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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 08 JUNE 2019

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m0005mks)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (m0005mhv)
Lowborn

Episode 5

What does it really mean to be poor in Britain today? Kerry Hudson explores her own childhood, growing up in grinding poverty, and some of Britain's most deprived towns.

Kerry is an award winning novelist, with a love of travel, art, music and culture. Yet her life was not always like this, as she spent most of her childhood living through poverty with a single mother who was always on the move. Living in any flat or B&B they could afford, Kerry attended countless schools before she was able to leave that life behind her, twenty years ago.

Lowborn is Kerry's journey to revisit where she spent her childhood, in the spirit of looking back to see how far you have come. She also visits deprived areas of the country to see if anything has really changed.

In Episode 5, visiting her old school is therapeutic for Kerry, although some unpleasant memories are hard to deal with. She is ready to talk to some relatives about her early years.

Written and read by Kerry Hudson
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0005mkv)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0005mkx)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0005mkz)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m0005ml1)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0005ml3)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the director of a Christian arts charity, Fiona Stewart


SAT 05:45 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (m0005ml5)
The Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt on whether he's following advice from Henry Kissinger, the fate of Brexit and how to have fun dancing the lambada


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m0005sx8)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (m0005mm6)
Proud, Resilient & Native American in the UK

Clare Balding meets a group of native American women who live and work in the UK. A sense of isolation and homesickness led them to the Rainmaker Gallery in Bristol seeking connection with other indigenous people. They now meet regularly. Clare joins them on a walk around Henley in Arden in Warwickshire and hears how despite different tribal affiliations, the common cultural and spiritual backgrounds they share bring great comfort to them thousands of miles from home. Leandra Nephin is from the Omaha tribe of Nebraska and grew up on the reservation there. Sarah Sense is a Chitimacha artist who met her husband while she was exhibiting her work at the Rainmaker Gallery in Bristol run by Joanne Prince, while Stephanie Pratt is an academic and art historian from the Dakota Crow Creek tribe. Melinda Schwakhofer is Muscogee Creek and through her artwork is attempting to reconnect with her culture from her home on Dartmoor.

The walk: Start Henley in Arden Centre ending Preston Bagot Church. Distance approximately four miles OS grid reference SP151660

Producer: Maggie Ayre


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m0005sxb)
Farming Today This Week

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside


SAT 06:57 Weather (m0005sxd)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (m0005sxg)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m0005sxj)
Jo Brand

Richard and Aasmah are joined by: Jo Brand, who has been in comedy for over 30 years, trailblazing the way with her edgy humour at a time when there were very few women in standup. She came to comedy from psychiatric nursing and a strict upbringing.
Listener and retired accountant Peter Barratt grew up hearing stories about his Great Grandmother who was a suffragette. 15 years ago he researched her story and has since completed 500 talks, including at Parliament and he now has one of the most complete collections of suffragette memorabilia in the UK still with descendants.
Brought up in a strict religious household Lohani Noor ran away from home aged 15 and ended up in care, which is where her drive and ability to smash stereotypes began - she was a professional bodybuilder, trained as a plumber and now she is a TV psychotherapist.
Matthew Walker is a renowned sleep scientist. Originally from Liverpool, his fascination with sleep has taken him from Nottingham University to Harvard and on to the University of California, Berkeley, where he is currently Professor of Neuroscience and Psychology and Director of the Centre for Human Sleep Science.
Tractor Fest is the largest outdoor Tractor Festival in the UK. This year it has a 1940s theme, with displays of vintage tractors from the era, including the Fordson N: ‘the tractor that won the war’ and was widely used by the RAF for plane towing, as well as by the Women’s Land Army. Kevin Watson, restorer of more than 20 vintage tractors joins us from there.
Singer Bryn Terfel chooses his Inheritance Tracks - Hen Wlad fy Nhadau by James James and Eli Jenkin's Prayer from Under Milk Wood by Dylan Thomas, music by AHD Troyte performed by Dunvant Male Voice Choir.


SAT 10:30 The Patch (m0005sxl)
Ferryside

Producer Polly Weston is sent to a random UK postcode in search of a story.

The series began with a random postcode generator, and a simple idea. In an age of echo chambers, maybe by going to a postcode completely at random, we'd find important stories which have been going unnoticed.

So far the generator has led her to the extent of illegal cigarette smoking in Lincolnshire, the north-south divide in Hertfordshire, disappearing crabs in Devon, and a mysterious story of land access in the Highlands of Scotland.

Now the wheel has been spun again. Over the next three weeks Chatham in Kent, Ferryside in South-West Wales, and a collection of villages outside Stoke-on-Trent all become her patch. In each episode she goes to a different postcode in search of a story - from why a ferry with wheels is causing a stir in Wales, to the startling situation which has led to a pharmacist in Medway becoming the "local hero".

This week - Ferryside, South West Wales.

Produced and presented by Polly Weston in Bristol.
Executive producer: Jolyon Jenkins.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m0005sxn)
Radio 4's assessment of developments at Westminster


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m0005sxq)
US-Mexico relations

Mexico takes a tougher approach to migrants as it comes under pressure from the United States. Will Grant returns to Chiapas in Southern Mexico, where he travelled with the migrant caravan last year, and finds it a very different place.
Sudan has been heavily criticised for the crackdown by its military on protestors in Khartoum, killing dozens of people. Fergal Keane, the BBC’s Africa Editor, looks at how far the country has changed over the years.
Kevin Connolly, the BBC’s Europe editor, looks back at Poland’s first big step towards democracy in the late 1980s and why it went largely unnoticed.
Amy Guttman meets the female chefs in Japan who are blazing a trail for Prime Minister Abe’s plans to get more women into the workplace.
Monkey puzzle trees are an endangered species in Chile, but Sarah Wheeler finds they still have special significance for the Mapuche people


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m0005sxs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m0005sxv)
Bridging the 'advice gap'

Millions of people need financial advice but don't get it according to a damning report out this week. It's called the 'advice gap' and includes people who need advice about investment or pensions but can't afford professional advice and people who need free advice on a variety of money matters but don't know where to get it. We discuss how to make financial advice more accessible to everyone.

Banks have until April next year to implement major changes on overdraft charges. The fees from overdrafts bring in nearly two and a half billion pounds a year and they are mainly paid by a small number of customers who are in debt or vulnerable. The Financial Conduct Authority say it will be the biggest shakeup of overdraft fees in a generation, others aren't so impressed.

Over 9000 students in higher education are estranged from their families, without the safety net of the bank of Mum or Dad if things go wrong. Estrangement charity Stand Alone has found that financial and other pressures mean they're three times more likely to drop out before their course finishes than other students.

The Scottish Government have launched a brand new benefit for low income families. We found out how it works.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Reporter: Dan Whitworth
Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Emma Rippon


SAT 12:30 Dead Ringers (m0005mk5)
Series 19

Episode 1

This series of Dead Ringers features Jon Culshaw, Jan Ravens, Lewis Macleod, Debra Stephenson and Duncan Wisbey,

The producer and creator is Bill Dare
A BBC Studios Production


SAT 12:57 Weather (m0005sxx)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News (m0005sxz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m0005mkd)
Joanna Cherry MP, Max Hastings, Lord Howard, Keir Starmer MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Heathfield School in Ascot, Berkshire, with the SNP's Joanna Cherry MP, Historian Max Hastings, former leader of the Conservative Party Lord Howard, and the Shadow Brexit Secretary Keir Starmer MP.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m0005sy1)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Drama (m0005sy3)
One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's classic tale, published in 1962 and the first book to give a true insight into life in a 1950s Soviet labour camp. It was specifically mentioned in the presentation speech when Solzhenitsyn was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Ivan Denisovich Shukhov has been sentenced to a camp in the Soviet gulag system. He was accused of becoming a spy after being captured briefly by the Germans as a prisoner of war during the Second World War.

He is innocent, but is sentenced to ten years in a forced labor camp. This is what happens during one day of his sentence.

Cast:
Ivan ..... John Hollingworth
Buinovsky ..... Nigel Cooke
Tsezar ..... Joseph Kloska
Alyosha ..... Joshua Akehurst
Tiurin ..... Nick Murchie
Pavlo ..... Pat Marlowe
Kolya ..... Christopher Buckley
Volkovoi ..... David John
Fetiukov ..... Sam Donnelly
The Narrator ..... Olivia Darnley

Music by Joseph Bedell-Brill

Based on the book by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
Adapted for Radio by Robin Brooks
Produced and Directed By Clive Brill

A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 15:30 Art of Living (m0005msv)
Breath is Life: Eileen Kramer

"You don't start a dance by letting breath out, you do it by taking breath in... it's coming to life."

Eileen Kramer first fell in love with a dance in 1939 - watching the members of Gertrud Bodenwieser's company waltz to the Blue Danube in Sydney in a whirl of feeling and expression. She tracked down the Austrian dance pioneer within days, auditioned, and later joined her group - one of the first modern dance companies in Australia.

"The new dance... wishes to embrace all the human feelings, not only harmony, lightness and charm but also passionate desire, immense fervour, lust, domination, fear and frustration, dissonance and uproar. The new dance does not content itself with being enchanting and entertaining only; it wishes to be stirring, exciting and thought-provoking" - Gertrud Bodenwieser.

In this documentary, we hear how Eileen has carried this expression of feeling into her second century. Still working as a dancer and choreographer at 104, Eileen returned to her hometown of Sydney in the hopes of hearing a kookaburra. Across the decades, she has lived and danced in America, India and Europe, learned the twist from Louis Armstrong, written books, made films, fallen in love and most recently entered a self-portrait into the Archibald Prize, one of Australia's biggest art competitions.

"You have all this in you and then somebody comes along and shows you how to express it in dance... it's a wonderful thing."

Photo credit: Sue Healey
Additional recordings by Catherine Freyne and Fiona Croall
Workshop recorded at the Dance and the Child International conference in Adelaide (2018)

Produced by Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m0005sy5)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Women's Football World Cup, the word Wife, Chelsea Pensioner Helen Andrews

We look ahead to the Women’s Football World Cup in France with former England, Chelsea and West Ham player Claire Rafferty, BBC Women’s Sports reporter Jo Currie and Gemma Clarke author of Soccer Women: the Icons, Rebels, Starts and Trailblazers Who Transformed the Beautiful Game.

The author Elif Shafak tells us about her latest novel 10 minutes 38 seconds In This Strange World.

The Violinist Nicola Bennedetti talks about her new album a collaboration with the jazz legend Wynton Marsalis.

The writer and journalist Francesca Segal tells us about her identical twin daughters born prematurely at 30 weeks and how her expectations of motherhood were shattered by their early arrival.

As part of coaching week talk to Louisa Arnold and Kim Johnson about Project 500, a scheme to inspire and support women to become sports coaches.

We hear about a new play Wife which explores the meaning of the word wife over 90 years with the director Indhu Rubasingham and Dr Rebecca Jennings lecturer in modern gender history at UCL.

As we mark D Day this week we hear from Chelsea Pensioner Helen Andrews one of thousands of women who volunteered for the British Army at Bletchley Park during the Second World War.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Eleanor Garland


SAT 17:00 PM (m0005sy7)
Saturday PM

Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (m0005mmn)
The Last Mile

The package brought to your door may have crossed the globe - but the most expensive and fiddly bit of the journey will undoubtedly be what's known as 'the last mile'. Delivery firms are constantly innovating how they do this - using electric vehicles and e cargo bikes, robots, or offering customers a click and collect option at a local store of their choice. Consumers take it for granted that they will get free delivery in many cases. But is the whole 'last mile' industry sustainable? Delivery vans add to traffic congestion and consumers are ordering more than they need and returning unwanted goods for free.

Evan Davis and guests discuss the latest trends in the logistical puzzle of 'the last mile.'

Guests

Jon Ormond Operations Director of Hubs and Depots at parcel carrier, Hermes.
Nick Hale, Managing Director of BT Ventures.
and Catherine Weetman, founder of Re-think solutions.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0005syb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m0005syd)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0005syg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m0005syj)
Dom Joly, The Divine Comedy, Giles Cooper, Jordan Rakei, Tilly Collins, Emma Freud, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Emma Freud are joined by Dom Joly, Neil Hannon, Giles Cooper and Tilly Collins for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from The Divine Comedy and Jordan Rakei.

Producer: Sukey Firth


SAT 19:00 Profile (m0005syl)
Sadiq Khan

This week Sadiq Khan was called a "stone cold loser" and mocked for his compact stature by the President of the United States. But London's mayor hit back. He described the President's behaviour as that of an 11 year old. Becky Milligan profiles the first Muslim to mayor of a European capital.

Producer: Ben Carter


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (m0005syn)
Gloria Bell, Wife at The Kiln Theatre, Frank Bowling, Brian Bilston, Wild Bill

Chilean director Sebastián Lelio's 2013 film Gloria has been remade for an English-speaking audience as Gloria Bell. Starring Julianne Moore it's extremely faithful to the original; what's new about it?
Wife is the latest play by Samuel Adamson which has just opened at The Kiln in London. Drawing on many influences including Ibsen's A Doll's House, it explores many decades of gay history
Guyana-born artist Frank Bowling OBE has lived in then UK since he was a teenager and been a painter almost as long. Now at the age of 85, Tate Britain is staging a retrospective exhibition of his abstract expressionist work. Comparisons are being drawn to Rothko, Pollock and Turner
Brian Bilston has been described as the Poet Laureate of Twitter. His new comic novel Diary of a Somebody follows his attempt to write a new poem everyday for a year
Wild Bill is ITV's comedy starring Rob Lowe as an American police chief constable who is transferred from Boston Massachusetts to Boston in Lincolnshire with hilarious consequences!

