
Abridged by Sara Davies and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m0007kj8)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


TUE 12:57 Weather (m0007kjb)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m0007kjd)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague.


TUE 13:45 Breakdown (m0007kjg)
Episode 2

There's no definitive account of the week in August 1969 when Northern Ireland erupted into the full-scale violence of the troubles. But the powerful,largely forgotten testimonies heard soon after by the Scarman Tribunal can help bring us close. Chaired by distinguished judge, Lord Leslie Scarman, the tribunal compelled witnesses from all sides to testify to their experience of the events which led to the breakdown of law and order and the British Army being deployed.

Ruth Sanderson grew up in Northern Ireland and recently moved back there. While she wasn't born when the Troubles started, she thinks they continue to cast a long shadow. Now, expecting her first child, Ruth tries to unravel the events of August 1969 and ask whether their legacy can ever be lifted.

Episode Two:

As the Battle of the Bogside rages in Derry, calls come for the British Army to be deployed. Meanwhile in Belfast, a large crowd has gathered on the streets and the mood is turning ugly...

Actors: Niall Cusack, Frankie McCafferty, Peter Balance and Ian Beattie.

Music: David Holmes featuring Gerry Diver on violin

Access to Violence and Civil Disturbances in Northern Ireland in 1969 - Report of Tribunal of Inquiry was kindly provided by Special Collections, Queen’s University Belfast. Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0

Photo credit: Foundation Gilles Caron / Clermes

Producers: Conor Garrett & Ophelia Byrne


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m0007k6z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Dangerous Visions (m0007kjj)
I’m Dying To Help

by Jon Canter

As people continue to live longer, they cost the NHS and Social Services far too much; in our futuristic dark comedy a new Prime Minister and her aide come up with a radical solution to the problem. All they need now is a volunteer.

Sam . . . Tony Robinson
Prime Minister . . . Haydn Gwynne
Ella . . . Sophia di Martino
Gerry . . . Paul Hickey
Mr King . . . David Hounslow
Chrissy . . . Debbie Korley
Bianca . . . Debbie Korley
Sue . . . Helen Clapp
Mrs Griffin . . . Susan Jameson

Directed by Sally Avens


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (m0007kjl)
Deep Time

A solar eclipse repeats over and over, a musical key unlocks lost memories and a life marked out in books. Josie Long presents short documentaries and adventures in sound on our experience of time.

Crow
Featuring Christina McLeish
Produced by Jaye Kranz

A Channel of Music
Produced by Nanna Hauge Kristensen

Totality
Written and produced by Mae-Li Evans
Sound and composition by Calum Perrin
This piece is an adapted extract from a performance developed and supported by The Yard Theatre, Camden People’s Theatre and Hearsay Festival.

Production Team: Andrea Rangecroft and Alia Cassam

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:30 No Triumph, No Tragedy (b09jby2r)
Peter White meets CBeebies Presenter Cerrie Burnell, who became the victim of a disturbing online campaign after parents complained that she was scarring toddlers by not wearing a prosthetic arm. She didn't let this short-sightedness get to her, however, and has gone from strength to strength in her commitment to tackle discrimination.
In No Triumph No Tragedy she tells Peter White, who has been blind since birth, that she is glad her disability allows her to see the damage that such narrow mindedness can have. She recently left CBeebies in order to concentrate on her writing career and has published several books for children that focus on acceptance and celebrating the differences between us.
When she first took the job at CBeebies she was already facing the challenge of being a solo parent to daughter Amelie, who is now nine. The controversy that erupted as a small number of parents called on her to cover up her missing right arm seemed to coame out of the blue. Messages started appearing on the CBeebies board and before long she was speaking to journalists across the world.
Cerrie is forgiving about those who were hostile to her, believing that any adverse reaction was due to ignorance: "I don't mean that in a rude way - I just think they hadn't been exposed to it. I think having someone who is speaking directly to your child is a lot more intimate and more personal than just seeing a character in a wheelchair.
"I think having a children's TV presenter, for the adult, is more challenging. We live in an age where everyone thinks their opinion matters: that's the dark side of Twitter really, that everyone can say anything."
She tells Peter White that she hopes to use her writing career to tackle different forms of discrimination and she is also keen to continue with her acting career. She is nothing if not determined and says she is reluctant to ask for help, preferring to be seen as someone who can cope with whatever life throws at her. This was apparent even as a youngster, when doctors and her parents tried to persuade her to wear a prosthetic arm:
"There I was, as a seven year old, and they were saying that I would have more friends if I had the prosthetic. I laughed at them - my friends accepted me as I was. I wasn't aware of it ever being a problem and was picked on more for having braces!" A bigger problem at school was her dyslexia, with a diagnosis not coming until she was eight - when she still couldn't read and write. But even that has its compensations: her memory, sense of a story and vivid imagination, to name but three.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (m0007kjn)
Gabriel Gbadamosi

Michael Rosen meets London-born writer Gabriel Gbadamosi, to talk Dickens and dialect.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (m0007kjq)
Series 49

Laura Marling on the first woman psychoanalyst, Lou Andreas-Salome

Laura Marling, folk singer-songwriter, nominates the first female psychoanalyst, Lou Andreas-Salomé.

Laura has been unravelling the mysteries of Russian-born Lou Andreas-Salomé ever since she came across her name in the biography of the poet, Rainer Maria Rilke. She'd never heard of Salomé's name but discovered she was Rilke's literary mentor for years. As well as this, she was the only woman allowed in Sigmund Freud's Inner Psychoanalytic Circle, and was proposed to by Friedrich Nietzsche, who called her “the cleverest person I ever knew...” Yet today, she's been largely forgotten.
Laura makes the case for remembering this enigmatic woman who inspired some of the greatest minds of our time.

Laura Marling has been nominated for the Grammy Awards, the Mercury Prize and has won a Brit award for best British Female Solo Artist.

Chaired by Matthew Parris.
Produced by Eliza Lomas in Bristol.


TUE 17:00 PM (m0007kjs)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0007kjv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Andy Hamilton Sort of Remembers (m0007kjx)
Series 2

Class

Radio 4 favourite Andy Hamilton presents a collection of observations and reminiscences from his personal life and 40-plus years working in comedy.

Over this four-part series, Andy will be sort of remembering tales about Sport, Class, Religion and Stupidity. Through comic observations and personal anecdotes, he will explore each theme, examining how much (or how little) things have changed in the 60ish years he's been on this planet.

This week, Andy considers Class. As a middle-class child of working-class parents he recalls some of his bumps up against the class system at university and at work, and suggests comedy is a better mirror of class than drama ever has been.

Andy was born in Fulham in 1954, read English at Cambridge and then in 1976 began writing comedy for BBC Radio, on programmes like Week Ending and The News Huddlines. In 1990, he and Guy Jenkin created Drop the Dead Donkey for Channel 4. Andy has spent much of his working life making acute observations about politics and family life. In 2007, again with Guy Jenkin, he created the massive TV hit Outnumbered, which celebrated the chaos of life with young children. More recently they created the highly topical Ballot Monkeys and Power Monkeys for Channel 4, which charted the absurdities of the General Election and then the EU Referendum. For over 20 years he has been playing the part of Satan in his Radio 4 sitcom, Old Harry's Game. Andy is also a popular panellist on shows such as The News Quiz and Have I Got News For You.

Producer: Claire Jones
A BBC Studios Production


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m0007kjz)
Emma attempts to face the future and Will feels guilty.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m0007kk1)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 19:45 The Latvian Locum (m0007khy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 Land Power v Sea Power (m0007kk3)
What can the ideas of two long-dead geopolitical thinkers tell us about relations between Russia, China and America today?

