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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 15 JUNE 2019

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m0005tqx)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (m0005tp2)
The Moon

Episode 5

In this intimate and profound portrait of the Moon, writer Oliver Morton explores the different spaces that Earth’s closest neighbour occupies in our lives.

If humans were to return to the Moon what would compel us - and how long might we stay for?

Read by Robin Laing
Abridged by Anna Magnusson
Producer Eilidh McCreadie


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0005tqz)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0005tr1)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0005tr3)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m0005tr5)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0005tr7)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Sarah Teather, UK Director of the Jesuit Refugee Service

Good morning.

Tomorrow is Trinity Sunday in the Christian calendar: a celebration of the central mystery of Christian life and faith – the mystery of God, who is Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

Probably the most famous depiction of the Trinity is the Russian icon by Andrei Rublev. I ‘ve always been deeply moved by the picture. Complex theology is expressed with beauty and simplicity and there’s such profound peace in the scene, yet it seems to dance with tenderness and mutuality.

The icon plays with an Old Testament story about hospitality. It is based on the encounter from Genesis between Abraham and three mysterious visitors, for whom Abraham hurriedly and unexpectedly prepares a feast. Having taken their fill of his food, the greater gift turns out to be theirs to give, as they announce news that his wife, Sarah, will give birth to a much longed-for son, Isaac, though both are now elderly. Hospitality opens up seemingly impossible new horizons.

“Do not forget to show hospitality to strangers”, says the Letter to the Hebrews, “for by doing so, some have shown hospitality to angels without knowing it”.

In Rublev’s icon, the traces of Abraham’s story are still visible in aspects of the landscape and the angelic appearance of the three persons of the Trinity, but now the table is an altar, and the meal a chalice. Abraham’s place of hospitality becomes a place of God’s hospitality for us: we gaze on the figures and find ourselves drawn into the scene, beckoned forward, to sit at the table and share in the mystery of the life of God.

O God, give us eyes to see you in the encounters that demand our generosity, and open our hearts to respond to your call to share in your life of love.

Amen.


SAT 05:45 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (m0005t2v)
Helle Thorning-Schmidt, the former Prime Minister of Denmark, on the EU's approach to Brexit, Boris Johnson and advice to Theresa May as she prepares to leave office


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m00060s5)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (m0005t71)
Going Wild in the West Country

Clare Balding walks with sisters Georgina and Rebecca - both mothers of young children - who started a group called Go Wild Go West to help inspire other young families to get out and enjoy the outdoors. They have happy childhood memories of exploring and adventuring in nature and are concerned that children today are losing touch with the thrill of walking and playing outdoors. They take Clare on a circular route around from East Harptree in North Somerset. It's a walk designed to delight and entertain the children who build a den, climb trees and find a rope swing along the way. The children are free to roam and explore with the mums a safe distance behind.

There are more walks and ideas for days out on their Facebook page GoWildGoWest

The walk is from East Harptree Woods up Smitham Hill and down Harptree Combe

Producer: Maggie Ayre


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m00060s7)
15/06/19: Crop protection

Charlotte Smith and guests discuss how farmers can best protect their crops from pests and diseases. She's joined by Liz Bowles, Associate Director of Farming and Land Use at The Soil Association, arable and beef farmer John Cherry who started the Groundswell Conference about No-till farming, and Sarah Mukherjee, Chief Executive of the Crop Protection Association. Together they consider what constitutes crop protection, the use of the herbicide Glyphosate, the impact of the ban of the insecticide Neonicotinoids and what the alternatives are to protect Oil Seed Rape, and what the Government should do with pesticide regulation after the UK leaves the European Union.

Producer: Toby Field


SAT 06:57 Weather (m00060s9)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (m00060sc)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m00060sf)
Benjamin Zephaniah

Benjamin Zephaniah talks to Aasmah Mir and Rev. Richard Coles about the origins of his passion for rhyme, music and country living. Marian Newman went from being a forensic scientist to a nail expert whose career highlights include the supermodel nails for the Olympics 2012 Closing Ceremony. A clip of Daniel Alston and his sisters appeared on the Radio 4 programme Rewinder - they recall their memories of Blue Peter coming round to tea. Former World Karate Champion Janice Francis-Irwin on the importance of martial arts and organising Caribbean tea parties. Professor Alice Roberts shares her Inheritance Tracks: A Whiter Shade Of Pale by Procol Harum and Ash, Girl from Mars. Writer Gabriel Bisset-Smith grew up in the 80’s, looking white but having a mixed-race mum. He talks about the impact this had and why drama school saved him.

Producer: Claire Bartleet
Editor: Beverley Purcell


SAT 10:30 The Patch (m00060sh)
Chatham

Producer Polly Weston is sent to a random UK postcode in search of a story.

The series began with a random postcode generator, and a simple idea. In an age of echo chambers, maybe by going to a postcode completely at random, we'd find important stories which have been going unnoticed.

So far the generator has led her to the extent of illegal cigarette smoking in Lincolnshire, the north-south divide in Hertfordshire, disappearing crabs in Devon, and a mysterious story of land access in the Highlands of Scotland.

Now the wheel has been spun again. Over the next three weeks Chatham in Kent, Ferryside in South-West Wales, and a collection of villages outside Stoke-on-Trent all become her patch. In each episode she goes to a different postcode in search of a story - from why a ferry with wheels is causing a stir in Wales, to the startling situation which has led to a pharmacist in Medway becoming the "local hero".

This week - Chatham, Kent.

Produced and presented by Polly Weston in Bristol.
Executive producer: Jolyon Jenkins.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m00060sk)
Radio 4's assessment of developments at Westminster


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m00060sm)
Ebola spreads to Uganda

Ebola has spread from the Democratic Republic of Congo to Uganda as the authorities struggle to control it. Olivia Acland visits an Ebola zone in the DRC.
Russian journalist, Ivan Golunov, this week was let off drug dealing charges after a public outcry. Steve Rosenberg looks at why the case has been so embarrassing for the Russian authorities.
The protests in Hong Kong this week have seen some unlikely allies - and foes. Gabriel Gatehouse witnesses a rare stand off between a Hong Kong legislator and the police.
Italy's Prime Minister is arguably less well known than his deputies. James Reynolds unpicks a complicated web of Italian politics.
Whether you are visiting New Zealand's volcanoes or its spectacular fjords, getting around without a car in the country can be difficult. Christine Finn finds out why hitchhiking is popular for tourists.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m00060sp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m00060sr)
The latest news from the world of personal finance plus advice for those trying to make the most of their money.


SAT 12:30 Dead Ringers (m0005tqb)
Series 19

Episode 2

This series of Dead Ringers features Jon Culshaw, Jan Ravens, Lewis Macleod, Debra Stephenson and Duncan Wisbey,

The producer and creator is Bill Dare.
A BBC Studios Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (m00060st)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News (m00060sw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m0005tqj)
Thangam Debbonaire MP, Andrew Mitchell MP, Matthew Parris, Ash Sarkar

Jonathan Dimbleby presents topical debate from the Paignton Palace Theatre in Devon with Labour Whip Thangam Debbonaire MP, Conservative MP Andrew Mitchell the columnist and broadcaster Matthew Parris, and Ash Sarkar from Novaramedia.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m00060sy)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Drama (b0b0lxlz)
Vive la Republique

The true story behind General de Gaulle's secret flight from Paris at the height of the civil unrest of 1968. A drama that uncovers the panic at the centre of France's government and the fractured relationship between de Gaulle and his Prime Minister Georges Pompidou.

Based on first hand testimony, the drama paints a vivid picture of France teetering on the brink of a second revolution. Starring Ronald Pickup as de Gaulle, Barbara Flynn as Yvonne de Gaulle and Philip Jackson as Georges Pompidou. Witten by Mike Walker.

At the height of the 1968 civil unrest in France, Charles de Gaulle, President of the French Republic, fled the Elysee Palace fearing armed attack and the violent fall of the government. He left Georges Pompidou alone and in charge, with a civil service concerned this was a Communist revolution.

His helicopter flew across a Paris of smoking barricades and running battles in the streets. Ten million people were on strike in France - two thirds of the workforce.

De Gaulle left word that he would be at his country house. But for six hours he disappeared. In fact he had left the country and gone to the HQ of the French army in Germany. He only dared return to France once he had the backing of General Jacques Massu and his troops. This is the story of those hours, of France with no government and a desperate de Gaulle.

WRITER: Mike Walker
PRODUCER: David Morley

A Perfectly Normal production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 15:30 Art of Living (m0005t8p)
A Cape Sound Story

Music and dance are so tied together; it is hard to imagine how a profoundly deaf dancer can become an International star in the contemporary dance world, but South African Andile Vellem has done it. Vellum lost his hearing at the age of five, but that hasn’t stopped him from dancing, or becoming the artistic director of one of South Africa's leading integrated dance Companies - Unmute.

To find out how, Nathaniel Mann, a British singer and musician, travels to the beautiful and troubled city of Cape Town for a close encounter with the talented dancer, as he embarks on a new production - Trapped Man – in which he and another dancer are bound tightly together, struggling for release.

The plan is to perform the dance out in the street but it’s a risky business. Adrienne Sichel, South African dance critic, recalls how a previous site specific dance attracted violence - a truck driven at dancers by an enraged white driver.

Andile grew up in a house full of dance. His parents were famous ballroom dancers - one of the few professional dance genres open to non-whites - and as a small child he remembers his sister holding his hand to a speaker so he could feel the vibrations created by the music. As he grew older, inspired first by Michael Jackson, and later by the rich musical history of the Cape, he learned to sense music through vibration - creating his own style of dance, including sign dance.

Now with his life partner, Mpotseng Shuping, he travels the world, performing at international festivals, and it was in Berlin that he first met UK singer and musician Nathaniel Mann. Mann follows two parallel stories; what it is to move to music which you can't hear, and how Vellum has interpreted a century of South African music, from the colonial era, through apartheid, and out the other side, through dance.

As a musical legacy, it's complex and politically weighty, but it is these sounds that Andile Vellem asked UK composers, Dom Coyote and Nathaniel Mann, and musicologist Noel Lobley, to work with as a sound track for one of this productions.

We hear his feelings about this music, his personal journey, and the recordings themselves - a powerful way in to the history of recorded South African music.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall

With thanks to Unmute Dance Company members -
Mpotseng Shuping
Andile Vellem
Siphenathi Mayekiso
Themba Mbuli
Nadine McKenzie

and Siemon Allen archivist - Flat International

All Alone - Irving Berlin - Piano Roll 9676
Marching on Pretoria - Ian Calquhoun - 1901
Wa Q'Um Udalimede - Reuben Caluza's Double Quartet 1930
Zulu Piano Medley - Thomas Mabilesta 1948
African Market Abdullah Ibrahim -1988
Slow-Moving (Trapped Man) · Orson Hentschel 2016


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m00060t0)
Women obsessed with women, Returning to work, Jack Monroe

What's the fascination with films books and television programmes like Killing Eve where the story centres on women obsessed with other women? Author Joanna Briscoe and journalist Sirin Kale discuss.

We hear why a UK wide coalition of women’s organisations, represented by the Centre for Women’s Justice, has begun legal action against the Crown Prosecution Service claiming that rape cases are being dropped because of a change in policy and practice. Beth and Gina tell us what happened to them and Rachel Krys the co-founder of End Violence Against Women tells us what the coalition is hoping to achieve.

Food writer Jack Monroe Cooks the Perfect....Cannellini Beurre Blanc.

Emma Land and Tontschy Gerig tell us how the struggled to find work after a long period off.

The Booker Prize winner for fiction Arundhati Roy tells us about her new book of political essays focusing on environmental degradation, government elites and the impact on the poorest and most marginalised people in India.

Ell Potter and Mary Higgins tell us about their theatre show Hotter.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Produced by Rabeka Nurmahomed
Edited by Jane Thurlow


SAT 17:00 PM (m00060t2)
Saturday PM 15/06/2019

Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (m0005t7k)
The Fitness Industry

Who wins and loses in the cut-throat exercise market? Looking good and being fit has become more important as we have become more wealthy. Yet most new gyms and fitness centres fail. Evan Davis and his guests work out the secrets of success in this growing industry, which is is worth over £5 billion in the UK.

GUESTS

Stuart Broster, CEO, Anytime Fitness UK

Tommy Matthews, Managing Director, Be Military Fit

Dawn Tuckwell,, Director and Co-founder, Action PR

PRESENTER: Evan Davis

PRODUCER: Julie Ball


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m00060t5)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m00060t7)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00060t9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m00060tc)
Martha Plimpton, Lou Sanders, Emily Watson, Nels Abbey, Ady Suleiman, Arlo Day, Emma Freud, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Emma Freud are joined by Martha Plimpton, Lou Sanders, Emily Watson and Nels Abbey for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Ady Suleiman and Arlo Day.

Producer: Sukey Firth


SAT 19:00 Profile (m00060tf)
Jo Swinson

Jo Swinson is the bookies favourite to win the Liberal Democrat leadership race and take over from Vince Cable. But can this 'millennial' politician from a suburb of Glasgow, be the woman who takes the Liberal Democrats to election victory?


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (m00060th)
Sweat, Diego Maradona, Catch 22, Elif Shafak, Manolo Blahnik

Sweat, starring Martha Plimpton was a sel-out success when it premiered at London's Donmar Warehouse last year. Now it's got a West End transfer to the Gielgud Theatre
Asif Kapadia won an Oscar for his biopic about Amy Winehouse. Now he's looking at Diego Maradona's extraordinary career as the finest footballer in the world and also his unravelling life off the pitch
George Clooney appears in and is a producer and director for a new TV adaptation of Joseph Heller's Catch 22 on Channel 4
In Elif Shafak's new novel 10 Minutes 38 Seconds in this Strange World we look backwards from the death of a prostitute. In flashback, she remembers her life and reflects on the changing nature of Turkish society
The shoe designer Manolo Blahnik has staged an exhibition of his footwear at The Wallace Collection in London, drawing inspiration form the paintings and objects on display there

Rajan Datar's guests are Linda Grant, Deborah Orr and David Hepworth. The producer is Oliver Jones


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m0005syq)
Speaking Truth to Power

The BBC's Parliamentary Correspondent Mark D'Arcy examines how, 40 years after they were established, select committees in the House of Commons are increasingly asserting themselves and holding the powerful to account.


SAT 21:00 Vanity Fair (m0005t0b)
Episode 3

Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray. Dramatised by Jim Poyser with additional material by Al Murray.
Thackeray's celebrated satire on money, class and sex in nineteenth century England given a new makeover in this pacey, anarchic adaptation. George Osborne is dead, leaving Amelia bereft. She is unaware of his betrayal with Becky Sharp. Starring Ellie White as Becky, Helen O'Hara as Amelia and Al Murray playing his ancestor William Makepeace Thackeray.