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Jenny McCartney, Dea Brikett and Ekow Eshun. The producer is Oliver Jones

Podcast Extra recommendations:

Dea: Delighted by the return of big top circuses
Ekow: Faith Ringold at Serpentine Gallery. Also Get Up Stand Up and Kaleidoscope at Somerset House
Jenny: Lowborn by Kerry Hudson
Tom: MIke Nelson at Tate Britain


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m0005y6l)
How to Win a Tory Leadership Election

What lessons should the current candidates to be Conservative leader learn from the contests of the past? The political journalist Michael Crick explores this question with the help of archive clips and interviews with leading figures involved. He recalls key moments from contests going back to Edward Heath's battle against Reginald Maudling in 1965, when the Conservative party first began to elect rather than appoint its leader. How should candidates approach and woo their colleagues - and the wider party? Can certain dark arts be useful? What tips can history offer on campaigning, presentation and media relations? What role can luck and timing play? How can a campaign become derailed? And does the favourite really never win?
Interviewees include Kenneth Baker, Iain Duncan Smith, Gabby Bertin, Andrew Mitchell, Iain Dale,
Producer: Leala Padmanabhan


SAT 21:00 Vanity Fair (m0005mg4)
Episode 2

Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray. Dramatised by Jim Poyser with additional material by Al Murray.
Thackeray's celebrated satire on class, sex and money in nineteenth century England given a new makeover in this pacey, anarchic adaptation. Becky has married Rawdon, but her plans to enrich them both have come to nought with their disinheritance by Aunty Crawley. But we are on the eve of Waterloo, how can she turn this to her advantage? Starring Al Murray as his ancestor William Makepeace Thackeray and Ellie White as Becky Sharp.

Thackeray (narrator)......Al Murray
Becky Sharp......................Ellie White
Amelia Sedley..................Helen O'Hara
Rawdon Crawley..............Blake Ritson
Jos Sedley..........................Thom Tuck
George Osborne..............Rupert Hill
Dobbin................................Graeme Hawley
Mrs Sedley.........................Emma Gregory
Mr Sedley..........................Jonathan Keeble
Mr Osborne....................Malcolm Raeburn
Pitt.......................................Lloyd Peters
Lady Bareacres................Fiona Clarke
Director/Producer Gary Brown.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (m0005sys)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:15 The Reith Lectures (m0005msd)
2019: Jonathan Sumption

3/5. Human Rights and Wrongs

Jonathan Sumption argues that judges - especially those of the European Court of Human Rights - have usurped power by expanding the interpretation of human rights law. Lord Sumption argues that concepts of human rights have a long history in the common law. But by contrast, the European Convention on Human Rights has become a dynamic treaty, taking on new interpretations and powers. Article 8 – the right to private and family life – is the most striking example. Should these decisions be made by judges or parliament? The lecture is recorded before an audience in the old Parliament House in Edinburgh.

The Reith Lectures are presented and chaired by Anita Anand and produced by Jim Frank.
Editor: Hugh Levinson


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (m0005mqw)
Heat 11, 2019

(11/17)
In the penultimate heat of the 2019 general knowledge tournament, another four contenders will be going all out to secure a place in the series semi-finals. What's the name of the Prime Minister of New Zealand? Which novel by Benjamin Disraeli shares a name with a character in Fawlty Towers? What did Karl Lagerfeld say a woman can never be under-dressed or over-dressed when wearing?

Today's contest is between
Malcolm Dent from Reading
Frankie Fanko from Market Harborough in Leicestershire
Richard Lawrence from Tormarton in Gloucestershire
Roger Look from Kenilworth in Warwickshire.

To provide some light relief for the contestants, a listener will also get the chance to win a prize by outwitting them with questions he or she has suggested.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets (m0005mg8)
Cumbria

A return of the series on dialect poetry in different parts of the UK. Poet and novelist Katie Hale explores the legacy of early dialect poets in her native county of Cumbria, to discover if dialect poetry is a way of expressing local identity.

Cumbria has a long history of dialect poetry, beginning with poets like Josiah Relph, Susanna Blamire and Robert Anderson, and continuing right up to the present day. Katie finds out more about some of these historic poets and their contemporary counterparts. She also speaks to Cedric Robinson - the Queen’s Guide to the Sands of Morecambe Bay - and to farmer and writer James Rebanks, trying to understand the connection between dialect, identity and the land itself. How does the place we live in shape who we are and how we choose to express ourselves?

In episodes two and three, the series takes a look at dialect poetry in the Isle of Man and Yorkshire.

A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4



SUNDAY 09 JUNE 2019

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m0005syv)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m0005mjs)
Magpie

"Compact, the listing read, well-situated. A rare and lovely find." An original short story for radio by Julia Armfield about open houses, onward chains and lingering presences.

Julia Armfield lives and works in London. She is a fiction writer and occasional playwright with a Master’s in Victorian Art and Literature from Royal Holloway University. Her work has been published in Lighthouse, Analog Magazine, Neon Magazine and Best British Short Stories 2019. She was commended in the Moth Short Story Prize 2017, long-listed for the Deborah Rogers Prize 2018 and was the winner of The White Review Short Story Prize 2018. Her debut collection, salt slow, was published by Picador in May 2019.

Read by Caroline Lennon
Produced by Mair Bosworth


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0005syx)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0005syz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0005sz1)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m0005sz3)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m0005sz5)
The Cathedral Church of St Andrew, Wells, in Somerset.

Bells on Sunday comes from The Cathedral Church of St Andrew, Wells, in Somerset. The South West tower contains a peal of ten bells from three different founders, Mears & Stainbank, Abel Rudhall and the ninth and tenor bells by John Taylor cast in 1877. With the tenor weighing just over fifty six hundredweight, they are the heaviest ringing peal of ten in the world. We hear them ringing Stedman Caters.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m0005syl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (m0005sz7)
The latest national and international news headlines.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b084th9n)
Restoration and Transformation

Academic Sarah Goldingay examines the process of restoration. She discovers that restoring a broken or damaged item can have a transformative and spiritual impact on us.

To make do and mend is becoming a thing of the past as we slip into a cycle of consuming and quickly discarding our possessions. But Sarah argues the act of giving a damaged piece of clothing or a broken knick-knack a new lease of life by mending it is hugely rewarding. An intriguing example is the work of highly skilled audio restorer Andrew Rose, who digitally removes layers of noise ruining old and battered classical music records, revealing the beautiful music that was previously smothered in a fog of hiss.

The process of restoration can go beyond just returning a damaged object to its original state. It can inspire imagination and ingenuity. A broken or damaged thing can be a catalyst for creativity. Sarah takes us to Paraguay where we meet an internationally acclaimed youth orchestra who play instruments made out of rubbish. We also hear excerpts from William Basinski’s stunning Disintegration Loops, a classic ambient album made from ruined recordings of old compositions that had begun to decay.

Sarah concludes that mending and restoring are both hugely therapeutic. By mending broken objects we can also often mend ourselves.

Presenter: Sarah Goldingay
Producer: Max O’Brien
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (m0005sz9)
A Beautiful Fish

Simon Scott is a passionate carp angler. He loves nothing more than sitting on the banks of a lake, waiting for the perfect fish to bite.

For more than a decade he's also been a fish farmer specialising in producing carp to stock angling lakes. He prides himself on breeding carp that grow fast and look beautiful. But what makes a 'beautiful' fish?

Verity Sharp joins Simon on his farm to meet the fish and see inside the hatchery, where the next generation of carp have only just hatched.

Producer: Heather Simons


SUN 06:57 Weather (m0005szc)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m0005szf)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m0005szh)
Gangland funerals, Jewish women's abuse helpline. Grenfell two years on

Two years after Grenfell we hear about the role that faith plays in the lives of those still fighting for justice and overcoming the trauma of the worst UK residential fire since the Second World War. We hear why the Archbishop of Dublin has called for an end to gangland-style funerals and why some fear his statement could put local priests at risk. And as a new helpline for Jewish women suffering sexual abuse is launched, we hear from the head of Jewish Women's Aid about the cultural and religious reasons why Jewish women take over 11 years to seek help.

Producers: Catherine Earlam
Helen Lee

Editor: Amanda Hancox


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m0005szk)
Crimestoppers

Baroness Helen Newlove makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity Crimestoppers.

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Crimestoppers’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘Crimestoppers’.

Registered Charity Number: 1108687 (England) and SCO37960 (Scotland)


SUN 07:57 Weather (m0005szm)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m0005szp)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m0005szr)
Thy Kingdom Come

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, preaches at a service for Pentecost. This Pentecost Sunday afternoon, Trafalgar Square in Central London is set to host a large gathering of Christians celebrating the most joy filled festival marking when the Holy Spirit came upon the disciples and they were sent out across the known world to preach a gospel of repentance, faith and hope. The event will be the climax of this year’s 'Thy kingdom come' global prayer movement which invites Christians around the world to pray for the growth of the Church as more people come to faith in Jesus Christ.

Today’s service looks forward to the celebration and is led by the Bishop of London, Sarah Mullally, with contributions from leaders of other Christian denominations including Cardinal Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster, Archbishop Angaelos, General Bishop in the UK of the Coptic Orthodox Church and Michaela Youngson, President of the Methodist Conference. Christian singer-songwriter Matt Redman explores the power of the Holy Spirit through music.

In the ten days between Ascension Day and Pentecost Sunday, hundreds of thousands of Christians have united by pledging to pray in the most ambitious evangelism project in a generation. What started in 2016 as an invitation from the Archbishops of Canterbury and York to the Church of England has grown into an international and ecumenical call to prayer, involving over 65 denominations, in 114 countries around the world.

Producer: Andrew Earis


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m0005mkg)
Simply a Writer

"If you're a writer of colour", writes Monica Ali, "you're only supposed to write about what people imagine to be your self".

"That self might be labelled as Asian writer, or Bangladeshi writer or BAME writer, but it is never labelled simply 'writer' - that would be the true privilege".

Producer: Adele Armstrong


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0sqd)
Greater Roadrunner

Michael Palin presents the greater roadrunner of south western North America. A cuckoo that can run at 20 miles per hour and snap up venomous reptiles might not seem destined for cartoon fame, but that's exactly what happened to the Greater Roadrunner.

The loud "beep-beep" call of the Warner Brothers cartoon creation, always out-foxing his arch-enemy Wile-E. Coyote brought this very odd member of the cuckoo family racing into the living rooms of the western world from 1949 onwards . Greater roadrunners live in dry sunny places in the south western states of North America, where their long-tailed, bushy--crested, streaky forms are a common sight. They will eat almost anything from scorpions to rats, outrunning small rodents and lizards and even leaping into the air to catch flying insects.

As it runs across the desert, the roadrunner's footprints show two toes pointing forward and two backwards. The "X" shape this forms was considered a sacred symbol by Pueblo tribes and believed to confound evil spirits because it gives no clues as to which way the bird went.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m0005szt)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m0005szw)
Writer ….. Caroline Harrington
Director ….. Kim Greengrass
Editor ….. Jeremy Howe

Jill Archer ….. Patricia Greene
David Archer ….. Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ….. Felicity Finch
Josh Archer ….. Angus Imrie
Kenton Archer ….. Richard Attlee
Helen Archer ….. Louiza Patikas
Natasha Archer ….. Mali Harries
Harrison Burns ….. James Cartwright
Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Ian Craig ….. Stephen Kennedy
Bert Fry ….. Eric Allan
Clarrie Grundy ….. Heather Bell
Will Grundy ….. Philip Molloy
Emma Grundy ….. Emerald O'Hanrahan
Ed Grundy ….. Barry Farrimond
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Jim Lloyd ….. John Rowe
Adam Macy ….. Andrew Wincott
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Kate Madikane ….. Perdita Avery
Elizabeth Pargetter ….. Alison Dowling
Robert Snell ….. Graham Blockey
Lynda Snell ….. Carole Boyd
Tim Oatey ….. Carl Prekopp
Fiona ..... Adjoa Andoh


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (m0005szy)
Professor Monica McWilliams, social scientist

Professor Monica McWilliams is an academic, peace campaigner and former politician.

In 1996, she was the co-founder of the Northern Ireland Women’s Coalition political party and was elected to a seat at the Multi-Party Peace Negotiations, which led to the Belfast (Good Friday) Peace Agreement in 1998.

She served as a member of the Northern Ireland Legislative Assembly from 1998-2003 and was the Chief Commissioner of the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission from 2005-2011.

She continues her academic research into domestic violence and is Emeritus Professor in the Transitional Justice Institute at Ulster University. She also specialises in conflict resolution and working with women who are in conflict situations. Alongside her academic work and peace work she currently sits on the Independent Reporting Commission for Northern Ireland.