Documentary-maker Phil Tinline traces how, in the late 19th century, an American sea captain turned scholar, Alfred Thayer Mahan, drew on the historic successes of Britain’s Royal Navy to argue that sea power was a decisive force in world history, and that the rising United States should establish its own permanent naval forces.

But then a British geographer, Sir Halford Mackinder, spotted the revolutionary potential of the new Trans-Siberian Railway, and argued that land power, in the form of the Eurasian Heartland could now mobilise its resources to outdo British sea power.

Both men’s ideas have had profound influence on geopolitical thinking ever since. Today, as the post-war international order falters, Phil talks to leading scholars and strategists to discern what influence Mahan’s and Mackinder’s ideas are having on our new era of great power rivalry – between NATO and Russia in the Black and Baltic Seas, between Russia and China in the Eurasian heartland as the Belt and Road stretches westward, and between China and the USA, in the hotly-disputed waters of the South China Sea.

And he asks whether, in a globalised world, ends that were once pursued by military means are now being achieved through commerce, but in pursuit of the same hard geopolitical aims.

With contributions from: Professor James R. Holmes, Professor Charles Kupchan, Dr Nick Megoran, Professor Rana Mitter, Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart Peach, Professor Angela Stent, Dr Dmitri Trenin

Producer: Phil Tinline


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m0007kk5)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted


TUE 21:00 Science Stories (m0007kk7)
Galileo's lost letter

Galileo famously insisted in the early seventeenth century that the Earth goes round the Sun and not vice versa – an idea that got him into deep trouble with the Catholic Church. In 1633 Galileo was put in trial for heresy by the Inquisition, and was threatened with imprisonment, or worse, if he didn’t recant. Galileo spent the rest of his days under house arrest and is now seen by some as a near-martyr to science in the face of unyielding religious doctrine. But the discovery of a letter questions the received version of events. Philip Ball tells the story of the relationship between Galileo, the church and his fellow professors.

Philip talks to science historians Paula Findlen and Mary Jane Rubenstein about Galileo's time and about the history of the relationship between science and religion.


TUE 21:30 Fry's English Delight (m0007khp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m0007kk9)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 Ulverton (m0007kj6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 Phil Ellis Is Trying (m0007kkc)
Series 2

Pinball

When Phil discovers Parbold is hosting the World Pinball Championships, he sees a way to solve his money troubles by winning the big cash prize. But it's not just him who wants the money, as Phil's past catches up with him. Meanwhile, Polly starts a pet-walking business as a sideline.

Written by Phil Ellis and Fraser Steele.

Starring:

Phil Ellis as Phil
Johnny Vegas as Johnny
Amy Gledhll as Polly
Terry Mynott as Barry Bean
Katia Kvinge as Ellie
and with special guest star Sean Lock as The Dragon

Produced by Sam Michell

A BBC Studios production


TUE 23:30 The Untold (m0001mmy)
Van Life

When Kirsty's youngest son goes to university, she decides to go in search of adventure. At the age of 47 she buys an old plasterer's van, and moves into it - knowing nothing about vehicles or DIY, and with a fear of heights so strong she gets scared of big hills.

She starts a Youtube channel to record her journey, and over the next eighteen months goes through a radical change. But through the story of this change, we hear about her past - and what she's left behind.

Produced in Bristol by Polly Weston.



WEDNESDAY 14 AUGUST 2019

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m0007kkf)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 00:30 Mudlarking, by Lara Maiklem (m0007kht)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0007kkh)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0007kkk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0007kkm)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m0007kkp)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0007kkr)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Canon Patrick Thomas, Vicar of Christ Church in Carmarthen


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m0007kkt)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04mlvyz)
Great Snipe

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the superbly camouflaged great snipe of Eastern Europe. A thin drizzle of tinkling notes mingled with rhythmic tapping drifts across a Polish marsh in spring a sign that great male snipes are displaying. Great snipe are wading birds with short legs and very long two-toned bills, which they use to probe bogs and wet ground for worms. Across much of Europe having newly returned from its sub-Saharan wintering grounds a number of northern and eastern European marshes, set stage as breeding sites for the larger, great snipe. They court females at traditional lekking or displaying grounds where several males vie for attention. Perched on a small mound, males gather at sunset to fan their white outer tail feathers, puff out their chests and produce a medley of very un-wader-like calls. The females, looking for a mate, are attracted to the dominant males at the centre of the lek.


WED 06:00 Today (m0007ks8)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 A Singer's Guide to Britain (m0007ksb)
Songs of Love and Desire

Renowned baritone, Roderick Williams continues his exploration of Britain’s stories, told through our song. Today, he uncovers what our singing history reveals about Britain's changing attitudes to love and passion.

Roderick samples love songs from medieval times to the modern day and explores how singing has, for centuries, helped Briton's through the murky waters of desire and romance. He hears how the Tudors and the Victorians approached the sensitive topic of sex in their songs, and he meets singer and harpist, Leah Stuttard, to try out what may have been Britain’s very first internationally best-selling love song.

The instinct to sing is as old as humans themselves and, in Britain, we have been singing our story, consciously and unconsciously, all through our history. Songs that harness a fleeting thought, capture a mood, tell a tall tale, or simply make us smile.
In this four part series, Roderick Williams explores different aspects of our British story, through the lens of the songs we sing. He’ll show how songs can transport us across all classes, all eras and all areas of the UK. Each song telling us something essential about our nation at different times and places by teleporting us right inside the experience of someone who was there. We’ll see how songs have passed from singer to singer, from listener to listener, reflecting who we are as a nation, and celebrating the things we hold most dear.


WED 09:30 Four Thought (m0007ksd)
Taking Humour Seriously

Harriet Beveridge says we don't take humour seriously enough and thinks it's a "woefully misunderstood and underused tool". She extols its power in managing human relationships, dealing with adversity and overcoming prejudice.
"Cracking a joke is a hugely effective way to hold up a mirror, to challenge fixed ideas, because jokes shatter assumptions."
Recorded in front of a live audience at Womad, the World of Music, Arts and Dance festival in Wiltshire.
Presenter: Mark Coles
Producer: Sheila Cook


WED 09:45 Mudlarking, by Lara Maiklem (m0007kt7)
Episode 3

"There are parts of the foreshore that sing with the voices of the past and have absorbed the richness of life: people’s toil, pain, hope, happiness and disappointment. Their ghostly essence is contained within the mud and thrown onto the shore with every lapping wave."

Lara Maiklem has scoured the banks of the Thames for over fifteen years, in pursuit of the objects that the river offers up from its muddy depths - from Neolithic flints to Roman hair pins, medieval buckles to a Tudor shoe, along with Georgian clay pipes, Victorian toys and semi-precious stones. These objects tell her about the people who lived in or visited London and how they ate, drank, dressed, worked and loved.

Moving from the river's tidal origins in the west of the city to the point where it meets the sea in the east, Mudlarking is a search for urban solitude and history on the River Thames, a place Lara describes as the longest archaeological landscape in England. And, as she has discovered, it is often the tiniest objects that tell the most surprising and enthralling stories.

Written and read by Lara Maiklem
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0007ksj)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


WED 10:41 The Latvian Locum (m0007kss)
Series 2

Episode 3

By Ben Cottam. After a hypochondriac steps through the door Dace finds herself running late for her other appointments and struggles to help a young gambling addict.

Writer: Ben Cottam
Director: Alison Crawford


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (m0000nf8)
Hwa and Lesley – The Adoption

A mother and the daughter she adopted from Vietnam reflect on who is more concerned about her Vietnamese identity. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 The Courage of Ambivalence (m0007k73)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 All Those Women (b09ppwdz)
Series 3

Episode 2

Comedy series by Katherine Jakeways about four generations of women living under one roof.