Thackeray (narrator)...................Al Murray
Becky Sharp......................Ellie White
Amelia Sedley..................Helen O'Hara
Rawdon Crawley..............Blake Ritson
Jos Sedley..........................Thom Tuck
George Osborne..............Rupert Hill
Dobbin................................Graeme Hawley
Mrs Bute.........................Emma Gregory
Mr Sedley..........................Jonathan Keeble
Mr Osborne....................Malcolm Raeburn
Pitt.......................................Lloyd Peters
Miss Briggs......................Fiona Clarke
Director/Producer Gary Brown.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (m00060tk)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:15 The Reith Lectures (m0005t85)
2019: Jonathan Sumption

4/5. Rights and the Ideal Constitution

Jonathan Sumption assesses the US and UK’s constitutional models. He describes Britain's unwritten constitution as a political institution. The US Constitution is by contrast essentially a legal document. This has led Americans to address what should be political questions – such as the right to abortion – via the courts, rather than through politics. Britain, Lord Sumption argues, should learn from the United States be careful about which rights should be put beyond democratic choice.

The programme is recorded in front of an audience at George Washington University in Washington DC.

The Reith Lectures are presented and chaired by Anita Anand and produced by Jim Frank.
Editor: Hugh Levinson


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (m0005t2k)
Heat 12, 2019

(12/17)
With just one automatic place remaining in the semi-finals, four contenders from the North of England line up at the BBC's Salford headquarters for the last of the 2019 heats. For what sort of buildings did the architect Frank Matcham become famous? Which unit of measurement derives its name from the Latin for 'a thousand paces'? Which political group did Trotsky say belonged on the 'dust heap of history'? Russell Davies has all the questions, and all the answers - but how will the contestants get on?

Today's contest features:
Pamela Culley from Preston
Andrew Fisher from Sheffield
Matt Goodstadt from Eccles
Gary Grant from Lytham St Anne's.

There's also a chance for a Brain of Britain listener to Beat the Brains, and win a prize, by outwitting them with his or her own ingenious questions.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets (m0005t0g)
Episode 2 - Isle of Man

Actor and writer Catherine Harvey returns to her family roots in the Isle of Man to explore the voices of Manx dialect and language speakers, whose words are influenced by the Celts and Norsemen.

Catherine concentrating her search in two areas - the north of the island where her family are from and the west, an area associated with the speaking of Manx Gaelic. She looks at the work of T E Brown, who is still thought of as the island’s national poet, and the writers who were part of the Manx Cultural Revival.

In St Johns, she meets Dr Breesha Maddrell, Director of Culture Vannin, to discuss the influence of Manx Gaelic on the dialect of the island, before travelling north to talk to cultural activist, Bob Carswell, and members of The Michael Players – the only organisation in the world regularly performing plays in Manx dialect.

Meanwhile, Catherine asks the current Manx Bard, Annie Kissack, if the dialect and language spoken on the island today has changed – and whether one of them has ultimately triumphed

Other episodes in this series look at dialect poetry in Cumbria and Yorkshire.

A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4



SUNDAY 16 JUNE 2019

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m00060tm)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m0005tpy)
Bosco

A boy finds a brave and personal response to loss in an original short work by Eugene O'Hare.

Read by Stephen Rea.

Producer: Gaynor Macfarlane

A BBC Scotland production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00060tp)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00060tr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00060tt)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m00060tw)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m00060ty)
St Mary’s Church, Lymm in Cheshire

Bells on Sunday comes from St. Mary’s Church, Lymm in Cheshire. In 1712 there were four bells at St. Mary’s, which were later recast into a ring of five by Abraham Rudhall of Gloucester. After further changes in the nineteenth century the Whitechapel bell foundry again recast and added to the ring to make the full octave we hear them ringing.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m00060tf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (m00060v0)
The latest national and international news headlines.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b087pdt9)
Immortality

Rabbi Shoshana Boyd Gelfand explores our fascination with immortality, its significance within both the scientific and faith communities and the desirability of life eternal.

According to Shoshana, our yearning for immortality shapes the world and drives civilisation. She examines the desire to leave a legacy that motivates writers, artists and musicians. The music of Mozart is described as "a gift to the world", his enduring cultural impact allowing him to achieve a form of immortality.

Shoshana suggests that a longing for immortality may be fuelling our current obsession with celebrity culture as we strive for the fame that will ensure that we're not forgotten. However, the fiction of neuroscientist David Eagleman warns us that eternal life through fame may not be as desirable as we first imagine.

Drawing upon the work of gerontologist Aubrey de Grey, Shoshana discusses the latest scientific research into "age-reversal" and "life extension". She goes on to examine the different approaches to immortality in several faiths including Christianity, Hinduism and her own Jewish tradition.

The programme draws to a close with a striking conclusion - that mortality is not a punishment to humankind, but a gift. For Shoshana, our mortality is a vital catalyst that encourages us to seize the day.

Drawing upon a wide range of music, Shoshana introduces us to the haunting Jewish prayer for the dead, El Malei Rachamim, and picks out blues singer Washington Phillips' stunning recording of What Are They Doing In Heaven Today?. Readings include the philosopher Stephen Cave and the poet Robert Frost.

Presenter: Shoshana Boyd Gelfand
Producer: Max O'Brien
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (m00060v2)
My Living World

Skomer

New series. Wildlife film maker Hannah Stitfall and guest discuss one of her selections from the LIVING WORLD archive. Today the subject is Skomer Island and its city of sea birds, as well as the ‘clowns of the air’, an endemic vole and strange cries at night. Producer Sarah Blunt


SUN 06:57 Weather (m00060v5)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m00060v9)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m00060vg)
Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme presented by Edward Stourton.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m00060vl)
Vision Care for Homeless People

Poet John Hegley, who is himself a glasses wearer, makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Vision Care for Homeless People.

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Vision Care for Homeless People’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘Vision Care for Homeless People’.

Registered Charity Number: 1118076

(Photo: BBC/Amanda Benson )


SUN 07:57 Weather (m00060vq)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m00060vv)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m00060vz)
Trinity Sunday and Father's Day

Marking Trinity Sunday and Father’s Day from the Memorial Chapel of
Glasgow University, with Rev Dr Doug Gay and Professor Alison Phipps.
Readings: Proverbs 8 / John 16
Hymns: Holy, holy, holy (Nicaea)
(Psalm 8) O Lord, our Lord throughout the earth (Tramps & Hawkers)
All creatures of our God and King (Lasst uns erfreuen)
Alta Trinità (Medieval Italian)
My Father (Hutchings)
Benediction: God keep you with a mother’s strength
Chapel Choir directed by Katy Lavinia Cooper.
Organist: Kevin Bowyer
Producer: Mo McCullough


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m0005tql)
Refugee Tales

Monica Ali discusses the UK's use of immigration detention centres and, in particular, indefinite detention.

She argues that, although detention or deportation are sometimes necessary, the policy of indefinite detention is "callous and dehumanising".

She believes - as the only place in Europe that allows indefinite detention - the UK should adopt the recommendations of a recent parliamentary report and introduce a 28 day limit.

Producer: Adele Armstrong


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b08y0smr)
Liane Holdsworth on the Kestrel

RSPB Yorkshire staff are reflecting on birds all this week for Tweet of the Day. Today Visitor Experience Manager Liane Holdsworth recalls the thrill of watching a kestrel.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Tom Bonnett.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m00060w3)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m00060w7)
Contemporary drama in a rural setting.

Writer, Naylah Ahmed
Director, Rosemary Watts
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Jill Archer ….. Patricia Greene
David Archer ….. Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ….. Felicity Finch
Ben Archer ….. Ben Norris
Tony Archer ….. David Troughton
Pat Archer ….. Patricia Gallimore
Brian Aldridge ….. Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ….. Angela Piper
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Jim Lloyd ….. John Rowe
Adam Macy ….. Andrew Wincott
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Lynda Snell ….. Carole Boyd
Peggy Woolley ….. June Spencer
Leonard Berry ….. Paul Copley


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (m00060wc)
Nitin Sawhney, musician, producer, composer

Nitin Sawhney is a composer, musician and producer working in the worlds of music, film, video games, dance and theatre. He has released 10 studio albums, scored over 50 films and television programmes, and is known for his collaborations, with musicians and artists including Paul McCartney, Akram Khan, John Hurt and Andy Serkis.

He was born in 1964 to parents who had emigrated from North India the previous year to work in the UK. His father was a chemical engineer while his mother taught English and later worked at the post office in their home town of Rochester. Nitin showed early musical promise when he took up the piano aged five, later also learning flamenco guitar, sitar and tabla. He was bullied at school at a time when the National Front was gaining traction and music became his sanctuary.

After abandoning a law degree at Liverpool and completing an accountancy course in Hertfordshire, he became financial controller of a hotel, before leaving to become a full time musician. While at college, he met Sanjeev Bhaskar and formed a comedy duo with him which would become the radio and TV series, Goodness Gracious Me.

His breakthrough came with his fourth album, released in 1999, entitled Beyond Skin, which was nominated for the Mercury Music Prize. Since then, his career has been in the ascendant: he has established himself as one of the most versatile composers for film, scoring pictures like Midnight’s Children and television programmes including the BBC’s Human Planet series. He received the Ivor Novello Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017.

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Cathy Drysdale


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m00060wh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (m0005t37)
Series 84

Episode 5

Gyles Brandreth, Graham Norton, Lucy Porter and Paul Merton join Nicholas Parsons for the panel game where the challenge is to speak without repetition, hesitation or deviation.

A BBC Studios Production.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m00060wm)
The Food & Farming Awards 2019: First Course

The winners of the BBC Food & Farming Awards 2019 are revealed at a glittering ceremony in Bristol.

In the first course of the 2019 awards story, Sheila Dillon is joined by food industry experts including Angela Hartnett, Matt Tebbutt, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall and Andi Oliver - to celebrate the cooks, shop keepers, farmers, producers, entrepreneurs and food pioneers who make up this year's finalists.

The first instalment of our awards coverage features Best Food Producer, Best Drinks Producer, Best Street Food or Takeaway and Best Shop or Market.

Presented by Sheila Dillon
Produced in Bristol by Lucy Taylor


SUN 12:57 Weather (m00060wr)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m00060wv)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 Call Yourself an Impartial Journalist? (m0004f5s)
Amid the anger increasingly directed at broadcast journalists from those who claim that the so-called "mainstream media" can't be trusted, a battle is being fought over impartiality.

The big, regulated broadcasters - including the BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and Sky - argue that their output has to meet the test of "due impartiality"; their critics claim that too often programmes in fact evince bias.

In this documentary, Jonathan Coffey - who has worked on major stories for "Panorama" for over a decade - explores what impartiality means as our politics and national discourse have become increasingly polarised. Does it still matter as a concept for broadcasters? And how should broadcasters approach controversial issues like Brexit, immigration and transgenderism?

He considers how well impartiality is understood, the arguments advanced by the broadcasters' critics about alleged failures of impartiality; the BBC's track record on reflecting significant strands of thinking; the "liberal media bubble"; how far broadcasters are open-minded in avoiding biases; and if a more rigorous and radical open-minded journalistic approach is needed, especially in the coverage of deep value disputes.

Among those taking part: columnist, Rod Liddle; Kerry-anne Mendoza, a supporter of Jeremy Corbyn and editor-in-chief of the news website, "The Canary"; BBC director of editorial policy and standards, David Jordan; presenter of Channel 4 News, Krishnan Guru-Murthy; Emily Maitlis, presenter of BBC TWO's "Newsnight" and author of "Airhead: The Imperfect Art of Making News"; ITV's political editor, Robert Peston; Richard Sambrook, a director of BBC News from 2001 to 2010; and philosopher Jason Baehr, author of "The Inquiring Mind".

Producer Simon Coates


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0005tpw)
Summer Garden Party at Mount Stewart: Part One

Kathy Clugston hosts a special edition at the annual Summer Garden Party. Bob Flowerdew, Matthew Pottage, Bunny Guinness and Neil Porteus are answering the horticultural questions at National Trust Mount Stewart in County Down, Northern Ireland.

This week, the panellists discuss improving a beetroot crop, the time to deadhead your Hydrangea and the best variety of Witch-hazel.

They also give advice on saving an over-watered Rhododendron, helping a Scots Pine thrive against the sea salt exposure, and how long it takes for an Allium to flower.

Away form the questions, David Maxwell from BBC Ulster roams around the Garden looking at some of the highlights.

Produced by Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (m00060x3)
Sunday Omnibus - Love and Family

Fi Glover presents the omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen with three conversations about the power of love and family - a couple planning their future after retiring; a couple in their 60th year of marriage recalling the significance of that first kiss; and mother and daughter talk about making positive memories in the wake of the mother being diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


SUN 15:00 Drama (m00060x7)
Reading Europe: Savages

Episode 1

It is the eve of the French presidential elections (“The Election of the Century” say the headlines), and Idder Chaouch, the country’s first Arab candidate has victory in his sights. Meanwhile, the French-Algerian Nerrouche family is preparing for a grand wedding. But something is up with younger cousin Krim. Linking these two worlds is heartthrob actor Fouad Nerrouche. Within a matter of hours, the threads begin to unravel on both wedding and election campaign, and the collision between the destiny of a family and the hopes of a nation becomes inevitable.

By Sabri Louatah
Adapted for radio by Hugh Costello from the translation by Gavin Bowd

Krim ..... Mohammad Amiri
Fouad & Benbaraka ..... Khalid Laith
Rabia..... Sirine Saba
Luna, Kenza & Jasmine ..... Shavani Cameron
Uncle Bouzid ..... Nabil Elouahabi
Granny Nerrouche & Bride’s Mother ...... Amira Ghazalla
Great Uncle Ferhat ..... Raad Rawi
Slim ..... Hamza Jeetooa
Momo ...... Farshid Rokey
Chaouch & Rachid ..... Waleed Elgadi
Zoran ...... Emma Frankland
Djamel ..... Ali Barouti
French girl ..... Catriona Stirling
French guy …. Will Howard

Other voices were played by the cast

Executive producer …. Sara Davies
Produced by Nicolas Jackson & Steve Bond

An Afonica production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m00060xf)
Carolina Setterwall; Re-reading and what it offers; Shadowplay reviewed; Ahmad Danny Ramadan

Swedish writer Carolina Setterwall discusses her autobiographical debut novel Let's Hope for the Best, which deals with the aftermath of her partner's sudden death.

Belinda Jack and Tim Parks joins Mariella to explore the pleasures of re-reading, and consider which books merit revisiting in an age when so many new books are being published.

Critic Peter Kemp chose Shadowplay by Joseph O'Connor as the book he was most looking forward to in 2019. He gives his verdict on whether he made the right choice.

And Syrian Canadian writer Ahmad Danny Ramadan explains why when it came to writing his debut novel, he took inspiration from the stories of One Thousand and One Nights.


SUN 16:30 Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets (m00060xk)
Episode 3 - Yorkshire

Academic Dr Katie Edwards examines the roots and prevalence of dialect poetry in Yorkshire.