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Sarah Taylor


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m0005t00)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (m0005mr8)
Series 84

Episode 4

Gyles Brandreth, Kerry Godliman, Jenny Eclair and Paul Merton join Nicholas Parsons for the panel game where the challenge is to speak without repetition, hesitation or deviation.

A BBC Studios Production.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m0005t02)
Ten Good Things

With days to go before we learn who the winners are of the 2019 BBC Food & Farming Awards Dan Saladino looks at the remaining food and drink ideas on this year's shortlist.

Drinks writer Alice Lascelles guides us through the drinks makers; an experimental brewer from Leeds, a distiller based on the east coast of Scotland and a cider and perry producer from Herefordshire.

Genevieve Taylor describes the street food offer this year, including a pie shop team who bake in the shadow of Liverpool FC's Anfield Stadium and a fish and chip shop in Nottingham run by a former chef.

Barney Desmazery explains the finalists in the inaugural Pat Llewellyn Award set up to recognise young talent in the food world, including two young doctors working to increase the amount of nutrition training in their profession and a young entrepreneur who has devised an ingenious solution to food waste in restaurants.

Presented by Dan Saladino.


SUN 12:57 Weather (m0005t04)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m0005t06)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 Ian Sansom Is Waiting (m00047tf)
We're always waiting for something. Sometimes, it feels like it might never arrive. But what if the secret to getting what you want lies in the space between things, rather than in the destination itself?

Through terminal spaces, waiting rooms and traffic jams, Ian Sansom offers a delayed deliberation on those moments when someone or something makes us... wait.

As Ian puts us on hold, forms an orderly queue and sits down to watch a slow film in the company of filmmaker Spencer Slovic, he experiences a sense of delayed gratification with philosopher Professor Harold Schweizer, tunes up in the orchestra pit with percussionist Sam Staunton, and endures the protracted delay in getting published with Northern Irish author Wendy Erskine.

Maybe if he's able hang around long enough, Ian might just arrive at his conclusion.

Producer: Steven Rainey


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0005mjq)
Huntingdonshire

Kathy Clugston and the gardening experts are in Huntingdonshire. Christine Walkden, Anne Swithenbank and Bob Flowerdew are on hand to answer questions from green-fingered enthusiasts.

This week the panel discuss the fundamentals to feeding plants, how to make a level garden, and give recommendations on replacing Escallonia hedges.

They also discuss their favourite trees, which unusual seed they have germinated, and how to produce the best fruit on a Gooseberry tree.

Matt Biggs visits Osterley Park in West London. He chats to Head Gardener Andy Eddy where there is a 250 year old Cork Tree which is one of the 'Great Trees of London'.

Produced by: Laurence Bassett
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

A Somethin’ Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (m0005t08)
Capturing the nation in conversation, in partnership with the British Library.


SUN 15:00 Vanity Fair (m0005t0b)
Episode 3

Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray. Dramatised by Jim Poyser with additional material by Al Murray.
Thackeray's celebrated satire on money, class and sex in nineteenth century England given a new makeover in this pacey, anarchic adaptation. George Osborne is dead, leaving Amelia bereft. She is unaware of his betrayal with Becky Sharp. Starring Ellie White as Becky, Helen O'Hara as Amelia and Al Murray playing his ancestor William Makepeace Thackeray.

Thackeray (narrator)...................Al Murray
Becky Sharp......................Ellie White
Amelia Sedley..................Helen O'Hara
Rawdon Crawley..............Blake Ritson
Jos Sedley..........................Thom Tuck
George Osborne..............Rupert Hill
Dobbin................................Graeme Hawley
Mrs Bute.........................Emma Gregory
Mr Sedley..........................Jonathan Keeble
Mr Osborne....................Malcolm Raeburn
Pitt.......................................Lloyd Peters
Miss Briggs......................Fiona Clarke
Director/Producer Gary Brown.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m0005t0d)
Pajtim Statovci, Gerald Murnane discussed, Roxane Gay's favourite book, Benjamin Dreyer

Gerald Murnane has been called 'the best English language writer you've never heard of'. Publisher and critic Geordie Williamson and writer Chris Power discuss the appeal of this reclusive Australian literary giant.

Roxane Gay explains why the short story collection Break Any Woman Down, by Dana Johnson, is the book she would never lend.

Finnish-Kosovan novelist Pajtim Statovci had international success with his debut My Cat Yugoslavia. He explains why in his second novel Crossing he wanted to deal with the shame that many migrants feel towards their homeland.

And Benjamin Dreyer, Chief Copy Editor at Random House US, discusses his new book Dreyer's English - An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style.


SUN 16:30 Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets (m0005t0g)
Episode 2 - Isle of Man

Actor and writer Catherine Harvey returns to her family roots in the Isle of Man to explore the voices of Manx dialect and language speakers, whose words are influenced by the Celts and Norsemen.

Catherine concentrating her search in two areas - the north of the island where her family are from and the west, an area associated with the speaking of Manx Gaelic. She looks at the work of T E Brown, who is still thought of as the island’s national poet, and the writers who were part of the Manx Cultural Revival.

In St Johns, she meets Dr Breesha Maddrell, Director of Culture Vannin, to discuss the influence of Manx Gaelic on the dialect of the island, before travelling north to talk to cultural activist, Bob Carswell, and members of The Michael Players – the only organisation in the world regularly performing plays in Manx dialect.

Meanwhile, Catherine asks the current Manx Bard, Annie Kissack, if the dialect and language spoken on the island today has changed – and whether one of them has ultimately triumphed

Other episodes in this series look at dialect poetry in Cumbria and Yorkshire.

A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m0005mvn)
On Whose Authority?

The law says decisions about care for people who can not decide for themselves should be done collaboratively with the person’s best interests always at heart. So why do family members, feeling ignored and even intimidated, often find themselves in open conflict with councils and care providers?

Campaigners say poor training, lack of understanding of the law and shrinking budgets mean too often the legitimate concerns about care for people with learning disabilities, autism or mental health problems are being ignored. Claire Bolderson investigates.

Producer: Rob Cave
Editor: Gail Champion

Photo credit: Katarzyna Bialasiewicz


SUN 17:40 Profile (m0005syl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0005t0j)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m0005t0l)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0005t0n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m0005t0q)
Farrah Jarral

The best of BBC Radio this week with Farrah Jarral


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m0005t0s)
Lynda makes her mark at Open Farm Sunday and Alice finds herself on the spot


SUN 19:15 A Trespasser's Guide to the Classics (b08h0c9k)
Series 2

The Neck

By John Nicholson and Richard Katz

In 19th-century Whitby, a magician prepares to compete with Harry Houdini at a major international Magic Convention. When a ship carrying a cargo of fifty coffins runs aground on the town's beach, he suspects Houdini of pulling a huge publicity stunt.

In this second series, the comedy troupe Peepolykus assume the roles of minor characters in great works of fiction and derail the plot of the book through their hapless buffoonery.

Director . . . . . Sasha Yevtushenko

Peepolykus (pronounced people-like-us) has exported its brand of irreverent comic theatre to over 100 towns and cities across four continents, often under the auspices of the British Council. The company's varied CV includes two tours of Bangladesh, winning the audience award at The Tehran Festival, performing to royalty in Brunei, to Indian states people in the Himalayas, a truly disastrous run in Barbados, an unforgettable stint on The Price is Right in Australia and other occasional bits of telly for the BBC. Their theatre scripts are licensed world wide and their award-winning musical with NYMT:UK is pencilled for re-launch. The company has also played for 3 months in the West End and collaborated with numerous organisations including Neal Street Productions, Aardman, NT, The Kevin Spacey Foundation and currently with Brunel University on STUCK - working with schools to adopt improvisation into the curriculum. Past forays on Radio 4 have included a co-penned series with Rik Mayall, a star-studded adaptation of A Christmas Carol and a live recording of The Hound of The Baskervilles. Peepolykus is produced by Eleanor Lloyd Productions.


SUN 19:45 Strictly Stories (m0005t0v)
Paso Doble

Maksym, the Ukrainian ballroom teacher at the Pink Lemon Dance Studio, is hoping to win the championships at Blackpool with his Paso Doble routine. Last year his chances were ruined when boyfriend Joe's phone started ringing in the middle of the Flamenco taps and he got distracted. This time he's taking no chances.

Written by Bethan Roberts and read by Andrew Byron.

Produced and Directed by Kate McAll
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:00 More or Less (m0005mjx)
Are married women flipping miserable?

Are married women flipping miserable?

Professor Paul Dolan told an audience at the Hay Festival that when married women are asked if they are happy – if their husbands were out of the room – they admitted to being miserable. Unfortunately, this was due to a misunderstanding of the American Time Use Survey which had a category called ‘Spouse Absent’. It turns out this does not mean that a husband has left the room while a wife is being surveyed, it means that the husband is living away from home at the moment – perhaps serving abroad with the military. So what can we say about the happiness of people who are married, single, with or without children?

Arguing over university access in Scotland

Jo Swinson, the Liberal Democrat MP, was accused of using inaccurate statistics in a recent edition of BBC Question Time. She compared the numbers of people going to university in an area in Glasgow with an area in her own constituency, to raise a point about inequalities in Scottish education. Many people were cross about this especially those in the SNP, such as First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon and Deputy First Minister John Swinney. Education researcher Lucy Hunter Blackburn joins us to look at what she described as the strangest political argument she's seen over the years.

Do One in Two people get cancer?

Channel 4’s The Great British Bake Off recently ran a celebrity series raising money for charity. It ran with the statistics that one in two people will get cancer in their lifetime. Many listeners were surprised by this high number. We find out why this is.

The Hidden Half

Broadcaster Michael Blastland has written a book called ‘The Hidden Half’ about the things we fail to see when measuring things. Tim Harford sits down with him to talk about counting sheep and economic productivity.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m0005mjv)
Edward Seaga, Binyavanga Wainaina, Mary Stopes-Roe, Gloria Schiff, Dr John

Pictured: Edward Seaga

Julian Worricker on:

The Jamaican politician, Edward Seaga, who led his country as prime minister throughout the 1980s

Binyavanga Wainaina, one of Kenya's most prominent writers and LGBTQ activists

The Vogue fashion editor and Manhattan socialite, Gloria Schiff

Archivist, Mary Stopes-Roe, daughter of the bouncing bomb developer Barnes Wallis

And the Grammy Award-winning, New Orleans born singer, Dr John.

Interviewed guest: David Katz
Interviewed guest: Ellah Wakatama Allfrey
Interviewed guest: Jenny Guinness

Producer: Neil George

Archive clips from: International Profile, Radio 4 20/11/1987; The World Tonight, Radio 4 17/12/1976; BBC Sound Archive, Jamaican Labour Party Victory 03/11/1980; One Day I Will Write About This Place by Binyavanga Wainaina, read by Freddy Macha, Radio 4 07/11/2011; HardTalk, BBC World Service 21/02/2014; Regional Extra, Radio 4 16/04/1968; Interview with Mary Stopes-Roe, University of Huddersfield Research 19/07/2013; The First Time With Dr John, 6 Music 22/01/2018.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m0005sxv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m0005szk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (m0005mrj)
Maintenance

Maintenance is an unfashionable word. But as Chris Bowlby discovers, keeping our infrastructure in good condition is one of the most crucial and creative challenges we face. Key assets such as concrete bridges built in the early post-war decades are crumbling, and may be what one expert calls 'ticking time bombs'. And all kinds of systems, even in the digital world, still need maintaining well. But all the focus for politicians and many engineers is on brand new infrastructure, not sustaining the vital assets we already have. So how can we learn to value maintenance in a radical new way?

Producer: Chris Bowlby
Editor: Jasper Corbett


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m0005t0y)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (m0005mm8)
Asif Kapadia on Diego Maradona

With Antonia Quirke

Asif Kapadia, the director of Amy and Senna, discusses his latest documentary, Diego Maradona, and reveals why he's never wanted to touch anyone more than he wanted to touch the footballer's legendary left foot.

Sir Christopher Frayling talks us through the soundtrack of Once Upon In The West and how Ennio Morricone was influenced by a symphony of metal ladders.

In the latest edition of Pitch Battle, Gavia Baker-Whitelaw pitches a novel called Swordspoint to a panel of movie insiders, Lizzie Francke, Rowan Woods and Clare Binns. They decide whether Ellen Kushner's book is a suitable case for the movie treatment.


SUN 23:30 The Song Hunters (m0004cpm)
Suppression and Survival

Singer and song collector Sam Lee travels to Tbilisi to explore the ancient polyphonic folk songs and sacred chants of Georgia. He discovers a nation where singing is in the blood.

With some of Georgia's finest singers and musicologists as his guides, Sam is introduced to the ritualistic folk songs that are said to the control the weather and even cure the sick. He is invited to a feast, high on a mountainside above Tbilisi, where he meets the Chamgelianis - a singing family from the remote region of Svaneti who are keeping the tradition of age-old pre-Christian folk songs alive.

At the beautiful Kashveti Church in the heart of Tbilisi, Sam meets singer and ethno-musicologist John Graham who introduces him to the liturgical chanting tradition. These orthodox Christian chants feature sacrosanct melodies that are said to have been passed down by God and transmitted orally over the centuries.