Maggie's in a flap after her free-spirited cousin Max arrives for a visit and Jen turns out to be an unexpected source of parenting wisdom for Layla.

All Those Women explores familial relationships, ageing, marriages - it's about life and love and things not turning out quite the way that you'd expected them to. Every week we join Hetty, Maggie, Jen and Emily as they struggle to resolve their own problems, and support one another.

Written by KATHERINE JAKEWAYS
Producer Alexandra Smith

A BBC Studios Production.


WED 12:00 News Summary (m0007kz6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Ulverton (m0007kt1)
Stitches

Adam Thorpe's ground-breaking Ulverton was published in 1992. Although it was a first novel, the reviews heralded a "masterpiece" (Peter Kemp, Sunday Times) and it was also celebrated in the American press - "as encompassing a portrait of what it means to be British as I have ever read" (Seattle Times) and "One of the great British fictional works of our time" (LA Times).

It's a novel which has long been celebrated for the way it employs all the lyrical agility of the English language as it evolved down the centuries to give us a narrative that is shaped by time and character and born of a particular landscape - the chalk downlands of West Berkshire. A succession of different voices offer brief glimpses of life in Ulverton at roughly a generation's interval.

Written by Adam Thorpe
Read by Trevor Cooper
Abridged by Sara Davies and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m0007kz8)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


WED 12:57 Weather (m0007kzb)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m0007kzd)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


WED 13:45 Breakdown (m0007kzg)
Episode 3

There's no definitive account of the week in August 1969 when Northern Ireland erupted into the full-scale violence of the troubles. But the powerful, largely forgotten testimonies heard soon after by the Scarman Tribunal can help bring us close. Chaired by distinguished judge, Lord Leslie Scarman, the tribunal compelled witnesses from all sides to testify to their experience of the events which led to the breakdown of law and order and the British Army being deployed.

Ruth Sanderson grew up in Northern Ireland and recently moved back there. While she wasn't born when the Troubles started, she thinks they continue to cast a long shadow. Now, expecting her first child, Ruth tries to unravel the events of August 1969 and ask whether their legacy can ever be lifted.

Episode Three: As street lights are extinguished in Belfast, Ruth's dad is caught up in the events which follow...

Actors: Richard Croxford and Patrick FitzSymons

Music: David Holmes featuring Gerry Diver on violin

Picture credit: Foundation Gilles Caron/Clermes

Access to Violence and Civil Disturbances in Northern Ireland in 1969 - Report of Tribunal of Inquiry was kindly provided by Special Collections, Queen’s University Belfast. Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0

Producers: Conor Garrett & Ophelia Byrne


WED 14:00 The Archers (m0007kjz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b0b1r1d8)
Rumpole

Rumpole and the Official Secret

Rumpole defends a civil servant accused of selling secrets and is embroiled in a wine fraud. Phillida tells Rumpole she plans to leave her husband and asks him to keep it a secret. Rumpole considers just what that might mean.

For fifteen years and 33 episodes, Rumpole has fought, won and, very rarely, lost myriad cases - and fallen in and out of love with his wife Hilda and
"the Portia of our Chambers", Phillida Trant, who adores him, and probably always will. These three final episodes leave us guessing until the very end - will Rumpole finally leave his wife Hilda, "She who must be obeyed", for Phillida?

Cast:
Horace Rumpole ... Julian Rhind-Tutt
Hilda Rumpole ... Jasmine Hyde
Sam Ballard ... Michael Cochrane
Claude Erskine-Brown/Hugh Timson ... Nigel Anthony
Phillida Erskine-Brown/Tina Bradbury ... Cathy Sara
Oliver Bowling/Kenneth Eastham ... Ben Crowe
Rosemary Tuttle/Honoria Bird ... Deborah Findlay
Liz Probert ... Amy Morgan
Judge Bullingham/Martyn Vanberry ... Ewan Bailey

Adapted by Richard Stoneman
Directed by Marilyn Imrie

A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 The Money Clinic (m0007k8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


WED 15:30 Science Stories (m0007kk7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Mastertapes (m0001hkq)
Lily Allen (A-side)

John Wilson returns with another run of the series in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios. Each edition includes two episodes, with John initially quizzing the artist about the album in question, and then, in the B-side, the audience puts the questions. Both editions feature exclusive live performances.

A-side: "No Shame" by Lily Allen

Always conversational in tone and infused with a dark sense of humour, Lily Allen’s lyrics never shies away from the personal – and her most recent album, released in July 2018, is no different. Set against dancehall and reggae influences, the album moved away from her usual witty sarcastic songwriting style and opted for a more "candid" approach. With tracks like ‘Trigger Bang’, ‘Lost My Mind’, ‘Three’ and the album title track, she tackles everything from the breakdown of her marriage and her friendships… to maternal guilt, substance abuse and, as if that’s not enough, social and political issues.

The B-side of the programme, where it's the turn of the audience to ask the questions, can be heard tomorrow at 3.30pm.
Complete versions of the songs performed in the programme (and others) can be heard on the 'Mastertapes' pages on the Radio 4 website, where the programmes can also be downloaded and other musical goodies accessed.

Producer: Paul Kobrak


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m0007kzk)
The programme about a revolution in media with Amol Rajan, the BBC's Media Editor


WED 17:00 PM (m0007kzm)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0007kzp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Gaby's Talking Pictures (m0007kzr)
Series 2

Episode 3

Gaby Roslin hosts the film quiz with impressions by Alistair McGowan and Ronni Ancona. This week, team captains John Thomson and Ellie Taylor are joined by special guests Lucy Porter and Emma Kennedy.

Presented by Gaby Roslin
Team Captains: John Thomson and Ellie Taylor
Impressionists: Alistair McGowan and Ronni Ancona
Created by Gaby Roslin
Written by Carrie Quinlan and Barney Newman

Produced by Gaby Roslin and Barney Newman
Executive Producer Gordon Kennedy
Recorded at RADA Studios, London

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4


WED 19:00 The Archers (m0007ksn)
The past returns to haunt Will and Jazzer makes a monumental error


WED 19:15 Front Row (m0007ksq)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 19:45 The Latvian Locum (m0007kss)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Unreliable Evidence (m0007ksv)
Series exploring and analysing the legal issues of the day


WED 20:45 Four Thought (m0007ksd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 Stranger Than Sci-Fi (m0007ksx)
Astro-physicist Jen Gupta and comedian Alice Fraser travel the parallel worlds of science and sci-fi.

Starting with the latest books and films, they discover real life science that sounds too strange to be true - from babies grown in bags, via black hole Jacuzzis, to flowers that behave like our ears.

Each episode starts with imagined futures and ends with today’s latest scientific research, exploring along the way how each impacts the other.

Produced by Joe Sykes and Rich Ward
Executive Producer: Peggy Sutton
A Somethin’ Else production for BBC Radio 4


WED 21:30 A Singer's Guide to Britain (m0007ksb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m0007ksz)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 Ulverton (m0007kt1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 The John Moloney Show (m0007kt3)
Britain's Most Expensive Mouse

The Godfather of British stand-up John Moloney returns to the live stage to share his latest tribulations of modern life.

This week, John goes toe-to-toe with the law. Consumer law to be precise. What could be better than an afternoon of kitchen shopping, long phone calls to your credit card company and the opportunity to find the most expensive mouse in the country?

Featuring Karen Bartke.