Ever since Katie found herself mocked in academic circles for her broad South Yorkshire accent, she's made it her mission to celebrate her linguistic heritage. She travels round what was historically England's largest county discovering a huge range of dialect and dialect poetry. She meets with members of the Yorkshire Dialect Society, hears how dialect has evolved in different parts of Yorkshire, finds out what's been lost down the years and discovers a fresh passion for using Yorkshire dialect among several young poets in the region.

From Ilkley Moor Bah Tat (Yorkshire's unofficial national anthem) via the industry and land that spawned much of the dialect, to poets using it as part of various types of social activism, Katie gets a real sense of a county in which dialect is still very much an important part of identity.

A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m0005t9m)
The Spy in Your Pocket

Anti-obesity campaigners in Mexico, human rights advocates in London, and friends of the murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi all claim they’ve been targeted by surveillance software normally used by law enforcement to track drug-dealers and terrorists.

File on 4 reveals compelling evidence that software is being used to track the work of journalists, activists and lawyers around the world. Paul Kenyon investigates the multi-billion pound ‘lawful surveillance’ industry. Sophisticated software can allow hackers to remotely install spyware on their targets’ phones. This gives them access to everything on the devices – including encrypted messages – and even allows them to control the microphone and camera.

So what are the options for those who are targeted and is there any way to control the development and use of commercially available software?

Presenter: Paul Kenyon
Producer: Joe Kent.

Photo credit; Valery Brozhinsky\Getty


SUN 17:40 Profile (m00060tf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m00060xp)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m00060xt)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00060xz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m00060y3)
John Waite

This week Anneka Rice reveals how she was a secret agent for several years – and no she isn’t fibbing. Why the cello is more than a just a musical instrument? And the orchestra musicians playing to their own tune. We hear what we can learn from people who lived for a whole century, and why playing Peggy in The Archers is like putting on an old coat. And there was a young woman called Kathy. It’s limerick time on Gardener’s Question Time – but you just try rhyming Clugston…


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m00060y7)
Tony sets himself a mission and Shula blames herself for recent events.


SUN 19:15 A Trespasser's Guide to the Classics (b08hqf5w)
Series 2

The Nose

By John Nicholson, Javier Marzan and Richard Katz

In 17th-century Paris, an early practitioner of plastic surgery has her work cut out when she meets a man with the most wonderfully large nose.

In this second series the comedy troupe Peepolykus assume the roles of minor characters in great works of fiction and derail the plot of the book through their hapless buffoonery.

Director . . . . . Emma Harding
Producer . . . . . Sasha Yevtushenko.


SUN 19:45 Annika Stranded (m00060yc)
Series 5

Resilience

Eight new cases to challenge the detective wit of Chief Inspector Annika Strandhed, queen of the Oslo Police boat patrol.

Annika is still coming to terms with the death of her friend and long-time, long suffering forensic photographer Mikel. But life goes on, and so does police work on the Oslofjord. Annika must forge a new relationship with Mikel’s young replacement, Sigrid.

Episode 1: Resilience
Annika flies north to investigate a strange death in the permafrost of Spitsbergen.

Nick Walker is the author of two critically-acclaimed novels, Blackbox and Helloland. His plays and short stories have often featured on BBC Radio 4 - including the First King of Mars stories (2007 - 2010) and the plays Life Coach (2010) and Stormchasers (2012). The previous series of Annika Stranded were broadcast in 2013, 2014, 2016 and 2018.

Writer: Nick Walker
Reader: Nicola Walker
Sound Design: Jon Calver
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:00 Feedback (m0005tq2)
Roger Bolton presents the programme that holds the BBC to account on behalf of the radio audience.

This week - who should sit in the News Quiz chair now that Miles Jupp has decided to vacate it? Roger asks one of its regular panellists, Hugo Rifkind, if he is a candidate.

The BBC’s head of newsgathering Jonathan Munro is also in the studio to answer audience questions about the coverage of recent elections.

And the Reith Lectures have been running since 1948, have they now reached their sell-by date? The editor Hugh Levinson tells us why he believes they are as necessary as ever.

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Kate Dixon
Executive Producer: Samir Shah
A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m0005tq0)
John Tidmarsh OBE, Sylvia Denman, Paul Darrow, Sheila Turner, Leon Redbone

Pictured: John Tidmarsh

Matthew Bannister on

John Tidmarsh, who presented Outlook on the BBC World Service for thirty years and brought comfort to the Beirut hostages. John McCarthy pays tribute.

Sylvia Denman, the Barbados-born lawyer who campaigned for better race relations in the UK and fought to improve educational outcomes for young black people.

Paul Darrow, the actor best known as Avon, the anti-hero of the cult sci-fi TV show Blake's 7.

Sheila Turner, who campaigned for better treatment for patients who, like her, suffered from thyroid disorders.

And the mysterious singer Leon Redbone, who specialised in music from the Tin Pan Alley era of the 20s and 30s.

Interviewed guest: Bob Chaundy
Interviewed guest: John McCarthy
Interviewed guest: Daniel Stilitz QC
Interviewed guest: Lincoln Crawford OBE
Contributor: Matthew Sweet
Interviewed guest: Marian Reed

Producer: Neil George

Archive clips from: Outlook, BBC World Service 27/07/1974; Outlook, BBC World Service 15/06/1978; BBC News 12/10/1960; Outlook, BBC World Service 04/07/1996; Newsnight, BBC Two 26/07/2001; Blake's 7, BBC One 25/02/1980; Blake's 7, BBC One 21/12/1981; Dr Who, BBC One 09/03/1985; Kaleidoscope Extra, Radio 4 22/05/1990.

Please refer to the following websites if you would like further information about thyroid disorders:
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/overactive-thyroid-hyperthyroidism/
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/underactive-thyroid-hypothyroidism/


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m00060sr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m00060vl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (m0005t3n)
The Real Gender Pay Gap

Women are paid less than men and do more unpaid work. The gender pay gap doubles after women become mothers. Female-dominated professions tend to be lower-paid than male-dominated ones. What's going on and can we fix it?

Reporter: Mary Ann Sieghart
Producer: Arlene Gregorius
Editor: Jasper Corbett


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m00060ym)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (m0005t73)
Frank Cottrell Boyce

With Antonia Quirke

Writer Frank Cottrell-Boyce talks about his Scrabble-based drama Sometimes, Always, Never and reveals why the film took 12 years to go from script to screen.

Neil Brand continues his series on famous film scores that were last minute replacements with the story of Oliver Stone's Platoon and Samuel Barber's Adagio For Strings.

Voice coach Penny Dyer reveals what lessons she gave Helen Mirren to talk like the Queen, and helps Antonia rediscover her Manchester accent.


SUN 23:30 The Song Hunters (m0004mcw)
The Black Mountains' Lament

Singer and song collector Sam Lee travels to the remote mountains of Greece and discovers the haunting sound of Europe's oldest folk music.

High in the black mountains of Epirus, close to the northwestern tip of Greece, winding its way through the thick forest, is the river Acheron, the river of woe. According to Greek mythology, the newly dead must travel across this river before entering Hades - the underworld.

An otherworldly music pours from these mountains. It's an ancient music. Filled with sadness. Filled with longing. Filled with dread.

Sam journeys to Epirus, an unforgiving mountain range housing 46 tiny villages, each with its own distinct style of folk music. The nature of the harsh terrain means that the ancient musical tradition of these villages is remarkably well preserved - an intoxicating blend of violin and clarinet dancing between wild frenzy and hypnotic solemnity.

Speaking to writer, record producer and song collector Chris King, whose book A Lament From Epirus first brought the strange music of this region to a wider audience, Sam hears about the riotous festivals in Epirus when musicians play around the clock for three days straight while entire villages come together to dance.

Sam discovers that the sadness saturating the music of Epirus is often attributed to "xenitia", the pain and longing caused by the separation of emigration. In a region plagued by dwindling population as people abandon traditional village life for jobs in urban centres, the sadness of the music looks set only to intensify.

Presenter: Sam Lee
Producer: Max O'Brien
A TBI production for BBC Radio 4



MONDAY 17 JUNE 2019

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m00060yr)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b08rrc0k)
The meaning of the face

The meaning of the face: How critical is it to our sense of identity, and relationship with others?
Sharrona Pearl, Assistant Professor in Communications at the University of Pennsylvania, discusses her study of face transplant surgery. She's joined by Anne-Marie Martindale, Post-Doctoral Research Associate at the University of Manchester, who has studied the impact of facial disfigurement; as well as Professor Jonathan Cole, consultant in clinical neurophysiology, and author of two books examining the relationship between facial expressions, communication and the self. Revised repeat.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m00060ty)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00060yw)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00060z0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00060z4)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m00060z8)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00060zd)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Sarah Teather, UK Director of the Jesuit Refugee Service

Good morning.

This week is Refugee Week – a joyous nationwide festival of arts, culture and educational events celebrating the lives and contributions of refugees. The theme this year provides an interesting perspective – it takes us back in history, exploring the stories of refugees welcomed throughout generations: from Vietnamese refugees in the 1970s right back to French Huguenots in the 1680s. People from many different nationalities have sought sanctuary in Britain over the centuries; their stories, struggles, gifts and innovations have been woven into the history of Britain, shaping our identity in subtle ways.

It isn’t just Britain which has been shaped in this way: the history and identity of Christianity itself is woven out of stories of migration, displacement and exile. All the first figures of the Old Testament journeyed or were forced to migrate. The New Testament too begins with a story of the Holy family fleeing to escape Herod’s clutches. The early Church was propelled outwards from Pentecost, as exiles and missionaries around the globe. And the story hasn’t ended: displacement and persecution are a wound which continues to shape the Church in many areas of the world today, forcing Christians from their homes and onto the hospitality of others to welcome and protect them.

It is not possible to unpick stories of displacement and exile from the narrative of our faith, because these stories were foundational to how our ancestors came to know God. The question then is how the stories of those forced to migrate today might shape our identity and relationship with God into the future?

Lord Jesus, you have told us that you identify with the rejected strangers of every age, help us to recognise your face in the one who knocks at our door, asking to come in.

Amen.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m00060zj)
17/06/19: Underwater crops, general licences and farm safety

After heavy rainfall in many parts of the country some farmers are now counting the cost of flooded fields and lost crops. We speak to one pea-grower in Lincolnshire whose ankle-deep in water.

Another update in the ongoing saga of the general licences which allow the shooting of some bird species to protect crops, livestock or wildlife. After a legal challenge by the Wild Justice Group, Natural England agreed they were unlawful and removed 3 licences at the end of April. Many countryside groups protested, both at the removal and they way it had been carried out, and Michael Gove took control of the issue away from Natural England and announced a consultation. 4,000 responses and some weeks later, the 3 licences were re-instated late last week... as a 'temporary way forward'. The licences are not exactly the same, herring and black backed gulls are no longer covered and the licences don't apply in some protected areas. DEFRA says there will be a further more detailed consultation on all this later in the year.

And farming is the most dangerous job in the UK. Every year, an average of 32 people die working on our farms, despite numerous campaigns. This week we're going to look at why farming has such a problem and what is being done to change it.

Presented by Charlotte Smith
Produced by Heather Simons


MON 05:56 Weather (m00060zm)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09h2rbp)
Greta Scacchi on the Goldfinch

Actress Greta Scacchi compares the birds she once knew in Australia with those who now visit her London home, especially the goldfinch which makes her very happy.

Producer: Andrew Dawes
Photograph: Gareth Hardwick.


MON 06:00 Today (m0006124)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m0006126)
Money - in your pocket and in the bank

Andrew Marr discusses money, from central banks to personal finances. The historian John Guy looks back to the emergence of London as the financial centre of the world. His latest biography focuses on the life and world of Sir Thomas Gresham, Elizabeth I’s banker – a flawed and ambitious man who dabbled in blackmail, fraud and adultery and left his widow saddled with debt.

Few of today’s central bankers could match Gresham’s tumultuous private life, but they do wield enormous power in the markets. Paul Tucker spent more than 30 years as a central banker and regulator at the Bank of England and sounds a warning against increasing the authority of technocrats.

Miatta Fahnbulleh is the Chief Executive of the radical economics think-tank, NEF, which aims to build a new economy from the bottom up and put more power in the hands of the people. She looks at the role central banks have to play in a Green New Deal and the impact of debt on the country and its citizens.

While government debt makes the headlines, personal debt is now at a record high, and could derail future confidence in the market. The behavioural economist Alice Tapper offers a guide to personal finances and argues for more openness when it comes to talking about what we earn and what we spend.

Producer: Katy Hickman


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (m0006128)
Deaf Republic

Introducing Deaf Republic

"We lived happily during the war / And when they bombed other people's houses, we / protested, / but not enough, we opposed them but not / enough".

In a departure for Book of the Week, Radio 4 presents an adaptation of Ukrainian-American author Ilya Kaminsky's new book of poetry, read by Fiona Shaw, Christopher Eccleston, Noma Dumezweni and Arinzé Kene.

Deaf Republic defies classification - it is a poetic narrative, a drama-in-verse, a contemporary epic. In an unnamed country, soldiers shoot dead a young deaf boy at a public gathering and the townspeople respond with refusal to hear the government's commands. Deafness becomes a form of protest and resistance.

This is a fable which speaks incisively about our political moment: about populations living under occupation and about governments at war with their own people. It is about our collective deafness to trauma happening elsewhere to others; and about the news we might choose not to hear. At its heart it is also a tender love story about a pregnant woman and her husband, caught up in this crisis; their love and joy set against the horror of events.

The week's programming begins with a documentary about Ilya Kaminsky, providing the backstory to this remarkable new work, more than 15 years in the making. Deaf since the age of 4, when a doctor in his native Ukraine misdiagnosed mumps as a cold, Ilya learned as a boy to closely observe the world around him. When his family fled to the USA as political refugees and settled there, he taught himself English by translating American poems back and forth between languages. We hear from Ilya and from leading authors Andrew Motion, Max Porter, Raymond Antrobus, Garth Greenwell and Carolyn Forché.

The book itself can be heard adapted across the following four episodes. The performers are Fiona Shaw (Fleabag, Killing Eve), Christopher Eccleston (The A Word, Doctor Who), Arinzé Kene (Death of a Salesman, Been So Long, The Pass) and Olivier Award-winning Noma Dumezweni (Harry Potter, Black Earth Rising).

Illustrations by Jennifer Whitten
Produced by Mair Bosworth with original sound design and music by Aaron May.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000612b)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


MON 10:45 Drama (m000612d)
Reading Europe: Lullaby

Episode 1

Adapted from Leïla Slimani’s international bestseller, winner of France’s prestigious Prix Goncourt.

When Myriam, a French-Moroccan lawyer, decides to return to work, she and her music producer husband Paul look for the perfect nanny for their two young children. They never dreamed they would find Louise - a quiet, polite and devoted woman who captivates the children, cleans the family’s chic Paris apartment, stays late without complaint and hosts enviable birthday parties.