Bordered by powerful neighbours including Russia and Turkey, Georgia has been attacked and invaded persistently over the centuries, its traditional songs suppressed. Sam learns that, under Soviet rule, sacred chanting was banned in Georgia and chanters threatened with exile and even death. Practitioners were forced to go underground from the early 1920s.

The tradition might have died out entirely were it not for the efforts of a single monk who buried manuscripts containing the forbidden sacred songs in order to keep them safe. Many years later, following the end of the Soviet stranglehold, the buried manuscripts were rediscovered and became the backbone of a chant revival that has seen Georgian singing spread around the world.

Presenter: Sam Lee
Producer: Max O'Brien
A TBI production for BBC Radio 4



MONDAY 10 JUNE 2019

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m0005t10)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b07gg1kb)
A special programme on Pierre Bourdieu

A special programme on Pierre Bourdieu: Laurie Taylor explores the ideas and legacy of the French sociologist, best known for establishing the concepts of cultural, social, and symbolic forms of capital (as opposed to traditional economic forms of capital). His book 'Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgment of Taste' was judged the sixth most important sociological work of the twentieth century by the International Sociological Association. His work is credited with enhancing the understanding of the ways in which the social order and power are transferred across generations. Laurie is joined by Diane Reay, Professor of Education at Cambridge University, Derron Wallace, Post Doctoral Fellow at Brandeis University and Kirsty Morrin, Phd Student at the University of Manchester and co-convenor for the Bourdieu Study Group. Revised repeat

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m0005sz5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0005t12)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0005t14)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0005t16)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m0005t18)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0005t1b)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the director of a Christian arts charity, Fiona Stewart


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m0005t1d)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


MON 05:56 Weather (m0005t1g)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0sry)
Snail Kite

Michael Palin presents the snail kite from the Florida Everglades. Unlike many birds of prey which are known for their speed and agility, the snail kite hunts at a leisurely pace, one which matches its prey; and here in Florida's swamps, it is on the lookout for the apple snail.

To pick them out of floating vegetation the kite has evolved long needle-like claws, and its slender, viciously - hooked bill is perfect for snipping the snails' muscles and winkling them out of their shells. Snail kites are common across wetlands in South and Central America, but rare in Florida where there are around one thousand birds. Drainage of these marshes has made them scarce, but popular with bird watchers.

It's easy to see why, because snail kites are striking birds with their orange feet and black and red bill. The males are ash-grey apart from a white band at the base of their tails. Females and young birds are browner and more mottled. In times of drought, they will eat turtles, crabs or rodents, but these avian gourmets always return to their favourite dish of, escargots.


MON 06:00 Today (m0005t1j)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m0005t1l)
Beyond the headlines

Diego Maradona was a footballer of unrivalled talent, but off the pitch his story is one of despair and betrayal. Chris King, the editor of a feature documentary on the player, tells Kirsty Wark that the film reveals the life of this flawed icon through his own words and personal archive.

Hussein Kesvani also aims to tell a story that goes beyond the usual headlines, exploring the unexpected online worlds of British Muslims. He reveals a new generation of young media-savvy Muslims creating their own diverse cultural identities online.

More secrets are unveiled in Shahidha Bari’s book, Dressed, which looks at the hidden power of clothes in our culture and daily lives. She explores the link between what we wear and who we are.

The latest exhibition at the British Museum offers visitors the chance to enter a graphic world where art and storytelling collide in its display of Japanese manga. The curator Nicole Rousmaniere argues that manga has long been a way to tell the stories of those whose history is not recorded.

Producer: Katy Hickman


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (m0005t1n)
The Moon

Episode 1

An intimate and profound portrait of the Moon.
Ranging across science, art and mythology, writer Oliver Morton explores the different spaces that Earth’s closest neighbour occupies in our lives and lays out the history and future of our relationship with the Moon.

Reader Robin Laing
Abridger Anna Magnusson
Producer Eilidh McCreadie


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0005t1r)
Arundhati Roy, Returning to work, Treatment after smears

Arundhati Roy won the Booker Prize for Fiction in 1997 with The God of Small Things. It was followed up twenty years later with Ministry of Utmost Happiness. Now she has just published My Seditious Heart, a collection of political essays written in the two decades between those novels. She had a lot of praise for the essays but also a lot of criticism for challenging subjects like the acquisition of land, environmental degradation, government elites and the impact on the poorest and most marginalised people in India.

How easy has it been for you to get back into work after a long time away? Did you apply for hundreds of jobs before getting one? Were you able to return to what you wanted to do? We hear from two women who struggled. They are Tontschy Gerig and Emma Land.

A cervical cancer charity says we don’t always know that treatments for abnormal smear tests can have side effects. Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust says some women experience bleeding, pain and even lose interest in sex after going for follow up procedures. They conducted a small survey and found that 1 in 5 women said that no one discussed side effects with them.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (m0005t1t)
A Woman on the Edge of Time

Episode 1: The Fault Line

In 1965, Hannah Gavron – a 29 year old, bright, sophisticated sociologist – gassed herself in a flat in Primrose Hill, north London. She left behind a suicide note, two small children, and an about-to-be-published manuscript: The Captive Wife. Four decades later, her son Jeremy tries to piece together the events that led to her death. Jeremy Gavron's book is dramatized by Sarah Daniels and stars Dominic Mafham, Helen Clapp and James Bolam.

Directed by Emma Harding

Jeremy Gavron.....Dominic Mafham
Judy Gavron.....Helen Clapp
Young Leah.....Amy-Jayne Leigh
Young Mima.....Megan Webb
Bob.....Sean Baker
Simon.....Christopher Harper
Nurse.....Debbie Korley
Hannah.....Sarah Ovens
Aunt Susie.....Susan Jameson
Tasha.....Elaine Claxton
Shirley.....Catherine Cusack
Susan.....Georgie Glen
Tom.....James Bolam
Friend.....David Hounslow


MON 11:00 The Untold (m0005t1x)
Followed by Thousands

Katie is 17 and a rising star of social media, followed by thousands. She's also a grade A student but is not sure she can do both. Will this mean dropping out of A-levels in Year 12? Grace Dent presents.

Producer: JP Devlin


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m0005syj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m0005t20)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 How to Find Home (m0005t22)
Episode 1

Molly’s lived on the streets of Nottingham since she was a teenager. Drawn to an intense young man at a party, she agrees to travel across Britain with him. While he’s in search of buried treasure she has her own reasons for getting out of town for a while - but along the way she’ll discover that it’s not always possible to run from your past.

Read by Anjli Mohindra
Written by Mahsuda Snaith
Abridged by Siân Preece


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m0005t25)
Marathon mortgages, Dementia care, Energy comparison sites

Mortgages that last beyond the traditional 25 years are becoming more usual and some loans now stretch to 30, 35 and even 40 years. The Building Society Association says 47 percent of their mortgages are now for more than 25 years, that's up from 19 percent in 2008. Paying back over a longer term means homeowners pay more interest but it does bring monthly payments down. Is it worth it? Our reporter, Jess Quayle, talks to homeowners about the types of mortgages they've taken out. We also hear from Paul Broadhead, the Head of Mortgages and Housing at the Building Society Association.

Our reporter, Samantha Fenwick, investigates ways to improve the quality of life for people living with dementia. She visits Salford University which is leading research into this. There are 850,000 people in the UK living with dementia right now. This will increase to over 1 million by 2025 and over 2 million by 2051.

We ask how much duty of care comparison sites should have when switching customers to smaller energy companies that may be at risk of going bust. Eleven energy firms have gone out of business in the last 18 months. You and Yours has had a record number of complaints from people chasing money owed, sometimes hundreds of pounds, after their supplier goes bust. Many customers are avid switchers, following Government and industry advice to shop around, and use comparison sites to find the best deals on the market which are often with smaller suppliers. We speak to Kirsty Good from Money Saving Expert about what checks these sites should be doing before switching people to suppliers that might go under.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Tara Holmes


MON 12:57 Weather (m0005t27)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m0005t29)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


MON 13:45 Living Memory (m0005t2c)
Like Children Fighting Over Toys

There's an estimated 15,000 people in Britain who have reached the age of 100 and received the famous telegram from the Queen. That's 0.02% of the overall population.

Over five programmes, we hear from some of them about the lives they've led, their experiences in the last 100 years, the lessons they've learned and how they view the future.

Bob Weighton is a supercentenarian. He's aged 111 and England's oldest man. In this episode, Bob, with remarkable eloquence and generosity, reflects on a full life spent in different parts of the globe; he looks around him at the world he now inhabits and considers what lies ahead for himself and the rest of us.

A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


MON 14:00 The Archers (m0005t0s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (m0005t2g)
Torn

Torn by Eve Steele
Sasha has done some bad things in the past. She has lost her marriage and her relationship with her child. She is now clean and wants to make amends. Can she rebuild her relationship with her daughter?

Sasha.......................Eve Steele
Marvin...................Simon Trinder
Nicole....................Sade Malone
Del.........................Will Ash
Tony....................Jim English

Director/Producer Gary Brown


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (m0005t2k)
Heat 12, 2019

(12/17)
With just one automatic place remaining in the semi-finals, four contenders from the North of England line up at the BBC's Salford headquarters for the last of the 2019 heats. For what sort of buildings did the architect Frank Matcham become famous? Which unit of measurement derives its name from the Latin for 'a thousand paces'? Which political group did Trotsky say belonged on the 'dust heap of history'? Russell Davies has all the questions, and all the answers - but how will the contestants get on?

Today's contest features:
Pamela Culley from Preston
Andrew Fisher from Sheffield
Matt Goodstadt from Eccles
Gary Grant from Lytham St Anne's.

There's also a chance for a Brain of Britain listener to Beat the Brains, and win a prize, by outwitting them with his or her own ingenious questions.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m0005t02)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 New Weird Britain (m0005t2r)
Post-Industrial Towns

Music journalist John Doran travels across the country in search of an underground movement of musicians, blossoming in the margins of Britain.

Artists of all stripes have been driven out of the city centres by soaring rent prices and hit hard by the dwindling revenues of the digital economy. But, untethered from the prospect of making any money and fuelled by the current political turmoil, a new wave of musicians is splintering away from convention to stage bizarre one-off performances that fly in the face of austerity.

They are living off-grid in the countryside, building their own instruments out of electronic junk, staging strange rituals with priests smeared in clay or even performing with a team of dancers dressed as anatomically correct vaginas which squirt cream over the audience.

Rather than moving to the capital to seek out the crumbling infrastructure of the music industry, they are self-releasing straight to the internet, teaching themselves how to edit via YouTube or avoiding recording entirely to put on unrepeatable live shows.

In this episode, John Doran heads to the East Midlands and Northern England where a musical underground is flourishing in the back rooms of Newcastle, the bedrooms of Nottingham and the phone boxes of Todmorden.

Contributors include Sophie Cooper, Nwando Ebizie, AJA, Richard Dawson and Urocerus Gigas from Guttersnipe.

Produced by Alannah Chance
A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4

Image credit: Laura Kate Bemrose


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (m0005t2w)
The Analogue Human

To celebrate the 100th episode of The Digital Human Aleks Krotoski explores how digital and analogue technologies make us think differently.

And she'll do it by going 'old school' putting down the keyboard and mouse in favour of audio tape and razor blades. But this programme isn't about nostalgia, she'll be investigating the psychological experiences of using these different technologies.

With the help of artists, musicians and photographers she asks if the endless possibilities we're offered by digital tools are as liberating as we think or paradoxically are they paralysing, making it impossible to choose one product, picture, tindr date over another?

Are we more creative, and decisive when we're forced to be by constraints; as we used to be when camera's shot film with a limited number of shots and tippex was the only way to erase something we'd written?

And are we too readily allowing our digital technologies to decide what's important. Whether in music or on the phone our digital devices strip out the 'noise'. Whether that's the background of where we're making a call, or the sound of fingertips on an instrument. When we lose some of that context what else are we sacrificing? Aleks will aim to find the right balance between the two domains, to make the most of each.

Throughout the programme we'll also offer a glimpse behind the scenes of making a programme where the final assembly uses pre-digital techniques; and the scavenger hunt it required to find the long decommissioned tape machines and the people who remember how to operate them.

Producer: Peter McManus


MON 17:00 PM (m0005t30)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0005t34)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (m0005t37)
Series 84

Episode 5

Gyles Brandreth, Graham Norton, Lucy Porter and Paul Merton join Nicholas Parsons for the panel game where the challenge is to speak without repetition, hesitation or deviation.

A BBC Studios Production.


MON 19:00 The Archers (m0005t3d)
A mysterious invitation is issued and Alistair fears he's done the wrong thing.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m0005t3j)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0005t1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 My Name Is... (m0005t3h)
Sammy - I'm leaving the NHS

As far back as she can remember, Dr Samantha Batt-Rawden dreamed of being a doctor at the sharp end of medicine. For several years, she has worked on the frontline of the NHS as a registrar in A&E and intensive care, and is two years away from qualifying as a consultant.

But the rising pressure on services has left her worrying that she can “no longer keep her patients safe”. She says, “I used to love my job and now I’m dreading what I’m going to find when I walk in there.”