A Dabster production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:15 TEZ Talks (m00014lc)
Series 3

Timey-Wimey Stuff

Series 3. Episode 1. Timey-Wimey Stuff

Tez Ilyas returns for a third series of TEZ Talks.

In this first episode Tez talks about those moments in life that you would change if you could go back in time.

Written and performed by Tez Ilyas
Produced by Carl Cooper

A BBC Studios Production


WED 23:30 The Untold (m00024ns)
Should I study at Cambridge?

The recordings follow Anoushka as she tours the Cambridge colleges and debates what she should do. It's a difficult choice and one that is made all the harder by the University's poor record in relation to black students, who make up just 2.2 per cent of the under-graduate population.

In talking to her friends she discovers that some of the more able students are clearly put off from even applying to Oxbridge because of the compromises they would have to make. They talk to her about concerns over what they say is a lack of racial diversity and worries about so many students coming from fee paying schools.

Anoushka's parents, Anjula and Roy, are patient and supportive as she debates the merits of her top choices, including the London School of Economics, Queens’ College Cambridge and Kings College London. They feel that an Oxbridge degree would set her up for life and that she would also flourish within the small teaching groups offered in the history department. But this is her decision and it's one she's determined to get right.

Producer: Sue Mitchell



THURSDAY 15 AUGUST 2019

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m0007kt5)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


THU 00:30 Mudlarking, by Lara Maiklem (m0007kt7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0007kt9)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0007ktc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0007ktf)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m0007kth)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0007ktk)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Canon Patrick Thomas, Vicar of Christ Church in Carmarthen


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m0007ktm)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04mj32d)
Toco Tucan

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the South American toco tucan. Few of us are lucky enough to have seen or heard a Toco Toucan at home in its South American strongholds but its image will be familiar to drinkers of a certain age. Its pied plumage and sky-blue eye-rings are striking enough but it is the toco toucan's huge black-tipped orange bill that makes the bird instantly recognisable. Despite appearances this cumbersome-looking banana-shaped bill is really quite light. Under the colourful plates which cover the bill a matrix of horny fibres and air-pockets combines strength with lightness a formula which has caught the attention of light aircraft manufacturers . The bird's massive bills were prominent in advertisements for a well-known brand of Irish stout beer in the 1930s and 40s. In various poses, often with a pint pot perched precariously on its bill, toucan's, extolled the virtues of beer-drinking.


THU 06:00 Today (m0007kty)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 Front Row (m0007kv0)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 09:45 Mudlarking, by Lara Maiklem (m0007kvv)
Episode 4

"There are parts of the foreshore that sing with the voices of the past and have absorbed the richness of life: people’s toil, pain, hope, happiness and disappointment. Their ghostly essence is contained within the mud and thrown onto the shore with every lapping wave."

Lara Maiklem has scoured the banks of the Thames for over fifteen years, in pursuit of the objects that the river offers up from its muddy depths - from Neolithic flints to Roman hair pins, medieval buckles to a Tudor shoe, along with Georgian clay pipes, Victorian toys and semi-precious stones. These objects tell her about the people who lived in or visited London and how they ate, drank, dressed, worked and loved.

Moving from the river's tidal origins in the west of the city to the point where it meets the sea in the east, Mudlarking is a search for urban solitude and history on the River Thames, a place Lara describes as the longest archaeological landscape in England. And, as she has discovered, it is often the tiniest objects that tell the most surprising and enthralling stories.

Written and read by Lara Maiklem
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0007kv4)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


THU 10:45 The Latvian Locum (m0007kvd)
Series 2

Episode 4

By Ben Cottam. District Nurse Pippa brings a desperately sick Romanian woman to see Dace. Whilst attempting to treat her Dace makes a difficult choice.

Writer: Ben Cottam
Director: Alison Crawford


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (m0007kyc)
Barbuda: Storms, Recovery and ‘Land Grabs’

Who will shape the future of the hurricane-hit, tropical isle of Barbuda? In 2017, category-5 hurricane Irma devastated much of Barbuda's 'paradise' landscape, and its infrastructure. The national government – based on the larger, neighbouring island of Antigua – evacuated the population of some 1800 people. But within days, although the people weren’t allowed to return, bulldozers were clearing ancient forest to build an international airport. Critics called this another case of, 'disaster capitalism' – governments and business taking advantage of catastrophe to make a profit.

Barbuda has long been viewed as ripe for more tourism – Hollywood actor Robert De Niro is part of a commercial enterprise working on the opening of an exclusive resort. One of the obstacles to widespread development has been the island’s unique system of tenure – all land has been held in common since the emancipation of Barbuda’s slave population in the 19th century. But last year the government repealed the law guaranteeing those communal rights, partly to attract investment to the island. Meanwhile, although the hurricane season began on June 1st, families are still living in tents.

With the main opportunity to earn revenue coming from tourism, the national government is thoroughly irked by Barbudans' resistance to profit from top-dollar visitors. It argues that projects can be environmentally-friendly. But in the wake of Irma, the impact of climate change hangs heavily on Barbuda. How can this pristine island preserve its future and still develop the economy?

Presenter / producer: Linda Pressly


THU 11:30 Art of Now (m0007kyf)
Jeremy Deller’s Peterloo

For any artist - this is a daunting commission.
Two hundred years ago in Manchester 18 people were killed and 600 injured in a defining moment for protest and democracy in the UK.
And to mark the anniversary of the Peterloo Massacre Manchester City Council commissioned Turner Prize-winning artist Jeremy Deller to create a £1m pound monument to Manchester's revolutionary consciousness and the power of everyday people in the face of the armed state.
Some of the artist's best known works have been about a moment in time - his commemoration of The Battle of the Somme "We're Here Because We're Here" and The Battle of Orgreave, but here he was tasked with memorialising a defining moment of the past for perhaps another two hundred years.
A Peterloo monument has been the focus of campaigns in the city for decades, and strong opinions abound - as traditionalists call for a figurative work, but as the artists explains, public art requires a certain toughness. There can be only one vision.
From first concepts explained in 2018 in the artist's studio to the unveiling of plans before a packed Manchester Central Library, producer Kevin Core talks to the artist about the preparations and planning up to the August 2019 unveiling.
For the artist it's a people-centric piece - a stepped platform designed to "disappear" when covered in a mass of humanity, and one which points the way to contemporary instances of states turning their might on innocent protestors.
Recorded over the course of a year, it's an intimate look at an artistic vision - and the moment art collides with the public.

Produced by Kevin Core


THU 12:00 News Summary (m0007kyh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Ulverton (m0007kvn)
Treasure (1914) 1/2

Adam Thorpe's ground-breaking Ulverton was published in 1992. Although it was a first novel, the reviews heralded a "masterpiece" (Peter Kemp, Sunday Times) and it was also celebrated in the American press - "as encompassing a portrait of what it means to be British as I have ever read" (Seattle Times) and "One of the great British fictional works of our time" (LA Times).

It's a novel which has long been celebrated for the way it employs all the lyrical agility of the English language as it evolved down the centuries to give us a narrative that is shaped by time and character and born of a particular landscape - the chalk downlands of West Berkshire. A succession of different voices offer brief glimpses of life in Ulverton at roughly a generation's interval.

Treasure, Part 1 of 2:
1914. Life goes on in Ulverton but the threat of war looms large.

Written by Adam Thorpe
Read by Anton Lesser
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m0007kyk)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


THU 12:57 Weather (m0007kym)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m0007kyp)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


THU 13:45 Breakdown (m0007kyr)
Episode 4

There's no definitive account of the week in August 1969 when Northern Ireland erupted into the full-scale violence of the troubles. But the powerful, largely forgotten testimonies heard soon after by the Scarman Tribunal can help bring us close. Chaired by distinguished judge, Lord Leslie Scarman, the tribunal compelled witnesses from all sides to testify to their experience of the events which led to the breakdown of law and order and the British Army being deployed.