But as the couple’s dependence on their nanny increases, their idyllic domesticity is shattered.

By Leïla Slimani
Adapted for radio by Hattie Naylor from the translation by Sam Taylor

Cast:
Louise ….. Christine Bottomley
Myriam ….. Laila Alj
Paul ….. Shaun Evans
Mila ….. Beatrice Butler
Wafa ….. Lara Sawalha
Gigi….. Liz Sutherland-Lim
Grace ….. Feyi Babalola
Adam ….. Leo Layton-McClean
Emergency services ..... Céline Fuhrer
Emergency services ..... Cédric Moreau

Other voices played by the cast.

Executive Producer: Sara Davies
Produced by Nicolas Jackson and Steve Bond

An Afonica production for BBC Radio 4


MON 11:00 The Untold (m000612g)
Knocking on Britain's Door

Shahrzad was arrested as she worked in her newly opened tattoo parlour and hair salon in Iran. Fearing what might happen, her parents paid smugglers to get her to Europe. So began a two-year journey in which she has faced beatings, rapes and danger at sea when her dinghy started to sink. Grace Dent follows her story as she presses ahead with her dreams of starting life afresh in England.


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m00060tc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m000612k)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 How to Find Home (m000612m)
Episode 6

Molly's lived on the streets since she was a teenager. Her violent ex-boyfriend Rusby is back in Nottingham and won't leave her alone. So when she meets Luca at a party and he asks her to go away with him she jumps at the chance to escape. Old friend Jules doesn't trust this newcomer and invites herself along for the ride.

On the way to Skegness the friends have stopped off with Luca's parents. Their initial warm welcome is beginning to fray around the edges as Molly is plagued by dark visions.

Read by Anjli Mohindra
Written by Mahsuda Snaith
Abridged by Siân Preece
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m000612p)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


MON 12:57 Weather (m000612r)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m000612t)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


MON 13:45 Naturebang (m000612w)
Starlings and Social Dynamics

Starling murmurations, those swirling, shifting sky-patterns made by hundreds of birds moving in synchrony, are one of nature’s greatest spectacles. How do they avoid crashing into each other? Becky Ripley and Emily Knight delve into the maths behind the movement with some computer modelling to help them chart the flight patterns, and discover the secret.

As for us humans, sadly we don’t fly together thought the sky in swirling clouds. But there ARE patterns to how we interact with one another. Like a ripple of movement, travelling through a cloud of starlings, ideas can spread through social media with blistering speed. Here too, computer modelling can help us chart how opinions morph as we react to those around us. Do we have more in common with the birds than we think?


MON 14:00 The Archers (m00060y7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b08q7j32)
Now, Where Were We?

By Claire Miller

Yasmine's sneezes send her back in time, so she uses this opportunity to get her relationship with Ross just right, against the advice of best friend Becky. Surely, nothing should be this difficult!

Writer ... Claire Miller

Director ... Janine H. Jones.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (m000612y)
Semi-Final 1, 2019

(13/17)
Russell Davies welcomes the first four of this season's semi-finalists to the Radio Theatre in London. All of the competitors have won their heats or been high-scoring runners-up in the tournament so far. The standard promises to be high and the pace hots up, with a place in the 2019 Final awaiting today's winner.

Competing today are:
Frankie Fanko, a freelance translator from Market Harborough
Tim Hall, a researcher from Kidlington in Oxfordshire
Stephen Hatcher, a teacher of modern languages from Ashbourne in Derbyshire
Ruth Wright, a part-time gardener from a village near Moreton-in-Marsh in the Cotswolds.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m0006130)
The BBC Food & Farming Awards 2019: Second Course

The winners of the BBC Food & Farming Awards 19 are revealed at a ceremony in Bristol. In part two, Jamie Oliver reveals the winner of the inaugural Pat LLwellyn New Talent award.

Presented by Sheila Dillon
Produced in Bristol by Clare Salisbury


MON 16:00 New Weird Britain (m0006132)
Radical Rural

Music journalist John Doran travels across the country in search of an underground movement of musicians, blossoming in the margins of Britain.

Artists of all stripes have been driven out of the city centres by soaring rent prices and hit hard by the dwindling revenues of the digital economy. But untethered from the prospect of making any money and fueled by the current political turmoil, a new wave of musicians is splintering away from convention to stage bizarre one-off performances that fly in the face of austerity.

They are living off-grid in the countryside, building their own instruments out of electronic junk, staging strange rituals with priests smeared in clay or even performing with a team of dancers dressed as anatomically correct vaginas which squirt cream over the audience.

Rather than moving to the capital to seek out the crumbling infrastructure of the music industry, these musicians are self-releasing straight to the internet, teaching themselves how to edit via youtube or abandoning recording entirely.

Now that all you need to be a musician is a bit of spare time and reliable broadband, some musicians have sought out the space and isolation of the countryside for their creative practice. In this episode, John Doran heads to the rural areas of Britain to discover what musicians actually find when they go in search of England’s green and pleasant lands.

Contributors include Elizabeth Bernholz, aka Gazelle Twin, David Chatton Barker, Layla and Phil Legard from Hawthonn, Saxon Roach, Farmer Glitch and Richard Skelton.

Produced by Alannah Chance.
A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (m0006134)
Series 17

Obsession

Aleks explores how obsessive behaviour can spiral out of control and hears from people whose watching of others became uncontrollable, compulsive and all consuming.


MON 17:00 PM (m0006137)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0006139)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (m000613c)
Series 84

Episode 6

Tony Hawks, Cariad Lloyd, Zoe Lyons and Paul Merton join Nicholas Parsons for the panel game where the challenge is to speak without repetition, hesitation or deviation.

A BBC Studios Production


MON 19:00 The Archers (m00060x4)
Tom attempts to bury his own ambitions and Kirsty receives an unexpected opportunity.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m000613f)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 19:45 Drama (m000612d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 My Name Is... (m0006106)
Gary: homeless and needing help

Gary is homeless, and up until very recently, slept rough on the streets of Manchester. He's confused as to why a happy childhood with his dad and a good upbringing has led him to his current position. As he puts it: "I don't know where I went wrong." But like many people on the streets Gary is mentally ill, diagnosed with schizophrenia, and despite still bearing the scars and addictions of homelessness he has a curious mind and has found himself with some questions. How did he slip through? Why has he found it so hard to get help?

The Mayor of Greater Manchester Andy Burnham has a high-profile ambition to end the need for rough sleeping by 2020. Gary supports the ambition of A Bed Every Night and thinks it's right that someone is prioritising the problem, but unlike most reporters and commentators he's used it. And he explains why for him, it was not a straightforward process.

With Amanda Croome, the Chief Executive of Manchester's Booth Centre for the homeless, Gary asks about the struggling services which Amanda says make delivering help harder all over the country. He talks to other homeless people about their experiences on the streets, and to mental health workers about whether charities can help the vulnerable in the same way health professionals can.

He wants to know why the Government's own rough sleeping target is a lifetime away in 2027. And Gary wants to put his questions about the Bed Every Night scheme to Andy Burnham himself, to offer a view of support for the homeless from street level.

Presented by Gary
Produced by Kev Core


MON 20:30 Analysis (m000613h)
Green technology and early adoption

Climate change has shot up the current political agenda in part due to the Extinction Rebellion protests. An urgent question now facing UK policymakers is whether they should accelerate the adoption of cutting-edge green energy technology to curb the country's carbon emissions. But are there dangers of being an early adopter of new technology? What happens if it doesn't work or if it's outpaced by newer technologies which are cheaper and more efficient? The BBC's Business Editor, Simon Jack, investigates.


MON 21:00 Tell Me Where It Hurts (m0005t8m)
In recent decades there's been a shift in the GP-patient relationship from the traditional, doctor knows best approach to a new emphasis on shared decision making and patient centred care. Margaret explores how this is working out in practice by examining two real GP consultations read by actors.

To discuss the benefits and challenges, Margaret is joined by fellow GP Jonathon Tomlinson; senior consultant in leadership development at the King's Fund, Mark Doughty; and Jenni Burt, Senior Social Scientist at The Healthcare Improvement Studies Institute in Cambridge.

With contributions from Richard Lehman, Professor of Shared Understanding in Medicine at the University of Birmingham, and Sir Denis Pereira Gray, Professor of General Practice at Exeter University.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m0006126)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m000613l)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 How to Find Home (m000612m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 Spain's Lost Generations (m0003ctt)
Franco’s Disappeared

Lucas Laursen joins families searching for loved ones who disappeared during the Spanish Civil War and the subsequent dictatorship.

At a rare repatriation of the remains of 22 men and women missing since the war 80 years ago, he meets 3 generations of the De Llerra family who get together to bury a father, grandfather and great grandfather. Francisco De Llerra Díaz was a farmer shot by Franco’s army and buried in a mass grave in Guadalajara.

Spain has had a democratic constitution since 1978, but Spanish officials were only willing to open De Llerra’s grave after an Argentinian judge applied the principle of universal jurisdiction to the search of another family in 2016. This international court order classed the systematic and widespread killing of Franco’s victims as a crime against humanity.

Lucas attends a demonstration in Madrid demanding more state action to help victims find missing family members and meets Emilia Silva whose grandfather was the first victim of the Franco repression to be identified by DNA, and who founded the Association for the Recovery of Historical Memory which has a list of nearly 115,000 missing people.

Lucas explores the limitations of Spain’s transition to democracy and the extent to which the Amnesty Agreement of 1975 – also known as the Pact of Forgetting or Pact of Silence – hides open wounds of the war and subsequent dictatorship in plain sight.

Alongside persistent families and the renowned former judge Balthazar Garzon, he learns about proposed updates to the 2007 Law of Historical Memory - although, with elections called during the recording of the programme, the law and historical memory in Spain face an uncertain future.

Producer Anna Scott-Brown
An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000613n)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



TUESDAY 18 JUNE 2019

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m000613q)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (m0006128)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000613s)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000613v)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000613x)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m000613z)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0006141)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Sarah Teather, UK Director of the Jesuit Refugee Service

Good morning.

One of my earliest memories is standing on a choir pew at church so I could reach to hold the edge of my mother’s music and join in the singing. Music has been my preferred way to worship God ever since. This I find I have in common with people around the world.

A few years ago, I spent some weeks in South Sudan, which was then, as now, engulfed in a violent conflict that has scattered millions of men, women and children across the country and over borders. There are many things that left a deep impression on me from my time there – the extraordinary dignity of the people, uprooted time and again by violence, hungry for food and for peace; the resourcefulness of the children and their insatiable curiosity; the beauty of the landscape and more besides.

But what lodged itself deep in my heart was sound of the singing. One Sunday, I accompanied the Comboni missionaries to mass in a squalid impromptu camp in Juba. The service was in a vast cavernous metal hangar, draped with a few coloured cloths that billowed out in the wind. It was a curious vision. But oh, the singing… deep, slow, multi-layered harmonies filled the space, accompanied by make-shift percussion. Children danced in time to the beat in the procession behind altar servers who incensed the shed as if it were the finest Cathedral in the world.

What faith is it, I wonder, to sing alleluia, there, like that, with your whole body, and together, as a community as one? The people I met had had their lives torn apart, their day-to-day reality was painful, fractured, and uncertain, but the singing was sure, open, warm, grounded, rooted in faith.

My heart is ready, God, I will sing and make music; come, my glory!

Amen.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m0006143)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09h34y1)
Sue Perkins on the Great Horned Owl

Comedian Sue Perkins recalls attending the Staffordshire Country Show where she came face to face with a great horned owl possessing a powerful grip.

Producer Andrew Dawes
Photograph Neils Jensen.


TUE 06:00 Today (m00060v8)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Reith Lectures (m00060vc)
2019: Jonathan Sumption

5/5. Shifting the Foundations

Jonathan Sumption argues against Britain adopting a written constitution as a response to political alienation. The former UK Supreme Court Justice has argued that politics is in decline partly, at least, because the courts and the law is increasingly doing what politicians used to do. This has indirectly contributed to the electorate’s increasing rejection of the political process. There is growing resentment against the political elite. So what can we do? Lord Sumption makes some suggestions to restore faith in democracy – starting by fixing the party system and changing the way we vote.

The programme is recorded in front of an audience at Cardiff University.

The Reith Lectures are presented and chaired by Anita Anand and produced by Jim Frank

Editor: Hugh Levinson


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (m00060vh)
Deaf Republic

Part One

"We lived happily during the war / And when they bombed other people's houses, we / protested, / but not enough, we opposed them but not / enough".

In a departure for Book of the Week, Radio 4 presents an adaptation of Ukrainian-American author Ilya Kaminsky's new book of poetry, read by Fiona Shaw, Christopher Eccleston, Noma Dumezweni and Arinzé Kene.

Deaf Republic defies classification - it is a poetic narrative, a drama-in-verse, a contemporary epic. In an unnamed country, soldiers shoot dead a young deaf boy at a public gathering and the townspeople respond with refusal to hear the government's commands. Deafness becomes a form of protest and resistance.

This is a fable which speaks incisively about our political moment: about populations living under occupation and about governments at war with their own people. It is about our collective deafness to trauma happening elsewhere to others; and about the news we might choose not to hear. At its heart it is also a tender love story about a pregnant woman and her husband, caught up in this crisis; their love and joy set against the horror of events.

The week's programming begins with a documentary about Ilya Kaminsky, providing the backstory to this remarkable new work, more than 15 years in the making. Deaf since the age of 4, when a doctor in his native Ukraine misdiagnosed mumps as a cold, Ilya learned as a boy to closely observe the world around him. When his family fled to the USA as political refugees and settled there, he taught himself English by translating American poems back and forth between languages. We hear from Ilya and from leading authors Andrew Motion, Max Porter, Raymond Antrobus, Garth Greenwell and Carolyn Forché.

The book itself can be heard adapted across the following four episodes. The performers are Fiona Shaw (Fleabag, Killing Eve), Christopher Eccleston (The A Word, Doctor Who), Arinzé Kene (Death of a Salesman, Been So Long, The Pass) and Olivier Award-winning Noma Dumezweni (Harry Potter, Black Earth Rising).

Illustrations by Jennifer Whitten
Produced by Mair Bosworth with original sound design and music by Aaron May.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m00060vp)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


TUE 10:45 Drama (m00060vt)
Reading Europe: Lullaby

Episode 2

Adapted from Leïla Slimani’s international bestseller, winner of France’s prestigious Prix Goncourt.

When Myriam, a French-Moroccan lawyer, decides to return to work, she and her music producer husband Paul look for the perfect nanny for their two young children. They never dreamed they would find Louise - a quiet, polite and devoted woman who captivates the children, cleans the family’s chic Paris apartment, stays late without complaint and hosts enviable birthday parties.