In a few months, she will leave the NHS to begin a new career with the Air Ambulance, enticed by the promise of saving lives within a well-resourced emergency service. Sammy isn’t alone. Last year, a poll by the General Medical Council found that over half of NHS doctors were considering leaving the NHS or slashing their hours.

Before she leaves, Sammy is determined to find out how things could be improved for her NHS colleagues.

Producer: Dan Hardoon
Reporter: Sara Parker
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


MON 20:30 Analysis (m0005t3n)
The Real Gender Pay Gap

Women are paid less than men and do more unpaid work. The gender pay gap doubles after women become mothers. Female-dominated professions tend to be lower-paid than male-dominated ones. What's going on and can we fix it?

Reporter: Mary Ann Seighart
Producer: Arlene Gregorius
Editor: Jasper Corbett


MON 21:00 An Alternative History of Mothering (m0003sz2)
Another year, another Mother's Day, and the usual celebration of the special love mothers have for their children. The overall message is that maternal love is powerful and instinctive, rooted in our biology, rather than our culture.

Historian Emma Griffin turns to history to debunk what she calls the Motherhood Myth. She explores how, despite constant efforts since the 18th century to insist that maternal love is as natural as sunshine, the reality is much more complex. Ideas about motherhood have changed over the past five hundred years, and so too have the actual emotions themselves.

Emma meets Jane Whittle, an Early Modernist from Exeter University, who studies a time in our culture when motherhood was not sentimentalised - both parents were expected to care for children in an extended family household and many were sent out to wet nurses until they were two or three years old. At this time, Britons had little sense of motherhood involving a particularly intense form of love and devotion.

At Audley End House, in the beautifully appointed Victorian nursery, Emma explores the emergence of new ideas about mothering and raising children, with commentary from historians Joanne Begiato and Jennie Batchelor.

She then visits the Southwell Workhouse in Nottinghamshire with Kate Gibson to explore how, while middle-class mothers were being increasingly idealised, mothers at the other end of the social scale were being separated from their children and judged to be ‘bad’ through their inability to provide appropriate care for them.

Rising living standards in the 20th century vastly improved child welfare and allowed society to create a narrative in which ‘bad’ mothers were an aberration - exceptions to the rule of selfless and devoted mothering. Emma speaks to leading child psychologist Laverne Antrobus at the Tavistock Centre in London to understand how attachment theory informs the way we approach the psychology of maternal relationships today, and how we might re-think our traditional view that mothers should be the principal providers of children’s emotional welfare.

Singing by Vivien Ellis
Readings by Will Huggins
Produced by Melissa FItzGerald

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m0005t1l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m0005t3v)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 How to Find Home (m0005t22)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 The Art of Now (m0005t3z)
Art Surgery: Anxiety

Can the arts help solve today’s burning issues? Perhaps not entirely, but there’s no harm in trying.

As the UK’s “anxiety economy” continues to grow and we spend more money on supposed stress-relieving services and products – from meditation apps and scented candles to comfort blankets and aromatherapy pendants – Art Surgery asks if we can find the answers we’re looking for within the arts.

Music journalist Elizabeth Alker and writer Nikesh Shukla hear from musicians, poets, illustrators and visual artists in a bid to combat personal and societal anxiety.

Artists featured include Erland Cooper, Ellis O’Connor, Nikita Gill, Luke Sital-Singh and Laura Callaghan.

Presenters: Elizabeth Alker and Nikesh Shukla
Producer: Maddie Hickish

A Wisebuddah production for BBC Radio 4


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0005t42)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



TUESDAY 11 JUNE 2019

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m0005t44)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (m0005t1n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0005t48)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0005t4c)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0005t4h)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m0005t4m)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0005t4r)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the director of a Christian arts charity, Fiona Stewart


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m0005t4w)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0t02)
Oilbird

Michael Palin presents the oilbird, from a Venezuelan cavern. Demonic screeching's and the rush of unseen wings mixed with a volley of strange clicks are the sound backdrop to oilbirds.

Oilbirds are known in Spanish as guacharos .."the wailing ones". These bizarre-looking brown birds with huge mouths, long broad wings and long tails were seen in 1799 by the explorer Alexander von Humboldt in 1817 who described their sounds as "ear-splitting". They're similar to nightjars, their closest relatives, but unlike them, oilbirds feed on fruit; ..... they're the world's only nocturnal flying fruit-eating bird.

In their dark breeding caves, they navigate using echolocation like bats. Young oilbirds grow fat on a diet of fruit brought in by their parents and can weigh half as much as again as the adults. These plump chicks were once harvested by local people and settlers for oil which was used in cooking and, ironically for a bird which spends its life in darkness, for lighting lamps.


TUE 06:00 Today (m0005t81)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Reith Lectures (m0005t85)
2019: Jonathan Sumption

4/5. Rights and the Ideal Constitution

Jonathan Sumption assesses the US and UK’s constitutional models. He describes Britain's unwritten constitution as a political institution. The US Constitution is by contrast essentially a legal document. This has led Americans to address what should be political questions – such as the right to abortion – via the courts, rather than through politics. Britain, Lord Sumption argues, should learn from the United States be careful about which rights should be put beyond democratic choice.

The programme is recorded in front of an audience at George Washington University in Washington DC.

The Reith Lectures are presented and chaired by Anita Anand and produced by Jim Frank.
Editor: Hugh Levinson


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (m0005t89)
The Moon

Episode 2

In this intimate and profound portrait of the Moon, writer Oliver Morton explores the different spaces that Earth’s closest neighbour occupies in our lives.

Since Galileo's day, humans have been fascinated by the geography of the Moon and the forces that created its many craters.

Reader Robin Laing
Abridger Anna Magnusson
Producer Eilidh McCreadie


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0005t8f)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (m0005t8k)
A Woman on the Edge of Time

Episode 2: The Affair

Jeremy Gavron was just four in 1965, when his mother, Hannah, a bright young sociologist and writer, took her own life. Four decades later, he tries to piece together events before her death. He begins by talking to some of Hannah's schoolfriends and learns the details of her teenage relationship with the school's headmaster.

Jeremy Gavron's book is dramatized by Sarah Daniels and stars Dominic Mafham, Elaine Claxton and Georgie Glen.

Directed by Emma Harding

Jeremy Gavron.....Dominic Mafham
Judy Gavron.....Helen Clapp
Young Leah.....Amy-Jayne Leigh
Young Mima.....Megan Webb
Bob.....Sean Baker
Simon.....Christopher Harper
Nurse.....Debbie Korley
Hannah.....Sarah Ovens
Aunt Susie.....Susan Jameson
Tasha.....Elaine Claxton
Shirley.....Catherine Cusack
Susan.....Georgie Glen
Tom.....James Bolam
Friend.....David Hounslow


TUE 11:00 Tell Me Where It Hurts (m0005t8m)
Dr Margaret McCartney explores the doctor-patient relationship at the heart of the NHS through a real GP consultation.


TUE 11:30 Art of Living (m0005t8p)
A Cape Sound Story

Music and dance are so tied together; it is hard to imagine how a profoundly deaf dancer can become an International star in the contemporary dance world, but South African Andile Vellem has done it. Vellum lost his hearing at the age of five, but that hasn’t stopped him from dancing, or becoming the artistic director of one of South Africa's leading integrated dance Companies - Unmute.

To find out how, Nathaniel Mann, a British singer and musician, travels to the beautiful and troubled city of Cape Town for a close encounter with the talented dancer, as he embarks on a new production - Trapped Man – in which he and another dancer are bound tightly together, struggling for release.

The plan is to perform the dance out in the street but it’s a risky business. Adrienne Sichel, South African dance critic, recalls how a previous site specific dance attracted violence - a truck driven at dancers by an enraged white driver.

Andile grew up in a house full of dance. His parents were famous ballroom dancers - one of the few professional dance genres open to non-whites - and as a small child he remembers his sister holding his hand to a speaker so he could feel the vibrations created by the music. As he grew older, inspired first by Michael Jackson, and later by the rich musical history of the Cape, he learned to sense music through vibration - creating his own style of dance, including sign dance.

Now with his life partner, Mpotseng Shuping, he travels the world, performing at international festivals, and it was in Berlin that he first met UK singer and musician Nathaniel Mann. Mann follows two parallel stories; what it is to move to music which you can't hear, and how Vellum has interpreted a century of South African music, from the colonial era, through apartheid, and out the other side, through dance.

As a musical legacy, it's complex and politically weighty, but it is these sounds that Andile Vellem asked UK composers, Dom Coyote and Nathaniel Mann, and musicologist Noel Lobley, to work with as a sound track for one of this productions.

We hear his feelings about this music, his personal journey, and the recordings themselves - a powerful way in to the history of recorded South African music.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall

With thanks to Unmute Dance Company members -
Mpotseng Shuping
Andile Vellem
Siphenathi Mayekiso
Themba Mbuli
Nadine McKenzie

and Siemon Allen archivist - Flat International

All Alone - Irving Berlin - Piano Roll 9676
Marching on Pretoria - Ian Calquhoun - 1901
Wa Q'Um Udalimede - Reuben Caluza's Double Quartet 1930
Zulu Piano Medley - Thomas Mabilesta 1948
African Market Abdullah Ibrahim -1988
Slow-Moving (Trapped Man) · Orson Hentschel 2016


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m0005t8r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 How to Find Home (m0005t8t)
Episode 2

Molly’s lived on the streets since she was a teenager. Her violent ex-boyfriend Rusby, recently released from prison, is back on the scene and won't leave her alone. So when she meets Luca at a party and he invites her to go away with him she jumps at the chance to get out of Nottingham.
While Luca’s in search of buried treasure Molly has her own reasons for getting out of town for a while - but along the way she’ll discover that it’s not always possible to run from your past.

Read by Anjli Mohindra
Written by Mahsuda Snaith
Abridged by Siân Preece
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m0005t8w)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


TUE 12:57 Weather (m0005t8y)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m0005t90)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


TUE 13:45 Living Memory (m0005t92)
Dear Me! What Next?

There's an estimated 15,000 people in Britain who have reached the age of 100 and received the famous telegram from the Queen. That's 0.02% of the overall population.

Over five programmes, we hear from some of them about the lives they've led, their experiences in the last 100 years, the lessons they've learned and how they view the future.

Today, Londoners born around the end of the First World War - including Beattie Orwell who reached political consciousness fighting Oswald Mosley's fascists in Cable Street, and Classicist Joyce Reynolds who still researches in Cambridge University library three times a week - consider the "gloomy" state of the world around them and the kind of attitude people need to keep upbeat.

A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m0005t3d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b0902sx3)
Holding Back the Tide

Democracy

by Nick Warburton

Directed by Sally Avens

Richard and Clare have inherited a house on a clifftop in Breck Howe but the sea is eroding the land.
Their tenant John Hector is intent on stopping them all from being evicted, but when Clare suggest they need a voice on the council the result is anything but the democratic process she imagined. Comedy as North meets South in a definite clash of cultures.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (m0005t94)
Nocturne

Josie Long presents short documentaries and adventures in sound about what happens after darkness falls. From Mark Thomas's childhood nocturnal journeys to a late-night story told in the glow of a turf fire.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:30 Mastertapes (m0005t96)
Mastertapes on Tour: Richard Hawley at the Crucible (Part 2)

The second half of a special edition of MASTERTAPES, in which guitarist, singer-songwriter and producer, RICHARD HAWLEY welcomes John Wilson to the Crucible in his home town of Sheffield.

Sheffield has always played an influential part in Richard Hawley's song-writing. His 2001 album, Late Night Final, was named after the cry of vendors selling the Sheffield Star evening newspaper on the streets, and all his solo albums since, from Lowedges and Coles Corner to Truelove’s Gutter and Hollow Meadows, immortalized Sheffield landmarks.

At the end of a busy year , in which he worked on four film soundtracks, recorded a new album and debuted his first stage musical - "Standing at the Sky’s Edge" at Sheffield’s Crucible Theatre (featuring a mix of his old and new songs), Richard Hawley looks and plays his way back over a 33 (and a third?) year career as a musician (he first recorded a John Peel session at the age of 19, with his band, Treebound Story).

Performances include what was the world premier of 'My Little Treasures' from Richard's new album, as well as a version of 'Open Up Your Door' from the stage musical "Standing At The Sky's Edge" sung by Maimuna Memon and accompanied by Will Stewart.

Playing with Richard Hawley are Shez Sheridan on guitars, Jon Trier on piano and Clive Mellor on harmonica.

Producer: Paul Kobrak


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (m0005t7h)
Joshua Rozenberg presents Radio 4's long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion on matters relating to law.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (m0005t98)
Kiri Pritchard-McLean & Hannah Peel

Comedian Kiri Pritchard-McLean and singer/composer Hannah Peel share books they love with Harriett Gilbert. Hannah's is Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino, Kiri is blown away by Nervous Conditions by Zimbabwean author Tsitsi Dangarembga and Harriett picks You Think It, I'll Say It by Curtis Sittenfeld, author of American Wife.
Producer Beth O'Dea


TUE 17:00 PM (m0005t9b)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0005t9d)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Heresy (m0005t9g)
Series 11

Episode 1

Joining Victoria Coren Mitchell to commit heresy about Brexit and make up are comedian and actor Rufus Hound, presenter Matt Johnson and comedian Jo Brand.