Ruth Sanderson grew up in Northern Ireland and recently moved back there. While she wasn't born when the Troubles started, she thinks they continue to cast a long shadow. Now, expecting her first child, Ruth tries to unravel the events of August 1969 and ask whether their legacy can ever be lifted.

Episode Four: As violence spreads, gangs of Protestants and Catholics across Belfast are preparing to fight for their areas...

Actors: Peter Ballance, Richard Croxford, Niall Cusack and Patrick FitzSymons

Music: David Holmes featuring Gerry Diver on violin

Picture credit: Foundation Gilles Caron / Clermes

Access to Violence and Civil Disturbances in Northern Ireland in 1969 - Report of Tribunal of Inquiry was kindly provided by Special Collections, Queen’s University Belfast. Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0

Producers: Conor Garrett & Ophelia Byrne


THU 14:00 The Archers (m0007ksn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (m0007kyt)
Fire in the Bookshop

Timothy X Atack holds a satirical mirror up to an imaginary Britain – a dystopia where books are shunned and bullies have business arrangements with their schools.

Documentary maker Jeremy J Wylie confronts his own childhood demons by embarking on an “up close and personal” investigation of how bullying has changed over 30 years. His first encounter is with 15 year old Kevin Hartcliffe who is employed by his own school, Straight Edge Academy, to keep fellow pupils in line. But things get more intriguing when Jeremy meets pupils Dulcie Arnold and Shawnessa Mengis. He starts to find out just how crooked things are in Straight Edge.

Cast:

Jeremy J Wylie...................Tom Meeten
Juliet .............................Pippa Haywood
Hartcliffe...................Tom Edward-Kane
Dulcie............................Ayesha Antoine
Shawnessa...................Evlyne Oyedokun

Writer: Timothy X Atack
Director: Alison Crawford


THU 15:00 Open Country (m0007kyw)
The Isle of Eels

Earlier this year, Helen Mark visited the Isle of Eels in the heart of the Cambridgeshire Fens for its annual eel day festival. She joins the parade of eels through the streets and takes part in the World Eel Throwing Competition (which thankfully involves no real eels). She also learns about the life cycle of the eel and discovers how this extraordinary fish is intimately bound up with the history and culture of Ely. Producer Sarah Blunt.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m0007kcy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m0007kdv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (m0007kyy)
Where To Begin With... Tilda Swinton

With Raifa Rafiq.

In a series of three summer specials, Raifa Rafiq, from the Mostly Lit podcast, hosts a new series called Where To Begin With...

In part two, she enlists the help of critics Tim Robey and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh to find out where she should begin with the films of Tilda Swinton, the star of this month's release, The Souvenir.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m0007kvj)
Gareth Mitchell and guests illuminate the mysteries and challenge the controversies behind the science that is changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (m0007kz0)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0007kz2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 BBC Introducing Radio 4 Comedy Award (m0007kz4)
2019

Final

Host Mark Watson will be joined by an expert panel of judges comprised of stalwarts of the comedy world, including Sioned Wiliam, Commissioning Editor for Comedy on Radio 4, as five of the UK's most exciting new comedy acts compete for the coveted title.

The winner of this year's competition will take home £1000 and a 15-minute script commission from BBC Studios. Past winners and finalists of the BBC New Comedy Award include Alan Carr, Peter Kay, Lee Mack, Sarah Millican, Russell Howard, Joe Lycett, Josie Long and Nina Conti.

Producer: Adnan Ahmed
A BBC Studios production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (m0007kv8)
Kate faces the unexpected and Tracy's girls night in does not go as planned


THU 19:15 BBC Introducing Radio 4 Comedy Award (m0007kvb)
2019

Final - Results

The results of the BBC Introducing Radio 4 Comedy Award 2019 final, live from Edinburgh.

Host Mark Watson will be joined by an expert panel of judges comprised of stalwarts of the comedy world, including Sioned Wiliam, Commissioning Editor for Comedy on Radio 4, who will announce the winner of the coveted title.

The winner of this year's competition will take home £1000 and a 15-minute script commission from BBC Studios. Past winners and finalists of the BBC New Comedy Award include Alan Carr, Peter Kay, Lee Mack, Sarah Millican, Russell Howard, Joe Lycett, Josie Long and Nina Conti.

Producer: Adnan Ahmed
A BBC Studios production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:45 The Latvian Locum (m0007kvd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Making History (m0002m3p)
Battle Lines

In the last of this series Tom Holland and Iszi Lawrence look at the stories around another line in history - battle lines. From the fable of the Nazi invasion across one of Britain's oldest battle lines on Suffolk's beaches, through Thucydides and on to cross-dressing soldiers across the ages.

Presenters: Iszi Lawrence and Tom Holland
Producer: Alison Vernon-Smith
Series Editor: Simon Elmes
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


THU 20:30 In Business (m0007kvg)
The Berlin Airport Fiasco

Germany is known for its efficient infrastructure and transport. So why has Berlin's new airport not quite gone to plan? It is billions over budget, seven years late in opening, and is still being rebuilt before a single plane has landed. What has gone so wrong in a place supposed to be the capital of well-ordered engineering? And is the Berlin airport fiasco a warning for infrastructure builders everywhere? Chris Bowlby’s had a rare behind the scenes tour.

Presenter: Chris Bowlby
Producer: Jim Frank


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m0007kvj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 Making Art with Frances Morris: Sophie Calle (m0003jpr)
Frances Morris, Director of Tate Modern, meets French artist Sophie Calle in her studio in south west Paris.

The studio is a cabinet of curiosities, with an incredible array of intriguing objects including stuffed animals, one of which, the head and shoulders of a giraffe, represents the artist's mother - while a tiger is her father and the zebra, her cat Souris.

Sophie Calle is a visual artist, who recently produced an album of songs by 40 international musicians, in memory of her dead cat Souris. There’s Jarvis Cocker, Juliette Armanet, Bono, Michael Stipe to name a few. She’s made work out of her mother dying or her boyfriend ditching her. She’s had a job as a stripper, made a crazy road movie called No Sex Last Night. She's contacted everyone in a lost address book she found on the street. She’s asked people to describe their most exquisite pain, invited strangers to attend the funeral of their secrets. She’s asked museum staff to remember stolen paintings, blind people to describe the most beautiful thing they’ve seen. And although the work seems apparently dry - images and texts, books - it's deeply personal for those involved, and for us - the viewer.

Sophie works with real life experiences we can all relate to – the death of a parent, the end of a relationship. Her work resonates with her preoccupations - death, absence, the mourning of the passing of life. "Growth is a series of mournings."

Frances Morris is fascinated to enter the inner sanctum of this avid artist who is famously controlling and who devises and implements "rules of the game". "Who will be interviewing who?" she asks en route to Paris.

Produced by Kate Bland
A Cast Iron Radio production for BBC Radio 4


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m0007kvl)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 Ulverton (m0007kvn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 Wisebowm: The Struggle Is Real (m0007kvq)
The competitive world of poetry slamming in Edgware, north London, is the setting for this new musical comedy where one wrong iambic pentameter can result in instant elimination.

Created by comedian Steve Whiteley, Wisebowm is the self-confessed genius of the slam poetry world. Still living with his step-mum, Val Bernstein (Joanna Brookes), who owns the local poetry club, Words on the Street, Wisebowm longs to win the monthly cup named after his famous poet father Sid Delicious (Ricky Grover).