But as the couple’s dependence on their nanny increases, their idyllic domesticity is shattered.

By Leïla Slimani
Adapted for radio by Hattie Naylor from the translation by Sam Taylor

Cast:
Louise ….. Christine Bottomley
Myriam ….. Laila Alj
Paul ….. Shaun Evans
Mila ….. Beatrice Butler
Wafa ….. Lara Sawalha
Emma ….. Liz Sutherland-Lim
Mme Bernard ….. Jane Slavin
Adam ….. Leo Layton-McClean
Emergency services ..... Céline Fuhrer
Emergency services ..... Cédric Moreau

Other voices played by the cast.

Executive Producer: Sara Davies
Produced by Nicolas Jackson and Steve Bond

An Afonica production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 11:00 Names in the Sky (m00060w0)
How do you remember lives lost far too young? Pioneering sound artist Justin Wiggan creates a 'sonic memory garden' at Ty Hafan Children's Hospice in Wales. He combines the thoughts of parents with everyday sounds of the hospice in a specially composed soundscape. In the playroom, children are acting out an underwater adventure. In the garden, a little group are playing on the swings. But the heavy paraphernalia of life-limiting illness is everywhere; suction machines, oxygen machines. tubes. The project is unbearably sad. But it's also inspirational.

Composer/Sound Artist: Justin Wiggan
Producer: Adele Armstrong


TUE 11:30 The Art of Now (m00060w4)
Istanbul's Factory of Tears

Writer Isobel Finkel takes us to Istanbul, where art and censorship are never too far apart. The state’s attempts to protect citizens from illicit sounds have taken absurd forms over the years, from the banning of all Turkish-language music from the radio in the early 30s to more recent attempts to control and interfere with Arabesk, the kitsch and mournful soundtrack of the 70s and 80s which was excluded from the radio even while it was so popular it made up for three-quarters of the country's record sales.

We travel to the IMC, a vast modernist complex in the heart of Istanbul's old city that once formed a production line for Arabesk; a community unto itself where agents, record producers and record shops all crowded in on top of one another. Musicians seeking to make their name in Turkey of the 70s and 80s would turn up and audition on the steps of the IMC, where they found fame, fortune and official censure.

Isobel interviews producers, fans and stars of the genre to find out what the state was so troubled by - and speaks to a new generation of musicians who are rediscovering and reworking these once-forbidden sounds in today's Istanbul.

Presenter: Isobel Finkel
Producer: David Waters

An SPG production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m00060w8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 How to Find Home (m00060wd)
Episode 7

Molly has lived on the streets since she was a teenager. Her violent ex-boyfriend Rusby is back in Nottingham and won't leave her alone. So when she meets Luca at a party and he asks her to go away with him she jumps at the chance to escape. Old friend Jules doesn't trust this newcomer and invites herself along for the ride.

The trio have broken their journey to Skegness at Luca's parents' house. When Molly overhears them discussing their son's mental health she is reminded of a story from her days on the streets.

Read by Anjli Mohindra
Written by Mahsuda Snaith
Abridged by Siân Preece
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m00060wj)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


TUE 12:57 Weather (m00060wn)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m00060wt)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


TUE 13:45 Naturebang (m00060wy)
Sea-Sponges and the Illusion of Self

The humble sea sponge has been around for over 500 million years. We may think of them as ‘simple’ animals, with no brain, no nerves and no organs. But they have a pretty good party trick up their fleshy sleeves. Push a sponge through a mesh, until all that remains is a cloud of cells. Pour those cells into a tank, and watch as the cells reform themselves, like the terminator, back into a sponge.

Becky Ripley and Emily Knight ask: is it the same sponge it was before?

In the human world, nobody is queueing up to be forced through a discombobulating mesh. But enter the world of science fiction and there’s something that’s not far off… the teleportation machine. Would you allow yourself to be dissolved into a molecular cloud and flung through space and time? And would the ‘you’ at the other end really be the same ‘you’ that left?


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m00060x4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b08rt9rt)
Slipping Through Time

Ellie Kendrick stars in Louise Monaghan's new play.
Twenty five year old Izzie has epilepsy, which isn't such a big deal. There are drugs and the drugs do work. Until you have a baby and want to breastfeed. Then everything changes. Everyone has an opinion - she should take her drugs - but this is Izzie's body and Izzie's condition and Sophie is the most important thing that has ever happened in her life. Anyway, she hasn't had a seizure in ages. And then she does ...

Produced and Directed by Tracey Neale

The play follows the story of a young mum, Izzie. Izzie experienced epileptic seizures as a teenager but they stopped in adult life. However, after having her first baby, her epilepsy comes back. Initially Izzie is in denial and her family struggle with the diagnosis. When Izzie finds her teenage diaries and begins reading them she reconnects with her own story, slipping through time from present to past and eventually comes to terms with her condition. Discovering her teenage diaries gives Izzie a new perspective on her epilepsy but it's not until she puts the words together with a picture of herself having a seizure that it all begins to make sense.

This is Louise's third play for radio and this one has been inspired by Louise's own epilepsy. A febrile convulsion at the age of two and then petit mals during puberty. For a number of years she didn't have one and then suddenly had one five years ago after coming round from an anaesthetic after a minor operation. It has also been inspired by the photo-journal Helen Stephens created with Matt Thompson.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (m00060x8)
Nature Documentaries

Singing with whales, a cloud of bats and the ballad of a rare bird - Josie Long presents short documentaries and adventures in sound about the natural world.

Whale Duet
A version of this story first appeared on the podcast Sound Matters
Interview by Tim Hinman
Produced by Andrea Rangecroft

Bats in the Attic
Produced by Jessie Lawson

The Lord God Bird
Originally broadcast in 2005
Produced by Dan Collison and Elizabeth Meister of Long Haul Productions
The song - Great God Bird - was written and performed by Sufjan Stevens
To listen to the song in its entirety and to hear more Long Haul stories, go to www.longhaulpro.org

Production Team: Alia Cassam and Eleanor McDowall
Produced by Andrea Rangecroft
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:30 The Invention of... (m0002rmj)
Britain

Like Quicksand for the Uninitiated

"Let's start with the monarchy - the Normans or Norsemen who'd settled in northern France; the Tudors, part Welsh; the Stuarts, they were Scots; then there's the Dutch, briefly, and the Hanoverians from 1714. There hasn’t been an English dynasty for almost a thousand years. And yet much of our history is centred on what London decides."

This is the story of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales, from Offa's Dyke to Hadrian's Wall via Dublin and Derry, Edinburgh too. What has made this Atlantic archipelago come together? Three acts of union, plus an Anglo-Irish agreement in 1921. Our rulers may have come from everywhere, yet for centuries we were at war with ourselves.

Episode 1 considers England and Scotland, and the reasons behind the union of 1707.

Recorded around the country - on the borders, the battlefields, in the rooms where deals were done - these programmes are told with Invention's trademark clarity.

Presenter Misha Glenny is a Sony award winning reporter and the author of McMafia. Miles Warde produces the How to Invent a Country series which has now travelled to Germany, Spain, Brazil, Italy, the Netherlands and the USA.

Contributors to the series include Diarmaid MacCulloch, Suzannah Lipscomb, Fiona Watson, Karin Bowie, Roy Foster, Fintan O'Toole, Tom Holland and Rebecca Rideal.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (m00060xd)
Joshua Rozenberg presents Radio 4's long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion on matters relating to law.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (m00060xj)
Cathy Newman and Jeffery Deaver

Channel 4 News presenter Cathy Newman and bestselling crime writer Jeffery Deaver discuss their favourite books with Harriett Gilbert. Jeffery chooses The Shipping News by Annie Proulx, Cathy chooses Gone: A Girl, a Violin, a Life Unstrung by Min Kymand and Harriett’s choice is White Houses by Amy Bloom.
Join our new book club on instagram: @goodreadbbc
Producer Becky Ripley


TUE 17:00 PM (m00060xn)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00060xs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Heresy (m00060xx)
Series 11

Episode 2

Victoria Coren Mitchell is joined by Katy Brand, Richard Herring and David Mitchell to commit heresy about the smoking ban, surviving in the wild and the Royal Family.

Produced by Victoria Coren Mitchell and Daisy Knight
An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m00060y0)
Lilian has concerns about her mother's plans for the future and Philip offers some reassurance.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m00060y4)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 19:45 Drama (m00060vt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 Our Next Prime Minister (m0006bck)
Emily Maitlis presents a debate between the candidates vying to succeed Theresa May as leader of the Conservative Party.


TUE 21:00 File on 4 (m00060y8)
The Right Place for Reg?

Just before Christmas, 94 year old World War 2 veteran Reg Thompson was taken to hospital after a fall at his home near Leicester. So began a journey which would see him transferred 13 times between five different hospitals in the last ten weeks of his life.

NHS managers claim that recent reforms will be able to simultaneously cut costs and drive up standards; creating a system fit for the future. Hospital wards will be replaced by ‘virtual’ ones; an army of nurses and GP’s providing care in people’s homes. Changes like these, managers say, will allow them to cut the number of hospital beds, save money and improve care. But experts warn that their evidence is shaky and that the process of reform is becoming increasingly unaccountable. Is it really possible to transform care, improve quality and cut budgets all at the same time?

With the NHS struggling to cope with an aging population, annual winter crises, staff shortages and ever increasing targets to get older patients out of scarce hospital beds, Tom Wright investigates what Reg’s story tells us about the future of the NHS.

Reporter: Tom Wright
Producer: Helen Grady
Editor: Andrew Smith


TUE 21:40 In Touch (m00060yd)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m00060yn)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 How to Find Home (m00060wd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 A Charles Paris Mystery (b084dnqp)
The Cinderella Killer

Episode 2

by Jeremy Front
Based on Simon Brett's novel

Charles ..... Bill Nighy
Frances ..... Suzanne Burden
Maurice ..... Jon Glover
Danny ..... Sean Baker
Electra ..... Lorelei King
Tad ..... Sam Rix
Kitty ..... Kirsty Oswald
Barman ..... Tom Forrister

Directed by Sally Avens

When the star of Cinderella is shot Charles finds himself filling Baron Hardup's shoes. But who wanted him dead? Charles comes under suspicion now he's been promoted up the billing.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m00060ys)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



WEDNESDAY 19 JUNE 2019

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m00060yx)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (m00060vh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00060z1)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00060z5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00060z9)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m00060zf)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00060zk)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Sarah Teather, UK Director of the Jesuit Refugee Service

Good morning.

In a few hours’ time, hardy volunteers at our Centre in East London will begin chopping bags and bags of onions. It’s a day to steer clear of our kitchen if you cry easily! The chopping is advance prep for the big day tomorrow, World Refugee Day, when we will put on a feast of food for around 150 destitute asylum seekers at our Day Centre.

The gospels are full of stories about Jesus’ shared meals, some simple, others elaborate. Meals for hungry crowds, feasts at weddings, intimate meals with friends like Mary and Martha, meals with outcasts, meals on a beach. And of course, the most sacred meal, the Eucharist, given by the Lord as a privileged way for us to be close to him and one another.

Shared meals are a huge part of our community at the Jesuit Refugee Service, as in so many refugee communities. Open hospitality, for staff, volunteers, refugees or visitors is a feature of our daily practice. Eating together at the same table is a great leveler and it creates space for relationships and friendships to grow. Special meals like the one we will share tomorrow though are also about the sheer joy of good food. Much of the menu creativity is led by refugee volunteers, many of whom struggle ordinarily to afford food to eat and get little chance to give hospitality to others, something highly prized across many cultures.

Sharing food seemed to be Jesus’ way of spending time with and drawing close to those he loved. Sharing meals for us too, is a way in which the human and the everyday is blessed when we make time to delight in it.

Lord, bless the food we eat today and let us taste the joy of sharing it with the hungry and the lonely. Help us cherish the earth which provides it.

Amen.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m00060zp)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09r3yy4)
Penny Anderson on the Red Grouse

Ecologist Penny Anderson has always liked Red Grouse and they never fail to make her laugh as she reveals in this recollection about her encounters with this dumpy red bird.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Sarah Blunt
Photograph: Fox Pix.


WED 06:00 Today (m00060zr)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Only Artists (m00060zt)
Two artists come together to talk about their creative work.


WED 09:30 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (m00060zw)
Nick Robinson talks about what’s really going on in British politics.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (m00060zy)
Deaf Republic

Part Two

"We lived happily during the war / And when they bombed other people's houses, we / protested, / but not enough, we opposed them but not / enough".

In a departure for Book of the Week, Radio 4 presents an adaptation of Ukrainian-American author Ilya Kaminsky's new book of poetry, read by Fiona Shaw, Christopher Eccleston, Noma Dumezweni and Arinzé Kene.

Deaf Republic defies classification - it is a poetic narrative, a drama-in-verse, a contemporary epic. In an unnamed country, soldiers shoot dead a young deaf boy at a public gathering and the townspeople respond with refusal to hear the government's commands. Deafness becomes a form of protest and resistance.

This is a fable which speaks incisively about our political moment: about populations living under occupation and about governments at war with their own people. It is about our collective deafness to trauma happening elsewhere to others; and about the news we might choose not to hear. At its heart it is also a tender love story about a pregnant woman and her husband, caught up in this crisis; their love and joy set against the horror of events.

The week's programming begins with a documentary about Ilya Kaminsky, providing the backstory to this remarkable new work, more than 15 years in the making. Deaf since the age of 4, when a doctor in his native Ukraine misdiagnosed mumps as a cold, Ilya learned as a boy to closely observe the world around him. When his family fled to the USA as political refugees and settled there, he taught himself English by translating American poems back and forth between languages. We hear from Ilya and from leading authors Andrew Motion, Max Porter, Raymond Antrobus, Garth Greenwell and Carolyn Forché.

The book itself can be heard adapted across the following four episodes. The performers are Fiona Shaw (Fleabag, Killing Eve), Christopher Eccleston (The A Word, Doctor Who), Arinzé Kene (Death of a Salesman, Been So Long, The Pass) and Olivier Award-winning Noma Dumezweni (Harry Potter, Black Earth Rising).

Illustrations by Jennifer Whitten
Produced by Mair Bosworth with original sound design and music by Aaron May.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0006100)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


WED 10:41 Drama (m0006102)
Reading Europe: Lullaby

Episode 3

Adapted from Leïla Slimani’s international bestseller, winner of France’s prestigious Prix Goncourt.

When Myriam, a French-Moroccan lawyer, decides to return to work, she and her music producer husband Paul look for the perfect nanny for their two young children. They never dreamed they would find Louise - a quiet, polite and devoted woman who captivates the children, cleans the family’s chic Paris apartment, stays late without complaint and hosts enviable birthday parties.

But as the couple’s dependence on their nanny increases, their idyllic domesticity is shattered.