Producers: Victoria Coren Mitchell and Daisy Knight
An Avalon Television production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m0005t4n)
Jill takes a step forwards and Ben has great pleasure in revealing Ruairi's masterplan


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m0005t9k)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0005t8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (m0005t9m)
The Spy in Your Pocket

Anti-obesity campaigners in Mexico, human rights advocates in London, and friends of the murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi all claim they’ve been targeted by surveillance software normally used by law enforcement to track drug-dealers and terrorists.

File on 4 reveals compelling evidence that software is being used to track the work of journalists, activists and lawyers around the world. Paul Kenyon investigates the multi-billion pound ‘lawful surveillance’ industry. Sophisticated software can allow hackers to remotely install spyware on their targets’ phones. This gives them access to everything on the devices – including encrypted messages – and even allows them to control the microphone and camera.

So what are the options for those who are targeted and is there any way to control the development and use of commercially available software?

Presenter: Paul Kenyon
Producer: Joe Kent.

Photo credit; Valery Brozhinsky\Getty


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m0005t9p)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (m0005t4x)
Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.


TUE 21:30 Natalie Haynes Stands Up for the Classics (b0bf56gp)
Series 4

Euripides

Join Natalie Haynes and guests for half an hour of comedy and the Classics from the BBC Radio Theatre in London.

Natalie is a recovering comedian who is a little bit obsessive about Ancient Greece and Rome. Each week she takes a different figure from the Ancient World and tells their story through a mix of stand-up comedy and conversation.

Today she stands up in the name of playwright Euripides. Feminist, anti-war, ironic, full of subtext: his work displays strikingly modern sensibilities and his Medea still has the power to shock.

With special guests playwright Mark Ravenhill and classicist Professor Edith Hall.
Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m0005t9r)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 How to Find Home (m0005t8t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 A Charles Paris Mystery (b083r275)
The Cinderella Killer

Episode 1

by Jeremy Front
Based on Simon Brett's novel

Charles ..... Bill Nighy
Frances ..... Suzanne Burden
Maurice ..... Jon Glover
Ken ..... Brian Protheroe
Danny ..... Sean Baker
Electra ..... Lorelei King
Larry ..... Nick Underwood
Tad ..... Sam Rix
Josie ..... Norah Lopez Holden
Sparkle ..... Tom Forrister

Directed by Sally Avens

A job in Panto seems the perfect way to spend the Christmas season for Charles, but the cast of Cinderella are a motley crew from reality TV and Charles finds himself having to explain the traditions of Panto to their baffled American star whose career is on a downward trajectory. It's not long before the slapstick makes way for a murder investigation and Charles as always can't help doing some sleuthing of his own.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0005t9t)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



WEDNESDAY 12 JUNE 2019

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m0005t9w)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (m0005t89)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0005t9y)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0005tb0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0005tb2)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m0005tb4)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0005tb6)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the director of a Christian arts charity, Fiona Stewart


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m0005tb8)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0vb1)
Black Sicklebill

Michael Palin presents the black sicklebill of New Guinea. The black sicklebill is a breath-taking creature. It's a bird of paradise, and the male sicklebill's black feathers gleam with metallic blue, green and purple highlights. But his most striking features are a slender scythe-like bill, and an extremely long sabre-shaped tail whose central plumes can reach 50cm in length.

During courtship, he transforms his pectoral and wing feathers into a huge ruff which almost conceals his head and exposes an iridescent blue patch. Perching on a dead branch, he displays horizontally, looking less like a bird than a small black comet, all the while producing strange rattling cries.

It is thought that the Black sicklebill and its relative the Brown Sickle bill may have spooked the Japanese in the Second World War. Japanese forces had occupied the North coast of (Papua) New Guinea and during their push south to the capital, Port Moresby, had to cross the mountain territories of the sicklebills. It's said that on hearing the birds' courtship displays; they flung themselves to the ground, thinking that they were under fire from the Allies.


WED 06:00 Today (m0005t2l)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Only Artists (m0005t2q)
Karine Polwart meets Jen Frankwell

The folk singer Karine Polwart meets the artist Jen Frankwell.


WED 09:30 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (m0005t2v)
Nick Robinson talks about what’s really going on in British politics.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (m0005t2z)
The Moon

Episode 3

In this intimate and profound portrait of the Moon, writer Oliver Morton explores the different spaces that Earth’s closest neighbour occupies in our lives.

Thanks to post-WWII advances in rocketry, scientists in the late 1940s were daring to dream about the prospect of man walking on the Moon.

Reader Robin Laing
Abridger Anna Magnusson
Producer Eilidh McCreadie


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0005t33)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (m0005t38)
A Woman on the Edge of Time

Episode 3: Wanting it All

In 1965, Hannah Gavron, a bright young sociologist and writer, took her own life. She left behind a suicide note, two small children and an about-to-be-published manuscript, The Captive Wife. Four decades later, her son Jeremy tries to coax his father into telling him more about Hannah's life.

Jeremy Gavron's book is dramatised by Sarah Daniels and stars Dominic Mafham, Georgie Glen and Sean Baker.

Directed by Emma Harding

Jeremy Gavron.....Dominic Mafham
Judy Gavron.....Helen Clapp
Young Leah.....Amy-Jayne Leigh
Young Mima.....Megan Webb
Bob.....Sean Baker
Simon.....Christopher Harper
Nurse.....Debbie Korley
Hannah.....Sarah Ovens
Aunt Susie.....Susan Jameson
Tasha.....Elaine Claxton
Shirley.....Catherine Cusack
Susan.....Georgie Glen
Tom.....James Bolam
Friend.....David Hounslow


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (m0005t3c)
Capturing the nation in conversation, in partnership with the British Library.


WED 11:00 My Name Is... (m0005t3h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 The Clemmie Hart Years (m0005t3m)
Anneka Rice tells a hilarious true story from her own life in this brand new one-woman show.

In 2004, Anneka was fired by her agent and decided to go it alone and represent herself with a fictional agent called Clemmie Hart. "Clemmie" looked after Anneka's career for many years, with incredible - and often disastrous - results. In this show, Anneka finally confesses to the lie which had the entire British showbiz world fooled.

A Talkback production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:00 News Summary (m0005t3r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 How to Find Home (m0005t3w)
Episode 3

Molly's lived on the streets since she was a teenager. Her violent ex-boyfriend Rusby is back in Nottingham and won't leave her in peace. So when she meets Luca at a party and he asks her to go away with him she jumps at the chance to escape.

Their trip to Skegness is threatened from the start when Molly's old friend Jules invites herself along along. Then Luca spots a shadowy figure on the train and the companions find themselves kicking their heels on an unexpected stop.

Read by Anjli Mohindra
Written by Mahsuda Snaith
Abridged by Siân Preece
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m0005t40)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


WED 12:57 Weather (m0005t47)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m0005t4d)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


WED 13:45 Living Memory (m0005t4j)
I'm Not Too Old At All!

There's an estimated 15,000 people in Britain who have reached the age of 100 and received the famous telegram from the Queen. That's 0.02% of the overall population.

Over five programmes, we hear from some of them about the lives they've led, their experiences in the last 100 years, the lessons they've learned and how they view the future.

Today, two centenarians from Yorkshire - Elsie Beesle, who's lived a life full of dancing until her legs "got a little wobbly" and attending night classes (latterly with the University of the Third Age), and Dennis Allen who was born in 1914 and spent fifteen years in the Army driving a truck and fighting in Afghanistan, Singapore and Burma. These days, he's been told he's too old even for a scooter - although he does have an exercise bike.

Produced by Hannah Dean
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


WED 14:00 The Archers (m0005t4n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b0910wsp)
Holding Back the Tide

I Want to Thank You All

by Nick Warburton

Directed by Sally Avens

Comedy as Clare and Richard move to Breck Howe and a house they inherited along with a sitting tenant John Hector. Their lives will never be the same again as Hector entangles them in his preservation of the town. This week they find themselves paying a visit to a famous resident and leaving with more than they expected when John takes off with what he believes rightly to belong to the town.


WED 15:00 Money Box (m0005t4s)
The latest news from the world of personal finance plus advice for those trying to make the most of their money.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (m0005t4x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b08rrc0k)
The meaning of the face

The meaning of the face: How critical is it to our sense of identity, and relationship with others?
Sharrona Pearl, Assistant Professor in Communications at the University of Pennsylvania, discusses her study of face transplant surgery. She's joined by Anne-Marie Martindale, Post-Doctoral Research Associate at the University of Manchester, who has studied the impact of facial disfigurement; as well as Professor Jonathan Cole, consultant in clinical neurophysiology, and author of two books examining the relationship between facial expressions, communication and the self. Revised repeat.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m0005t50)
The programme about a revolution in media with Amol Rajan, the BBC's Media Editor


WED 17:00 PM (m0005t52)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0005t54)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (m0005t56)
Series 8

Episode 4

John Finnemore returns to Radio 4 with an eighth series of his multi-award-winning sketch show, joined by his regular ensemble cast of Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin and Carrie Quinlan.

This week's episode will make you feel like a princess, whether you want it to or not - and you can have that, if you like. And, well... since you ask him for another tale of crossing the ocean by horseback...

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme was described by The Radio Times as "the best sketch show in years, on television or radio", and by The Daily Telegraph as "funny enough to make even the surliest cat laugh". Already the winner of a Radio Academy Silver Award and a Broadcasting Press Guild award, this year Souvenir Programme won its second BBC Audio Drama award.

Written by & starring ... John Finnemore
Cast ... Margaret Cabourn-Smith
Cast ... Simon Kane
Cast ... Lawry Lewin
Cast ... Carrie Quinlan

Production Coordinator ... Beverly Tagg
Producer ... Ed Morrish
A BBC Studios production


WED 19:00 The Archers (m0005t58)
Lilian finds herself out in the cold and Jim loses his temper


WED 19:15 Front Row (m0005t5b)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0005t38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m0005t5d)
Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Giles Fraser, Kehinde Andrews, Melanie Philips and Tim Stanley.


WED 20:45 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (m0005t2v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 The Origin of Stuff (m0005t5g)
High Heel

Katy Brand loves a high heel. Once known by friends and family for her ‘shoe fetish’, her dad even gave her a ceramic heel that could hold a wine bottle at a jaunty angle.

These days, Katy’s cherished heels from her torture days live in her cupboard. She has traded the pain for the statement trainer. But their art, history and construction still fascinate her.

So what is it about the high heel that has made it stand the test of time?

With the help of resident public historian, Greg Jenner, Katy explores the heel’s fascinating passage through time, finding a place on the feet of men, as well as women, in high and low places. Heels donned the feet of men on horseback in 17th century Persia, were adored by King Louis XIV, and gained an erotic currency with the invention of photography.

But how has science and engineering ensured the high heel’s survival?

Footwear Technologist, Mike George, shows us how the high heel is engineered, and how he can test if a particular design is teetering on the edge of safety. Social scientist, Heather Morgan, reveals the perceived benefits of wearing heels, as well as the risks when she fell foul to when fell in heels and broke her ankle.

Producer: Beth Eastwood


WED 21:30 Only Artists (m0005t2q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m0005t5j)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 How to Find Home (m0005t3w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 The East Coast Listening Post (m0005t5l)
Series 2

Skull Run

American reporters and sisters, Jenna and Dana Johnson, return to the UK to investigate the people of Great Britain. This week Jenna and Dana meet Rhodri Williams from the village of Tregafr, who is defending his right to take part in an ancient Welsh tradition known as Ras y Benglog or The Skull Run.

The East Coast Listening Post was written and performed by Celeste Dring and Freya Parker, with performances from David Elms and Steffan Rhodri. The original score was composed by Owain Roberts. The script editor was Matthew Crosby. The East Coast Listening Post was produced by Suzy Grant and is a BBC Studios production.


WED 23:15 Nurse (b076mmtv)
Series 2

Episode 3

A bittersweet comedy drama about a community mental health nurse created by Paul Whitehouse and David Cummings.

Liz (played by Esther Coles), the community psychiatric nurse of the title makes her rounds to visit "service users" in their homes. Most of those patients are played by comedy chameleon Paul Whitehouse himself – with supporting roles for Rosie Cavaliero, Vilma Hollingbery and Cecilia Noble.

Whitehouse brings us an obese bed-bound mummy's boy, an agoraphobic ex-con, a manic ex-glam rock star, ageing rake Herbert who hoards his house with possessions and memories, a Jewish chatterbox in unrequited love with his Jamaican neighbour, and a long-suffering carer and his Alzheimer's-afflicted mother.

There are new characters too in the guise of a self-proclaimed DJ and a Geordie struggling with his wife's job in the world's oldest profession.

We follow their humorous, sometimes sad and occasionally moving interactions with Liz, whose job is to assess their progress, dispense medication and offer support.

Nurse gives a sympathetic insight into the world of some of society's more marginalised people in a heartfelt and considered way.

Written by David Cummings and Paul Whitehouse, with additional material by Esther Coles.