Supported by his best friend Dean (also played by Steve) who is more addicted to scratch cards than being helpful, Wisebowm’s biggest rival is Katie Storm (Jen Wakefield) who announces gluten had been blocking her creativity but she is now writing freely. Wisebowm is forced to go gluten-free in order to win the competition.

Wisebowm: The Struggle Is Real lifts the lid on a new generation of woke and aware Londoners looking for a new way to fame.

Cast:
Wisebowm / Dean ..... Steve Whiteley
Katie Storm ..... Jen Wakefield
Val Bernstein ..... Joanna Brookes
Sid Delicious ..... Ricky Grover
Paul / Martin ..... Andrew Gentilli
Danielle ..... Olivia Nixon
Random / Pop-up Guy ..... Luke Nixon

Created by Steve Whiteley
Written with Daniel Audritt and Kat Butterfield
Additional material by Dave Tozer and Pete Latham

Music by Steve Whiteley, Stephen Hickling, Dave Tozer, Kevan Frost

Director: Alan Nixon
BA: Sarah Tombling
Sound: Alex O’Donovan
Associate Producer: Olivia Nixon
Producer: Luke Nixon

A Snipper Nixon production for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:30 The Untold (m00055ml)
The Two Sides of Silver Street

In many ways Silver Street in Halifax is a street like any other. Yet it also contains a scene you probably won't find anywhere else in the country.

At the end of the street is Calderdale Women's Centre. It provides support to female victims of abuse, facing financial difficulties or suffering from health problems. Just a few yards across the road from the Centre is La Salsa, a lap dancing bar.

Representatives from the Women's Centre have decided to mount an opposition to La Salsa's licence, and they are not alone. They're being support by White Ribbon UK, an international charity committed to ending male violence against women. White Ribbon's UK headquarters are just a few miles away from Silver Street. They believe the club forms part of a culture that leads to harmful behaviour toward women and a venue such as this directly opposite a haven for vulnerable women is unacceptable.

La Salsa's owner, Eduardo, sees things differently. In his eyes he's running a legitimate business which is above the law and staffed by people who are happy and content to work there. The dancers agree, for them, its their choice.

The objection will be heard by a meeting of the local authority, where the club will either close immediately or be permitted to remain open. Both parties will have their chance to make their case, but no one can be certain of the verdict.

Produced by Sam Peach



FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2019

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m0007kvs)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 00:30 Mudlarking, by Lara Maiklem (m0007kvv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0007kvx)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0007kvz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0007kw1)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m0007kw3)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0007kw5)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Canon Patrick Thomas, Vicar of Christ Church in Carmarthen


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m0007kw7)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04mj5kt)
New Zealand Bellbird

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the New Zealand bellbird. In 1770, during Captain James Cook's first voyage to New Zealand, an extraordinary dawn chorus caught the attention of his crew "like small bells exquisitely tuned": these were New Zealand bellbirds. New Zealand bellbirds are olive green birds with curved black bills and brush-like tongues which they use to probe flowers for nectar. Like other honeyeaters , they play an important role in pollinating flowers and also eat the fruits which result from those pollinations and so help to spread the seeds. The well camouflaged bellbird is more often heard before it is seen. They sing throughout the day, but at their best at dawn or dusk when pairs duet or several birds chorus together. Their song can vary remarkably, and it is possible hear different 'accents' in different parts of New Zealand, even across relatively short distances.


FRI 06:00 Today (m0007l1z)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m0007kdc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Mudlarking, by Lara Maiklem (m0007l2s)
Episode 5

Lara Maiklem shares the delights of mudlarking on the foreshore of the River Thames.

Lara has scoured the banks of the Thames for over fifteen years, in pursuit of the objects that the river offers up from its muddy depths - from Neolithic flints to Roman hair pins, medieval buckles to a Tudor shoe, along with Georgian clay pipes, Victorian toys and semi-precious stones. These objects tell her about the people who lived in or visited London and how they ate, drank, dressed, worked and loved.

Moving from the river's tidal origins in the west of the city to the point where it meets the sea in the east, Mudlarking is a search for urban solitude and history on the River Thames, a place Lara describes as the longest archaeological landscape in England. And, as she has discovered, it is often the tiniest objects that tell the most surprising and enthralling stories.

Written and read by Lara Maiklem
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0007l23)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


FRI 10:45 The Latvian Locum (m0007l2c)
Series 2

Episode 5

By Ben Cottam. After enduring the wrath of a local woman she has advised not to drive, Dace considers whether she really wants to call the UK her home.

Writer: Ben Cottam
Director: Alison Crawford


FRI 11:00 The Syrians and the Kindertransport (m0007l35)
In Lozells Church, Birmingham, new and old refugees meet and compare experiences.

Ruth is 98 and Lia is 88, and they are both Jewish. Louai and Murad are in their 30s and are both Muslims. Despite those obvious differences, these four people have much in common – especially their experience of having to flee the countries they grew up in because of war. They all miss the countries they left behind but, at the same time, they love their new home and are determined to make a life for themselves and their families here.

Ruth and Lia have done that, and share how they did it. Louai and Murad are at the beginning of that journey. With support from the people of Birmingham, we hear how.

Ruth was 15 when she left Germany in 1937. “I had a lot of friends in school,” she recalls, “but after 1933, they were all told not to speak to me. My teachers all became very anti-Semitic. When I was 14, I was thrown out of school.”

Ruth came to Britain via a private scheme that was a forerunner to what eventually became known as the Kindertransport. Arriving in Oxford, she worked first as a milkmaid and then moved to Birmingham where she trained as a nurse. “One good thing about refugees,” she says, “is that we think outside of the box. The worst thing about being a refugee is that you can’t make any plans.”

Lia was eight when she made the journey from then Czechoslovakia to Britain in 1939. Like Ruth, she trained as a nurse in Birmingham – a job she did for 45 years. “In a way, I feel lucky,” she tells the two Syrians. “I lost my family in the Holocaust, but I didn’t see it happen, whereas you actually saw your loved ones being killed.”

In Syria, Louai was a vet. “We had a very nice life,” he says, “but it all changed overnight. My father was injured and our house was burnt down. We struggled for a year, but what finally made us decide to leave was when my brother was killed. He was only 19.”

Louai is now a bus driver in Birmingham, on the bus route Ruth uses to travel to the synagogue she attends every week. “The word ‘home’ is not just about a place,” he says. “It’s about the people around you. This is what we lost in Syria, but we’ve found it here.”

Murad and his wife were both teachers in Syria. “Our children were all born in different countries,” he says. “One in Syria, one in Jordan, and our youngest is a Brummie.” Murad first met Louai at the airport in Jordan, when both were en route to starting their new lives in Birmingham.

Nikki Tapper hears Ruth, Louai, Lia and Murad describe what they left behind and the imperative to get out of one place and settle somewhere else. We also hear from Reverend David Butterworth and Rabbi Dr Margaret Jacobi who have campaigned for Birmingham to welcome refugees.

Produced by George Luke
A Cast Iron Radio production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 11:30 We've Got a Pill for That (m0007l37)
New comedy set in a small biotech company. A dedicated team of intensely committed people struggle to discover a cure for the world’s most life-threatening diseases - while also struggling to discover a way to get on with each other.

If they can find the wonder drug they're looking for, they'll hit the big time, and the rewards will be huge - in both money and prestige. But the prospect of money can turn even the most scientific of heads.

Starring Patricia Allison, Alex Carter, Sian Clifford, Katherine Jakeways, Stephen Mangan and Karl Theobald.