By Leïla Slimani
Adapted for radio by Hattie Naylor from the translation by Sam Taylor

Cast:
Louise ….. Christine Bottomley
Myriam ….. Laila Alj
Paul ….. Shaun Evans
Mila ….. Beatrice Butler
Wafa ….. Lara Sawalha
Sylvie ….. Jane Slavin
Pascal ….. Tayla Kovacevic-Ebong
Adam ….. Leo Layton-McClean
Emergency services ..... Céline Fuhrer
Emergency services ..... Cédric Moreau

Other voices played by the cast.

Executive Producer: Sara Davies
Produced by Nicolas Jackson and Steve Bond

An Afonica production for BBC Radio 4


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (m0006104)
Patience and Helen - It Was Always Summer

Friends take a stroll down memory lane and explore why we end up following the path we do. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


WED 11:00 My Name Is... (m0006106)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Leg Breakers (m0006108)
Inspection

By Tom Wainwright

Comedy-drama that follows the fortunes of Bridget, the principal of Leg Breakers School of Performing Arts, a struggling stage school for kids.

Bridget's school receives an impromptu visit from a schools inspector. Can she maintain order, keep wayward tutors Keith and Romeo on track, and survive the day? (And why does the feeling persist that she's seen the inspector before?)

Bridget . . . Rebekah Staton
Keith . . . Jeremy Swift
Romeo . . . Thos Wainwright
Rachel . . . Sarah Ovens
Pratt . . . Samuel James
Helen . . . Helen Clapp
Henry . . . Aaron Gelkoff
Bryan . . . Elspeth Whyte
Francesca . . . Rosie Boore
Angelica . . . Amy-Jayne Leigh

Musical direction and accompaniment by Colin Sell.

Directed by Sasha Yevtushenko.


WED 12:00 News Summary (m000610c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 How to Find Home (m000610f)
Episode 8

Molly has lived on the streets since she was a teenager. Her violent ex-boyfriend Rusby is back in Nottingham and won't leave her alone. So when she meets Luca at a party and he asks her to go away with him she jumps at the chance to escape. Old friend Jules doesn't trust this newcomer and invites herself along for the ride.

The trio have reached Skegness but it's late. They hook up with homeless man Igor to kill time until Luca is ready to search for his buried treasure.

Read by Anjli Mohindra
Written by Mahsuda Snaith
Abridged by Siân Preece
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m000610h)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


WED 12:57 Weather (m000610k)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m000610m)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


WED 13:45 Naturebang (m000610p)
The Portuguese Man O'War and the Individual

Strange things dwell out in the open ocean. Bobbing atop the waves, Becky Ripley and Emily Knight meet one such creature, the Portuguese Man O’War. With its bulbous air-sacs and trailing tentacles you’d be forgiven for thinking it’s a jellyfish, but you’d be wrong. It’s a colony, a society of tiny individual animals, who work together to eat, hunt and reproduce as one.

In the Age of the Individual, we humans like to think of ourselves as self-sufficient little nodes who don’t need nobody. But that perspective gets called into question when you consider where we live. Thanks to some complex maths and some incredible data-crunching, we’re beginning to see the cities we inhabit in a different light. They grow, move, breathe, and die, just like a living organism, according to strict mathematical principles. Just like polyps in a Man O’ War, are we really any more than cogs in a machine?


WED 14:00 The Archers (m00060y0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (m000610r)
The Cyprus Missing

By Mario Theodorou

London, 2014. Althea, a Greek Cypriot who has spent her adult life in London, has always believed that her father was killed in action during the Cypriot conflict of 1974. But a chance discovery causes her to question her family history, and go in search of answers within London's Cypriot community.

Althea ..... Agni Scott
Gizem ..... Fisun Burgess
Eleni ….. Anna Savva
Constantine ..... Chris Pavlo
Young Althea ..... Christina Kyriakos
Young Gizem ..... Jeyda Mustafa
Mags ..... Catherine Cusack
Missing Persons Rep .... Helen Clapp
Wine Seller ….. Shaun Mason
Soldier ….. Jonny Holden

Director, Sasha Yevtushenko


WED 15:00 Money Box (m000610t)
The latest news from the world of personal finance plus advice for those trying to make the most of their money.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (m00060yj)
Claudia talks to Professor Steven Rogelberg about the science of meetings. Should we get rid of them altogether? Or what can we do to improve them? Also, how can we help those with dementia sleep better? Professor Susan McCurry and Dr Alpar Lazar discuss the latest research on sleep-regulation for people with dementia. And how good are we at estimating the size of our bodies? Claudia visits Birkbeck, University of London where Renata Sadibolova and Professor Matthew Longo conduct an experiment to see how good Claudia is at estimating her body size.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b08k34n6)
The ways women age - Beauty politics

The ways women age: Laurie Taylor talks to Abigail Brooks, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Providence College USA, and author of a study which asks why women choose or reject cosmetic anti ageing proceedures. Also, beauty politics in the Neoliberal age. Ros Gill, Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis at City University, discusses the ways in which women are required to be 'aesthetic entrepreneurs', maintaining a constant vigilance about their appearance. They're joined by Rachel Wood, Research Associate in the Department of Psychology, Sociology and Politics at Sheffield Hallam University. Revised repeat.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m000610x)
The programme about a revolution in media with Amol Rajan, the BBC's Media Editor


WED 16:55 The Listening Project (m000610z)
Leonie and Julie - Home Is Where Your Mum Is

Mother and daughter explore the notion that home is where the Mum is. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


WED 17:00 PM (m0006111)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0006113)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (m0006115)
Series 8

Episode 5

John Finnemore returns to Radio 4 with an eighth series of his multi-award-winning sketch show, joined by his regular ensemble cast of Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin and Carrie Quinlan.

This episode contains some helpful guidance on the etiquette of "Thank Yous", and looks into the devastating consequences of World Peace.

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme was described by The Radio Times as "the best sketch show in years, on television or radio", and by The Daily Telegraph as "funny enough to make even the surliest cat laugh". Already the winner of a Radio Academy Silver Award and a Broadcasting Press Guild award, this year Souvenir Programme won its second BBC Audio Drama award.

Written by & starring ... John Finnemore
Cast ... Margaret Cabourn-Smith
Cast ... Simon Kane
Cast ... Lawry Lewin
Cast ... Carrie Quinlan

Production Coordinator ... Beverly Tagg
Producer ... Ed Morrish
A BBC Studios production


WED 19:00 The Archers (m0006117)
There's some upsetting news for Shula and Lilian makes herself useful.


WED 19:15 Front Row (m0006119)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 19:45 Drama (m0006102)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m000611c)
Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Anne McElvoy, Giles Fraser, Matthew Taylor and Melanie Philips.


WED 20:45 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (m00060zw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 The Origin of Stuff (m000611f)
Fork

The fork is essential. Even camping without one is a false economy, in Katy’s experience. Even a spork - with a spoon at one end and a fork at the other, with a knife formed along one prong - just won’t do. You need both - a fork to steady the meat and a knife to cut it with.

So how did the fork come to be so indispensable?

We didn’t always love the fork. Public historian, Greg Jenner, reveals how it was abandoned for the chopstick in Ancient China, and greeted with scorn in Western Europe when a Byzantine princess ate with a golden double-pronged one.

It was only after the traveller, Thomas Coryat, in 1608, celebrated its use by pasta-loving Italians that the English started to take note. By the mid-19th century, there was a fork for every culinary challenge – from the pickle and the berry, to ice-cream and the terrapin. The utensil transformed the dining experience, bringing the pocket knife onto the table in a blunt, round-tipped form, and ushering in British table manners.

So is there a perfect version of the fork? With the help of tomato, milkshake and mango, Katy discovers that the material a fork is made from can drastically alter a food’s taste.

Featuring material scientist, Zoe Laughlin, and food writer and historian, Bee Wilson.

Producer: Beth Eastwood


WED 21:30 Only Artists (m00060zt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m000611h)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 How to Find Home (m000610f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 The East Coast Listening Post (m000611k)
Series 2

Pig

American reporters and sisters, Jenna and Dana Johnson, return to the UK to investigate the people of Great Britain. This week Jenna and Dana meet Ruby Thudd, a young woman who shares her apartment with an ex-micro pig called Cleopatra.

The East Coast Listening Post was written and performed by Celeste Dring and Freya Parker, with performances from David Elms and Jessie Cave. The original score was composed by Owain Roberts. The script editor was Matthew Crosby. The East Coast Listening Post was produced by Suzy Grant and is a BBC Studios production.


WED 23:15 Nurse (b077gtw3)
Series 2

Episode 6

A bittersweet comedy drama about a community mental health nurse created by Paul Whitehouse and David Cummings.

Liz (played by Esther Coles), the community psychiatric nurse of the title makes her rounds to visit "service users" in their homes. Most of those patients are played by comedy chameleon Paul Whitehouse himself – with supporting roles for Rosie Cavaliero, Vilma Hollingbery and Cecilia Noble.

Whitehouse brings us an obese bed-bound mummy's boy, an agoraphobic ex-con, a manic ex-glam rock star, ageing rake Herbert who hoards his house with possessions and memories, a Jewish chatterbox in unrequited love with his Jamaican neighbour, and a long-suffering carer and his Alzheimer's-afflicted mother.

There are new characters too in the guise of a self-proclaimed DJ and a Geordie struggling with his wife's job in the world's oldest profession.

We follow their humorous, sometimes sad and occasionally moving interactions with Liz, whose job is to assess their progress, dispense medication and offer support.

Nurse gives a sympathetic insight into the world of some of society's more marginalised people in a heartfelt and considered way.

Written by David Cummings and Paul Whitehouse, with additional material by Esther Coles.

Cast:
Paul Whitehouse
Esther Coles
Margaret Cabourn-Smith
Rosie Cavaliero
Sue Elliott-Nichols
Charlie Higson
Vilma Hollingbery
Jason Maza
Cecilia Noble

A Down The Line production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000611m)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



THURSDAY 20 JUNE 2019

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m000611p)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (m00060zy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000611r)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000611t)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000611w)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m000611y)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0006120)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Sarah Teather, UK Director of the Jesuit Refugee Service

Good morning.

Today is World Refugee Day. On this day four years ago I was out with our home visits team in Lebanon meeting Syrian families in the backstreets of Bourj Hammoud in Beirut.

We had come to see a family who lived at the top of a ramshackle block of flats. “As-Salaam-Alaikum, can we come in?” A face peeked around the door, and then another, before a teenage girl gestured that we should follow her through a dark galley kitchen to an entirely empty sitting room, where we sat down on the floor. Soon it began to fill with people. Three large families lived in this small space. The children were attending specially provided classes to help them catch up with their missed education, get support with trauma and learn French and English needed for the Lebanese school system.

As foreign visitors, we were the ideal audience for the children to show off to. Counting demonstrations ensued, in two languages, “one two three, un deux trois”… all to raucous applause. “How old are you?” said one little boy at the back. “Oh, more than you can count!”, I quipped. “No” said the boy, “I can count to a hundred!” And off he went.

In all the boisterous jollity, it took me a while to notice his mother crying. “Ask her in Arabic why she cries”, I whispered to my colleague. “I am just so happy to see them do this,” she answered. “It gives me so much hope, because now I know they have a future”.

Lord Jesus, you beckoned the children to come to you, keep those around the world who are displaced from their homes safe from harm this day, and show us the way to support them to nurture a future full of hope.

Amen.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m0006122)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09789pb)
Stuart Butchart on the Bronze-Winged Jacana

BirdLife International's chief scientist Dr Stuart Butchart reveals the bronze-winged jacana. He shares what he found out whilst spending three years studying them at Vembanur Lake in India, surrounded by water lilies and patiently watching on a canoe.

Producer: Eliza Lomas
Photograph: Prerna Jane.


THU 06:00 Today (m000614n)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (m000614s)
The Mytilenaean Debate

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss why Athenians decided to send a fast ship to Lesbos in 427BC, rowing through the night to catch one they sent the day before. That earlier ship had instructions to kill all adult men in Mytilene, after their unsuccessul revolt against Athens, as a warning to others. The later ship had orders to save them, as news of their killing would make others fight to the death rather than surrender. Thucydides retells this in his History of the Peloponnesian War as an example of Athenian democracy in action, emphasising the right of Athenians to change their minds in their own interests, even when a demagogue argued they were bound by their first decision.

With

Angela Hobbs

Linda Hua

And

Paul Cartledge

Producer: Simon Tillotson


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (m000614x)
Deaf Republic

Part Three

"We lived happily during the war / And when they bombed other people's houses, we / protested, / but not enough, we opposed them but not / enough".

In a departure for Book of the Week, Radio 4 presents an adaptation of Ukrainian-American author Ilya Kaminsky's new book of poetry, read by Fiona Shaw, Christopher Eccleston, Noma Dumezweni and Arinzé Kene.

Deaf Republic defies classification - it is a poetic narrative, a drama-in-verse, a contemporary epic. In an unnamed country, soldiers shoot dead a young deaf boy at a public gathering and the townspeople respond with refusal to hear the government's commands. Deafness becomes a form of protest and resistance.

This is a fable which speaks incisively about our political moment: about populations living under occupation and about governments at war with their own people. It is about our collective deafness to trauma happening elsewhere to others; and about the news we might choose not to hear. At its heart it is also a tender love story about a pregnant woman and her husband, caught up in this crisis; their love and joy set against the horror of events.

The week's programming begins with a documentary about Ilya Kaminsky, providing the backstory to this remarkable new work, more than 15 years in the making. Deaf since the age of 4, when a doctor in his native Ukraine misdiagnosed mumps as a cold, Ilya learned as a boy to closely observe the world around him. When his family fled to the USA as political refugees and settled there, he taught himself English by translating American poems back and forth between languages. We hear from Ilya and from leading authors Andrew Motion, Max Porter, Raymond Antrobus, Garth Greenwell and Carolyn Forché.

The book itself can be heard adapted across the following four episodes. The performers are Fiona Shaw (Fleabag, Killing Eve), Christopher Eccleston (The A Word, Doctor Who), Arinzé Kene (Death of a Salesman, Been So Long, The Pass) and Olivier Award-winning Noma Dumezweni (Harry Potter, Black Earth Rising).

Illustrations by Jennifer Whitten
Produced by Mair Bosworth with original sound design and music by Aaron May.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0006151)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


THU 10:45 Drama (m0006155)
Reading Europe: Lullaby

Episode 4

Adapted from Leïla Slimani’s international bestseller, winner of France’s prestigious Prix Goncourt.

When Myriam, a French-Moroccan lawyer, decides to return to work, she and her music producer husband Paul look for the perfect nanny for their two young children. They never dreamed they would find Louise - a quiet, polite and devoted woman who captivates the children, cleans the family’s chic Paris apartment, stays late without complaint and hosts enviable birthday parties.

But as the couple’s dependence on their nanny increases, their idyllic domesticity is shattered.