Cast:
Paul Whitehouse
Esther Coles
Margaret Cabourn-Smith
Rosie Cavaliero
Sue Elliott-Nichols
Charlie Higson
Vilma Hollingbery
Jason Maza
Cecilia Noble

A Down The Line production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0005t5p)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



THURSDAY 13 JUNE 2019

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m0005t5r)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (m0005t2z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0005t5t)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0005t5w)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0005t5y)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m0005t60)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0005t62)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the director of a Christian arts charity, Fiona Stewart


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m0005t64)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0t44)
Kea

Michael Palin presents the kea from a windswept mountain in New Zealand. A a snow-capped mountain in New Zealand's South Island are not a place where you'd expect to find a parrot, least of all a carnivorous one (and with a penchant for rubber). But this is the home of the kea.

Keas are curious birds in every sense of the word. Drab greenish brown, they're the world's only Alpine parrot. When they can find them, keas eat fruits and berries, but also, especially in winter they descend from the higher slopes and scavenge on animal carcasses at rubbish dumps, cracking bones with their sharp beaks to reach the marrow. They will even attack live sheep, stripping the fat from their backs and damaging vital organs. Although this habit is rare and is now understood to be largely restricted to injured sheep, it led to widespread persecution of the birds and a bounty was paid on the head of each bird killed which led to widespread declines so that keas became endangered.

Today Keas are legally protected. In their mountain homes, the parrots survive to entertain and exasperate tourists as they clamber over cars, strip rubber seals from windscreens and remove wiper-blades ... curious birds indeed.


THU 06:00 Today (m0005t66)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (m0005t68)
The Inca

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss how the people of Cusco, in modern Peru, established an empire along the Andes down to the Pacific under their supreme leader Pachacuti. Before him, their control grew slowly from C13th and was at its peak after him when Pizarro arrived with his Conquistadors and captured their empire for Spain in 1533. The image, above, is of Machu Picchu which was built for emperor Pachacuti as an estate in C15th.

With

Frank Meddens

Helen Cowie

And

Bill Sillar

Producer: Simon Tillotson


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (m0005t6b)
The Moon

Episode 4

In this intimate and profound portrait of the Moon, writer Oliver Morton explores the different spaces that Earth’s closest neighbour occupies in our lives.

After the excitement of the Apollo missions comes inevitable disappointment as the focus shifts to further flung parts of the solar system. But is a return to the Moon imminent?

Reader Robin Laing
Abridger Anna Magnusson
Producer Eilidh McCreadie


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0005t6d)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (m0005t6g)
A Woman on the Edge of Time

Episode 4: Messed Up

Jeremy Gavron's quest to piece together why, in 1965, his mother Hannah - a bright, pioneering young sociologist - took her own life. Jeremy finally summons the courage to call the man his mother was having an affair with at the time of her death. Jeremy Gavron's book is dramatized by Sarah Daniels and stars Dominic Mafham and James Bolam.

Directed by Emma Harding

Jeremy Gavron.....Dominic Mafham
Tom.....James Bolam
Daphne.....Catherine Cusack
Judy.....Helen Clapp
Bob.....Sean Baker


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (m0005t6j)
Insight, and analysis from BBC correspondents around the world


THU 11:30 Art of Living (m0005t6l)
Knife Imitates Art - How Surgeons Use Creativity

Peter Curran presents a fascinating study of surgeons working in Belfast and Bristol who demonstrate the benefits of their work as musicians, songwriters and sculptors, and what that brings to the Operating Theatre.

Each offer a contrasting take on what music means to their lives; improving empathy, technique or just total immersion in a creative place that balances the life and death issues and responsibilities they face in their professional world.

In Belfast, the link between good surgeons and creativity is illustrated by the international prize-winning surgeon and Clinical Teaching Fellow at Queen's University, Ian Walsh.

Consultant surgeons Aidan Armstrong, Stephen White and Robert Cuthbert talk about the contrasting emotions of performing surgery and playing classical music concerts.

We visit the Bristol studio of Lisa Sacks, a South African plastic and reconstructive surgeon whose clinical career began in Soweto - but from the age of 13 she's been making sculptures of heads, bodies and hands. Her bronze portrait bust of Averil Mansfield, Britain’s first female Professor of Surgery is currently on display at the Royal College of Surgeons in London.

Produced by Peter Curran. A Foghorn production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:00 News Summary (m0005t6n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 How to Find Home (m0005t6q)
Episode 4

Molly's lived on the streets since she was a teenager. Her violent ex-boyfriend Rusby is back in Nottingham and won't leave her in peace. So when she meets Luca at a party and he asks her to go away with him she jumps at the chance to escape. Old friend Jules is mistrustful and invites herself along for the ride.

On the road to Skegness the travelling companions have spent a night sleeping rough. Molly's learning more about Luca and is perturbed to see a knife in his bag.

Read by Anjli Mohindra
Written by Mahsuda Snaith
Abridged by Siân Preece
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m0005t6s)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


THU 12:57 Weather (m0005t6v)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m0005t6x)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


THU 13:45 Living Memory (m0005t6z)
That's Life, I Suppose!

There's an estimated 15,000 people in Britain who have reached the age of 100 and received the famous telegram from the Queen. That's 0.02% of the overall population.

Over five programmes, we hear from some of them about the lives they've led, their experiences in the last 100 years, the lessons they've learned and how they view the future.

Today we hear from Richard Braithwaite from Newcastle-upon-Tyne, a retired collector of taxes; Olive Gordon, who arrived in London from British Guyana in 1952 believing the streets would be paved with gold - she was to be disappointed; Phyllis Haley, who's now 108 although she can't always keep count; and Ronald Atkins from Preston, the UK's oldest former MP.

Produced by Hannah Dean and Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


THU 14:00 The Archers (m0005t58)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b091wf7l)
Holding Back the Tide

Herring Week

by Nick Warburton

Directed by Sally Avens

Comedy as Clare and Richard move to Breck Howe and a house they inherited along with a sitting tenant John Hector. Their lives will never be the same again as Hector entangles them in his preservation of the town. This week Clare gets a job running Herring Week, but John is horrified that a Southerner should be put in charge and attempts a coup.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (m0005t71)
Mums and Toddlers Somerset

Clare Balding joins notable and interesting people for a walk through the countryside.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m0005szk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m0005t0d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (m0005t73)
Frank Cottrell Boyce

With Antonia Quirke

Writer Frank Cottrell Boyce talks about his Scrabble-based drama Sometimes, Always, Never


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m0005t75)
Dr Adam Rutherford and guests illuminate the mysteries and challenge the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (m0005t77)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0005t79)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 My Obsession (b09yclxr)
Pilot

Comedian Danny Heywood wakes in his hotel room to find that he is not alone. Sheryl, a fan on a mission, has let herself into the room and is determined not to leave until she gets what she wants. But what exactly is it that she wants?

The ensuing stand off is a hilarious game of verbal cat and mouse as they both endeavor to maintain control of a very bizarre situation.

This comedy drama observes the obsessive narcissistic culture of so-called celebrity, the desire to be famous and the urge to be near it. Funny, warm-hearted, surprising and all played in real time, My Obsession enjoyed a sold out run at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2014.

It garnered great reviews:
"Razor sharp wit" - Daily Telegraph
"Excellent" - Daily Mirror.

This comedy was originally broadcast on Radio 4 in April 2018 and is now being repeated ahead of two new episodes of Danny and Sheryl’s story.

Cast:
Danny – Paul Merton
Sheryl – Suki Webster

Written by Suki Webster
Producer: Liz Anstee

A CPL production for BBC Radio 4


THU 19:00 The Archers (m0005t7c)
Jim issues a shocking instruction and the mystery surrounding Peggy's activities deepens


THU 19:15 Front Row (m0005t7f)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0005t6g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (m0005t7h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (m0005t7k)
The Fitness Industry

Who wins and loses in the cut-throat exercise market? Looking good and being fit has become more important as we have become more wealthy. Yet most new gyms and fitness centres fail. Evan Davis and his guests work out the secrets of success in this growing industry, which is is worth over £5 billion in the UK.

GUESTS

Stuart Broster, CEO, Anytime Fitness UK

Tommy Matthews, Managing Director, Be Military Fit

Dawn Tuckwell,, Director and Co-founder, Action PR

PRESENTER: Evan Davis

PRODUCER: Julie Ball


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m0005t75)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (m0005t68)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m0005t7n)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 How to Find Home (m0005t6q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 V.I.P. R.I.P. (m0005t7q)
Sketch show commemorating the lives of the greatest people who never lived


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0005t7s)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



FRIDAY 14 JUNE 2019

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m0005t7v)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (m0005t6b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0005t7x)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0005t80)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0005t84)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m0005t88)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0005t8d)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the director of a Christian arts charity, Fiona Stewart


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m0005t8j)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0v6r)
American Bald Eagle

Michael Palin presents the iconic bald eagle from Alaska. In days of yore, when bald meant "white" rather than hairless, these magnificent birds with a two metre wingspans were common over the whole of North America. They were revered in native American cultures. The Sioux wore eagle feathers in their head-dresses to protect them in battle and the Comanche celebrated the birds with an eagle dance.

The bird became a national symbol for the United States of America and on the Great Seal is pictured grasping a bunch of arrows in one talon and an olive branch in the other.

But pomp and reverence don't always guarantee protection. In 1962 in her classic book "Silent Spring", Rachel Carson warned that bald eagle populations had dwindled alarmingly and that the birds were failing to reproduce successfully. Rightly, she suspected that pesticides were responsible. Bald eagle populations crashed across the USA from the middle of the twentieth century, but fortunately are now recovering following a ban on the use of the offending pesticides.


FRI 06:00 Today (m0005tp0)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m0005szy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (m0005tp2)
The Moon

Episode 5

In this intimate and profound portrait of the Moon, writer Oliver Morton explores the different spaces that Earth’s closest neighbour occupies in our lives.

If humans were to return to the Moon what would compel us - and how long might we stay for?

Read by Robin Laing
Abridged by Anna Magnusson
Producer Eilidh McCreadie


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0005tp4)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (m0005tp6)
A Woman on the Edge of Time

Episode 5: Before Her Time

In 1965, Hannah Gavron, a bright young sociologist and writer, took her own life. She left behind a suicide note, two small children and a book that later became a celebrated feminist textbook, The Captive Wife. Four decades on, her son Jeremy talks to fellow sociologists about the frustrations of his mother's academic career. Jeremy Gavron's book is dramatised by Sarah Daniels and stars Dominic Mafham, Georgie Glen and Elaine Claxton.

Directed by Emma Harding

Jeremy Gavron.....Dominic Mafham
Judy Gavron.....Helen Clapp
Older Leah.....Debbie Korley
Hannah.....Sarah Ovens
Ann.....Elaine Claxton
Bernice.....Georgie Glen
Aunt Susie.....Susan Jameson
Young Leah.....Amy-Jayne Leigh
Young Mima.....Megan Webb
Bob.....Sean Baker
Simon.....Christopher Harper
Shirley.....Catherine Cusack
Tom.....James Bolam
Friend.....David Hounslow


FRI 11:00 Rethinking Representation (m0005tp8)
Episode 3

The crisis around Brexit has revealed limitations in the relationship between representatives and represented. In these three programmes David Runciman explores that relationship -- between MPs and voters -- and looks for ways that democracies can take up the challenges of the present.


FRI 11:30 Mrs Sidhu Investigates (m0005tpb)
Mrs Sidhu's Deadly Highland Game

A Pie to Die For

A murder mystery with a quirky touch written by Suk Pannu and starring Meera Syal. The Indian Aunty from Slough gets mixed up in Highland homicide.

Mrs Sidhu (Meera Syal) is the interfering Indian chef with a taste for murder. Since her husband’s death, she has built a successful reputation as a caterer in Slough, and has snagged a billionaire client at a Scottish shooting estate. But when she is threatened by a mysterious Russian, she drags in Inspector Burton (Justin Edwards).

Supported by hotshot trainee PC Williamson (Okorie Chukwu), they pry into the dark corners of Castle Tannoch, its eccentric laird (John Sessions) and his gruff niece Jane (Hilary Maclean).

Meanwhile, handsome Gamekeeper Callum (Gordon Kennedy) makes her heart skip a beat, while her wayward son Tez (Hamza Jeetoa) causes more of a heart attack with his incendiary distractions.

Cast
Meera Syal- Mrs Sidhu
Justin Edwards- Inspector Burton
Hamza Jeetooa- Tez
John Sessions- Sir Alex and Zukhov
Hilary Maclean- Jane and Kirsty
Okorie Chukwu- Robert and PC Williamson
Gordon Kennedy- Callum

Written by Suk Pannu
Recorded at Soundhouse Studios
Edited by Leon Chambers
Studio Managers - Wilfredo Acosta and Leon Chambers
Production Manager- Sarah Tombling

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
Produced by Gordon Kennedy
An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m0005tpf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 How to Find Home (m0005tph)
Episode 5

Molly's lived on the streets since she was a teenager. Her violent ex-boyfriend Rusby is back in Nottingham and won't leave her alone. So when she meets Luca at a party and he asks her to go away with him she jumps at the chance to escape. Old friend Jules doesn't trust this newcomer and invites herself along for the ride.

After a night spent sleeping rough on the road to Skegness, Luca leads Molly and Jules to the door of a big house in the quaint village of Bingham.