Written by Tony Sarchet
Produced and Directed by Claire Broughton
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m0007l39)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Ulverton (m0007l2m)
Treasure (1914) 2/2

Adam Thorpe's ground-breaking Ulverton was published in 1992. Although it was a first novel, the reviews heralded a "masterpiece" (Peter Kemp, Sunday Times) and it was also celebrated in the American press - "as encompassing a portrait of what it means to be British as I have ever read" (Seattle Times) and "One of the great British fictional works of our time" (LA Times).

It's a novel which has long been celebrated for the way it employs all the lyrical agility of the English language as it evolved down the centuries to give us a narrative that is shaped by time and character and born of a particular landscape - the chalk downlands of West Berkshire. A succession of different voices offer brief glimpses of life in Ulverton at roughly a generation's interval.

Treasure (1914), Part 2 of 2:
Ulverton had more volunteers than any other village on the downs.

Written by Adam Thorpe
Read by Anton Lesser
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m0007l3c)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


FRI 12:57 Weather (m0007l3f)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m0007l3h)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 Breakdown (m0007l3k)
Episode 5

There's no definitive account of the week in August 1969 when Northern Ireland erupted into the full-scale violence of the troubles. But the powerful and largely forgotten testimonies heard soon after by the Scarman Tribunal can help bring us close to what happened. Chaired by distinguished judge, Lord Leslie Scarman, the tribunal compelled witnesses from all sides to testify on their experience of the events which led to the breakdown of law and order and the British Army being deployed.

Ruth Sanderson grew up in Northern Ireland and recently moved back. While she wasn't born when the Troubles started, she believes they continue to cast a long shadow. But now Ruth is expecting her first child and plans to raise her family in Northern Ireland. Ruth looks back through Scarman, archival news reports and talks with her own parents to see if she can unravel the events of that fateful week and ask whether their legacy can ever be lifted.

Episode Five:

Whole streets of houses have been burned out in Belfast and thousands of evacuees are on the move. The ground has been set for religious and political divisions which continue in Northern Ireland to this day. 50 years on from August 1969, Ruth wants to know what hope there is for her new baby's generation...

Producers: Conor Garrett & Ophelia Byrne

Music: David Holmes featuring Gerry Diver on violin


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m0007kv8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b08zd8vl)
The Tiny Problem

Tanya Franks and Paterson Joseph star in this razor-sharp family comedy by Tamsin Oglesby.

El and Jim have the normal mid-life marital issues: drink, work, stress, infidelity.

They also have a 16 year old daughter, Tiny.

Rather than communicate with each other, they concentrate on taking care of Tiny. They argue about her poor behaviour. They end up in family therapy.

Then... they think of another answer to their problem.

Tamsin Oglesby's political fire, sparky dialogue, and deftly funny observation of human weakness and self-deception, have led to a series of theatrical hits, including her dissection of the British education system in 'Future Conditional' for the Old Vic, and her dystopian comedy for the National Theatre imagining government solutions to the ageing population, 'Really Old, Like Forty-Five'.

"... burns with rage, and cackles with black humour." Time Out

"...this magical-satirical portrait of liberal middle-class England delivers an unexpected explosion, like a bomb in a designer bag" Sunday Times

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0007l3m)
Saltburn

Kathy Clugston and the team of gardening experts are in Saltburn. Bob Flowerdew, Matthew Pottage and Bunny Guinness answer this week's question from green-fingered enthusiasts.

Producer: Laurence Bassett
Assistant Producer: Rosie Merotra

A Somethin' Else production from BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 The Poet and the Echo (m0007l3p)
The Lamb

Writers choose poems as inspiration for new stories.

Pippa Goldschmidt is inspired by 'The Lamb', from William Blake's Songs of Innocence, to write this moving story of love and inheritance.

Writer ... Pippa Goldschmidt
Reader ... Kay McAllister
Producer ... Eilidh McCreadie


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m0007l3r)
Radio 4's weekly obituary programme, telling the life stories of those who have died recently.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (m0007l3t)
The programme that holds the BBC to account on behalf of the radio audience.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (m0000pf2)
Dalip and Ranjit – Inner Strength

Friends who are baptised Sikhs consider how others view them and the solace that comes from their religious belief. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (m0007l3w)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0007l3y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 Lobby Land (m0007l40)
Series 2

Episode 5

Second series of the Westminster sitcom.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (m0007l27)
Writer, Nick Warburton
Director, Julie Beckett
Editor, Jeremy Howe

David Archer ….. Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ….. Felicity Finch
Kenton Archer ….. Richard Attlee
Brian Aldridge ….. Charles Collingwood
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Neil Carter ….. Brian Hewlett
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Chris Carter ….. Wilf Scolding
Clarrie Grundy ….. Heather Bell
Emma Grundy ….. Emerald O'Hanrahan
Will Grundy ….. Philip Molloy
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Tracy Horrobin ….. Susie Riddell
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Jim Lloyd ….. John Rowe
Adam Macy ….. Andrew Wincott
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Kate Madikane ….. Perdita Avery
Freddie Pargetter ….. Toby Laurence
Lynda Snell ….. Carole Boyd
Roy Tucker ….. Ian Pepperell
Peggy Woolley ….. June Spencer
Jakob Hakansson ….. Paul Venables
Ray Hepburn ….. David Holt


FRI 19:15 Front Row (m0007l29)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


FRI 19:45 The Latvian Locum (m0007l2c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m0007l2f)
Lord Finkelstein, Faiza Shaheen

Ritula Shah presents topical debate from the Radio Theatre at Broadcasting House, London with a panel including the Conservative peer Lord Finkelstein and Faiza Shaheen, the director of the Centre for Labour and Social Studies and a prospective parliamentary candidate for Labour.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m0007l2h)
A weekly reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 A History of Delusions (m0007lh6)
Napoleon and 'Delusions of Grandeur'

Clinical psychologist Professor Daniel Freeman begins an exploration of delusions, looking at both historic and contemporary case studies. He hears first about the fourteen "Emperor Napoleons" who presented at Bicetre Asylum in Paris in 1840, the year Napoleon's body was returned to the city.

This "Delusion of Grandeur", featuring Napoleon in particular, continued as an intriguing phenomenon for many decades afterwards.

"That first day we found him dressed elegantly, head held high, with a proud, haughty air; his tone was that of command, and his least gestures indicated power and authority. He soon informed us that he was the Emperor of France, with millions in riches, that Louis Philippe was his chancellor, etc. Then... he pompously recited verses of his own commission, in which he allocated kingdoms, settled the affairs of Belgium and Poland, etc. During the day he smashed everything because people would not obey his every order."
Charenton Asylum, Paris. Register of Medical Observations. Patient admitted June 10th 1831.

Daniel Freeman also meets a woman who experienced a "Delusion of Grandeur" in more recent years, and hears her first-hand account of believing for a time that she was Christ.

Producers: Victoria Shepherd and Eve Streeter
A Greenpoint production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m0007l2k)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 Ulverton (m0007l2m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (m0007kjq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:25 The Untold (m0005mqd)
A Trip to Death Row

Laura from London visits a death row inmate in Florida to seek answers about her late father's final years.

Laura's dad John was an alcoholic. He spent the last ten years of his life writing to Michael, a man condemned to death for murder.

John confided things in Michael which he didn't share with his own daughter.

29 year old Laura enters a maximum security prison in Florida to find out what Michael knows.