By Leïla Slimani
Adapted for radio by Hattie Naylor from the translation by Sam Taylor

Cast:
Louise ….. Christine Bottomley
Myriam ….. Laila Alj
Paul ….. Shaun Evans
Mila ….. Beatrice Butler
Wafa ….. Lara Sawalha
Florence ….. Jane Slavin
Adam ….. Leo Layton-McClean
Emergency services ..... Céline Fuhrer
Emergency services ..... Cédric Moreau

Other voices played by the cast.

Executive Producer: Sara Davies
Produced by Nicolas Jackson and Steve Bond

An Afonica production for BBC Radio 4


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (m0006159)
Insight, and analysis from BBC correspondents around the world


THU 11:30 The Art of Now (m000615f)
Music of the Kaka'i

Farhad al-Kake shares the secret music of his ancient Kurdish religion, which is central to their faith but makes the Kaka’i a target for Islamic extremists in their homeland of Iraq.

Centuries of persecution have made the Kaka’i people of Iraq secretive about their faith. They believe they are the oldest religion in the world, and music is important to their worship. Many of their holy songs are thousands of years old, passed down from generation to generation, and are never played in public. In fact, the music of the Kaka’i has rarely been heard outside their community in Iraq before.

For the first time, in this programme, the Kaka’i share their rich musical heritage – music which some risk their lives to play.

Since the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003 and the rise of Islamic extremism that followed, the Kaka’i have faced growing persecution from Muslim militants who believe their peaceful religion to be a false cult. They also believe music is "haram", or forbidden.

What’s more, in the Kaka’i religion, men and women are equal, and woman play music alongside men – making them even more of a target.

The Kaka’i are finally revealing their lives to the world in an attempt to thwart the risk of genocide.

Recorded on location in Kurdistan, with religious leader Farhad al-Kake as our guide, we’ll hear music from a secret past, and meet the musicians who preserve it, despite the risk to their lives.

Producer: Eve Streeter
A Greenpoint production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:00 News Summary (m000615k)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 How to Find Home (m000615p)
Episode 9

Molly has lived on the streets since she was a teenager. Her violent ex-boyfriend Rusby is back in Nottingham and won't leave her alone. So when she meets Luca at a party and he asks her to go away with him she jumps at the chance to escape.
Old friend Jules doesn't trust this newcomer and invites herself along for the ride.

It's beginning to look as though Jules was right - when Luca's paranoia reaches fever pitch he verbally attacks Molly. The distraught girl wanders Skegness alone and unguarded as terrible memories intrude.

Read by Anjli Mohindra
Written by Mahsuda Snaith
Abridged by Siân Preece
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m000615t)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


THU 12:57 Weather (m000615y)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m0006162)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


THU 13:45 Naturebang (m0006166)
Parasites and Personality

If you think you’re in control, think again.

What invisible forces might be guiding your behaviour, your decisions, your most intimate emotions? Becky Ripley and Emily Knight take a trip into the bizarre nightmare world of the undergrowth, and watch ‘zombie ants’ stumble forward, blindly following the orders of the deadly fungi controlling their brains. Parasites often get the upper hand of their hosts, manipulating their behaviour in sometimes horrifying ways. But is that true of humans too? Could we be unknowingly subservient to creatures that live inside us? Do they wish us well, or might they be plotting our downfall?


THU 14:00 The Archers (m0006117)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b08rpy1z)
Floor 13

Ms Sherman is living a life of luxury. She's landed her dream job. Has a beautiful apartment, equipped with her very own maid. She wants for nothing. So why does she feel so terrible? A search for her tower block's missing floor 13 takes Ms Sherman on a strange and sinister journey that might just save her from a life wracked by guilt. But how much is Ms Sherman really prepared to pay to feel better about herself?
A twisted modern fable about first-world problems and middle class guilt by Sam Burns.

Original music composed by Lucy Rivers, performed by Dan Lawrence and Lucy Rivers.

Directed by Helen Perry
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production

Sam Burns was shortlisted for the Susan Smith Blackburn award and has worked with Paines Plough, the Bush, Theatre Clwyd, Sherman Theatre and Radio Wales.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (m000616b)
Going Dutch in Dorset

Clare Balding joins a unique family ramble in Dorset. She is walking from Osmington Mills to Weymouth with Simon Waley and his three Dutch sons-in-law. They are here, from their home in the Netherlands, for a three day hike along a stretch of the South West Coastal Path. Simon is British; he met and married a Dutch woman and moved to the Netherlands more than twenty five years ago. They have three daughters and each met a Dutch man. For the first time, Simon – a very keen walker, who regularly comes back to the UK – is bringing his three Dutch sons-in-law to experience long-distance British trekking. He says the culture of walking is very different in the Netherlands where every square inch of land has a specific purpose, there aren’t many public footpaths, and agricultural land is out of bounds. When people do walk, it’s usually in huge, organised groups along a network of rural roads. Simon wants his family to experience both the freedom of British walking and the unique delight of youth-hostelling, something they haven’t done before.

Producer: Karen Gregor


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m00060vl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m00060xf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (m000616g)
Midnight Sun Film Festival

Antonia Quirke visits the Midnight Sun Film Festival in Lapland, where the sun shines for 24 hours in summer and films are shown every hour of the day too.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m000616l)
Dr Adam Rutherford and guests illuminate the mysteries and challenge the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (m000616q)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000616v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 My Obsession (m000616z)
Series 1

Episode 1

Paul Merton and Suki Webster star in a new episode of this warm-hearted comedy exploring the obsessive narcissistic culture of so-called celebrity, the desire to be famous and the urge to be near it.

After a bizarre first meeting when Sheryl, a superfan of stand-up comedian Danny Heywood, broke into his hotel bedroom, the perfectly mismatched pair are reunited. This time the self-obsessed comic pays his number one fan a surprise visit.

But does the lonely comic want a date? No, he needs to be driven to his next gig.

However, Danny also reveals that Sheryl is now his inspiration, his muse. Will a bumpy road trip bring the obsessive lonely couple together or drive them both round the bend? And can this unlikely pair find happiness and a true connection or is the only thing they have in common that they are both obsessed with Danny?

Cast:
Danny – Paul Merton
Sheryl – Suki Webster
Malcolm – Matt Addis
Phoebe -Tilly Gaunt
Kevin - Terry Mynott

Written by Suki Webster
Producer: Liz Anstee

A CPL production for BBC Radio 4


THU 19:00 The Archers (m000615n)
It's a big day for Jazzer and Ian is forced to face his fears


THU 19:15 Front Row (m0006175)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 19:45 Drama (m0006155)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (m00060xd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (m0006177)
Commerce and Crime

From Somali pirates who've turned kidnapping into a global enterprise to cybercrime and fraud - the worlds of business and wrongdoing potentially have much in common. Clever criminals build business empires and fraud is sometimes carried out by well paid workers at legitimate companies. What the two worlds can have in common is a pursuit of profit and a series of apparently rational calculations. Evan Davis and guests explore why some bright, talented people try to get rich the wrong way, while others manage to do it within the rules.

Guests

Barrister, Sara George, a partner at Sidley Austin LLP
Michael Corrigan, Chief Executive at Prosper 4 - a training and recruitment firm for former prisoners
and Dr Anja Shortland, Reader in Political Economy at King's College, London.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m000616l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (m000614s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m000617d)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 How to Find Home (m000615p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 V.I.P. R.I.P. (m000617j)
Jo Brand hosts the show looking back on all the celebrities who have passed on this week. In this episode she looks back at the life of musical theatre impresario Jeremy Beaumont, failed politician Douglas Waithe, 60's sci-fi star Pamela Ducasse and electronics engineer Isidor Globovsky whose one (uncredited) invention changed broadcasting forever.

VIP RIP is voiced by Rosie Cavaliero, Emma Sidi, Vivienne Acheampong, Daniel Maier, and Daniel Barker.

It is written by Max Davis, Daniel Maier, Sarah Campbell, Madeleine Brettingham and James Kettle.

Producer was Sam Michell

It's a BBC Studios Production


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000617n)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament


THU 23:55 The Listening Project (m000617s)
Joel and Deirdre - Time Apart to Grow Together

Girlfriend and boyfriend who live 100 miles apart on different sides of the Irish border. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.



FRIDAY 21 JUNE 2019

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m000617x)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (m000614x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0006181)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0006185)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0006189)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m000618f)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000618k)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Sarah Teather, UK Director of the Jesuit Refugee Service

Good morning.

I spent yesterday with our outreach team in Harmondsworth Immigration Detention Centre. Detention is for most of those we support a shattering experience. But over the years of providing pastoral care to people held in this situation, we have learnt not to assume we know what is most troubling people, without listening carefully.

One of my colleagues took a phone call some months ago from someone in detention. He was deeply distressed at being separated from his five year old daughter as her birthday approached. “She’s going to think I’ve forgotten about her and don’t love her anymore. Is there anything you can do to help me send something so she’ll know I’m thinking of her?”

Unsure how to respond, my colleague took down his address, and went to look in our cupboard. She retrieved a toy from the stock of gifts donated for Christmas, and carefully wrapped it, as she would for her own family, adding a card for the girl saying the gift was from her dad and he loved her very much; she put it in the post, wondering if it was enough.

He called back a few days later: he’d spoken to his daughter, and she was ecstatic because the parcel had arrived. He called to tell us how much it meant to him. It was another emotional call, this time for him and for my colleague.

Those refugees we accompany have had so much of their lives stripped painfully away. But sometimes, from them, we glimpse truths we have forgotten: that love longs for expression even in separation; that the simplest of acts can communicate tenderness; that giving gifts creates ripples into lives beyond our imagination….
Lord, give us open hearts to give and receive in freedom, and in hope.

Amen.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m000618n)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b091stsb)
Clare Jones on the Little Egret

Clare Jones recalls the inspiration of seeing a little egret and how a small event can change an entire outlook on life in this Tweet of the Day.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Tom Bonnett.


FRI 06:00 Today (m0006145)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m00060wc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (m0006147)
Deaf Republic

Part Four

"We lived happily during the war / And when they bombed other people's houses, we / protested, / but not enough, we opposed them but not / enough".

In a departure for Book of the Week, Radio 4 presents an adaptation of Ukrainian-American author Ilya Kaminsky's new book of poetry, read by Fiona Shaw, Christopher Eccleston, Noma Dumezweni and Arinzé Kene.

Deaf Republic defies classification - it is a poetic narrative, a drama-in-verse, a contemporary epic. In an unnamed country, soldiers shoot dead a young deaf boy at a public gathering and the townspeople respond with refusal to hear the government's commands. Deafness becomes a form of protest and resistance.

This is a fable which speaks incisively about our political moment: about populations living under occupation and about governments at war with their own people. It is about our collective deafness to trauma happening elsewhere to others; and about the news we might choose not to hear. At its heart it is also a tender love story about a pregnant woman and her husband, caught up in this crisis; their love and joy set against the horror of events.

The week's programming begins with a documentary about Ilya Kaminsky, providing the backstory to this remarkable new work, more than 15 years in the making. Deaf since the age of 4, when a doctor in his native Ukraine misdiagnosed mumps as a cold, Ilya learned as a boy to closely observe the world around him. When his family fled to the USA as political refugees and settled there, he taught himself English by translating American poems back and forth between languages. We hear from Ilya and from leading authors Andrew Motion, Max Porter, Raymond Antrobus, Garth Greenwell and Carolyn Forché.

The book itself can be heard adapted across the following four episodes. The performers are Fiona Shaw (Fleabag, Killing Eve), Christopher Eccleston (The A Word, Doctor Who), Arinzé Kene (Death of a Salesman, Been So Long, The Pass) and Olivier Award-winning Noma Dumezweni (Harry Potter, Black Earth Rising).

Illustrations by Jennifer Whitten
Produced by Mair Bosworth with original sound design and music by Aaron May.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0006149)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


FRI 10:45 Drama (m000614c)
Reading Europe: Lullaby

Episode 5

Adapted from Leïla Slimani’s international bestseller, winner of France’s prestigious Prix Goncourt.

When Myriam, a French-Moroccan lawyer, decides to return to work, she and her music producer husband Paul look for the perfect nanny for their two young children. They never dreamed they would find Louise - a quiet, polite and devoted woman who captivates the children, cleans the family’s chic Paris apartment, stays late without complaint and hosts enviable birthday parties.

But as the couple’s dependence on their nanny increases, their idyllic domesticity is shattered.

By Leïla Slimani
Adapted for radio by Hattie Naylor from the translation by Sam Taylor

Cast:
Louise ….. Christine Bottomley
Myriam ….. Laila Alj
Paul ….. Shaun Evans
Mila ….. Beatrice Butler
Wafa ….. Lara Sawalha
Adam ….. Leo Layton-McClean
Emergency services ..... Céline Fuhrer
Emergency services ..... Cédric Moreau

Other voices played by the cast.

Executive Producer: Sara Davies
Produced by Nicolas Jackson and Steve Bond

An Afonica production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 11:00 The Secret History of Science and Religion (m000614f)
The Nature of the Beast

Nick Spencer explores the history of the relationship between science and religion and questions the received wisdom that they have always been in conflict with one another. He tells the story of science and religion not as if they were big, abstract ideas but as it happened, through the lives and cultures of different people and different times. From the Islamic 'Golden Age' to Galileo, he examines how they were engaged in the exploration of the natural world between the 8th and 17th centuries to discover where the fault lines began to emerge.

Contributors:
John Holmes - Professor of Victorian literature and culture at Birmingham University;
John Hedley Brooke - Historian of Science and author of "Science and Religion: Some Historical Perspectives";
Fern Elsdon-Baker - Professor of Science, Knowledge and Belief in Society at the University of Birmingham;
Peter Harrison - Professor in the History of Science at the University of Queensland and author of “The Territories of Science and Religion”;
Jamil Ragep - Professor of the History of Science in Islamic Societies at McGill University in Montreal;
James Hannam - Author of "God’s Philosophers: How the Medieval World Laid the Foundations of Modern Science";
Jack Cunningham - Reader in Ecclesiastical History at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln;
Tom McLeish - Professor of Natural Philosophy at the University of York;
Dava Sobel - Author of "Galileo's Daughter: A Historical Memoir of Science, Faith, and Love".

Producer: Dan Tierney
Series Editor: Christine Morgan


FRI 11:30 Mrs Sidhu Investigates (m000614j)
Mrs Sidhu's Deadly Highland Game

Episode 2: Loch, Meat Stock And Two Smoking Kippers

Meera Syal stars as the catering sleuth from Slough hunting down a Highland killer.

With Castle Tannoch cut off by snowfall, Mrs Sidhu is - as usual - finding "clues" that give Inspector Burton stress headaches. Pills, a game pie and blood that turns out to be quite something else.

Mrs Sidhu soon has her nose in everyone’s business on the highland estate, but it’s their leisure pursuits that raise her eyebrows. Big Willie Kendrick’s use of the old estate cottage certainly wasn’t for corporate entertainment. And she is sure the maid knows more than she’s letting on.