Read by Anjli Mohindra
Written by Mahsuda Snaith
Abridged by Siân Preece
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m0005tpk)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


FRI 12:57 Weather (m0005tpm)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m0005tpp)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 Living Memory (m0005tpr)
Cope and Carry On!

There's an estimated 15,000 people in Britain who have reached the age of 100 and received the famous telegram from the Queen. That's 0.02% of the overall population.

Over five programmes, we hear from some of them about the lives they've led, their experiences in the last 100 years, the lessons they've learned and how they view the future.

Today's centenarians are both actors.

Earl Cameron, a seafarer from Bermuda, came to prominence having been marooned in London during the Second World War. From severe poverty and much discrimination, he set about making a life for himself in England, eventually becoming one of the first black actors to break into British theatre, television and film.

June Spencer, born this day exactly 100 years ago, is most widely known among Radio 4 listeners as Peggy in The Archers. It's her motto for life that gives this final episode its title. It used to be "never give up", but she's realised, looking at the state of the world as well as her own circumstances, that there are some things you need to give up on. Now, it's "cope and carry on".

Produced by Hannah Dean and Alia Cassam
Series producer, Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m0005t7c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (m0005tpt)
Lighthouses

How do we keep going after the worst happens? Bristol composer Jennifer Bell's a-cappella songs of redemption and happiness regained are based on the true stories of two people who lost the loves of their lives - but something kept them going and brought them back to life from the depths of despair.
Producer Beth O'Dea
With specially composed songs by Jennifer Bell.
The singers are: Ellie Showering, Andy Marshall, Harry Humberstone, Katy Tucker, Alice Kirby, Jack Adkins, Molly King and Jennifer Bell.
Photo credit: Image of Wolf Rock Lighthouse by Colin Perry.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0005tpw)
Summer Garden Party at Mount Stewart: Part One

Kathy Clugston hosts a special edition at the annual Summer Garden Party. Bob Flowerdew, Matthew Pottage, Bunny Guinness and Neil Porteus are answering this week's horticultural questions at National Trust Mount Stewart in County Down, Northern Ireland.

Produced by Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Short Works (m0005tpy)
Bosco

A boy finds a brave and personal response to loss in an original short work by Eugene O'Hare.

Read by Stephen Rea.

Producer: Gaynor Macfarlane

A BBC Scotland production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m0005tq0)
Radio 4's weekly obituary programme, telling the life stories of those who have died recently.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (m0005tq2)
The programme that holds the BBC to account on behalf of the radio audience.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (m0005tq4)
Capturing the nation in conversation, in partnership with the British Library.


FRI 17:00 PM (m0005tq6)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0005tq8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 Dead Ringers (m0005tqb)
Series 19

Episode 2

This series of Dead Ringers features Jon Culshaw, Jan Ravens, Lewis Macleod, Debra Stephenson and Duncan Wisbey,

The producer and creator is Bill Dare.
A BBC Studios Production.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (m0005tqd)
Contemporary drama in a rural setting

Writer, Naylah Ahmed
Director, Rosemary Watts
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Jill Archer ….. Patricia Greene
David Archer ….. Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ….. Felicity Finch
Ben Archer ….. Ben Norris
Tony Archer ….. David Troughton
Pat Archer ….. Patricia Gallimore
Brian Aldridge ….. Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ….. Angela Piper
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Jim Lloyd ….. John Rowe
Adam Macy ….. Andrew Wincott
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Lynda Snell ….. Carole Boyd
Peggy Woolley ….. June Spencer
Leonard Berry ….. Paul Copley


FRI 19:15 Front Row (m0005tqg)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0005tp6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m0005tqj)
Matthew Parris, Ash Sarkar, Mark Wallace

Jonathan Dimbleby presents topical debate from the Paignton Palace Theatre in Devon with a panel including the columnist and broadcaster Matthew Parris, Ash Sarkar from Novaramedia and Mark Wallace the Executive Editor of ConservativeHome.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m0005tql)
A weekly reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 The Daily in Europe (m0005tqn)
The Daily in Europe on Radio 4


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m0005tqq)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 How to Find Home (m0005tph)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (m0005t98)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0005tqs)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (m0005tqv)
Capturing the nation in conversation, in partnership with the British Library.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (m0005t1t)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (m0005t1t)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (m0005t8k)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (m0005t8k)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (m0005t38)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (m0005t38)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (m0005t6g)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (m0005t6g)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (m0005tp6)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (m0005tp6)

A Charles Paris Mystery 23:00 TUE (b083r275)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (m0005t98)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (m0005t98)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m0005mkg)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m0005tql)

A Trespasser's Guide to the Classics 19:15 SUN (b08h0c9k)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (m0005t4x)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (m0005t4x)

An Alternative History of Mothering 21:00 MON (m0003sz2)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (m0005mrj)

Analysis 20:30 MON (m0005t3n)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m0005sy1)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m0005mkd)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m0005tqj)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m0005y6l)

Art of Living 15:30 SAT (m0005msv)

Art of Living 11:30 TUE (m0005t8p)

Art of Living 11:30 THU (m0005t6l)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m0005t75)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m0005t75)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m0005sz5)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m0005sz5)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (m0005mhv)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (m0005t1n)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (m0005t1n)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (m0005t89)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (m0005t89)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (m0005t2z)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (m0005t2z)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (m0005t6b)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (m0005t6b)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (m0005tp2)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (m0005mqw)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (m0005t2k)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m0005szt)

Dead Ringers 12:30 SAT (m0005mk5)

Dead Ringers 18:30 FRI (m0005tqb)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (m0005szy)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m0005szy)

Drama 14:30 SAT (m0005sy3)

Drama 14:15 MON (m0005t2g)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b0902sx3)

Drama 14:15 WED (b0910wsp)

Drama 14:15 THU (b091wf7l)

Drama 14:15 FRI (m0005tpt)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m0005sxb)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m0005t1d)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m0005t4w)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m0005tb8)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m0005t64)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m0005t8j)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (m0005tq2)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (m0005mvn)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (m0005t9m)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m0005sxq)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (m0005t6j)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m0005t3j)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m0005t9k)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m0005t5b)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m0005t7f)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (m0005tqg)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m0005mjq)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m0005tpw)

Heresy 18:30 TUE (m0005t9g)

How to Find Home 12:04 MON (m0005t22)

How to Find Home 22:45 MON (m0005t22)

How to Find Home 12:04 TUE (m0005t8t)

How to Find Home 22:45 TUE (m0005t8t)

How to Find Home 12:04 WED (m0005t3w)

How to Find Home 22:45 WED (m0005t3w)

How to Find Home 12:04 THU (m0005t6q)

How to Find Home 22:45 THU (m0005t6q)

How to Find Home 12:04 FRI (m0005tph)

How to Find Home 22:45 FRI (m0005tph)

Ian Sansom Is Waiting 13:30 SUN (m00047tf)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (m0005t68)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (m0005t68)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m0005t9p)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 18:30 WED (m0005t56)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (m0005mr8)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (m0005t37)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m0005mjv)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m0005tq0)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (m0005t7h)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (m0005t7h)

Living Memory 13:45 MON (m0005t2c)

Living Memory 13:45 TUE (m0005t92)

Living Memory 13:45 WED (m0005t4j)

Living Memory 13:45 THU (m0005t6z)

Living Memory 13:45 FRI (m0005tpr)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m0005syj)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m0005syj)

Mastertapes 15:30 TUE (m0005t96)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m0005mks)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m0005syv)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m0005t10)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m0005t44)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m0005t9w)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m0005t5r)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m0005t7v)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m0005sxv)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m0005sxv)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m0005t4s)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (m0005t5d)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (m0005mjx)

Mrs Sidhu Investigates 11:30 FRI (m0005tpb)

My Name Is... 20:00 MON (m0005t3h)

My Name Is... 11:00 WED (m0005t3h)

My Obsession 18:30 THU (b09yclxr)

Natalie Haynes Stands Up for the Classics 21:30 TUE (b0bf56gp)

New Weird Britain 16:00 MON (m0005t2r)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m0005ml1)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m0005sz3)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m0005t18)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m0005t4m)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m0005tb4)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m0005t60)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m0005t88)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (m0005sz7)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m0005sxs)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m0005t00)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m0005t20)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m0005t8r)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m0005t3r)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m0005t6n)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m0005tpf)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m0005sx8)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m0005szf)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m0005szp)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (m0005sys)

News 13:00 SAT (m0005sxz)

Nurse 23:15 WED (b076mmtv)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (m0005sz9)

Only Artists 09:00 WED (m0005t2q)

Only Artists 21:30 WED (m0005t2q)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m0005t0d)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m0005t0d)

PM 17:00 SAT (m0005sy7)

PM 17:00 MON (m0005t30)

PM 17:00 TUE (m0005t9b)

PM 17:00 WED (m0005t52)

PM 17:00 THU (m0005t77)

PM 17:00 FRI (m0005tq6)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m0005t0q)

Political Thinking with Nick Robinson 05:45 SAT (m0005ml5)

Political Thinking with Nick Robinson 09:30 WED (m0005t2v)

Political Thinking with Nick Robinson 20:45 WED (m0005t2v)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m0005ml3)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m0005t1b)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m0005t4r)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m0005tb6)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m0005t62)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m0005t8d)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m0005syl)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m0005syl)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m0005syl)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m0005szk)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m0005szk)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m0005szk)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (m0005mm6)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (m0005t71)

Rethinking Representation 11:00 FRI (m0005tp8)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m0005sxj)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (m0005syn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m0005mkx)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m0005syz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m0005t14)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m0005t4c)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m0005tb0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m0005t5w)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m0005t80)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m0005mkv)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m0005mkz)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m0005syb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m0005syx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m0005sz1)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m0005t0j)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m0005t12)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m0005t16)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m0005t48)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m0005t4h)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m0005t9y)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m0005tb2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m0005t5t)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m0005t5y)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m0005t7x)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m0005t84)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (m0005t94)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (m0005mjs)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (m0005tpy)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m0005syg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m0005t0n)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m0005t34)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m0005t9d)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m0005t54)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m0005t79)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m0005tq8)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b084th9n)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (m0005t1l)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (m0005t1l)

Strictly Stories 19:45 SUN (m0005t0v)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m0005szr)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m0005szh)

Tell Me Where It Hurts 11:00 TUE (m0005t8m)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m0005szw)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m0005t0s)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m0005t0s)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m0005t3d)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m0005t3d)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m0005t4n)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m0005t4n)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m0005t58)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m0005t58)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m0005t7c)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m0005t7c)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (m0005tqd)

The Art of Now 23:00 MON (m0005t3z)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (m0005mmn)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (m0005t7k)

The Clemmie Hart Years 11:30 WED (m0005t3m)

The Daily in Europe 21:00 FRI (m0005tqn)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (m0005t2w)

The East Coast Listening Post 23:00 WED (m0005t5l)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (m0005mm8)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (m0005t73)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m0005t02)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m0005t02)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (m0005t08)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (m0005t3c)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (m0005tq4)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (m0005tqv)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m0005t50)

The Origin of Stuff 21:00 WED (m0005t5g)

The Patch 10:30 SAT (m0005sxl)

The Reith Lectures 22:15 SAT (m0005msd)

The Reith Lectures 09:00 TUE (m0005t85)

The Song Hunters 23:30 SUN (m0004cpm)

The Untold 11:00 MON (m0005t1x)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (m0005sxn)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m0005t06)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m0005t3v)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m0005t9r)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m0005t5j)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m0005t7n)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m0005tqq)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b07gg1kb)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b08rrc0k)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (m0005t42)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (m0005t9t)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (m0005t5p)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (m0005t7s)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (m0005tqs)

Today 07:00 SAT (m0005sxg)

Today 06:00 MON (m0005t1j)

Today 06:00 TUE (m0005t81)

Today 06:00 WED (m0005t2l)

Today 06:00 THU (m0005t66)

Today 06:00 FRI (m0005tp0)

Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets 23:30 SAT (m0005mg8)

Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets 16:30 SUN (m0005t0g)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04t0sqd)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b04t0sry)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b04t0t02)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b04t0vb1)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b04t0t44)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b04t0v6r)

V.I.P. R.I.P. 23:00 THU (m0005t7q)

Vanity Fair 21:00 SAT (m0005mg4)

Vanity Fair 15:00 SUN (m0005t0b)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m0005sxd)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m0005sxx)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m0005syd)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m0005szc)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m0005szm)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m0005t04)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m0005t0l)

Weather 05:56 MON (m0005t1g)

Weather 12:57 MON (m0005t27)

Weather 12:57 TUE (m0005t8y)

Weather 12:57 WED (m0005t47)

Weather 12:57 THU (m0005t6v)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m0005tpm)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m0005t0y)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m0005sy5)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m0005t1r)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m0005t8f)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m0005t33)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m0005t6d)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m0005tp4)

World at One 13:00 MON (m0005t29)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m0005t90)

World at One 13:00 WED (m0005t4d)

World at One 13:00 THU (m0005t6x)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m0005tpp)

You and Yours 12:18 MON (m0005t25)

You and Yours 12:18 TUE (m0005t8w)

You and Yours 12:18 WED (m0005t40)

You and Yours 12:18 THU (m0005t6s)

You and Yours 12:18 FRI (m0005tpk)