Producer: Laurence Grissell


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (m0000pfs)
Caitlin and Orfhlaith – Challenging Tradition

Friends are grateful to their parents, who refused to model traditional roles. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A History of Delusions 21:00 FRI (m0007lh6)

A Poet Laureate’s Peterloo 16:30 SUN (m0007kdx)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m0007dkm)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m0007l2h)

A Singer's Guide to Britain 09:00 WED (m0007ksb)

A Singer's Guide to Britain 21:30 WED (m0007ksb)

A Surrealist's Map of Ireland 16:00 MON (m0007k6n)

A Woman of Firsts 00:30 SAT (m0007dkx)

Alex Edelman's Special Relationships 10:30 SAT (m0007k8c)

All Those Women 11:30 WED (b09ppwdz)

Andy Hamilton Sort of Remembers 18:30 TUE (m0007kjx)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m0007k8r)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m0007dkk)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m0007l2f)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m0007k9b)

Art of Now 11:30 TUE (m0007kj2)

Art of Now 11:30 THU (m0007kyf)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m0007kvj)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m0007kvj)

BBC Introducing Radio 4 Comedy Award 18:30 THU (m0007kz4)

BBC Introducing Radio 4 Comedy Award 19:15 THU (m0007kvb)

Bad Faith 14:30 SAT (b00qx1mc)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m0007k9s)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m0007k9s)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (m0007k6q)

Breakdown 13:45 MON (m0007k69)

Breakdown 13:45 TUE (m0007kjg)

Breakdown 13:45 WED (m0007kzg)

Breakdown 13:45 THU (m0007kyr)

Breakdown 13:45 FRI (m0007l3k)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m0007kd7)

Can Facebook Survive? 17:00 SUN (m0007bdg)

Classified Britain 09:30 TUE (m0007khr)

Cooking in a Bedsitter 19:15 SUN (b083mrvf)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (m0007cvc)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (m0007kyc)

Dangerous Visions 14:15 TUE (m0007kjj)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (m0007kdc)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m0007kdc)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b0b1hwwj)

Drama 15:00 SUN (m0007kds)

Drama 14:15 MON (m0007k6g)

Drama 14:15 WED (b0b1r1d8)

Drama 14:15 THU (m0007kyt)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b08zd8vl)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m0007k83)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m0007kfs)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m0007k7n)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m0007kkt)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m0007ktm)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m0007kw7)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (m0007dk1)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (m0007l3t)

Four Thought 05:45 SAT (m0007bvx)

Four Thought 19:00 SAT (b03hwbs0)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b03hwbs0)

Four Thought 17:40 SUN (b03hwbs0)

Four Thought 09:30 WED (m0007ksd)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (m0007ksd)

From Luton Streets to Jersey Shores 15:30 SAT (m0007lf8)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m0007k8f)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m0007k71)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m0007kk1)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m0007ksq)

Front Row 09:00 THU (m0007kv0)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (m0007l29)

Fry's English Delight 09:00 TUE (m0007khp)

Fry's English Delight 21:30 TUE (m0007khp)

Gaby's Talking Pictures 18:30 WED (m0007kzr)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m0007djv)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m0007l3m)

Gordon Brown on The Gospel of Wealth 13:30 SUN (m0007kdn)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (m0007kjq)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (m0007kjq)

In Business 21:30 SUN (m0007cwd)

In Business 20:30 THU (m0007kvg)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m0007kk5)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (m0007bkc)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (m0007k6x)

Land Power v Sea Power 20:00 TUE (m0007kk3)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m0007djz)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m0007l3r)

Lobby Land 12:30 SAT (m0007dkc)

Lobby Land 18:30 FRI (m0007l40)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m0007k5x)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m0007k5x)

Making Art with Frances Morris: Sophie Calle 21:30 THU (m0003jpr)

Making History 20:00 THU (m0002m3p)

Mastertapes 16:00 WED (m0001hkq)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m0007dkv)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m0007k9g)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m0007kfd)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m0007k78)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m0007kkf)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m0007kt5)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m0007kvs)

Mudlarking, by Lara Maiklem 09:45 MON (m0007k5k)

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Mudlarking, by Lara Maiklem 09:45 TUE (m0007kht)

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Mudlarking, by Lara Maiklem 09:45 FRI (m0007l2s)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m0007dl5)

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News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m0007k81)

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News and Weather 22:00 SAT (m0007k9d)

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No Triumph, No Tragedy 15:30 TUE (b09jby2r)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (m0007kcp)

One to One 15:15 SAT (m0001b05)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m0007kdv)

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Open Country 06:07 SAT (m0007cvw)

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PM 17:00 SAT (m0007k8x)

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Peterloo: The Massacre That Changed Britain 23:30 SUN (m0007djb)

Phil Ellis Is Trying 23:00 TUE (m0007kkc)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m0007kf5)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m0007dl7)

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Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m0007kcy)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m0007kcy)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m0007kcy)

Reflections with Peter Hennessy 09:00 MON (m0007k5h)

Reflections with Peter Hennessy 21:30 MON (m0007k5h)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m0007k89)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (m0007k98)

Science Stories 21:00 TUE (m0007kk7)

Science Stories 15:30 WED (m0007kk7)

Scotland’s Justice Warrior 11:00 MON (m0007k5v)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m0007dl1)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m0007k9l)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m0007kfj)

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Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (m0007kjl)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m0007k95)

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Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b09bxjzh)

Stillicide 19:45 SUN (m0007kf7)

Stranger Than Sci-Fi 21:00 WED (m0007ksx)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m0007kd4)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m0007kcw)

TEZ Talks 23:15 WED (m00014lc)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (m0007bk0)

The 3rd Degree 15:00 MON (m0007k6j)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m0007kd9)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m0007k6d)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m0007k6d)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m0007k6z)

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The Archers 19:00 THU (m0007kv8)

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The Archers 19:00 FRI (m0007l27)

The Courage of Ambivalence 20:00 MON (m0007k73)

The Courage of Ambivalence 11:00 WED (m0007k73)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (m0007cvy)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (m0007kyy)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m0007k6l)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m0007k6l)

The Gamble Network 00:15 MON (m0007bwl)

The Inquiry 17:30 SAT (m0007k8z)

The John Moloney Show 23:00 WED (m0007kt3)

The Latvian Locum 10:45 MON (m0007k5q)

The Latvian Locum 19:45 MON (m0007k5q)

The Latvian Locum 10:45 TUE (m0007khy)

The Latvian Locum 19:45 TUE (m0007khy)

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The Latvian Locum 19:45 THU (m0007kvd)

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The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (m0007kdq)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (m0000nf8)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (m0000pf2)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (m0000pfs)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m0007kzk)

The Money Clinic 12:04 SAT (m0007k8k)

The Money Clinic 21:00 SUN (m0007k8k)

The Money Clinic 15:00 WED (m0007k8k)

The Origin of Stuff 11:00 SAT (m0005t5g)

The Poet and the Echo 00:30 SUN (m0007djx)

The Poet and the Echo 15:45 FRI (m0007l3p)

The Power of... 21:00 MON (m0007bck)

The Power of... 11:00 TUE (m0007kj0)

The Syrians and the Kindertransport 11:00 FRI (m0007l35)

The Untold 23:30 MON (b0b7ddjx)

The Untold 23:30 TUE (m0001mmy)

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The Untold 23:30 THU (m00055ml)

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The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m0007kdl)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m0007k76)

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Today 07:00 SAT (m0007k87)

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Ulverton 12:04 MON (m0007k61)

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Unreliable Evidence 22:15 SAT (m0007bx1)

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We've Got a Pill for That 11:30 FRI (m0007l37)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m0007kfb)

Windbreakers, Sea Eagles and Anthrax 23:30 SAT (m0007b4w)

Wisebowm: The Struggle Is Real 23:00 THU (m0007kvq)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m0007k8v)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m0007k5n)

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Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (m0007bd0)

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World at One 13:00 MON (m0007k67)

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You and Yours 12:18 MON (m0007k63)

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