Meanwhile, Mrs Sidhu's son Tez proposes he needs a gun to protect her. And if that doesn’t fluster her, hunky gamekeeper Callum has her heart fluttering with a proposal of a different kind.

As Mrs Sidhu probes deeper into the death of Willie Kendrick and the secrets of the troubled hunting lodge, she faces a difficult choice between her heart and her head for crime.

Cast
Meera Syal- Mrs Sidhu
Justin Edwards- Inspector Burton
Hamza Jeetooa- Tez
John Sessions- Sir Alex and Zukhov
Hilary Maclean- Jane and Kirsty
Okorie Chukwu- Robert and PC Williamson
Gordon Kennedy- Callum

Written by Suk Pannu
Recorded at Soundhouse Studios
Edited by Leon Chambers
Studio Managers - Wilfredo Acosta and Leon Chambers
Production Manager- Sarah Tombling

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
Produced by Gordon Kennedy
An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m000614m)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 How to Find Home (m000614r)
Episode 10

Molly has lived on the streets since she was a teenager. Her violent ex-boyfriend Rusby is back in Nottingham and won't leave her alone. So when she meets Luca at a party and he asks her to go away with him she jumps at the chance to escape. Old friend Jules doesn't trust this newcomer and invites herself along for the ride.

Molly has helped Luca find his grandfather’s hidden legacy but the traumas in her past have grown too much for her - and she has chosen to walk into the sea.

Read by Anjli Mohindra
Written by Mahsuda Snaith
Abridged by Siân Preece
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


FRI 12:18 Four Seasons (m000614w)
Poetry readings for the summer solstice.


FRI 12:20 You and Yours (m0006150)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


FRI 12:57 Weather (m0006154)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m0006158)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:43 Four Seasons (m000615d)
Poetry readings for the summer solstice.


FRI 13:45 Naturebang (m000615j)
Vole-love and Fidelity

Ah, true love. Who can quantify that heady rush, the joy of another’s company, the unshakable bonds between one lover and another? Well, vole experts can.

This tiny rodent is not just an anagram of love, it can also teach us a lot about why we fall. And why we sometimes stray. Prairie Voles form life-long monogamous bonds, together until death they do part. Almost identical Meadow Voles don’t, living the single life, and mating at will. It all comes down to brain chemistry. And it turns out, some of us are more Prairie Vole than others.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m000615n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (m000615s)
Baselines

A drama by Mark Lawson exploring the challenges of the changing gender identity landscape for sport's governing bodies.

In recent decades, identity categories of all kinds have come to seem fragile and unsettled. Identity has become much more complex, fluid, and fragmented. As new categories have proliferated and old categories have come to seem ill fitting, we increasingly face uncertainties and ambiguities in identifying ourselves and categorising others.

Baselines considers whether male athletes transitioning to become women have an unfair advantage over born women due to their residual muscle density and larger physiques. And if so, how are governing bodies in sport to legislate to ensure a level playing field for all?

Cast:
PETER/PJ REANEY……..………………………………………………............Rosie Sheehy
SHEILA REANEY.……..…………………………………………………. .........Haydn Gwynne
DAVID HARVEY-LANE………………………………………………….........Dermot Crowley
RACHEL DU PREZ…………………………………………………………........Kerry Fox
ANDY TERRISTER...……………………………………………………….........Tom Glenister
KEVIN HUNTER/UMPIRE/SPORTS PRESENTER…….…................Adrian Decosta
LETITIA INGRAMS/COMMENTATOR/TESTING WOMAN.…….Marieme Diouf

Written by Mark Lawson
Directed by Eoin O'Callaghan
A Big Fish Radio production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000615x)
Summer Garden Party at Mount Stewart: Part Two

Peter Gibbs hosts the second of two GQT specials from the annual Summer Garden Party. Matt Biggs, Pippa Greenwood, James Wong and Anne Swithinbank are answering horticultural questions from the audience at National Trust Mount Stewart in County Down, Northern Ireland.

Produced by Laurence Bassett
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Short Works (m00066s6)
The Rivals

A writer receives a message requesting he visit a hospice in order to make peace with a man he hasn't seen in over forty years. An original short story for BBC Radio 4 by the Irish poet, playwright and novelist Dermot Bolger. As read by Owen Roe.

Dermot Bolger is one of Ireland’s most respected authors whose awards include the Samuel Beckett Award and the A.E. Memorial Prize. An acclaimed poet, playwright and novelist, his works have been staged and published in many countries. His extensive radio credits include 'Hunger Again', 'The Kerlogue', 'The Night Manager' and 'The Fortunestown Kid'. The audio version of his own novel 'The Woman’s Daughter' was awarded the Worldplay Award for Best Script.

Writer ..... Dermot Bolger
Reader ..... Owen Roe
Producer ..... Michael Shannon


FRI 16:00 Four Seasons (m0006161)
Poetry readings for the summer solstice.


FRI 16:03 Last Word (m0006165)
Radio 4's weekly obituary programme, telling the life stories of those who have died recently.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (m0006169)
The programme that holds the BBC to account on behalf of the radio audience.


FRI 17:00 PM (m000616f)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


FRI 17:58 Four Seasons (m000616k)
Poetry readings for the summer solstice.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000616p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 Dead Ringers (m000616t)
Series 19

Episode 3

This series of Dead Ringers features Jon Culshaw, Jan Ravens, Lewis Macleod, Debra Stephenson and Duncan Wisbey,

The producer and creator is Bill Dare
A BBC Studios Production


FRI 19:00 The Archers (m000616y)
Contemporary drama in a rural setting.

Writer, Gurpreet Kaur Bhatti
Director, Marina Caldarone
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Pip Archer ….. Daisy Badger
Kenton Archer ….. Richard Attlee
Tony Archer ….. David Troughton
Pat Archer ….. Patricia Gallimore
Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Natasha Archer ….. Mali Harries
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Ian Craig ….. Stephen Kennedy
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Adam Macy ….. Andrew Wincott
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Kirsty Miller ….. Annabelle Dowler
Peggy Woolley ….. June Spencer
Philip Moss ….. Andy Hockley


FRI 19:15 Front Row (m0006172)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


FRI 19:45 Drama (m000614c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m0006179)
Dawn Butler MP, David Davis MP, Simon Jenkins

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Wymondham High Academy in Norfolk with Shadow Women and Equalities Minister Dawn Butler MP, former Brexit Secretary David Davis MP, and Guardian columnist and author Simon Jenkins.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m000617f)
A weekly reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 The New Age of Capitalism (m00066s8)
Omnibus 1

David Grossman tells ten stories which help explain the world of contemporary capitalism


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m000617k)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 How to Find Home (m000614r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (m00060xj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000617p)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament


FRI 23:55 Four Seasons (m000617t)
Poetry readings for the summer solstice.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Charles Paris Mystery 23:00 TUE (b084dnqp)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (m00060xj)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (m00060xj)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m0005tql)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m000617f)

A Trespasser's Guide to the Classics 19:15 SUN (b08hqf5w)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (m00060yj)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (m0005t3n)

Analysis 20:30 MON (m000613h)

Annika Stranded 19:45 SUN (m00060yc)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m00060sy)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m0005tqj)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m0006179)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m0005syq)

Art of Living 15:30 SAT (m0005t8p)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m000616l)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m000616l)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m00060ty)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m00060ty)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (m0005tp2)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (m0006128)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (m0006128)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (m00060vh)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (m00060vh)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (m00060zy)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (m00060zy)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (m000614x)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (m000614x)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (m0006147)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (m0005t2k)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (m000612y)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m00060w3)

Call Yourself an Impartial Journalist? 13:30 SUN (m0004f5s)

Dead Ringers 12:30 SAT (m0005tqb)

Dead Ringers 18:30 FRI (m000616t)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (m00060wc)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m00060wc)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b0b0lxlz)

Drama 15:00 SUN (m00060x7)

Drama 10:45 MON (m000612d)

Drama 14:15 MON (b08q7j32)

Drama 19:45 MON (m000612d)

Drama 10:45 TUE (m00060vt)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b08rt9rt)

Drama 19:45 TUE (m00060vt)

Drama 10:41 WED (m0006102)

Drama 14:15 WED (m000610r)

Drama 19:45 WED (m0006102)

Drama 10:45 THU (m0006155)

Drama 14:15 THU (b08rpy1z)

Drama 19:45 THU (m0006155)

Drama 10:45 FRI (m000614c)

Drama 14:15 FRI (m000615s)

Drama 19:45 FRI (m000614c)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m00060s7)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m00060zj)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m0006143)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m00060zp)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m0006122)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m000618n)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (m0005tq2)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (m0006169)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (m0005t9m)

File on 4 21:00 TUE (m00060y8)

Four Seasons 12:18 FRI (m000614w)

Four Seasons 13:43 FRI (m000615d)

Four Seasons 16:00 FRI (m0006161)

Four Seasons 17:58 FRI (m000616k)

Four Seasons 23:55 FRI (m000617t)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m00060sm)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (m0006159)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m000613f)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m00060y4)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m0006119)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m0006175)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (m0006172)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m0005tpw)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m000615x)

Heresy 18:30 TUE (m00060xx)

How to Find Home 12:04 MON (m000612m)

How to Find Home 22:45 MON (m000612m)

How to Find Home 12:04 TUE (m00060wd)

How to Find Home 22:45 TUE (m00060wd)

How to Find Home 12:04 WED (m000610f)

How to Find Home 22:45 WED (m000610f)

How to Find Home 12:04 THU (m000615p)

How to Find Home 22:45 THU (m000615p)

How to Find Home 12:04 FRI (m000614r)

How to Find Home 22:45 FRI (m000614r)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (m000614s)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (m000614s)

In Touch 21:40 TUE (m00060yd)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 18:30 WED (m0006115)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (m0005t37)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (m000613c)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m0005tq0)

Last Word 16:03 FRI (m0006165)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (m00060xd)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (m00060xd)

Leg Breakers 11:30 WED (m0006108)

Living World 06:35 SUN (m00060v2)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m00060tc)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m00060tc)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m0005tqx)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m00060tm)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m00060yr)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m000613q)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m00060yx)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m000611p)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m000617x)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m00060sr)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m00060sr)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m000610t)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (m000611c)

Mrs Sidhu Investigates 11:30 FRI (m000614j)

My Name Is... 20:00 MON (m0006106)

My Name Is... 11:00 WED (m0006106)

My Obsession 18:30 THU (m000616z)

Names in the Sky 11:00 TUE (m00060w0)

Naturebang 13:45 MON (m000612w)

Naturebang 13:45 TUE (m00060wy)

Naturebang 13:45 WED (m000610p)

Naturebang 13:45 THU (m0006166)

Naturebang 13:45 FRI (m000615j)

New Weird Britain 16:00 MON (m0006132)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m0005tr5)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m00060tw)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m00060z8)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m000613z)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m00060zf)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m000611y)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m000618f)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (m00060v0)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m00060sp)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m00060wh)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m000612k)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m00060w8)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m000610c)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m000615k)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m000614m)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m00060s5)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m00060v9)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m00060vv)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (m00060tk)

News 13:00 SAT (m00060sw)

Nurse 23:15 WED (b077gtw3)

Only Artists 09:00 WED (m00060zt)

Only Artists 21:30 WED (m00060zt)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m00060xf)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m00060xf)

Our Next Prime Minister 20:00 TUE (m0006bck)

PM 17:00 SAT (m00060t2)

PM 17:00 MON (m0006137)

PM 17:00 TUE (m00060xn)

PM 17:00 WED (m0006111)

PM 17:00 THU (m000616q)

PM 17:00 FRI (m000616f)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m00060y3)

Political Thinking with Nick Robinson 05:45 SAT (m0005t2v)

Political Thinking with Nick Robinson 09:30 WED (m00060zw)

Political Thinking with Nick Robinson 20:45 WED (m00060zw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m0005tr7)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m00060zd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m0006141)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m00060zk)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m0006120)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m000618k)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m00060tf)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m00060tf)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m00060tf)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m00060vl)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m00060vl)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m00060vl)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (m0005t71)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (m000616b)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m00060sf)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (m00060th)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m0005tr1)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m00060tr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m00060z0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m000613v)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m00060z5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m000611t)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m0006185)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m0005tqz)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m0005tr3)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m00060t5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m00060tp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m00060tt)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m00060xp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m00060yw)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m00060z4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m000613s)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m000613x)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m00060z1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m00060z9)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m000611r)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m000611w)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m0006181)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m0006189)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (m00060x8)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (m0005tpy)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (m00066s6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m00060t9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m00060xz)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m0006139)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m00060xs)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m0006113)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m000616v)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m000616p)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b087pdt9)

Spain's Lost Generations 23:00 MON (m0003ctt)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (m0006126)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (m0006126)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m00060vz)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m00060vg)

Tell Me Where It Hurts 21:00 MON (m0005t8m)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m00060w7)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m00060y7)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m00060y7)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m00060x4)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m00060x4)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m00060y0)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m00060y0)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m0006117)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m0006117)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m000615n)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m000615n)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (m000616y)

The Art of Now 11:30 TUE (m00060w4)

The Art of Now 11:30 THU (m000615f)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (m0005t7k)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (m0006177)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (m0006134)

The East Coast Listening Post 23:00 WED (m000611k)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (m0005t73)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (m000616g)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m00060wm)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m0006130)

The Invention of... 15:30 TUE (m0002rmj)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (m00060x3)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (m0006104)

The Listening Project 16:55 WED (m000610z)

The Listening Project 23:55 THU (m000617s)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m000610x)

The New Age of Capitalism 21:00 FRI (m00066s8)

The Origin of Stuff 21:00 WED (m000611f)

The Patch 10:30 SAT (m00060sh)

The Reith Lectures 22:15 SAT (m0005t85)

The Reith Lectures 09:00 TUE (m00060vc)

The Secret History of Science and Religion 11:00 FRI (m000614f)

The Song Hunters 23:30 SUN (m0004mcw)

The Untold 11:00 MON (m000612g)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (m00060sk)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m00060wv)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m000613l)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m00060yn)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m000611h)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m000617d)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m000617k)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b08rrc0k)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b08k34n6)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (m000613n)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (m00060ys)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (m000611m)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (m000617n)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (m000617p)

Today 07:00 SAT (m00060sc)

Today 06:00 MON (m0006124)

Today 06:00 TUE (m00060v8)

Today 06:00 WED (m00060zr)

Today 06:00 THU (m000614n)

Today 06:00 FRI (m0006145)

Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets 23:30 SAT (m0005t0g)

Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets 16:30 SUN (m00060xk)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b08y0smr)

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V.I.P. R.I.P. 23:00 THU (m000617j)

Vanity Fair 21:00 SAT (m0005t0b)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m00060ym)

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Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m000612b)

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You and Yours 12:18 MON (m000612p)

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You and Yours 12:20 FRI (m0006150)